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Full text of "REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1918"

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University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries 



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REPORT 

OF THE 

Minister of Education 

Province of Ontario 

FOR THE YEAR 

1918 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 







l» 



TORONTO: ' 

Primed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 19 



Printed by 

WILLIAM BRIGOS 

Corner Queen and John Streets 

Toronto 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

REPORT OF THE MINISTER 5 

APPENDICES 

Appendix A.— Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools ... 15 

Appendix B. — Report of the Director of Industrial and Technical Education . . 19 

Appendix C. — Reports of the Inspectors of Continuation Schools 46 

Appendix D— Reports of thei Inspectors of High Schools 56 

Appendix E — Report of the Inspector of Manual Training and Household 

Science 65 

Appendix F. — Report of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes 81 

Appendix G— The Library of the Department 125 

Appendix H. — Report of the Inspector of Public Libraries 128 

Appendix I.— Statistics of Public, Separate. Continuation and High Schools: 

Summary of Statistics 

I.— Elementary Schools 14 q, 

II.— Secondary Schools 151 

III.— General: Elementary and Secondary Schools .......................... 152 

Comparative Statistics, 1867=1917 



I.— Public Schools (including Separate Schools): 

1. School Population, Attendance 

. Classification of Pupils 



153 

3. Teachers' Certificates T. .... .'.'.'.' .'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.'.'.' ' .' jf t 

4. Salaries and Experience ....'. ^ 

5. Receipts and Expenditures !„ 

Cost per Pupil *r' 

II.— Roman Catholic Separate Schools ... i£« 

III.— Protestant Separate Schools » " :;£ 

IV. — Continuation Schools [[[[ ^ 

V.— Collegiate Institutes and High Schools : 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc ica 

Cost per Pupil f™ 

2. Occupation of Parents of Pupils Jgl 

vt t 3 * De ^ tination of Pupils, and Schools charging Pees '.'.'.' 161 

\ 1.— Teachers' Institutes ^ 

VII.-Departmextal Examinations, Normal School * Attendance,' 'vrc. '.'.'. '.'.['.'. '.'.'. 162 

Public Schools 

T J~~^ ABLE A ~~ Total and Average Attendance, etc . 1fi4 

ttt £ ABLE i?-~£ Upils in the vari ous branches of instruction '. '. ill 

tv~£ ABLE ^--Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 184 

Z'~Z ABLE D ~ Sch0 ° 1 Houses > Prayers, Maps, etc ;£? 

V.— Table E.— Financial Statement, Value of School Property' '. ! '.'.'.'.['.'..[ ['.'. \[ 194 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

I.-Table F.— Financial Statement, Value of School Property 252 

II.-Tarle G.-Teachers Salaries, Certificates, Attendance, Pupils in the' various 

branches of instruction, etc 208 

[3], 



THE REPOBT OF THE No. 17 



Continuation Schools 

PAGE 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement 220 

II. — Table I. — Schools under Public School Board, Equipment, Destination of 

Pupils, etc 226 

III. — Table J. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc. 232 

Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

I. — Table K. — Financial Statement 244 

II. — Table L. — Boards of Education, Approved Schools, Equipment, Destination 

of Pupils, etc 256 

III. — Table M. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc. 268 

Miscellaneous 

Table N. — Protestant Separate Schools 282 

Table 0. — Report on Night Schools 283 

Table P. — Report on Truancy 284 

Table Q. — General Statistical Abstract 288 

Appendix J. — Teachers' Institutes, Financial Statement, 1917 290 

Appendix K. — Fifth Classes, 1917-18 294 

Appendix L. — Rural School Libraries, 1917-18 300 

Appendix M. — Cadet Corps, 1918 302 

Appendix N. — Superannuated Teachers 303 

Appendix O. — Financial Statements of the Faculties of Education 304 

Appendix P. — List of Inspectorates and Inspectors 307 

Appendix Q. — Junior High School Entrance Examination, 1918 312 

Appendix R. — Junior Public School Graduation Diploma Examination, 1918 .... 317 

Appendix S. — List of Certificates Issued by the Department, 1918 318 

Appendix T. — Orders in Council, 1918 329 

Appendix U. — Autumn Model Schools, 1918 332 

Appendix V. — Provincial Normal and Model Schools, 1918-19 333 

Appendix W. — List of Associate Examiners, and Continuation and High School 
Principals and Assistants: 

I. — Associate Examiners, 1918 337 

II. — Principals and Assistants of Continuation Schools, 

January, 1919 • • 340 

III. — Principals and Assistants of Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools, January, 1919 352 

Appendix X. — Report of the School for the Deaf, 1917-18 387 

Appendix Y. — Report of the School for the Blind, 1917-18 401 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1918 



To His Honour 

Colonel the Honourable Sir John Hendrie, K.C.M.G., C.V.O., etc., etc. 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I beg leave to present the Eeport of the Department of Education for the 
year 191'8. The statistics in the Eeport are chiefly for the calendar year 1917, 
and the appendices include reports from the Inspectors and various officials whose 
duties call for annual statements of the work done in the several branches. The 
circumstances of the time call for more than a formal presentation of the work 
of this Department. 

Reconstruction and Education 

In the earlier days of the war the term " Eeconstruction " was used to express 
a return to the conditions of July, 1914. The practical tasks of reconstruction 
were the two related problems of demobilization and restoration — how to get men 
as quickly as possible from their war positions in the army or in industry back 
into their old niches in civil life, and how to free employers and employed from 
the restrictions and control of war with a view to restoring the methods of the 
past. But as time went on and the deeper lessons of the struggle were being 
impressed on men's souls, the word reconstruction took on a deeper meaning. 
Men sought for more than a simple return to pre-war conditions. There grew 
the ideal of a better world after the war. By war achievements there was developed 
an enlarged sense of what is possible and a quickened sense of what is just. 
Not the old conditions but better conditions for all. is the aim of a true re- 
construction. 

The basis of reconstruction is the conservation and development of our human 
resources. All plans for commerce, industry, agriculture — all plans for the general 
utilization of our material wealth, depend upon the intelligence and character 
of the people. Eeconstruction is thus inextricably bound up with the broad subject 
of education. 

[5], 



THE EEPOKT OF THE No. 17 



The War and Education 

The importance of education has received fresh illustration from the world 
cataclysm of war. We have seen on a colossal scale the power of education over the 
souls and minds of men. It has been able to poison the springs of national life, 
to change and degrade national ideals, to minister to a monstrous vanity and 
egotism. Education, applied with persistence and pedantic pertinacity, is the 
most formidable instrument in the modern world for the control of conduct and the 
moulding of purpose. We have seen also that the application of science to industry 
and commerce can enormously develop the markets of a nation and increase its 
wealth. Technical and industrial education is a necessity if a country is to 
hold its own in world competition. Nothing but the best product sold and 
pushed in the most effective way can win a world market. This best product can 
be secured only by the best management and the most skilled labour, and these 
once more are linked with education. We have accepted as one of the aims of 
the war the making of the world safe for democracy. We believe that this on 
the whole is the noblest and safest form of government. But we equally realize 
that if the world is to be safe under democracy, then democracy must be intelligent. 
Of all forms of government, democracy can least afford to neglect universal 
education. 

Especial Value of Children 

All educationalists, indeed all thoughtful people, have long since recognized 
that the most effective service to the State can be rendered through the education 
and care of the young. Early formation is better than later re-formation. Pre- 
vention is better than cure. It is easier to train the child aright than to restore 
the adult. The age of the " Rights of Man " was succeeded by the age of the 
" Rights of Woman." Now we are living in the age of the " Rights of Children." 
Chief among their rights is the right to a sound education. But the appalling 
losses of our choice young men in these recent years have further enhanced the 
value of the present generation of children. War and influenza between them, so 
writes the medical correspondent of the London Times, have accounted for the 
deaths of 18,000,000 young men throughout the world. The children of to-day 
deserve special educational care, both because of their added obligations through 
the passing of so many of the world's young manhood and because of the altered 
world into which they will grow up. The State must therefore discharge its duty 
to the full, no matter what the cost, towards the conservation of the child. This 
means not only the preservation of life, but the best use of life and the fullest 
development of native gifts. 

Broader Meaning of Education 

We construe education to mean more than the impartation of knowledge and 
the training of the mind. Its broad scope covers bodily health and fitness, mental 
culture, devotion of spirit and social efficiency. The German educationalists 
thought of civilization in terms of intellect; the British in terms of character. 
. Which ideal is the safe and worthier, history has already pronounced. Efficiency 
in itself is no more moral than lightning. From what motive does it spring? To 
what aim is it directed? The proper place of efficiency is as the servant of a 
moral ideal. Apart from such an ideal, efficiency may be an evil and wicked instru- 
ment which in the end works woeful disaster. In the early stages of the war, 
the organized efficiency of Germany, brutal and immoral, was hammering at the 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



doors of humane civilization and had almost beaten them down. But the free 
peoples held the enemy until their moral ideals could evoke their own efficiency 
and form of organization. When this was accomplished, the end was in sight. 

Our educational activities to-day must serve various purposes. They will 
cultivate the mind by liberal studies and .aim to produce a trained intelligence. 
They will inculcate moral and patriotic ideals. They will also seek in some 
degree to prepare the pupil for his life work. His training will be both practical 
and theoretical. 

Educational Activities of the Year 

There have been many disturbing influences upon the work of the year. War 
conditions called for all available labour. Boys went from school to work on the 
farms. Academic standing was granted for this kind of national service. These 
agricultural permits have ceased with the cessation of hostilities. The influenza 
also worked havoc with schools over the whole Province. In order to give teachers 
and pupils more time to prepare for the necessary summer examinations, the 
date for such examinations has been moved forward two weeks. Examiners will 
doubtless, in the setting and the reading of papers, bear in mind the distracting 
conditions of the year. 

The following table shows the number of schools, teachers and pupils in 
the Province, and suggests how great is the volume of the work carried on, how 
vitally important and how complex it is. 



_ 


No. of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupils 


High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 


162 

137 

6,103 

548 


1,051 

241 

11,274 

1,488 


29,097 


Continuation Schools 


5,104 


Public Schools 


457,616 


Separate S hools 


70,048 






Totals. ., 


6,950 


14,054 


561,865 







In recent years the total Legislative grants for elementary and secondary 
education have been as follows : 

1912-13 $1,912,880 1915-16 $2,020,075 

1913-14 1,996,892 1916-17 2,225,804 

1914-15 2,012,165 

The amount expended on education yearly increases. This is inevitable and 
desirable in a growing and progressive Province. The people are willingly spend- 
ing larger sums on education, believing that it is the best investment they 
can make. 

A gratifying feature is the rapid extension of the teaching of agriculture 
in our schools. This has been aided by the Federal subvention for agricultural 
education ; at the present time, however, the Province is spending much more 
on this teaching out of its own funds than it is spending out of the Dominion 
grant. In 1911 there were 33 Public and Separate Schools qualifying for grants, 
on account of agricultural teaching. In 1918 there were 1,020. Five hundred 
and eighty-eight had school gardens and V32 home gardens. The number of 
High Schools taking agriculture in 1915 was 11 : in 1918, 28. Four High 
Schools have regular and complete agricultural departments. All the Normal 
Schools (the sources of teacher supply for the rural schools) have, during the 



8 THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 

last two years, materially developed their courses in agriculture and enlarged the 
area devoted to school gardens. The proposed erection of plant laboratories in 
connection with each Normal School will further facilitate agricultural teaching. 
Teachers of primary and secondary schools and Inspectors take summer courses 
in agriculture at Guelph in the Ontario Agricultural College. In 1911 the total 
attendance was 100, in 1918 it reached 147 and many could not be accommodated. 
For this summer's course, Guelph will be used to its limit, and in addition the 
Whitby Ladies' College will be rented to accommodate about 100 teachers. The 
object of this specialized education is to link the teaching in the rural schools 
especially, with the life and work of the farm. This object is being steadily 
attained. The Director of Elementary Agricultural Education, Dr. J. B. Dandeno, 
has published a " Manual of Elementary Agriculture " which has received warm 
appreciation from authorities both in Canada and in the United States. Dr. 
H. W. Foght, the specialist in Eural School Practice in the Bureau of Education 
at Washington, has written these words in acknowledgment of Dr. Dandeno's 
book : " I only wish that the average American state was as far along in making 
agriculture in all its small rural schools as practicable as you are making it in 
Ontario. Our trouble is this, that we either make so much of our agriculture 
or that we neglect it entirely. Thus in the larger consolidated schools it is very 
nicely worked out indeed, but in the one-teacher schools we are doing next to 
nothing. There you are ahead of us." 

A cognate development is that of manual training and household science, 
under the direction of Inspector Leake. There are 90 manual training centres 
and 80 household science centres in the urban schools. Each of these centres 
gives instruction to about 250 pupils a week. This work is also being developed 
in rural schools, in spite of difficulties due to limited accommodation and resources. 
The Department offers substantial grants to assist rural school boards to purchase 
equipment, and equipments have been designed which take up but little space 
in a one-room school. To assist teachers in this work. Mr. Leake has issued a 
most helpful manual containing lessons on the care of the home, sewing, cooking, 
household science without school equipment and the organization and management 
of the hot school lunch. The rapid extension of the hot lunch in rural schools is a 
feature of the year. The manual training affords a skill of hand and an applica- 
tion of theoretical knowledge which are of real educational value. 

Music and art are seen to be no longer mere adjuncts to education. They 
are channels for self-expression. They train the imagination. They open the 
eye to the beautiful in nature. 

A notable feature in connection with technical education has been the 
opening of the new Industrial and Technical School in London. Well-built, 
well-equipped, it will stand as a model for similar institutions in urban centres. 
There is a quickened interest in industrial and technical education in most of 
the manufacturing cities and towns in the Province. On all hands inquiries are 
being made and plans formed for the erection of Industrial and Technical Schools 
or departments. In order to cope with the rapidly increasing work of this branch 
of Education, the Director of Industrial and Technical Education, Dr. Merchant, 
is being relieved of his duties as Inspector of Normal Schools. He will give 
his whole time to the Technical department and will be assisted by field assistants, 
who will organize the work of Industrial and Technical Schools in the various 
cities and towns and will prepare such courses of study and work as will best 
meet the needs of the particular locality. A new Director of Teacher Training 
will be appointed. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 9 

The Rural School 

Movements of population from Europe to this continent, from Eastern Canada 
to Western, from the country to the city, have created difficult educational problems. 
In particular, the problem of the rural school has become serious. Those who live 
in rural sections are as eager as those who live in urban centres to secure the 
best educational facilities for their children. How can this best be effected? 
There is probably no one infallible method. But the most helpful plan yet devised 
is the consolidation of sections. The Consolidated School has proved successful 
in some of the western provinces and American states. We are seeking in 
Ontario to provide the fullest facilities for those sections which desire to consoli* 
date. We shall give financial assistance toward the school and toward the all- 
important factor of the conveyance of pupils. All consolidations will be voluntary 
and must be duly approved by this Department. Better roads, increased means 
of rapid transportation, wider distribution of electric power will make life in 
the country more attractive than ever. There will be more of community spirit. 
Such a Consolidated School, with its assembly hall, should become the local com- 
munity centre; and with its graded classes, better teachers, larger numbers, 
higher average of attendance, and advanced courses, it would bring the advantages 
of a High School education almost to the doors of the boys and girls on the farm. 
Perhaps no one educational step would solve more rural problems than would the 
Consolidated School. 

There will, however, probably be many places where the one-room school is 
still a necessity. In any event the salary of the rural teacher is a factor in 
efficient teaching. The salaries of rural teachers have increased considerably in 
the last twelve years; but there is still room for improvement. It is our aim 
to stimulate an upward movement in salaries by further grants, given directly 
for salaries and on the basis of the amount paid by the locality. This method has 
produced good results in the past, and may be counted on to do as well in the 
future. The Consolidated School and the increased salary for the teacher will 
go far to solve the problem of the rural school. The School Inspectors must 
make a survey of the situation in their respective inspectorates so that the people 
may know clearly what they are doing and that there be no overlapping or 
neglect of districts. 

Another method that may prove advantageous to the rural schools is the 
sending of specialists in various departments on tour among the schools. It is 
not only possible to bring pupils to a central school; but it may well be desirable 
to bring specialist teachers to local schools. 

-It will undoubtedly be in many cases an advantage to have a larger administra- 
tive school area than the section. Consolidation would bring such larger area. 
The law at present provides for the formation of Township Boards of Trustees. 
This may prove the best method of facilitating consolidation. The township 
would not be an area too large for the retention of local interest and responsibility. 

Still another factor in the solution of the rural school problem will be selec- 
tion of women as trustees. This will be possible by legislation to be passed at 
the present session of Parliament. The presence of women on rural school boards 
will mean much for the brightening of school buildings and improved care for 
the children. 

Industrial and Technical Schools • 



One of the most interesting and important of the reports which follow is 

deal 

2 E. 



that dealing with technical education. The Province has one of the best Indus 



10 



THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 



trial and Technical Schools Acts in the world. It is based on the experience of 
many countries, but it is specially adapted to our Provincial needs. These schools 
are an integral part of our system. They are designed to provide a further type of 
specialized secondary school, analogous to the regular High School, the Commer- 
cial High School and the Agricultural High School. They are more than trade 
schools. They combine the elements of a good general secondary education with 
special technical training. We believe that such institutions should teach good 
citizenship as well as good workmanship and that the trained intelligence is as 
vital as technical skill. It is probable that the next great educational advance in 
our Province will be along the line of this specialized secondary school for our 
adolescents. The Act had just come into operation before the war put a restric- 
tion on all undertakings of an expensive character. Now this development will 
be resumed with keenest zest. The law already provides the machinery necessary 
for the erection and maintenance of these schools. The initiative in securing a 
school lies with the municipality where it is to be situated. The financial element 
has heretofore been the greatest difficulty in the way of advance. The Province 
has made larger grants to this class of schools than to any other. The legislative 
grants for technical education have been as follows : 



1912-13 $126,527 1915-16 $113,260 

1913-14 136,309 1916-17 137,332 

1914-15 133,126 

These sums are, of course, in addition to the amounts spent by the muni- 
cipalities. But still greater aid will be necessary if rapid and needed development 
is to take place. The Dominion Government has promised to give substantial 
aid to technical education. On the basis of work done and money expended, 
Ontario's share in any Federal Grant would be considerable. Then the money 
needed would be available. Each Technical and Industrial School would be the 
product of the joint contribution of the Dominion, the Province and the muni- 
cipality. A rapid establishment of these schools in industrial centres may be 
looked for as soon as the financial aid is forthcoming. 

These schools will not be rivals of the High Schools, but parallels to them. 
They will provide the necessary further education for the vast majority of boys 
and girls who after leaving the elementary schools do not go forward to pro- 
fessions but enter business and industry. The proper kind of education is as 
necessary for those who become business men and workers as for those who become 
professional men. 

The Commercial Departments in our High Schools are already furnishing 
direct vocational training. 

Raising the School Age 

This provision of specialized and varied secondary schools is bound up with 
the question of the school age. It is increasingly recognized that, no matter what 
modifications may be made in the courses of study in elementary schools, it is 
impossible to teach under the age of 14 all that a boy or girl ought to learn for 
effective citizenship or for a life work. The attempt to do this has led to the 
charge of overloading the course. Over the whole English-speaking world this 
question of raising the school age is being discussed. The principle has already 
been accepted in the Adolescent School Act of this Province; but the principle 
has not yet been applied. From various industrial centres, where Technical 
Schools are likely to be established, comes the demand for compulsory adolescent 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 11 

— — — — . — — 

attendance. This question is ably discussed ill Dr. Merchant's Report. In all 
likelihood the next step forward in urban centres of a certain size will be along 
the line of compulsory adolescent attendance, either whole time or part time, as 
circumstances require. The necessary accommodation, the specialized schools and 
the proper teachers must be provided, before such compulsory attendance could 
wisely be enforced. But things are moving rapidly in this direction. The rural 
situation is somewhat different; yet the Consolidated School may be the solution 
of this problem in the country. Only by further education can Canadians be 
fitted to compete successfully in the world markets of the future. 

School Attendance 

Constant effort is needed to secure the highest possible attendance of children 
under the age of 14. A new school attendance Act will seek to provide more 
adequately for the enforcement of school attendance. A Provincial Officer will be 
appointed to supervise the carrying out of the Act. School Attendance Officers 
should be appointed to cover the work in every part of the Province. 

Health of the Children 

The physical condition of pupils has much to do with the progress of their 
studies. If they are strong in body, they are more likely to be strong in mind. 
The fit body means increased power. Increased attention is being given by school 
authorities to the ventilation and sanitary condition of buildings. The advent 
of women on school boards will give a fresh impetus to this consideration. In 
every school there should be some provision for physical training. The cadet 
movement has played a great part in this development. 

Many of the larger urban municipalities have made provision, as the law 
requires, for the medical and dental inspection of the children. During this 
current year, a medical and dental inspection will be made by this Department, 
working in conjunction with the "Women's Institutes, more particularly in the 
smaller urban and the rural sections. Much of the Province can be covered even in 
one year. The result will be that we shall know the actual facts of the situation 
and those in charge of this work will succeed in the establishment of regular 
inspection in many localities. Local boards readily respond when the needs and 
advantages of this physical inspection and subsequent "treatment are presented 
to them. We may well expect a great extension of this care for the physical 
welfare of the children in our schools. The physician, the dentist, the nurse will 
be looked on as educational factors almost as important as the teacher. In the 
future a real relationship will be established between home conditions, school 
conditions and work conditions. Neither at home nor in school nor at work 
must children and growing youth be subjected to conditions which impair the 
body and starve the soul. 

Courses of Study 

These are at present under careful consideration, with a view to revision, 
in the direction of simplification, thoroughness and interest. This applies to the 
courses in the elementary, secondary and Normal Schools. The text books in 
various subjects will be revised. Present contracts are expiring, and the changes 
wrought by the war call for fresh treatment of many subjects. Some lightening of 
the work in elementary grammar, arithmetic, and geography will leave room and 
time for more attention to reading, writing, " spelling, literature, as well as to 
history — the great vehicle of patriotic instruction — morals and pre-vocational sub- 



IB 



THE EEPOKT OF THE No. 17 



jects. The importance of the direct and indirect inculcation of sound moral 
and patriotic ideals cannot be overestimated. During the war, special manuals on 
the war and the great issues involved have been prepared and used in the schools. 
The children of Ontario have been well taught the essential principles of the 
struggle, the part Canada has played, and the meaning of the British Empire 
to the whole world. 

The Teachers 

The teacher after all holds the key to the educational citadel. On his or 
her personality largely depends the training of the child. Everything that tends 
to raise the status of the teaching profession makes directly for the improvement 
of education. On the teachers is being thrown to-day a burden which should be 
borne also by the other educational factors of the community — the home, the 
church, and the press. Heroically the teachers are seeking to respond to every 
good demand that is made upon them. They cannot teach well if they are in 
low spirits. Their task makes special drains on the nerves and on the very soul. 
They give themselves if they teach well. Salaries commensurate with their ser- 
vices, and their public recognition by the community as a most honourable pro- 
fession, will increase their teaching power. The grants made by this Depart- 
ment are directly designed to encourage the payment of higher salaries. This 
Department will do all within its power to improve the remuneration and the 
status of the teaching profession. 

Eegulations are necessary in a great system like ours. Only so can a multi- 
tude be turned into an educational army. But rules and regulations are meant 
to help and not to hinder the development, the personality, the initiative, the 
resourcefulness of the individual teacher. Text books, in the same way, are 
meant to be instruments, and not tyrannical masters. The teacher who is a real 
power will be a teacher of the spirit and not of the letter. Our Normal and 
Model Schools and Faculties of Education are crucial in our system. As is 
their spirit, so largely will be the spirit of the whole teaching body. Their courses 
of study will probably be better adjusted to meet the demands of the situation. 

Every opportunity will be afforded to returned soldiers to continue or to 
begin their work of preparation for the teaching profession. 

The Inspectors 

Under our system, the Public and Separate School Inspectors occupy a 
position of pivotal importance. They, more than any other factors in the educa- 
tional problem, can help or hinder. The work of an Inspector or Superintendent 
is not the work of a super-detective or a mere recorder of the observance of 
regulations. He is not primarily appointed to fill in reports. That is part of 
his work, but not the chief part. He is to be the helper, the counsellor, the 
inspirer, the encourager of the teachers under his care. He is to show them how 
to teach better. If he is not in close and sympathetic touch with the work of 
the elementary school, if he never teaches a lesson in the school himself, then 
he is not a true Superintendent. He is the real eye of the educational system. 
He should be always on the lookout for possible development in his inspectorate. 
He will have a large field in connection with school consolidations, in seeing 
that adequate salaries are paid, in maintaining school attendance, in furthering 
the teaching of agriculture, manual training and household science. There is a 
widespread feeling that Inspectors would do their work more efficiently if they 
were appointed and paid by the Department. If that condition came about, the 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 13 

various detailed qualifications now prescribed for Inspectors' certificates could 
be omitted, and appointments could be freely made from among those men, who 
by adequate educational training, experience of teaching, and force of character 
are best qualified to be educational leaders. This would be centralization at a 
point where centralization is necessary for efficiency; but it could then be safely 
accompanied by a diminution of detailed regulations and increased local responsi- 
bility. In England and Scotland, the central authority appoints the Inspectors, 
and then allows very considerable latitude to local authorities. In our Provincial 
system, so far as industrial and technical courses are concerned, the widest 
liberty is given to the local board to devise such as are best adapted to serve the 
needs of the particular community. Both centralization and decentralization are 
needed in our system. 

The Trustees 

Trustees as the elected custodians of educational interests in each locality 
are clothed with much power under our system. Their opportunities to help the 
teachers and the school are boundless. They are the link which should bind the 
teachers to the whole community. Women as trustees can render a special service 
in this respect. It will be the ambition of the efficient and conscientious trustee 
to secure the best teacher available, to pay the best salary possible, to have the 
best equipped school building, to be the personal friend of teachers and scholars. 
In connection with the payment of teachers' salaries it might be suggested that 
monthly payments would be of great practical help to many teachers. 

Public Libraries 

The public library is developing into a powerful teaching agency. It con- 
tinues education into the adult stage. It may be used by teachers and others as 
a means of popular educational extension work in the community. The new 
idea in the public library of to-day is the aggressive idea. The public library 
tries to get the right book to the right reader at the right time. It invites the 
community to read, and to read the best literature. The notable features of the 
modern public library in Ontario are the children's department, where the story 
hour is a feature, and the emphasis placed on the reference service, i.e., the library 
as a bureau of information. 

Ontario has 408 public libraries — in proportion 'to population the largest 
number of any country, state or province in the world. Yet more than a million 
of the people of the Province have not access to a public library. Some of our 
public libraries are equal in efficiency to the best in any country, but most of 
them can be lifted in quality and efficiency. The grants from this Department 
have made possible the increase in the number of libraries. The greatest need is 
a development in the standard of service rendered by libraries. To accomplish 
this, the expert staff of the Library department is being increased and librarians' 
schools are being held in various parts of the Province. The Public Libraries 
Act is being recast with a view to making it possible for municipalities to make 
larger grants to libraries and with a view to devising better facilities for a free 
library system in the rural districts. The Consolidated School will again prove 
its value as becoming a centre of library work. 

Personal Services 

To my predecessor in this office, the Hon. Dr. Pyne, I would pay a tribute of 
sincere respect. His tenure of this office was marked by certain real advances 



14 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



in educational policy. Grants from the Department were increased on condition 
of schools providing better equipment and higher salaries ; teachers' salaries steadily 
rose; the standard of teachers' certificates was elevated; cheaper text books were 
provided; industrial and technical education was launched; and the Teachers' 
Superannuation Fund was established. 

The Deputy Minister, Dr. Colquhoun, is one of the most efficient servants 
of the country. His sympathy with teachers, his accurate knowledge of the school 
situation in the whole Province and his unfailing courtesy make him an invaluable 
administrator. 

The veteran Superintendent, Dr. John Seath, who has been in ill-health 
a great part of the year, has just passed away. He was the most outstanding 
figure in connection with the Provincial Educational System, a man of fearlessness 
and force, whose energies were wholly devoted to what he believed to be the 
best interests of the schools. 

Ontario's Educational Ambition 

This Province has a historic system of education. It was a pioneer in 
educational organization and extended the benefits of free elementary teaching 
to every child in the community. It is Ontario's ambition to keep her traditional 
position of primacy in all sane educational advance. The achievements of 
Canadian soldiers — half of whom came from this Province — bear witness to the 
high standard of intelligence among the youth of our land. Our aim is to keep 
this standard high — to train up a generation strong in body, disciplined in mind, 
skilled in hand, honest and reverent in soul — worthy citizens of this fair land. 
" Education," as Mr. H. A. L. Fisher has well said, " is the eternal debt which 
maturity owes to youth." We are seeking to pay this debt as generously as we 
can. For who can estimate the capacity and influence of a nation of thoroughly 
well educated, well disciplined, men and women! 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. J. Cody, 
Minister of Education. 
March 19th, 1919. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 15 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC AND 
SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit, herewith, my report upon the Elementary 
Schools throughout the Province. The information is derived in part from the 
annual and special reports of the Public and Separate School Inspectors. 

During the past year a good deal of attention has been devoted to three 
subjects : — 

1st. The Consolidation of Rural Schools. 

2nd. Medical and Dental Inspection. 

3rd. A better and more effective means of putting into operation the require- 
ments of the Truancy Act. 

Consolidation of Schools 

During the past summer and autumn meetings have been held at various 
points dealing with the subject of the Consolidation of Schools and the special con- 
ditions affecting the Province of Ontario in this regard. It was pointed out that 
there are three different types of Consolidated Schools : — 

1st. Consolidation in the wealthier districts of Ontario for the purpose of uniting 
two or more vigorous rural schools to create a centre at which the pupils in attend- 
ance will be offered the advantages of some degree of secondary education and of 
special training in agriculture, manual training, and household science. 

2nd. Consolidation in the poorer districts of Ontario for the purpose of uniting 
several weak rural schools under one or more teachers to secure economy and efficiency 
in educational administration. 

3rd. Consolidation of a whole township in the newer districts of Ontario for the 
purpose of collecting children from a sparsely scattered area at one central school. 

It is clear that the first type of school, conducted under consolidation, will cost 
from 30 to 40 per cent, more than under the present organization, at any rate, for 
the period during which the debentures for the new school plant are current, 

Last September a circular letter was sent to all the rural school Inspectors, 
asking them to state what they believed to be the attitude of the general public 
towards consolidation. They were also asked to indicate local centres where con- 
solidation would be in the interests of education. The answers returned show that 
the Inspectors are practically unanimous as to the desirability of establishing con- 
solidated schools. In most cases they indicate localities where immediate con- 
solidation would be feasible. 

The attitude of the public, in the various inspectoral divisions, towards the pro- 
posal may be inferred from the following comments : — 

" The present attitude of the public may be best described as one of inquiry. 
It is certain that there is very much more interest in the subject than there was a 
few years ago. Many of the more intelligent people are giving the matter a good 
deal of attention and are coming to regard it with more favour." 

" The majority are opposed to consolidation for the reason that they do not 
understand its advantages and think the cost is beyond their reach." 



1G THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 

" The attitude of the ratepayers is largely apathetic, and, unless the matter is 
skilfully presented, would become strongly opposed to any change in the present 
system." 

« The greater part of the opposition could be overcome if the Government could 
offer substantial assistance in carrying out the experiment." 

" If a vote of the people were to be taken at the present time there would be 
an overwhelming majority against consolidation, but it is ceitain that thoughtful 
men are beginning to favour the idea, and it is equally certain that, if an educa- 
tional campaign were entered upon, meetings held, and the pioper financial basis 
presented to the ratepayers, the consolidation idea would find more and more favour. 

" Generally, the people of this county are sympathetic to the consolidation of 
public schools. This is particularly true of our leading farmers. Our population 
is largely rural, with essentially rural problems, and consolidation is needed in order 
that Secondary and Agricultural education may be given to our young people. We 

have an excellent High school at , but its graduates rarely return to the 

farm." 

The principal objections reported are : — 

1st. " An aversion to any interference with local independence, and sometimes 
an unwillingness to get away from the old system." 

2nd. " Fearful of its cost and of the feasibility of transportation of pupils." 

3rd. " The only objection against consolidation is the condition of the roads in 
winter and also in the early spring and late fall." 

4th. " Our schools are too costly and of too recent date to hope that the people 
would now think of abandoning them." 

On the whole the outlook for consolidation is favourable. The prospect of 
financial assistance from the Government, the educational propaganda being carried 
on by the Inspectors and others, the successful working of the system in neighbour- 
ing provinces and states, the changing social and economic conditions in rural dis- 
tricts, and the good sense of the people themselves, are all operating in favour of the 
movement for the consolidation of schools. 

On the other hand, it must be carefully borne in mind that there are many 
districts in this Province where consolidation is either impracticab n e or unnecessary; 
and that grave disappointments may be the result of ill-considered plans for bringing 
it into operation. 

The Inspectors in the Northern districts of Ontario are of the opinion that, 
except in a few favoured localities, consolidation would not be feasible on account 
of sparseness of settlement, lack of good roads, great distances for transportation, 
and the increased financial outlay involved. 

Medical and Dental Inspection 

In the rural districts no advantage has been taken of the Regulations for 
Medical and Dental Inspection, except in the counties of Peel and Lincoln. For over 
a year these Counties have each been employing a doctor and a nurse, appointed by 
the Department of Agriculture and acting under its authority. In Peel County, 
parents of children operated upon contributed a portion of the expenses. The 
Lincoln County Council gave grants of money in 1917 and 1918 to help defray 
expenses. In Prince Edward County, the Township of TTillier employs and pays 
the local Medical PTealth Officer to inspect the schools of the township twice a year. 

All the cities in the Province, so far as reported, have made some provision for 
carrying on the work. Port Arthur. Sault Ste. Marie, and Windsor employ Medical 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 17 

Inspectors. The Port Arthur officer is appointed by the City Council, which pays 
half his salary, the other half being paid by the Board of Education. The Sault Ste. 
Marie and Windsor officers are under the control of, and are paid by, the Board of 
Education. Brantford employs a dental officer who gives half his time to the schools. 
All the cities and a number of the large towns employ school nurses at salaries 
ranging from $550.00 to $1,000.00 per annum. 

Truancy Act 

The reported attendance of pupils in the schools of the Province indicates that 
further advances must be made before conditions can be regarded as entirely satis- 
factory. A comparison of the enrolment of the schools per annum and the average 
daily attendance in each seems, however, to have suggested to those unfamiliar with 
the conditions, certain wholly erroneous conclusions. In making any estimate based 
upon these figures, it is necessary to take into account certain factors. These are : — 

1st. The moving of families from one school centre to another, so frequent 
especially in the industrial centres of the Province, which increases the enrolment 
and diminishes the average. 

2nd. The computation of school averages against the number of legal teaching 
days, rather than against the number of days the school has been kept open. 

3rd. Listing as full year pupils those who enter in the spring of fall, and 
those who leave at the close of the school year in June, e.g., successful High School 
Entrance candidates. 

In estimating the effectiveness of the present Act, it must be remembered, too, 
that during the winter season and portions of the spring and fall, there are certain 
parts of the Province of Ontario where the schools are inaccessible by reason of 
weather conditions or the condition of the roads. The harvesting of small fruits 
in June and of the root crops in the early fall has also tended under war conditions 
to diminish the school attendance. 

Practically all the cities and towns) and a number of incorporated villages 
have truant officers, appointed in most cases by the Municipal Councils concerned. 
In the smaller towns and villages, the Chief of Police usually performs this duty. 

In rural districts the Act is not, as a rule, effectively administered. The chief 
reasons for this are (1) the neglect of many township Councils to appoint and 
pay a truant officer, and (2) the unwillingness of local trustee boards to assume 
the responsibility of appointing a local officer through fear of creating ill feeling 
in the section. 

Four counties are thoroughly organized for the carrying out of the Truancy 
Act. One of these has not only a county officer, but also township and urban 'officers. 
In these counties the Act is well administered. 

The following quotations from Eeports received need no comment: — 

" Every municipality in this inspectorate, rural and urban, has appointed a 
truant officer. These officers have been faithful in the discharge of their duties." 

" In the rural sections it seems to be impossible to get a responsible 
and reliable man who will accept the office or who will perform its duties if he 
accepts. The more sparsely settled a township is, the greater the difficulty/' 

" A few of the objections raised to the working of the present Act, are : — 

1st. The appointment of officers is permissive with Councils. 

2nd. Few local men will accept the office. 

3rd. The Act does not state by whom the officers are to be paid. 

4th. The Truancy Act would be more effective if it were obligatory on the part 
of Township Councils to appoint and pay the truant officers." 



16 THE REPOBT OF THE No. 17 

Inspection 

The Districts of Northern Ontario have been reorganized, and two additional 
districts added to those previously set up. It is hoped that this redistribution will 
meet the growing needs of Northern Ontario and enable education to keep pace 
with the rapid material development of this area. 

I am pleased to report that Mr. W. I. Chisholm, M.A., formerly a teacher in 
the Peterborough Normal School, who had previously served with distinction as a 
Public School Inspector in the County of Bruce, and who had been the represen- 
tative for several years of the inspectoral body on the Educational Council, was 
appointed Assistant Chief Inspector on July 1st, 1918. His good judgment, ability 
and energy have been of invaluable service in carrying on the work of the office and 
in enlarging its sphere of usefulness. 

It is with infinite regret that I have to record the death of Mr. J. W. Forrester, 
Public School Inspector for the County of Dundas. Mr. Forrester's devotion and 
talents were rapidly bringing him into the front rank, and his loss to education in 
the Province is difficult to estimate. Inspector Forrester has been replaced by 
Inspector H. B. Fetterly. 

Mr. Clarke Moses, Public School Inspector for the County of Haldimand, 
after many years of useful service, resigned his position at the close of the calendar 
year. Inspector Moses has been replaced by Inspector J. L. Mitchener. 

Since my last report the city of Toronto has lost the valuable and esteemed 
services of Inspectors W. F. Chapman and E. W. Bruce. They have been replaced 
by Inspectors N. S. Macdonald and Walter Bryce. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

Jno. Waugh, 
Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools. 

Toronto, Jan. £Sth, 1919. 



r 



191S DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 19 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 
Sir, — 

1 have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Ueport on Industrial and 
Technical Schools. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. W. Merchant, 

Toronto, February 8th, 1919. 



Increase in Attendance at Night Schools 

The statistical tables at the end of this report show a gratifying increase in 
the attendance at night schools. The increase is particularly marked in the schools 
at Chatham, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Pembroke, St. Catharines, Stratford, Toronto, 
Windsor, and Woodstock. While a constant increase in attendance has been main- 
tained from year to year throughout the war, the increase, as was to be expected, 
was confined chiefly to the classes for women. The enrolment this year indicates 
a larger increase in men. Of a total increase of 1,316 for the academic year 1917-18, 
749 were men and 567 women. 

New Night Schools 

New night schools were organized during the autumn at Almonte, Belleville, 
and North Bay. The Belleville Advisory Committee offers instruction in a wide 
range of subjects. Almonte is an important textile centre with four large woollen 
mills. The classes which have been organized are intended to meet more particu- 
larly the needs of those who are engaged in the textile industry. The classes at 
North Bay also have a very direct relation to local needs. North Bay is a railroad 
centre, and the apprentices from the railway shops constitute an important part of 
the attendance. They receive instruction in shop mathematics, applied mechanics, 
machine drawing and design. Classes for instruction in women's industries are 
formed in each of the new schools. 

Nationalities of the Students in Attendance at Night Schools 

The figures from year to year show a gradual change in the nationalities of 
those in attendance. In the early years of the night schools, from 60 per cent, to 
70 per cent, of the attendance was made up of young men and women from the 
British Isles, and the proportion of Canadians was low. This was to be accounted 
for by the fact that night schools had been a recognized part of the educational 
system in Oreat Britain for many years, and workers continued in Canada a prac- 



20 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

tice which was common in the Old Land of using these schools for improving 
their educational equipment. A gradual change is taking place and Canadians are 
acquiring the habit of attending night schools. Of the total attendance in 1917-18, 
66.28 per cent, were Canadian born, 25.39 per cent, from the British Isles, and 8.32 
per cent, from other countries. 

Subjects of Instruction in Night Schools 

The table giving the number of pupils in the various branches of instruction 
shows a somewhat marked difference in the character of the subjects taken by men 
and by women. Men in the industries apparently need most the elements of a 
general education and the theoretical subjects related to their occupations. The 
women, on the other hand, chiefly attend classes for practical subjects. The 
academic subject in greatest demand by men is arithmetic; then follow in order, 
English composition, reading and literature, shop mathematics, mechanical drawing, 
electricity, algebra and geometry, etc. Of the practical subjects for men, the largest 
enrolment is in automobile mechanics ; the second in order is in steam and gas 
engines and power plant operation ; and the third, in machine shop and forge shop 
work. Of the women's subjects, the greatest demand is for sewing and dress- 
making; 2,925 pupils were enrolled in the dressmaking class during the year. 
Next to dressmaking, cooking is the most popular of the subjects for women. The 
table shows that 2,369 were enrolled in this department. About half as many 
received instruction in millinery. 

CharacteristicJFeatures of the Ontario Type of Day Industrial and Technical Schools 

The Ontario type of day industrial and technical schools has certain distinctive 
features which mark it out, on the one hand, from similar types of schools organized 
in other countries, and, on the other, from other types of schools within the 
Province. 

The chief feature which distinguishes it from schools of the type in other 
countries is the stress which it places upon the essentials of a general education. 
The training demanded in English, mathematics, and science is the equivalent of 
that given in any of our High Schools. While less importance may be attached to 
the phases of mathematics and science that have a remote application, the courses 
include all that is essential to a complete understanding of the principles to be 
applied. This attention to the academic side of an education has been deliberately 
adopted after due consideration. A survey of the needs of the industries has made 
it abundantly clear that the lack of a general education is as frequently the cause 
of the failure of a worker to secure advancement as the lack of specialized knowledge 
or skill. Furthermore, the importance of developing well-informed and intelligent 
citizens should be as clearly recognized as that of the training of efficient workers. 

The principle of organization of the day industrial school assumes that the 
ends T have mentioned are not necessarily contradictory and that both can be real- 
ized through a course of training which emphasizes the practical, but, at the same 
time, makes adequate provision for the broader requirements of a sound general 
education. There is a necessity for emphasizing this fact at the present time, 
because T find that an impression appears to have got abroad that these schools are 
in a very narrow sense trade preparatory schools and that a pupil who is considering 
the question of the selection of a school must choose between a general education as 
provided for in our TTigh Schools and Collegiate Institutes and a narrow intensive 
course for nn industrial employment. This is a mistake. Both ends may be 
reached through attendance at a day industrial school of the Ontario type. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 21 

The feature which distinguishes the day industrial schools from our other 
secondary schools is the attention given to practical training for industrial employ- 
ments. 

A pupil of Fourth Form stain ling in the Public Schools is not in a position 
to choose wisely an industrial vocation. Accordingly, the main purpose in the 
practical work for the first two years in the course of the clay industrial school is 
to furnish a variety in experience which will serve as a basis for an intelligent choice 
of an industrial vocation. At this stage, no effort is made to give any direct instruc- 
tion for a particular trade, but as far as possible, the courses, especially in mathe- 
matics and mechanical drawing, are selected because the subjects treated are of 
fundamental value in a variety of industrial employments. The pupil who drops 
out of school at the end of the second year's course but does not select an industrial 
employment has lost no time, because he is equipped with a good practical educa- 
tion which will be of value to him in any pursuit. 

Where a four years' course is established, the advanced classes, as a rule, take 
specialized training for certain particular vocations. The chief distinction between 
the industrial and technical courses is made in the curriculum for the third and the 
fourth years. The industrial courses give attention to the requirements of trades, 
while the technical courses are especially adapted for those who are preparing for 
positions in which specialized knowledge of a technical character is required. No 
trade class, directly intended to take in full the place of apprenticeship, has been 
established in the Province. 

Progress in Development of Day Industrial and Technical Schools 

The day industrial and technical schools have now become firmly established 
as a part of the Provincial system of education. Substantial progress has been 
made in the development of these schools during the year. A new full-time day 
technical department has been established in connection with the High School at 
Sault Ste Marie. The part-time system, which has been in operation for several 
years in this school, is maintained. The statistical tables show a material increase 
in attendance in the other schools. 

But it is too early even to begin to grow satisfied with what has been accom- 
plished. The field for the day industrial or technical school is just beginning to 
be occupied. When we consider that at least 40 per cent, of the boys who are 
passing through the Public Schools in the urban centres of the Province become 
engaged in some form of industrial employment, and that the urgent demand of the 
industries is for a better educational equipment for workers, we begin to recognize 
the necessity for a very much fuller development of this type of school. The begin- 
ning which has been made has but shown the open door of opportunity. 

But in discussing this question, industrial should not be confounded with 
vocational education. The attendance at day industrial and technical schools is 
by no means a measure of what the Province is doing in the way of adapting second- 
ary education to meet vocational needs, because the commercial departments in our 
High Schools and Collegiate Institutes are essentially vocational schools. In fact, 
when proportionately as large an attendance is enrolled in industrial and technical 
schools and departments as is now registered in the commercial classes, we shall be 
approaching a solution of the problem of providing industrial training for the 
youth of the Province. 

It is of interest to note that the organization for industrial and technical 
education is beginning to meet more nearly the needs of the situation in outlying 
centres of population than in any of our larger urban centres. Take Haileybury as 



22 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

an example. In this town abont 70 per cent, of the boys who have passed through 
the High Schools in late years have found employment in some form of the mining 
industries. At present, about 60 per cent, of the boys in attendance at the High 
School are enrolled in the mining department. The number of boys in attendance 
at the mining department of the Sudbury High School also bears a close relation 
to the number entering the industry. 

The Development of the Courses of Study in the Day and Night Industrial and 

Technical Schools 

The courses of study, on both the theoretical and the practical side, are, more or 
less, in a formative condition. The Department of Education does not, as in the 
case of the Public Schools arid the High Schools, prescribe set courses. The mem- 
bers of the various staffs are expected to study industrial requirements and to 
develop courses which will meet the special needs of their classes. 

The chief difficulties in securing satisfactory courses arise from the fact that 
the teachers who have been trained along professional and academic lines have 
usually an inadequate conception of industrial problems, and practical men in the 
industries, who have been in the habit of regarding their work solely from the stand- 
point of production, find difficulty in organizing it for the purpose of effective 
teaching. 

The difficulties mentioned cannot be overcome at once. The academic teachers 
who have charge of the theoretical work are being encouraged to make a careful survey 
of the practical side of their courses in industrial establishments and to adapt their 
instruction, especially in mathematics and in science, to the more particular require- 
ments of industries. The practical men in the trades who have taken up the work 
of teaching are required in our teacher-training classes to analyze their jobs and 
to arrange the elements with a view of presenting them in logical order to pupils. 

We have been sending out, from time to time, in the form of circular letters 
to Principals, suggestive outlines of courses in such subjects as machine drawing, 
shop mathematics, and sheet-metal work. We have been assured that these have 
been of value, especially to teachers who are beginners. We hope to extend this 
practice : but it is evident that courses never can be absolutely standardized. 

Studies of Industries and Employments — Provisions for a Closer Co-ordination of 

Schools and Industries 

In order to perfect plans for bringing about a closer co-ordination of schools 
and industries, there is a necessity at the present time for a detailed study of 
industrial occupations with a view of determining with greater exactness the forms 
of education necessary for promoting industries and fitting men and women for 
employments. Ontario has a great variety of industries of a more or less specialized 
class, and schools which have been organized in accordance with types found in other 
countries are not completely meeting our needs. Moreover, the war has caused 
disturbed industrial conditions, and a special study of the situation is needed in 
order to provide the organization necessary for reconstruction. Provision has been 
made by the Department of Education for such an extension of the office staff as 
will make it possible to begin such a study. 

This study will cover the general industrial and technical educational require- 
ments of the men and women engaged in important industries and trades, such 
as the mining industry, the textile industry, the pulp and paper industry, the steel 
industry, the building trades, etc., with a view of making constructive recommenda- 
tion- regarding ihr organization of education to provide better trained workers for 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 23 

these industries and trades. It will also include a survey of the industrial estab- 
lishments in the more important industrial centres with the purpose, first, of 
finding out the nature of the employments and the character of the training that 
those employed require for improvement and advancement; and, second, of con- 
ferring with the employees, studying their individual needs, and guiding them into 
suitable courses of study. 

Teacher=Training and the Certification of Teachers 

The regulations governing the qualifications -and certification of vocational 
teachers for day and night industrial and technical schools have been amended with 
a view of attracting a larger number of those who have been trained in the indus- 
tries to take up permanently the work of teaching and of encouraging them to fit 
themselves for this vocation. The Department of Education now grants interim 
certificates, to be made permanent at the end of a period of successful teaching, to 
candidates who have had approved technical training or trade experience and who 
have taken approved teacher-training courses. 

To enable teachers to qualify under these regulations evening teacher-training 
classes have been opened up in Toronto, Hamilton, and London. A large number 
of the teachers engaged in the schools in these cities are registered for a two years' 
course. The course of training includes instruction in the general principles of 
education, with their application to technical and trade subjects, the analysis of 
trade operations and requirements, the construction of suitable courses of study, 
the development of lesson plans, and exercises in practical teaching with criticisms. 

Although the effort is being made in this way to secure a body of well-trained 
permanent teachers, the intention is not to restrict local boards in engaging tem- 
porarily practical men and women as teachers of vocational subjects. Temporary 
certificates will be granted freely to those who have approved technical training 
or trade experience and who can furnish evidence of possessing the essentials of a 
fair English education. These certificates are granted on the application of a 
board of trustees to the Department. 

Progress in Providing Buildings and Equipment 

Possibly the best evidence of permanent advance in the organization of indus- 
trial and technical education in the Province is the activity of municipalities in 
providing buildings and equipment for industrial and technical education. Satis- 
factory progress has been made in this direction during the present year. 

The London Board of Education has just opened one of the best buildings 
of its kind on the continent. It is especially adapted to meet the needs of a com- 
munity of the size of London. 

The class-rooms, laboratories, and shops are arranged along the outside walls. 
The lighting is effected by groups of large windows on one side only, in accordance 
with the established practice in school buildings. The class-rooms are entered from 
spacious corridors at the inner sides. 

The workshops include a machine shop, a general wood- working shop, and 
shops for plumbing and sanitary engineering, electrical construction, gasoline 
engines and auto mechanics, building construction, printing, tailoring, and work- 
rooms for all departments of women's work, including pow r er machinery operating, 
dressmaking, millinery, embroidery, and housekeeping. 

There are laboratories for chemistry, general physics, electricity, and dynamo 
and motor testing. These laboratories are complete in all their appointments. 



24 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 

The plan provides for a large auditorium, a gymnasium, and a swimming 
pool, but owing to the necessity for war-time economy, they are not included in the 
present building. Provision is made in the construction for carrying out the com- 
pleted scheme at a .later date. 

I would advise all who are thinking of building or of improving their present 
accommodations to visit this school. 

A mining building to furnish accommodation for the practical work of the 
mining students of the Haileybury High School was completed in September. Tt 
is a two-storey structure of brick and steel, sixty feet by thirty-five feet, standing 
in the school grounds. Besides a very complete milling plant, it contains an assay 
laboratory, a chemical laboratory, a woodworking shop, and a machine shop. 

The mill is a continuous, small-unit plant and is so well designed that it would 
be difficult to improve upon it for purposes of teaching and of making commercial 
tests on a variety of ores. Its equipment includes the most approved appliances 
for crushing, amalgamating, concentrating, and cyaniding, and the lay-out is such 
that the continuous treatment of an ore by any desired combination of these may be 
readily effected. 

The mill is designed for a capacity of one ton a day. The equipment consists 
of the following: Blake crusher, rolls, trommel, three-stamp battery with amal- 
gamating plate, Dorr classifier, tube-mill; jigs, Wilfley table, Deister table, Callow 
flotation plant, sand leaching plant, Dorr thickener, slime agitation tanks, Oliver 
filter, filter press, zinc boxes, zinc dust precipitation plant, and the necessary pumps, 
storage vats, etc. All the machinery is electrically driven. 

In addition, there is an equipment of miniature apparatus for small tests: 
jig, concentrating table, notation machine, agitator, etc. 

The importance that" the mining men of the district attach to the training of 
the boys along mining lines has been amply demonstrated. A very considerable 
part of the equipment of the mill was donated by mining companies of Cobalt and 
by the manufacturers; the designing of the plant and the installation of the 
machinery were closely supervised by Messrs. F. D. Eeid, J. J. Denny, and M. F. 
Fairlie ; and a large part of the work of erecting the machinery was carried out by 
expert workmen whose services could ill be spared from the mines at the time. 

The Ottawa Board has in course of erection a large building as an annex to the 
present technical school. It will provide for laboratories and for a number of 
additional shops. When this building is completed, the Ottawa Technical 'School 
will have an adequate equipment for all departments of work. 

The city of Hamilton has purchased a new site and has entered upon an exten- 
sive plan for the building of a new technical school to consist of a central building 
for administration, connected with a number' of semi-detached units. One of the 
units is in process of construction. 

Resignation of the Assistant Director 

The Provincial staffs have suffered a decided loss in the resignation of the 
Assistant Director, Mr. G. J. MacKay. He has taken an important part during 
the last two years in organizing and improving the industrial and technical schools. 
To him, in great measure, is due the credit for the recent developments in the 
night-school system and for establishing on a solid basis the mining departments of 
the High Schools at Haileybury and Sudbury. But Mr. MacKay's services are not 
to be lost to the wider movement for technical education in the Province. He 
resigned his position to accept the chair of metallurgy in the Faculty of Applied 
Science at Queen's University. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 25 

Reconstruction and Education 

Men in every department of life are discussing plans for after-war recon- 
struction. The discussions bear upon every phase of national interest and activity. 
Of all the plans proposed, there is not a single one which does not depend upon 
human purpose, intelligence, and judgment for its conception and .value, and upon 
the application of human knowledge, skill, and integrity for its realization. Now 
purpose, knowledge, intelligence, judgment, skill, and integrity are not bestowed upon 
us in fixed quantities. Their sources are to be found in the possibilities for develop- 
ment latent in the capacities of the children born to the nation, and the measure 
available will depend upon the character and the extent of the development of these 
capacities. We are beginning to realize, therefore, that the most fundamental of 
all problems of reconstruction is the educational problem. Hence it is that educa- 
tional aims, means, and results are receiving everywhere careful examination. 

Some Educational Problems in Reconstruction 

The discussions are being concerned with every department of elementary, 
secondary, and higher education, and recommendations, more or less radical, are 
being proposed. A careful survey of all these discussions shows that, while many 
plans are being proposed for the improvement of elementary and secondary schools 
and for the advancement of University education, especially along research lines, 
there is a singular unanimity in laying special stress on the necessities for the 
universal training of the youth during the period of adolescence and for laying 
emphasis in that training upon two main factors, first upon the development of the 
essential elements of sound character, and, second, upon a broad and liberal training 
for a life career in some useful vocation. 

We have had the most striking proof in the world's history of the necessity 
for the union of these two factors in national character. We have seen the possi- 
bility of combining efficiency with debased moral standards ; but we have seen also 
that high ideals and effective achievements are not necessarily the accompaniments 
of inefficiency. 

Necessity for Training During the Period of Adolescence 

Rightly or wrongly, the schools are being looked to, on the one hand, for the 
development of the character of the youth and, on the other, for a training in 
efficiency. If the schools are to accept the responsibility, the possibilities and limi- 
tations should be clearly recognized, and the conditions of attendance and organ- 
ization should be such as to make it possible to realize these ends. 

The elementary school has an important function to play in character forma- 
tion, because the tendency to conceive and to realize ends begins with the spon- 
taneity of the infant in the kindergarten and is nurtured by intelligent and sym- 
pathetic methods in dealing at every stage with every question, exercise, and prob- 
lem presented to the learner ; the teacher who throws his pupil during the earlier 
stages on his own responsibility, and leads him to work from interest and motive, 
is laying the foundation for a purposeful life. Yet if the child's schooling closes 
at the end of the elementary school period, the chief opportunity for character direc- 
tion is lost to the school, because the significant aims and purposes of life do not 
begin to take shape until the youth enters upon the period of adolescence. If the 
school is to be held responsible in a large measure for the development of national 
character, it follows that it must take an important part in guiding and controlling 
the youth during this critical and formative period. 



26 THE REPOET OF THE No. 17 

On the efficiency side, too, the training given in an elementary school cannot 
be said to be sufficient, whether the question is regarded from the standpoint of the 
academic training necessary as a basis of civic intelligence or from the standpoint 
of an adequate educational equipment for useful service in a commercial, agricul- 
tural, or industrial vocation. This statement is not to be construed as a reflection 
on elementary school systems ; much of what has been demanded of the elementary 
schools in this and other countries cannot be realized in any system, however per- 
fect, within the present age limitations of compulsory attendance. Most of the 
criticisms levelled at the elementary schools have resulted from a failure to realize 
the actual possibilities of education within this period, and many of the mistakes 
in school organization, especially in the line of congesting courses of study, have 
been made in the endeavour to modify school conditions to meet such criticisms. 

These considerations have turned the minds of those who are looking to educa- 
tion as a means for moral and social advancement to the importance of utilizing 
much more fully the period between fourteen and eighteen years of age for the 
training of the youth. Attention lias been drawn particularly to what secondary 
schools have accomplished for the very small fraction of the youth of the country 
who have been fortunate enough to continue their education in such institutions. 
The necessity for making some form of advanced training more universal is becom- 
ing very generally realized in all countries. 

Plans for Extending Period of Education 

How shall the period of education be extended for all children? This is 
probably the leading educational problem that the progress of the times is forcing 
upon the attention of educators and administrators. Several solutions have been 
proposed and a variety of experiments have been undertaken. Roughly speaking, 
these solutions and experiments fall into two classes, first, voluntary plans ; second, 
compulsory schemes for extending the period of full-time or part-time schooling 
beyond present limitations. Naturally, voluntary plans were the first to be tried. 
By giving a deeper interest to school studies it has been sought to induce a larger 
proportion of children to extend their education. The efforts have been directed 
mainly along two lines. The curriculum of the elementary school has been enriched 
by connecting the traditional subjects in a more vital way with typical forms of 
life's activities, and an' appeal has been made to the natural impulse of the youth 
for a life career, in the organization of a new type of school, which is intended to 
bridge the gulf between the elementary schools and employments. In these two 
ways, by vitalizing the curriculum of the elementary schools and by the organiza- 
tion of vocational schools, the effort has been made to extend the period of education 
for an increased number of children. But. these plans have been found to be 
exceedingly slow in their operation. They may raise by a few points the percentage 
of attendance at secondary schools, but as a means of reversing the figures and 
changing the eighty or ninety per cent, of non-attendance to a corresponding per- 
centage of attendance at advanced classes, they must be regarded as a failure. 

The causes which lead children to drop out of school at the early stages 
continue to operate in spite of the attractions of more interesting courses of study. 
The necessity foT earning a livelihood is forced upon a number of children at an 
early age, and possibly the natural desire for an adventure into the life of the adult 
and for the independence which employment gives causes even a larger number to 
leave school than economic pressure. These causes are effective even when distaste 
for school is removed. 



1B1» DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 27 

It is now very generally conceded that the only adequate means of carrying out 
any comprehensive scheme for the further extension of general education is through 
some form of compulsory legislation. Legislation of this kind either has been 
adopted or is being considered by educational administrators in most countries 
where advanced systems are established. 

Provision in Ontario for Compulsory School Attendance of Adolescents 

Ontario was among the first of the British communities to accept the principle 
of compulsion. The Adolescent School Attendance Act, which provides for local 
option in compulsory attendance, was passed in 1912 and amended in 1916. As 
yet, no municipality has adopted and enforced the Act. A single municipality 
appears to be loath to accept the responsibility for a radical change in policy and 
to provide the necessary school accommodation for the increased attendance. The 
same conditions appear in other countries where similar permissive legislation has 
been adopted. As far as I am aware, Boston, Mass., is the only municipality that 
has taken advantage of and enforced effectually a permissive law. 

But this much, at any rate, has been accomplished in Ontario : the question of 
compulsory attendance has been brought prominently before Boards of Education, 
and it has been receiving careful consideration in many parts of the Province. The 
passing of the Fisher Bill in England has stimulated discussion. As an evidence 
of the awakened interest in this subject, we are receiving in the office constant 
inquiries regarding the provisions of the Fisher Bill and of compulsory legislation 
in other countries. To furnish a general answer to such inquiries, I submit the 
following summaries of the legislation bearing on this subject in Great Britain and 
the United States. I omit the provisions of the Ontario Adolescent School Attend- 
ance Act, because a copy of this Act can be secured from the Department of Educa- 
tion at any time. It is published in Schools Acts and Amendments of 1916. The 
facts regarding the United States have, in the main, been reprinted from a summary, 
published in Bulletin No. 19, issued by the Federal Board for Vocational Edu- 
cation, Washington. 

Provision for Compulsory Attendance in England. The Fisher Bill 

The provisions of the Fisher Bill, in so far as they relate to compulsory attend- 
ance at schools, may be summarized as follows : 

The bill provides for compulsory full-time education of all pupils to fourteen 
years of age. The period may be extended by; a local board to fifteen years by 
passing a by-law for this purpose, and such a board has power to grant exemptions 
for pupils between fourteen and fifteen years of age. 

No child under twelve years of age may be employed in any capacity. A 
child over twelve years of age may not be employed on any day on which he is 
required to attend school before the close of school hours, nor before 6 a.m. or 
after 8 p.m. 

Youths between fourteen and eighteen years of age shall attend continuation 
schools during the daytime for three hundred and twenty hours a year; that is, 
eight hours a week for forty weeks. But any young person who is above the age 
of sixteen years and either (a) has passed the matriculation examination of a uni- 
versity of the United Kingdom or an examination recognized by the Board of Edu- 
cation, which corresponds to our Department of Education, as equivalent thereto ; or 
(b) is shown to the satisfaction of the local education authority to have been up to 
the aa:e of sixteen under full-time instruction in a school recognized by the Board of 



28 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Education as efficient, or under suitable and efficient full-time instruction in some 
other manner, shall be exempt from the obligation to attend continuation schools 
under the Act. 

It is provided that (a) the obligation to attend continuation schools shall not, 
within a period of seven years from the appointed day on which the provisions of 
the law come into force, apply to young persons between the ages of sixteen and 
eighteen, nor after that period to any young person who has attained the age of 
sixteen before the expiration of that period; and (b) during the like period, if the 
local education authority so resolve, the number of hours for which a young person 
may be required to attend continuation schools in any year shall be two hundred 
and eighty instead of three hundred and twenty. 

Employers may be required to suspend a pupil's employment, not only during 
the period for which he is required to attend school, but also for such additional 
time, not exceeding two hours, as is necessary to place the pupil in a fit mental and 
physical condition to receive the full benefit from attendance at school. 

A part of the education provided in continuation schools must consist of 
physical instruction. 

A fine of five shillings may be imposed upon a young person who fails to 
attend a continuation school, and a fine, not exceeding two pounds, may be imposed 
upon a parent who attempts to evade the Act. 

Local educational authorities, either separately, or in co-operation with other 
local educational authorities, are required to establish and maintain free continua- 
tion schools with suitable courses of instruction and physical training, but all 
plans must be submitted to the Board of Education for approval. This Board has 
final supervision. 

Scotch Education Act of 1918 

The Scotch Education Act of 1918 fixes the limit of compulsory full-time 
attendance of children at elementary schools at fifteen years. 

The Act provides that every education authority shall, after due inquiry and 
consultation with persons concerned in local crafts and industries, and with due 
regard to local circumstances generally, prepare and submit for the approval of the 
Department a scheme or schemes for the part-time instruction in continuation 
classes of all young persons, within the education area of the authority, who may 
under the Act be required to attend such classes. 

Every education authority shall prepare and submit for the approval of the 
Department under this section, (1) within one year after the appointed day a 
scheme applicable to young persons under the age of sixteen years; and (2) as 
soon thereafter as the Department may require a scheme or schemes applicable to 
young persons of any age greater than sixteen but not exceeding eighteen years. 

Every such scheme shall provide for, (1) instruction in the English language 
and literature, and in such other parts of a general education as may be deemed 
desirable; (2) special instruction conducive to the efficiency of young persons in 
the employment in which they are engaged or propose to be engaged: and (3) 
instruction in physical exercises adapted to age and physique. 

The instruction given in continuation classes under any such scheme shall 
amount for each young person to an aggregate of at least three hundred and twenty 
hours of attendance in each year distributed as regards times and seasons as may 
best suit the circumstances of each locality. 

The obligation to attend continuation classes under any such scheme shall not 
apply to any young persons who (1) are in full-time attendance at a recognized 



1918 DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 29 

primary, intermediate, or secondary school; or (2) are shown to the satisfaction of 
the education authority to be receiving suitable and efficient instruction in some 
other manner; or, (3) have been in full-time attendance at a recognized inter- 
mediate or secondary school until the close of the school session in which they have 
attained the age of seventeen years and are certified by the school authorities to 
have completed the post-intermediate course; or (4) have attained the age of 
seventeen years and are shown to the satisfaction of the education authority 
to have completed, a course of instruction equivalent in value to the post-inter- 
mediate course. 

The obligation to attend continuation classes under any such scheme shall not, 
within a period of three years from the appointed day on which the provisions of 
the law come into force, apply to young persons between the ages of sixteen and 
eighteen, nor after such period to any young person who has attained the age of 
sixteen before the expiration of that period. 

Whenever a scheme has been approved by the Department, the education 
authority shall, in such manner as the Department may by order prescribe, require 
every young person to whom the obligation to attend continuation classes under 
such scheme applies to attend with due regularity for instruction in accordance 
witli the scheme at such times and places as the education authority may appoint. 

Every employer of labour shall afford to every young person in his employ- 
ment any opportunity necessary for attendance at continuation classes in accordance 
with the requirements of the education authority. 

Minnesota Compulsory Attendance Law 

Every child between eight and sixteen years of age shall attend a public school 
or a private school, in each year during the entire time the public schools of the 
district in which the child resides are in session ; provided, that in districts where 
the entire term of school is of unequal length in different schools such child shall 
be required to attend school as herein provided during at least the entire time of 
the shorter term. 

Such child may be excused from attendance upon an application of his parent, 
guardian, or other person having control of such child, to any member of the school 
board, truant officer, principal, or city superintendent, for the whole or any part 
of such period, by the school board of the district in which the child resides, upon 
its being shown to the satisfaction of such board : 

1. That such child's bodily or mental condition is such as to prevent his 
attendance at school or application to study for the period required : or 

2. That such child has already completed the studies ordinarily required 
in the eighth grade ; or 

3. That there is no public school within reasonable distance of his residence, 
or that conditions of weather and travel make it impossible for the child to 
attend : provided, first, that any child fourteen years of age or over, whose help 
may be required in any permitted occupation in or about the home of his parent 
or guardian may be excused from attendance between April 1st and November 
1st in any year ; but this proviso shall not apply to any cities of the first and 
second class ; provided, second, that nothing in this Act shall he construed to 
prevent a child from being absent from school on such clays as said child attends 
upon instruction according to the ordinances of some church. 

The clerk, or any authorized officer of the school hoard, shall issue and keep 
a record of such excuses, under such rules as the board may from time to time 
establish. 



30 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Wisconsin Compulsory Attendance Law 

In 1911 Wisconsin passed a law making it compulsory for all employed 
children between the ages of fourteen and sixteen to attend a part-time school 
one-half day a week. The 1916 report shows that this law has been modified 
so that all children between seven and fourteen years of age and between fourteen 
and sixteen, when not employed, must attend the all-day school ; but that children 
between fourteen and sixteen who are regularly employed and who are living 
within two miles of a town school, or within the corporate limits of any city 
or village, and who are physically fit for such work, must attend the part-time 
school, if one is provided. The law further specifies that when twenty-five persons 
qualified to attend such instruction shall file a petition for such a school, the local 
board must establish the same, the courses to be approved by the State super- 
intendent of education and by the State board of industrial education, and to be, 
like the other forms of industrial education, State aided. The Bray Act of 
1917, while not modifying any of the above statements, has changed the hours 
of attendance and increased the age limit to seventeen years, so that at present 
pupils between fourteen and seventeen, must either attend an all-day school or 
else be regularly employed and in attendance upon a continuation school for 
eight hours per week for eight months of the year. It is provided also that permit 
pupils between the ages of sixteen and seventeen in part-time schools shall devote 
one-half of their time to practical work and one-half to related subjects and 
citizenship training; and it is further provided that only indentured apprentices 
and work-permit pupils between the ages of fourteen and eighteen years may 
be excused for any permanent employment. 

Pennsylvania Compulsory Attendance Law 

The State of Pennsylvania in 1915 passed the Cox Child Labour Act, which 
established continuation schools to extend general education and to give voca- 
tional and civic intelligence. These schools are for pupils between fourteen and 
sixteen years of age having work permits, with the exception of those in farm 
and domestic service. The law provides that these schools shall be established 
by school districts if more than twenty minors eligible to such schools are living 
in the district. The school session is the same number of weeks as that of the 
common school, and pupils may attend eight hours for one day per week or four 
hours each two days per week, or two hours each four days per week, or they 
may attend continuously, the total number of hours being eight times the number 
of weeks the common school is in session. These schools must be approved by 
the State superintendent of public instruction and be part of the free public 
school system. Furthermore, an employer may establish such a school in his 
plant for his own men, and attendance at such a school will be accepted by 
the law. 

The general continuation school developed under this Act has a typical course 
which divides the time as follows: forty per cent, to academic subjects, thirty 
per cent, to fixed vocational subjects common to many industries, and thirty per 
cent, to variable vocational subjects. Abnormal labour conditions make figures 
useless, but the report of 1916 gave one hundred school districts with thirty-six 
thousand pupils in attendance upon part-time continuation schools. 

Massachusetts Compulsory Attendance Law 

The State of Massachusetts, by legislation enacted in 1911 and amended 
in 1913, provides that the school committee in any city or town may establish 
continuation schools for pupils between the ages of fourteen and sixteen who are 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 31 



employed at least six hours a day, and they may establish these schools in the city 
or town where the children are living or in the city or town in which the children 
are employed. It is to be noted in this connection that the board may, not must, 
establish such schools, thus leaving the initiative with the board. Moreover, 
Massachusetts provides that the local board may, with the consent of the State 
board, compel attendance upon these schools of all children between the ages of 
fourteen and sixteen receiving certificates after the establishment of the school, 
provided they are not otherwise receiving equivalent instruction. Here again 
Massachusetts avoids State compulsion. The schools are to be in session not less 
than four hours per week, between eight o'clock in the morning and six o'clock 
in the afternoon; they are to be reckoned as part of the lawful working day, and 
the State pays half the net maintenance cost. Up to the present time Boston 
is the only city which has adopted compulsory continuation school attendance. 

New York Compulsory Attendance Law 

The State of New York, by legislation enacted in 1910 and amended in 1913, 
compels all children between seven and fourteen, or in towns of less 'than five 
thousand population, between eight and fourteen to attend a full-time school for 
one hundred and sixty days a year as a minimum. Children between fourteen and 
sixteen must do the same unless regularly employed with a work certificate. In 
such cases, in cities of the first and second class, these children must attend 
evening school for six hours a week for sixteen weeks if they have not completed 
the full elementary public school course. The law provides, further, that pupils 
between fourteen and sixteen when employed on certificate in any city or district 
where part-time and continuation schools have been established, and who are 
not graduates of the elementary school or its equivalent, may be compelled by 
the board of education to attend continuation school instruction for thirty-six 
weeks in the year, not less than four, nor more than eight hours a week, and 
between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. This condition frees the pupils from 
the evening school requirement, and they are to present a certificate of attendance 
issued monthly. It is to be noted that the law leaves it with the board of education 
to determine whether such schools shall be established or not, and whether or 
not the attendance shall be compulsory. 

Indiana Compulsory Attendance Law 

The Indiana State law of 1916 provides that part-time classes for industrial. 
agricultural, and domestic science subjects may be established. The instruction 
must be complementary to day employment. Attendance is limited to persons over 
fourteen and under twenty-five years of age. When part-time classes are estab- 
lished, boards shall require attendance of youths between fourteen and sixteen 
years of age. Attendance must not be less than five hours per week between 
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. So far as it has been possible to ascertain, a few classes are 
in operation under this law, including one for girls in South Bend. 

Ohio Compulsory Attendance Law 

The State of Ohio by legislation enacted in 1913 provides that boards of 
education may establish part-time schools to be attended by youths over fifteen 
and under sixteen years of age who are regularly employed. When such part-time 
schools have been established, attendance is mandatory. The instruction shall not 
exceed eight hours per week, and shall be given between 8 a.m. and & p.m. The 
Acts relative to child labour, restrictive employment, and hours of labour, are 
supplementary to this law in that State. 



THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 



Questions to be Considered in Extending the Period of Compulsory Attendance 

A study of the provisions of the laws I have outlined and of their operation 
suggests certain important questions that must be taken into account in considering 
any modifications of our requirements for the school attendance of adolescents 
and indicates the steps that have been taken to settle them. The remaining sec- 
tions of this report refer to some of these questions. 

The Responsibility for Initiative in Compulsory Systems 

The English law, the Scotch law, and the laws of Pennsylvania and Minnesota 
provide for real compulsion; attendance at schools is fixed arbitrarily by the 
State and is independent of local initiative or control. In Massachusetts and 
New York, as in Ontario, responsibility for initiative is placed upon local boards. 
In Wisconsin, Indiana, and Ohio, compulsory attendance is conditioned upon the 
establishment of continuation schools; where schools are established, attendance is 
compulsory. In Indiana and Ohio, the organization of such schools is dependent 
upon local initiative, but in Wisconsin, if twenty-five persons qualified to attend, 
petition for a school, it must be established by a local board and, when established, 
attendance is compulsory upon all within the age limits. 

Part=time or Full=time Education 

The question as to whether compulsory laws should provide for full-time 
or part-time training has been very fully discussed and those who have given 
the subject consideration are divided in opinion, but the tendency is towards 
the approval of part-time systems. It will be observed that Minnesota is the 
only one of the States named which makes no provision for part-time schools. 
In this State the period of education for all has been extended from fourteen to 
sixteen under conditions which are somewhat elastic. The laws which provide 
for part-time education in England, Scotland, and in New York also include 
provisions for the extension of full-time education. In England, the extension 
of the full-time period is from thirteen to fourteen ; in Scotland, from fourteen 
to fifteen; in New York, from fourteen to sixteen for children not employed on 
work certificates. 

Methods of Enforcing Compulsory Attendance Laws 

There are three general methods adopted for securing the observance of the 
compulsory attendance laws. 

The first plan places the responsibility for attendance on the child and 
prescribes a penalty upon him for absenting himself from school without a satis- 
factory reason. The law imposes a fine in England upon the pupil as well as 
upon the parent; in Wisconsin, it is possible to arrest an absentee and to bring 
a charge of vagrancy against him. 

The second plan places the responsibility for attendance of children on the 
parents and provides for fines, or imprisonment, or both, for parents who fail 
to send their children to school in accordance with the direction of the law. 
Provisions of this character are found in most compulsory laws. 

A third plan makes it a criminal offence for any employer, to give employment 
to a. child within the age limits for compulsory attendance, except under the 
conditions provided by law. 

Certain laws make provision for combinations of these plans for enforcement. 
A combination of the second and the third plans, which throws the responsibility 
on both the home and the employer, is the most common. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 33 

The satisfactory working of these schemes is dependent upon very close 
co-operation between school authorities and employers. Such co-operation is 
usually maintained through some scheme for the issuing of employment certi- 
ficates or permits to workers wh'o are compelled to attend part-time courses. For 
example, in Pennsylvania, a certificate is issued by the school authorities to the 
employer for the minor and not to the minor himself. In fact, the certificate 
never becomes the property of the minor. The employer must keep such certi- 
ficates on file and accessible to attendance officers. 

Types of Schools Needed to Carry Out Compulsory Education Provisions 

This is a question in which school boards are very directly concerned, because 
wherever compulsory education is enacted, local authorities are expected to provide 
iol accommodation and to establish courses of study. 

The variety of attainments, requirements, and occupations of those brought 
into schools by the application of a compulsory attendance law necessitates the 
organization of schools and classes of varied types. 

These types may be roughly divided into the following classes : 

1. Classes for continuing general education: 

One of the surprises of the application of compulsory laws has been the large 
number of young people found who needed the rudiments of an elementary 
education. With this class, most of the time must be directed to a training in the 
elementary subjects of the Public School course of study. This training is specially 
needed in centres where there is a proportionately large foreign element in the 
population. 

It is found advisable also to devote a very large share of the school time of 
children between fourteen and sixteen to the subjects of a general education, even 
in the case of pupils who have had a fairly satisfactory Public School education. 
Real vocational training with children of this grade is, as a usual thing, not 
possible, because but a small fraction of the youth at this stage have fixed upon 
a vocation. 

2. Commercial and trade preparatory classes : 

A fairly large number of children in attendance at part-time compulsory 
schools are engaged in dead-end occupations that have but little or no promise 
for the future, and one of the functions which the compulsory continuation school 
has taken upon itself has been the preparation of such persons for a career in a 
more satisfactory calling. The classes organized for this purpose are necessarily 
of a vocational character. To take an example, on a visit to the Milwaukee 
Continuation School I was taken to a class in baking and I had an opportunity 
of talking with the boys. There were twenty in all. None were engaged in 
the baking business when at work out of school. Some were errand hoys, some 
messengers, others cleaners, and so on ; all were engaged in " blind alley " occupa- 
tions. They were doing good work in the baking class. They told me that they 
liked the trade and expected to follow it when they left school. The Milwaukee 
system provides similar classes in a wide range of industrial and commercial 
occupations. 

3. Commercial and trade extension classes: 

The purpose of such classes is to supplement and to amplify the instruction 
which those engaged in a vocation are receiving from day to day in their employ- 
ments. As a usual thing, the instruction is concerned with the more theoretical 
departments of the requirements of a vocation, while the practical side of the 
work is acquired in the shops. This type of school has been very popular. The 
reasons are apparent: the pupils appreciate the relationship of instruction to work. 

3 e. 



34 THE BEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

It is understood that, while these may be regarded as types of schools and 
classes, the forms of instruction cannot be rigidly classified. For example, most 
systems provide, both in preparatory and extension courses, for a fairly wide 
range of what may be termed purely academic education, and all systems stress 
the importance of a training for citizenship. The English law is somewhat unique 
in the stress which it places on the importance of physical education and the 
necessity for conserving the vitality of the nation. 

Necessity for Making Preparation in Advance for the Operation of a Compulsory 

Continuation School Law 

The bringing into operation of a compulsory part-time system naturally 
disturbs the established order of employments, especially in commercial and 
industrial concerns. The absence from work at intervals of the young persons 
subject to the law upsets the ordinary routine of office or shop organization. 
But it is surprising how quickly establishments adjust themselves to conditions 
under a flexible system. In Pennsylvania, for example, during the first months 
of the operation of the law, most industries had provided satisfactory working 
arrangements. In a few cases firms refused to endeavour to conform to the 
law and threatened to dispense entirely with juvenile labour, but this disorganiza- 
tion was only temporary. The young workers were continued in their employ- 
ments and time schedules were adjusted to meet the requirements of the Child 
Labour Law. 

One of the chief conditions which has interfered with the successful operation 
of a compulsory continuation school law has been the inadequate accommodations 
provided for carrying on satisfactory courses. In fact, the work is still handi- 
capped in such cities as Boston and Milwaukee, where laws have been in operation 
for several years. In each of these cities accommodation in the beginning was 
found for the classes by renting office flats in business centres of the city. On 
account of the variety in the types of the instruction to be given in compulsory 
continuation schools, the problem of providing accommodations for such schools 
differs materially from that of providing buildings and equipment for ordinary 
Public or High School education. Such schools should provide, as I have pointed 
out, for a fair measure of vocational, as well as for academic education, and 
the buildings and equipment should be adapted for this purpose. The centres of 
employment also affect the location of schools; in Boston, New York, and Phila- 
delphia, the large departmental stores provide class rooms in their own buildings 
and the employees go from work to school without loss of time. 

The facts I have mentioned show the necessity for making adequate pre- 
paration in advance for the application of a compulsory continuation school law. 
Where such provisions are not made, one of two results follows : either the law 
is not enforced and becomes eventually a dead letter or a host of children are 
taken from disorganized industries and handed over to school authorities who 
have made no provision for caring for their education. Both results are to be 
guarded against. The Fisher Bill provides adequately for such preparation. In 
fact, the suspension for a period of seven years of one of the important sections 
of the bill might almost appear to suggest indefinite postponement. 

Criticisms of Part=time Systems 

The criticisms of compulsory education have rarely, if ever, been directed 
against the principle of extending the education of the youth. They have had 
reference usually to the meagreness of the training which can be provided during 
short school periods at interrupted intervals. The answer to this objection made 



1918 DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 35 

by the advocates of the part-time principle was expressed by Mr. Fisher in his 
speech on August 10th, 1917, in introducing his Education Bill, when he said, 
" And here I may be asked whether the spell of eight hours a week, or 320 hours 
a year, is, in reality, sufficient to accomplish any substantial educational purpose, 
and why, the principle once admitted, a longer period has not been suggested. 
I need not say that on purely educational grounds I should have preferred a 
larger amount of instruction, even if that amount had been confined to the age 
between fourteen and sixteen, but, after careful consideration, I came to the 
conclusion that the practical obstacles were too great, that it would be difficult, 
if not impossible, for us to provide, in a reasonable length of time, the requisite 
supply of teachers of ability, that the scheme, if it is to be made accessible to 
the working people, would have to be supplemented by a very large expenditure in 
maintenance allowances and buildings, and that it would involve too great a 
disturbance of the juvenile labour market. At the same time, I should not like 
it to go abroad that I regard the period of eight hours a week either as ideal 
or as the necessary limit. I feel to the full the strength of the contention that 
young people, whatever may be their station in life, should primarily be regarded 
as subjects for education and not as parts of the industrial machine, and it may 
be that after the lapse of a few years it will become practicable, with the approval 
of Parliament, to extend the period of schooling in particular areas, or perhaps 
even for the whole juvenile population." 



36 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



INDUSTRIAL, TECHNICAL 
I. DAY 

Statistics, 



Attendance 



ft >» 






43 c3 



Number of 
whose heaxi 



1. Brantf ord Industrial School 

2. Chatham Industrial School 

3. Haileybury, Mining Dep't of High School 

4. Hamilton Technical and Art School 

5. Kingston, School of Navigation 

6. London Industrial and Art School 

7. Ottawa Technical School 

8. Sault Ste. Marie, Technical Dep't of High 

School 

9. Sudbury, Mining Dep't of High School. .. 

10. Toronto, Technical and Art School 

11. Windsor industrial School 

Totals 



132 



54 
19 

453 
11 
94 

397 



19 

2,581 

31 



3,674 



54 

8 

164 



68 
397 



1,830 
31 



2,571 



9 

35 
19 
323 
11 
55 
55 

6 

19 

1,516 

17 



2,065 



19 



130 



39 
342 



1,065 
14 



1,609 



198 
188 
196 
200 
30 
193 
213 

30 
179 
188 
187 



7 

34 

14 

420 

8 

58 
55 

4 
16 

1,408 
24 



23 



365 

9 



2,048 455 



■<?> 



54 



75 
1 

89 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



37 



AND ART SCHOOLS 

SCHOOLS 

1917=1918 



Pupils from : 
is occupied as 


! amilies 
below 


Destination of pupils 


Accom- 
modate 


Religious and other 
exercises 


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38 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



INDUSTRIAL, TECHNICAL 

I. DAY SCHOOLS 

Statistics, 

Number of Pupils in the 















03 








« 








03 




O) 








H 








O 




03 








fl 




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r> 




o 












fl 
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ft 

o 

rfl 



1 Brantford Indus* rial School 


9 

54 

16 

269 


9 

54 

5 

269 


9 

54 

16 

269 


"54 
*269 


9 
54 
16 

269 


9 

54 

16 

269 


.... 


9 
54 

16 
163 


9 

35 
16 

78 


9 

35 
16 
17 




2 Chatham Industrial School 




3 Haileybury, Mining Dpt. of High School 

4 Hamilton Technical and Art School. . 

5 Kingston , School of ^Navigation 


"40 


6 London Industrial and Art School . . . 

7 Ottawa Technical School 


94 
59 


94 
59 


94 
59 


94 
59 


94 
59 


94 
59 


55 


94 
59 


42 

43 


42 

43 


55 
43 


8 Sault Ste. Marie, Technical Depart- 
ment of High School 


6 


9 Sudbury, Mining Dept. of High School 

10 Toronto, Technical and Art School. . 

11 Windsor Industrial School 


18 

1227 

31 


7 

1086 

31 


18 

1211 

31 


7 

1080 
31 


18 

1211 

31 


12 

1080 

31 


iiii 


12 

1211 

31 


19 

813 

17 


12 

813 


6 
656 












Totals 


1777 


1614 


1761 


1594 


1761 


1624 1266 


1649 


1072 


987 


806 











Number of Pupils in the Various 



— 


03 

fl 

a fl 

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fl 

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1 Brantford Industrial School . 










9 

54 
















2 Chatham Industrial School. . 










19 


54 

18 












3 Haileybury, Mining Dpt.of High Schl 

4 Hamilton Technical and Art School 
























33 




204 








12 






5 Kingston, School of Navigation. . 


















6 London Industrial and Art School. 











• • • 1 














7 Ottawa Technical School 




26 




— 
. . . . 


16 


16 


16 
6 


16 


16 




16 




8 Sault Ste. Marie, Technical Depart- 
ment of High School 










9 Sudbury, Mining Dept. of High Schl 

10 Toronto, Technical and Art School 

11 Windsor Industrial School .. 






















90 


30 235 


164 


43 
14 

340 


83 
14 


91 


196 


163 


108 


108 


60 


Totals 


90 


.)() 268 164 


132 


185 


212 


179 


120 


124 


60 









1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



39 



AND ART SCHOOLS— Continued 



—Concluded 

1917=1918 

Various Branches of Instruction 



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9 














9 

35 

19 

294 








9 


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9 

35 
16 












9 














35 
19 










35 






3 16 


[ 19 
56 


"i4 

80 


16 


18 
68 


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18 






18 
94 


16 








4 


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63 


40 


2 






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55 

43 


55 

96 












55 
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55 
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82 


341 


180 


98 


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70 




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51 


202 


128 


341 


301 


123 


161 


259 


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1263 


419 


1300 


108 


16 



Branches of Instruction.— Concluded 



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03 

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16 
51 












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19 


19 


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19 


19 


19 




















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63 




59 




76 












5 ... 
























6 ... 






39 
250 


39 
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39 
16 


39 


39 
16 


39 
67 


39 
1.6 


39 
44 


39 


24 
16 


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94 
59 












7 ... 
















8 ... 




. . . . 












9 ... 





























19 

1211 

31 








12 
213 




10 133 

11 ... 


29 


83 


558 
14 


54 
14 


284 
14 


88 
14 


134 
14 


538 
14 


61 


304 


16 


543 
14 


158 


93 


28 


37 


11 






















133 


29 


83 


932 


142 


372 


160 


222 


740 


135 


446 


55 


673 


158 


1544 


93 


28 


37 


239 


11 



40 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



INDUSTRIAL, TECHNICAL 



II. NIGHT 
Statistics, 













Attendance 










u 












u 


a, 






1> 


bo 


CD 


t-t 






99 

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& 






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d 


53 


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o 

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d 

B 


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to 




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I 5 




43 CD 

6^ 


ftrt 




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be 


f 1 Amprior 


2 


46 


39 




46 


46 






24 


£2 Brantford 


19 


314 




179 


135 


183 


iis 


13 


33 


£3 Brockville 


11 


129 


64 


56 


73 


103 


23 


3 


48 


H Chatham 


20 


331 


. 278 


105 


226 


291 


33 


7 


82 


', 5 Cobourg 


9 

7 


100 
54 


76 
35 


33 
17 


67 
37 


77 
50 


20 

1 


3 
3 


70 


6 Oollingwood 


48 


7 Coniston 


5 
3 


53 
40 


53 
30 


53 


""40 


36 
38 


15 

1 


2 
1 


77 


8 Cornwall 


31 


1 9 Dundas 


7 


94 


65 


49 


45 


57 


31 


6 


93 


10 Fort William 


12 
9 
6 
3 


151 
186 
102 
120 


118 
144 
102 
114 


91 
65 
27 


60 
121 

75 
120 


63 

93 


35 

81 


53 
12 


40 


11 Gait 


316 


12 Gananoque 


23 


18 Goderich 


114 


6 





186 


14 Guelph 


15 

31 

5 


305 

701 

81 


242 
'"53 


99 

447 
40 


206 

254 

41 


216 

331 

71 


73 
294 

8 


16 

76 

2 


64 


15 Hamilton 


71 


16 Ingersoll 


48 


17 Kitchener 


12 

28 
5 

8 


116 

761 

74 
218 


"623 

65 

186 


24 
405 

32 
100 


92 
356 

42 
118 


101 

515 

46 

126 


6 

195 

28 

71 


9 
51 


51 


3 8 London 




19 Newmarket 


50 


20 Niagara Falls 


118 


21 Ottawa 


40 

12 

6 

14 
11 


1,617 

215 

64 

180 

222 


993 

178 

60 

75 

176 


432 
65 
39 
68 

115 


1,185 

150 

25 

112 

107 


1,334 

193 

40 

166 

154 


217 

20 

13 

8 

59 


66 
2 

11 
6 
9 


138 


22 Owen Sound 


102 


23 Parry Sound 


50 


24 Pembroke 


91 


25 Peterborough 


91 


26 Port Arthur 


14 


308 




150 


158 


203 


50 


55 


41 


27 Renfrew 


5 
12 
8 
9 
7 
159 
7 
6 

18 
12 


113 

201 

290 

205 

- 79 

6,130 

( 70 

69 

637 

221 


72 
165 
272 
115 

58 
2,452 

65 

46 
600 
194 


36 
132 

60 
106 

51 
2,504 

37 

9 

358 

127 


77 
69 

230 
99 
28 
3,626 
33 
60 

279 
94 


97 
135 
159 
119 

37 
3,714 

49 

49 
414 
188 


12 
33 
107 
79 
29 
1,866 
15 
15 
92 
27 


4 
33 
24 

7 

13 
550 

6 

5 
131 

6 


78 


28 SaultSte. Marie 


75 


29 St. Catharines 


106 


30 Stratford 


100 


31 Thorold 


43 


32 Toronto 


118 


33 Welland 


38 


34 Whitby 


140 


35 Windsor 


85 


36 Woodstock 


41 






Totals 


557 


14,597 


7,808 


6, 111 


8,486 


9,608 


3,681 


1,206 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



41 



AND ART SCHOOLS— Continued 



Occupations of pupils on entering school 















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2 




10 


10 


1 








4 


•• 


1 


5 


11 






11 
















8 " 




2 

17 


4 
2 


10 


18 
18 


6 

8 




9 " 

10 A 

11 1 


1 


21 








2 












1 




23 




1 




7 




3 




2 


4 








9 


3 




30 






8 


7 


27 


49 




2 


30 


•• 


12 


3 


2 










1 






1 




36 


5 


13 


53 


27 




12 












13 " 
































6 
54 


5 

7 


42 
93 


41 
2 


26 
98 




14 " 

15 '• 

16 •' 




23 




3 




2 


4 




1 




3 


1 


1 


8 




5 


. , 


109 


3 


2 




2 


7 


4 


22 


. . 


22 


35 




215 


2 


55 


92 


12 




30 


89 


'8 


22 

4 
67 


'3 


13 


'6 

5 


2 
1 

2 
















16 

11 

352 


•■ 


16 
41 
46 






5 

2 

103 


20 
13 
66 




17 " 










2 
17 


"20 




"is 

15 


18 
12 




18 "* 

19 •' 


9 


7 


3 


9 


114 


4 


16 






3 












2 






5 




5 


5 


15 


15 


4 




20 9 

21 ^ 

22 •• 




6 




3 




2 


18 




2 


2 


16 


1 




48 




26 


32 


2 


27 


10 


21 


4 


33 


1 


. , 


1 


1 


2 


2 


19 


1 


6 


12 


7 


16 


7 


6 


202 


265 


57 


975 






15 


2 


4 




20 












2 




15 






15 


3 


83 


54 


2 


23 


2 


10 
25 




in 






8 
10 




2 


1 








7 
18 




5 

20 


4 

8 


2 
12 


10 
56 


13 

14 




24 


1 


1 




4 


25 

26 " 


3 


12 










1 


1 


2 




24 


1 


1 


39 






27 


10 


19 


79 


3 




28 
12 








2 


2 

4 


5 












25 
16 


•• 


5 
19 


30 
16 


10 
21 


35 
3 


25 
14 


10 


27 






8 








28 5 




36 










10 








66 






15 






11 


5 


39 


14 




29 




17 










5 








5 


1 




14 




45 


18 


26 


78 


76 


5 


30 


1 


58 
11 


2 


3 

1 


2 


10 


8 
1 








4 
10 


"i 




10 
10 




22 

5 


12 
5 


22 


25 
11 


26 
22 




31 






2 




32 49 


23 


281 


8 


20 


i 


u 


45 


17 


45 


15 


199 


121 


37 


294 


29 


539 


1,557 


123 


433 


1,822 


458 


33 3 


•• 


9 
2 


5 


4 














3 
1 






14 

4 




1 
22 


4 
54 


4 
2 


10 

28 


13 
2 




34 














31 


3d 5 


4 










































36 2 


9 


12 








6 


11 


2 


.... 


7 


.... 


2 


•• 


42 




10 


13 


5 


37 


49 


14 


70 


81 


1,050 


32 


98 


26 


97 


163 


45 


105 


55 


448 


218 


48 


1,336 


39 


1091 


2,233 


802 


1352 


3,984 


792 



4 E. 



42 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



INDUSTRIAL, TECHNICAL 



II. NIGHT 

Statistics 

Number of Pupils in the various 



— 


03 

t-t 

P 

£ 

03 
P 

H 


be 

a 

03 


8 

p. 

CO 

§ 
.1 

'55 

ft 

B 

O 


B 
B 

cS 

u 




CO 



V 
5 

>> 

?H 



■*- 
CO 

s 


>> 
-ft 




1 

CO 

•— 1 

bi co 

**-« CO 
bfl 

i& 

^ cd 

o'B 


03 

B 
p 


c6 
M 

03 

be 

< 


03 



03 



03 

a 


g 

.bo 


CO 

a 

03 

cd 

3 

p< 


& 


1 A rnprior 






i 
















2 Brantf ord 


47 
23 
60 


47 
"50 


47 
23 
60 


47 
23 
42 








47 
23 
60 








1 19 
23 

9 


3 Brockville 








1 


1 




4 Chatham 


42 


42 


42 
12 


5 C obourg 










6 Colling wood. . .y. 




















17 
52 


7 Coniston 






















8 Cornwall 




















9 Dundas 


39 


39 39 39 

53 1 88 1 35 








63 










19 


10 Fort William 


58 


.... 


35 


35 
33 

49 








9 


11 Gait 




16 


.... 


2 


33 


12 Gananoque 


49 


49 


49 








12 


13 Goderich 




1 














14 Guelph 






20 
33 


20 
33 












— 1 — 




15 Hamilton 












184 


184 


184 


184 


184 


16 Ingersoll 












26 


17 Kitchener 




::::::i:; 


15 

188 
















21 


18 London 


188 
25 


1881 188 

25 25 


188 


188 


188 


188 
25 








37 


19 Newmarket 












20 Niagara Falls ...... 




! 




20 








21 


21 Ottawa 


199 


199: 199 


199 






207 

44 

9 

36 


5 






lb 


22 Owen Sound 


10 














8 


23 Parry Sound 




1 17 
36 
















24 Pembroke 


36 


36 














24 


25 Peterborough 


















62 


26 Port Arthur 


57 


57 


57 


57 






11 

8 


34 








21 


27 Eenf rew 














28 Sault Ste. Marie 








34 
19 






34 


6 






18 


29 St. Catharines 


19 


19 


19 

30 

9 

734 

14 












35 


30 Stratford 








50 

9 

898 

14 
6 

61 
7 


10 






16 


31 Thorold 










8 








32 Toronto 


734 


734 
14 


734 






548 


548 


57 


548 


33 Welland 










34 Whitby 








18 
29 
28 










35 Windsor 




34 


95 


! 










25 


36 Woodstock 




































Totals 


1,476 


1,505 


1,782 


1 534 288 


230 


399 


2,116 


770 


733 


243 


1 254 











1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



43 



AND ART SCHOOLS— Continued 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

1917=1918 

Branches of Instruction 



CO 

n 


CO 

.2 

"co 

>> 

& 

<v 
d 

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03 


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0) 


CO 

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CO J 

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co 

& 


CO 

e 

H 

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O -1-3 


d 

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go 


1 

6? 

Q 

1 

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8 


bo 

d 

1 

u 
Q 

is 


| 

2 

d 

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CD 

o 

M 


9 

S 

Q 

i— i 

55 

+3 

Id 
o 
u 

< 


Q 

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0) 

05 


o 

A 
o 

A 
C0 
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d 


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B 



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1 




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d 

M 
O 




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d 
<d 

O 


d 

too 

d 

M 

si 

.H d 

8* 


H 

O 

O 
O 


1 




































2 .... 




34 
11 










27 
6 






9 


3 


n 


24 




24 
24 
12 






3 








11 












4 








18 




9 














5 




























6 




































7 














30 






















8 .... 


































9 




7 

9 

13 


19 
10 








19 
10 
33 
12 


19 
10 




















10 




20 


2 






















11 
















13 






12 






























13 .... 


































14 




23 
52 










9 

127 

26 

15 

111 

15 










21 

56 






13 
39 
13 






15 
















17 








39 




16 




















16 


17 15 




23 
71 


.... 


24 






















18 












4 


102 


102 


102 




72 


35 


19 




















20 




28 










?1 






21 
23 














21 




29 




12 






41 
12 
24 
45 
23 
20 
11 
18 
21 
25 

238 
15 


41 


.... 


2 


1 








105 




22 










1 






26 




23 




























24 .... 
































25 




21 






























26 .... 












16 




13 












16 






27 


























28 .... 





66 
17 
15 

355 


31 




























29 .... 




























30 .... 


7 


16 

"is 


12 

96 
4 


























31 .... 


85 




134 




















32 .... 






128 


5 132 






61 






33 .... 




8 














34 .... 






























35 .... 




45 










30 
10 






















36 .... 




















"37 


37 






10 


























! 








15 


7 


837 


94 


174 


104 


16|l004 

1 


232 


13 


207 


14 


359 


i 163 


102 


241 


226 


51 



u 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



INDUSTRIAL, TECHNICAL 



II. NIGHT 

Statistics 

Number of Pupils in the various 



— 


9 

d 

u 

^> 


d 

M 

§1 

»-4 d 

d -^> 

4> CO 

p<d 

eSo 
O 


1 


CO 

^ g 
s £ 

c3 o 


| 

o 
o 

En 


Printing and Book- 
binding 


Photography, Photo- 
engraving and Litho- 
graphy 


CO 

o 

a 

o 

a 
1 


u 
P 

b 

d 

a 

co 

3 


>> 

-d 

CQ 

S3 
O 

o 
O 


a 

u 

CD 

+-> 


o 

o 

-d 

OQ 


a 
*co 

CD 
« 

9 

CO 

d 


1 Arnprior 




























2 Brantford 




13 












43 










41 


3 Brockville 














6 


5 


5 


3 




4 Chatham 


















24 


5 Cobourg 
















43 












6 Collingwood 


























7 Coniston 




























8 Cornwall 




























9 Dundas 




























10 Fort William 


























11 Gait 


























12 Gananoque 


























13 Goderich 




























14 Guelph 
























18 




15 Hamilton 


9 




18 






33 






19 




5 


12 


16 Ingersoll 












17 Kitchener 




























18 London 






17 




27 






97 


32 


32 


.... 


23 




19 Newmarket 












20 Niagara Falls 




























21 Ottawa 






15 










200 


35 




9 


9 




22 Owen Sound 
















23 Parry Sound 




























24 Pembroke 




7 
























25 Peterborough 














8 








16 




26 Port Arthur 






















6 


27 Renfrew 



























28 Sault Ste. Marie .... 




8 






















3t. Catharines 
























30 Stratford 


























31 Thorold 


























32 Toronto 




13 


36 


407 


73 


48 


361 


214 


39 


40 


72 


39 


33 Welland 






34 Whitby .-.. 


























35 Windsor 
















79 
90 












36 Woodstock 












































76 


59 


141 




Total.-, 


9 


41 


86 


407 


27 


106 


48 


921 


306 


122 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



46 



AND ART SCHOOLS— Concluded 

SCHOOLS— Concluded 

1917=1918 

Branches of Instruction— Concluded 



be 

.2 


CO 




bo 

a 

"-+3 

g 

■3.1 

%< 
£2 


bo 
•S 


bo 

.a 

Oh 

9.8 

£2 


be 

.5 
13 


8 


*£ ° 
«° 1 ° 

Oh j O 


co 
O 

a 




& 

B 


W 


1 

I 

55 


CO 

s 

Q 


Sewing and Dress- 
making 


1 


M 

3 


03 

1 

si 


■8 

S 




3 
O 

•a 

°CO 

Ph 


p. 
Si 

H 


bfi 

.a 

O 


1 .. 




















46 
81 
35 
30 
8 
14 
















2 .. 












71 
27 

40 
26 
14 








.... 


28 
41 
21 

8 
9 












3 


3 


3 














.... 


5 


18 






4 .. 










63 


.... 


51 




5 . . 
















14 




6 .. 


























7 .. 




























8 .. 












18 
13 








22 

18 
17 

102 
53 
54 
48 

117 
15 
58 
















9 
































10 .. 




















9 
18 








5 




11 .. 












11 
















32 .. 




























13 .. 




. . . . 








19 
30 
70 










47 
19 
113 
11 
17 
37 

10 

17 

194 

62 












14 .. 














90 


.... 








14 


.... 


15 8 


5 


5 


6 


4 


.... 










16 .. 


















17 .. 












24 
32 










.... 






8 


18 .. 












.... 


28 


.... 


206i .... 
29 


91 


.... 








19 .. 




















20 .. 


.... 










53 

437 
65 


53 






18 
281 


— 












21 2 


"43 


43 






















22 .. 
























23 .. 












/ 


24 
83 
65 
37 
42 
22 

205 
40 
25 

925 
23 
39 

102 
41 














24 .. 




.... 
















.... 


57 
27 
15 












25 .. 












61 

15 


















26 


























27 .. 






!!"! :::: 














52 






28 .. 










27 








. . . . 


25 
69 
13 










29 .. 


















* ! 






30 .. 














27 






.. |. . . . 








31 .. 


























32 43 


68 


174 


34 


46 


45 


1,246 
25 


128 


399 


38 


54 


518 


71 


407 


595; 






33 .. 






34 .. 


















.... 


22 
21 
17 












35 .. 












21 
15 








.... 


18 


155 






36 .. 










....1 










































53 


119 


225 


40 


50 


45 2,360 


208 


580 


38 


2,925 


54 


1,445 


162 


430 


834 


70 


8 



46 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX C 



REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF CONTINUATION 

SCHOOLS 



I. REPORT OF INSPECTOR MILLS 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have- the honour to submit the following report on the Continuation 
Schools of the western part of the Province in my charge for the school year 
1917-18. 

In this district there are sixty-five schools classified as follows : — 

Grade A Schools (three teachers giving full-time to the work) 2 

" B " (at least the full time of two teachers) 53 

" C " (i) the full time of one teacher and at least half the time 

of a second teacher 4 

(ii) the full time of one teacher 6 

[ .... 

Total 65 

Qualifications of Teachers 

In these schools there are one hundred and twenty-seven teachers, of whom 
thirty-seven are graduates of universities. In art, fifteen hold the specialist and 
fifty- three the elementary certificate. In physical culture, eight hold the specialist 
certificate and sixty-eight the elementary certificate. During the school year 
1917-18 nine temporary certificates were issued to those who had attended the 
Summer Course in Art but failed on examination and three temporary certificates 
in art to teachers who had not attended or completed the course because of illness. 
It was necessary to issue thirteen temporary certificates in physical culture. No 
other temporary certificates were necessary. 

Scarcity of Teachers 

The most marked change in connection with these schools during the past 
year has been the rapid falling off in the number of teachers available for Con- 
tinuation School work. There is now a decided scarcity of qualified teachers. 
This is due in part to the number of young men who have enlisted and to the 
number of young women who have accepted positions in some form of industrial 
or commercial life, but there is a much more important cause. Since the recent 
regulations were issued, very many teachers have made and are making every pos- 
sible effort to secure positions on the staffs of High Schools, in order to prevent the 
expiration of their High School Assistant's certificate in 1920. These regulations, 
which after 1920 limit the issue of High School Assistants' certificates! to graduates 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



47 



of universities who have taken certain courses and to those who have two years' 
successful experience in High School work, have caused much dissatisfaction among 
our young teachers and will for several years limit the supply of teachers available 
for Continuation School work. 

Proportion of Boys to Girls attending School 

A considerable falling off in the number of boys in attendance at many 
schools during the past two years led me to look into the matter of the relative 
proportion of boys and girls in attendance at our secondary schools. As the 
results may be of interest I have tabulated them from the year 1911, the first year 
for which the attendance at Continuation Schools was kept separate from that at 
Public and High Schools. Table I gives the percentage attendance for boys and 
girls at Continuation Schools since 1911; Table II gives similar figures for all 
secondary schools, and Table III gives the percentage of attendance for boys and 
girls at High Schools and Collegiates since 1880. 



Table I. — Continuation Schools 


Table II. — All Secondary Schools 


Year 


P ercentage 
of Boys 


P ercentage 
of Girls 


Year 


P ercentage 
of Boys 


P ercentage 
of Girls 


1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916-17 

1917-18 


41.61 

41. 

40.20 

40.77 

41.22 

38.94 

38.96 


58.38 

59. 

59.80 

59.23 

58.78 

61.05 

61.03 


1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916-17 

1917-18 


44.95 
45.21 
45.10 
45.79 
45.37 
42.22 
41.93 


55.05 
54.78 
54.90 
54.21 
54.63 
57.78 
58.06 



Table III. — Attendance in High Schools and Collegiates since 1880 



Year 


Percentage 


Percentage 


Year 


Percentage 


Percentage 


of Boys 


of Girls 


of Boys 


of Girls 


1880 


55. 


45. 


1907 


45.49 


54.51 


1885 


58. 


42. 


1908 


46.16 


53.83 


1890 


49. 


51. 


1909 


47.66 


52.33 


1895 


49. 


51. 


1910 


46.59 


53.4 


1900 


48.63 


51.37 


1911 


45.54 


54.45 


1901 


48.26 


51.74 


1912 


46. 


54. 


1902 


47.52 


52.48 


1913 


45.9 


54.1 


1903 


46.6 


53.4 


1914 • 


46.62 


53.37 


1904 


45.9 


54.1 


1915 


46.07 


53,93 


1905 


45.48 


54.52 


1916-17 


42.79 


57.20 


1906 


45.37 


54.63 


1917-18 


42.45 


57.54 



The* above tables show three things: 

1. In the High Schools and Collegiates, where most of the attendance is drawn 
from the larger urban centres, the proportion of boys is considerably greater than 
in the Continuation Schools. 

2. There has been a gradual decrease in the proportion of boys attending the 
Secondary Schools since 1880. 

3. This decrease has been marked for the past two years. 



48 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 

(1) Causes for Smaller Proportion of Boys in the Continuation Schools. 

Many causes contribute to prevent the rural child from getting a High School 
education. In towns the schools are close to the homes of the people, and there 
is, therefore, less expense in sending the children to school. The long distances 
rural pupils must walk to the country school in all kinds of weather and the bad 
roads prevent the regular attendance necessary to enable the pupil to reach the 
standard set for entrance to High Schools. Many rural children know of nothing 
beyond the Public School, and, even if they do, circumstances make it so impossible 
for them that the idea fails to stimulate them or their parents to better effort. The 
distance, the cost, the necessity for leaving home, and the difficulties to be over- 
come, combine to discourage both children and parents and prevent very many 
children in rural districts from receiving a High School education. 

While the above difficulties apply equally to boys and girls, there are some 
causes that apply more directly to boys. For many years labour has been scarce on 
the farm and a boy old enough to go to High School can do a man's work. Also, 
I am convinced that many boys from rural homes do not get to High School because 
the course of study does not provide the education and training that many parents 
want for their boys. To send them to the High School would be the best possible 
means of weaning tliem from home and from the farm. 

(2) Causes of the Decrease in the Percentage of Boys. 

This decrease, in my opinion, is due to three main causes : — 

(a) The rapid growth of industry and commerce has greatly increased the 
number and complexity of human activities, and the demand for skilled labour at 
attractive wages, that may be earned without a High School education, has attracted 
many from the country and town to the larger centres and has lessened the attrac- 
tion to the so-called learned professions. 

(b) The High School courses have not been adapted to the needs of that very 
large number of young people who decide to follow agricultural, industrial or com- 
mercial life. When the courses offered by our, 'Secondary Schools are made to meet 
the needs of the youth of the localities in which these schools are situated, and by 
which they are largely maintained, and when these courses receive suitable recog- 
nition by the universities a much larger number of boys and girls will seek to take 
advantage of the opportunities offered. 

(c) During this period it has become the custom for girls to prepare them- 
selves to make their own living. Constantly increasing opportunities for profitable 
employment attract more and more girls from the homes, and the relatively low 
percentage of boys in our secondary schools is probably due not so much to a 
relative decrease in the number of boys seeking a High School education as to an 
increase in the number of girls. 

(3) Cause of the Marked Decrease of the Past Two Years. 

This decrease has been caused by the scarcity of labour that has resulted in 
unusually high wages, and by the campaigns that have been carried on to indnc-r 
our young men to enlist, to work on the farms, or to engage in some form of war 
work. Under the influence of these campaigns and frequently against the wishes 
of their parents many school boys of from sixteen to eighteen enlisted and made 
their way as near the front line as they could get. Other boys even yovnger sought 
employment on farms, and after the summer's work on the farm they sought work 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 49 

in munition plants or in some other form of war work in the firm faith that they 
were doing their bit. Parents have frequently spoken to me of the unsettling effect 
this has had on the boys and of the difficulty of inducing them to return to school. 

I am not at all sure that a grave injustice has not been done to many of our 
school boys. No effort was spared to induce them to offer their services to the 
state, and they responded nobly, if in many cases inadvisedly, but no effort has been 
made to show such boys how they can serve their country and themselves best 
now that the war is over. Can not the spell of patriotism in time of war be 
replaced by the idea of service in time of peace? Many parents would be grateful 
for the assistance that such a campaign would give them in inducing their boys 
to seek a better education as a preparation for their life's work. 

Means of Improving the Janitor Service 

Continuation Schools in most places are carried on in the same building as 
the Public Schools, and too frequently the work of the janitor is unsatisfactory. 
As a means of securing more serious attention to this important matter by School 
Boards I would recommend a change in the method of apportioning the grant. 
It has been the custom to give an annual Legislative grant of 8 per cent., and as the 
county must pay the same, the School Board receives 16 per cent, of the value of the 
equipment annually. As this continues year after year the equipment is paid for 
over and over again by grants. Much of it needs repair or has been discarded 
because the courses in science have been altered and about the only value it has is 
to draw its annual apportionment of grant. 

I would recommend that the Legislative grant on equipment be increased to 
10 per cent, and that it be continued only for a limited period. As the county must 
pay the same as the Legislature, School Boards will receive an annual grant of 
20 per cent, of the value of the equipment. This grant should be continued for six 
years only, as by that time the total value of the equipment will have been returned 
to the Boards, leaving a liberal margin for breakages and other loss. 

To maintain the present amount of the Legislative and County grants the 
duties of the janitor should be defined in the regulations and his work be graded 
I-IV by the Inspector. If for Grade I a grant of about $40 were given and the 
amount decreased rapidly with the grading, the School Board would be aroused to 
take an active interest in the work of the caretaker, as it would mean a serious 
falling off in grants if the grading were low. It might also lead to more adequate 
pay for the work of the janitor. 

Causes Operating Against Extension of the Work of Continuation Schools 

All efforts to extend the work of these Continuation Schools so that they 
may better serve the needs of the communities in which they are located are 
rendered of little avail because of two things: 

1. When a building has to be enlarged or a new school erected to provide 
the room necessary to carry on the work, all the expense must, under the present 
Schools Act, be borne by the section or small urban centre in which the school 
is located. 

2. When a third teacher becomes necessary from any cause the Principal 
must hold the qualifications of a High School Principal and the grants to the 
school are the same as those ariven to a two-teacher Continuation School. 



50 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

(1) The Cost of Building. 

In most cases the Continuation School is carried on in the same building 
as the Public School. There is no room in the building for any extension of the 
work and in many cases the rooms occupied by the Continuation School are 
needed for Public School purposes. As a result any proposal to extend the 
work of the Continuation School must take into account the extension of the 
present school building or the erection of a separate building for Secondary 
School purposes. Rural sections or small urban centres do not feel that they can 
bear, or that they should be expected to bear, the whole cost of the building 
required for such extension of the work. 

To distribute the load more fairly and to encourage the extension of the work 
of the Continuation Schools so as to include a department of agriculture and 
later, of household science, I would make the following recommendations in regard 
to the cost of the building: 

(a) Where, in order to provide room to carry on the work of a department 
of agriculture or household science, it becomes necessary to erect a new building 
or enlarge the present building, similar assistance shall be given by the Legislature 
to such sections or small urban centres as may be given toward the erection of 
Technical Schools in the large urban centres. 

(b) Since a department of agriculture or of household science established 
in a Continuation School would be of particular benefit to the youth of the 
surrounding rural municipality, this municipality, or the county, shall contribute 
annually a proportion of the cost based on the relative number of children in 
attendance from the municipality. 



(2) Qualifications of Staff. 

To carry on the work of an agricultural department requires at least half 
the time of a teacher. To do this work satisfactorily, in addition to the usual 
work of the school, will necessitate a third teacher on the staff. Under present 
regulations this means, in the great majority of schools, the dismissal of the 
present principal, who holds only a First Class certificate, and the engagement 
of a teacher who holds the qualifications of a High School Principal. In many 
cases it means the dismissal of a teacher whose efficient work for some years 
lias built up the attendance and has given the ratepayers the confidence 
that is necessary to induce them to consider a further extension of the work 
of the school. It further means the engagement of a stranger, who is not likely 
to be among the best of his class or he would not be seeking the principalship 
of such a small school, and the payment of a salary of from three to five hundred 
dollars per year more than is paid to the teacher with whose work everyone is 
entirely satisfied. As this increase of from three to five hundred dollars must 
be borne entirely by the section or small urban centre, it means that the tax 
rate will be increased about two mills. School Boards will not consider such a 
proposition, particularly when it also means an additional cost for the necessary 
class room accommodation. 

I would offer the following recommendation: 

Where a third teacher becomes necessary because of the establishment of any 
course in agriculture or household science as part of the work of a Continuation 
School, the school shall still be regarded as a Grade B School and the courses of 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 51 

study, the qualification of the staff, and the grants shall be those prescribed for 
Grade B Schools, with the addition of such subjects of study, qualifications of 
teachers and grants, as may be prescribed for the work and maintenance of the 
particular departments that are carried on in the school. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

G. K. Mills. 
Toronto, January 8th, 1919. 



II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOAG 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A. a D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit for your consideration the following report on the 
Continuation Schools under my supervision for the year 1917-1918. 

v 
I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. HOAG. 

Toronto, December 31st, 1918. 

Extent of the District 

The district within which are situated the Continuation Schools over which 
I have inspectoral charge, is of vast extent. It stretches from the Quebec boundary 
on the east to the Manitoba boundary on the west, a distance of nearly 1,200 
miles. It extends from Lake Ontario on the south to the line of the National 
Transcontinental Eailway on the north, a distance of about 500 miles. Within 
this territory there are but 73 Continuation Schools. To visit these schools 
requires considerable physical endurance as during 1917-1918 I travelled 19,190 
miles in performing the inspectoral work of the school year. I spent 42 nights 
on sleeping cars and many hours of other nights on day coaches. However, the 
interest in education shown by trustees and teachers, and the enthusiasm of the 
pupils themselves more than repay one for any personal sacrifice involved in the 
work of inspection. 

During the school year I visited every school in my district at least once. 
Several, where the local conditions seemed to make it advisable to do so, I visited 
more than once. In addition I visited a number of schools not classed as Con- 
tinuation Schools but doing work of Form V of the Public School Course or 
higher work. Of the condition of each school inspected, I made due report im- 
mediately after the conclusion of the inspection. In the work of inspection itself 



52 



THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 



I was assisted by many of the Public School Inspectors. As the local Inspector 
knows the local conditions thoroughly, his presence during the days of inspection 
• is of great assistance. I am greatly indebted to these Inspectors who aided me 
by their presence and with their advice. 

The exceptionally severe weather during the winter of 1918 and the outbreak 
of Spanish influenza during the autumn of the same year greatly interfered with 
the routine of inspection. In some cases schools were closed for considerable 
periods, ranging from one week to three months. 

Schools and Accommodations 

During the year two Continuation Schools, Bracebridge and Port Frances 
were raised to the status of High Schools. These schools have done good work 
in the past and 1 have no doubt that, with enlarged teaching staffs and improved 
accommodations, they will do even better work in the future. 

Three schools, Fitzroy Harbour, Wolfe Island, and Malakoff have been closed 
for some months through the inability or failure of the Boards concerned to 
secure qualified teachers. Indeed, it has been very difficult during the past year 
for Boards to secure teachers. 

Two schools, Westboro' and New Toronto, have become two-teacher or Grade B 
Continuation Schools. As these schools are situated on the outskirts of Ottawa 
and Toronto, I feel sure that in the near future they will develop into High 
Schools. Indeed, it would seem to be advisable for New Toronto to unite with 
Mimico to form a High School District. Early in the year 1918 Burk's Falls 
Continuation School moved into fine new quarters in the building which had for- 
merly been the District Court House. Unfortunately, in the early summer of the 
same year, the building was struck by lightning and destroyed. The loss was a 
staggering one to the community and the Board. But during the summer and 
fall the work of rebuilding was carried on and on December 30, the school re- 
opened in a new building far superior to the one destroyed. 

The school building at Fitzroy Harbour was burned during the winter of 
1918. The school work was carried on in a rented hall until June. Since 
summer, however, this school has not re-opened. 

The accommodations in several schools are unsatisfactory but during the 
progress of the war, on account of .the condition of the labour, material, and 
money markets, I did not press for immediate action. Since the signing of the 
armistice, however, several School Boards are going carefully into the question 
of how to provide better accommodation. During the next two years there will, 
I am sure, be great improvements in the school buildings of the Continuation 
Schools. 

Teachers 

In my report for the year 1911 I said: 

"If c it is the man behind the gun that does the work,' it is also the teacher 
in the school who makes the school a success. In the past it has been found 
difficult to secure a sufficient number of properly qualified teachers for our 
Continuation Schools, but at present, I am glad to say, the supply is quite 
adequate. It is true that in some schools, particularly in the districts, on account 
of the unwillingness of many teachers to accept situations, it has been necessary 
to grant temporary certificates of qualification. At present there are, however, 
only fwo sneli certificates in my Inspectorate. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 53 

" But as a large proportion of the teachers of the Continuation Schools are 
women, and as Cupid is no respecter of the needs of School Boards, there are 
many changes in the personnel of the staffs. These changes are more numerous 
also because so many teachers change positions in order to secure larger salaries 
or more congenial places of residence. It- is needless ■ to say that changes in 
teachers very seriously afreet the work of the school, and it is greatly to be 
desired that something be done to prevent changing teachers except at the end 
of a school term. School Boards themselves could do much to bring about 
such a desirable condition, if, when engaging a teacher who has a position in 
another school, the agreement were made for such teacher to begin work at the 
close of the then current term." 

The insistent call of the war depleted our Continuation Schools of most 
of its young male teachers who were sound in body and in heart. As a result 
many School Boards found great difficulty in securing teachers. Then the 
greater financial and other advantages offered by the larger towns and cities 
attracted many of our best teachers to High Schools and . Collegiate Institutes. 
As a result, it has been necessary to recommend the granting of a considerable 
number of temporary certificates so that schools should not remain closed. In 
particular it has been necessary to recommend a considerable number of temporary 
certificates in Art and Physical Culture. 

Now that the war has ended victoriously, no doubt many teachers will return 
to the schools. We will welcome them heartily. But I wish to point out to the 
Boards of Trustees of our Continuation Schools that the only way to secure and 
retain thoroughly qualified teachers is by making salaries as attractive as are 
those offered in larger centres. 

There is one factor, however, which makes it very difficult for Continuation 
School Boards- to secure or retain teachers. As this factor is one which will con- 
tinue to operate adversely toward the Continuation Schools, I venture to call 
attention to it. The factor is the Amended Eegulations of 1917 so far as they 
relate to qualifying certificates for teachers of High and Continuation Schools. 
Under these amended regulations, it is uncertain whether experience gained in 
Continuation Schools will count toward securing a permanent certificate valid 
after 1920 for both High and Continuation Schools, as was formerly the case. 
The result is that young teachers graduating from the Faculties of Education 
avoid, as far as possible, Continuation Schools. Then again the regulations referred 
to, are retroactive in character, and as a result a number of experienced teachers 
have accepted positions in High Schools rather than remain in the Continuation 
Schools. 

I feel it my duty to call attention to the effect of the amended regulations 
of 1917, in the hope that before they go into operation in 1920, they may be 
re-considered and revised. I feel confident that the matter need be but brought to 
your attention to secure a remedy. 



Ordinary School Subjects 

The Continuation Schools are doing very efficient work in providing sound 
secondary training for the youth of many rural and village communities. The 
skill and energy of the teachers are all that can be expected; the earnestness and 
enthusiasm of pupils are most encouraging. As a result the general work of the 
schools is good. 



54 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 

But while this is the case I wish to point out two places where great improve- 
ment is possible and desirable. In the first place, writing is not good. No 
doubt many pupils are poor writers when they enter High and Continuation 
Schools, but unfortunately very many pupils are worse writers after a year or 
two spent in these schools. Far too many note-books are kept and far too 
much hurried writing required of the pupils. Then though the teacher of writing 
is earnest and painstaking during the formal writing lesson, little or no attention 
is paid to the writing or neatness of the pupils in their other lessons. Constant 
attention to writing by all teachers in all school subjects will lead to great 
improvement-. 

In the second place, history is not well taught. Too many of our teachers 
either give notes for pupils to learn or require pupils to underline passages in 
the textbooks for memorization. As a result history teaching is too often a dead 
thing and many (I fear most) pupils leave school with a positive dislike for the 
subject of history. Perhaps our examination system is to blame for much of 
the difficulty in interesting pupils in history. But the chief aim of the teacher 
should be to create an interest in history and a desire on the part of the pupils 
to read for themselves. That this is possible is shown by the fact that a few 
of our teachers are succeeding along these lines without failing to prepare their 
pupils for examinations. 

Art 

In many schools I find that the work in Art is not satisfactory. This is 
due in some degree to the fact that many teachers are not well qualified to teach 
Art. It is, however, due also to some extent to the fact that many parents and 
trustees and^most of the boys look upon the Art work as of little use. Indeed, 
some Boards have asked if they might not substitute simple commercial work 
and drawing for the colour work in Art. In the large High Schools and Collegiate 
Institutes it is possible to teach both Art and Commercial Work but in a two- 
teacher Continuation School this is impossible as the time of the teachers is 
fully taken up with compulsory subjects of which Art is one. 

It would appear that a certain amount of elasticity in the choice of such 
subjects as Art, Agriculture and Horticulture, and Commercial Work might be 
permitted so that School Boards having control of two and three-teacher schools 
might, with the approval of the Inspector, select the subject most suited to the 
youth of the community. Thus one school might teach Art; another, Agriculture 
and Horticulture; and another Commercial work. I feel assured that as much 
use and cultural value may be found in any one of these subjects as in any other 
but it is clearly impossible for a small school to provide for all of them. Too 
much attention has, I feel, been given to Art in the past. 

Continuation Schools in Rural Districts 

When Continuation Schools were first formed, it was expected that they 
would provide secondary education for country districts, that they would be Kural 
High Schools. However, nearly all our Continuation Schools are situated in 
small town or village communities. Very few of our Continuation Schools are in 
the country proper. 

Rural children surely require and deserve as great opportunities for education 
as the children of towns and villages. The willingness of rural communities 
to provide good educational advantages for the youth is a test of the right to 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 55 



retain young people in the community. We need secondary schools in rural 
districts. But these schools must be of a type adapted to the needs of these districts. 
I can, however, see no prospect of securing the establishment of such schools until 
we have made progress in the consolidation of school sections. With consolida- 
tion will come good secondary schools in the country and a great increase in 
the number of schools and of pupils in attendance. 

|The Obstacles to Consolidation 

Wherever consolidation of schools has been effected in the United States, 
there has followed a demand for secondary school advantages. Rural Continuation 
Schools will surely follow consolidation in Ontario. Whatever then prevents 
consolidation tends to hinder the development of Continuation Schools. The 
history of the movement toward consolidation in the United 'States shows that, 
wherever the small district system has prevailed in school administration, con- 
solidation has made little or no progress; but wherever there are. township or 
larger school units in school administration, consolidation has made remarkable 
progress. In no State of the American Republic has there been greater advance- 
ment in the consolidation of schools, than in Indiana. But in that State the 
township unit prevails. It would appear, therefore, that in Ontario we must 
strive to replace the school section unit in school affairs with the township or 
county unit. If this can be done, I look forward to great advances not only 
in the ordinary public school work of our schools, but also in the work of the 
Continuation Schools. 



56 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

APPENDIX D 
REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF HIGH SCHOOLS 

I. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOUSTON 

To the Honoukable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit for your consideration a brief report on the general 
condition of the Collegiate Jnstitutes, High Schools and private institutions which 
were under my supervision during the academic year 1917-1918. 

I have the honour to be, Sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. Houston. 
December. 1918. 

Schools visited 

During the year I visited the Collegiate Institutes at Brockville, Cobourg, 
Kingston, Lindsay, Morrisburg, Napanee, Ottawa, Perth, Peterborough, Picton, Ren- 
frew, Smith's Falls and Vankleek Hill, thirteen in all, and the High Schools at 
Alexandria, Alliston, Almonte, Arnprior, Athens, Avonmore, Aylmer, Belleville, 
Brighton, Bowmanville, Campbellford, Carleton Place, Chesterville, Colborne, Corn- 
wall, Deseronto, Dutton, Gananoque, Hawkesbury, Iroquois, Kemptville, Madoc, 
Markham, Morewood, Newburgh, Newcastle, Norwood, Omemee, Pembroke, Plan- 
.tagenet, Port Hope, Port Perry, Prescott, Richmond Hill, Rockland, Stirling, 
Sydenham, Tweed, Trenton, "Oxbridge, Williamstown, "Whitby, and Winchester, 
forty-three in all. 

I also visited the following private schools : The Academy of St. Mary Imma- 
culate, Pembroke; St. Joseph's Academy, Lindsay; Albert College, Belleville; The 
Convent of Notre Dame, Kingston; The Ladies' College, Whitby; Loretto Abbey, 
403 Wellington Street, Toronto; and the Loretto Day School, 385 Brunswick Ave., 
Toronto. My list thus comprises 13 Collegiate Institutes, 43 High Schools, and 7 
private schools, all of which are preparing candidates for one or more of the exam- 
inations for admission to the professional training schools for teachers. 

Accommodations 

Only in two towns in my district has there been a new building completed and 
occupied during the school year. In April, 1918, the classes of the Trenton High 
School took possession of a new, commodious, up-to-date Collegiate building which 
is a credit to the town and to the enterprise and perseverance of the Board, which is 
to be congratulated upon the successful completion of an undertaking begun some 
years ago under rather adverse conditions. The formal opening was attended by a 
large number of representative citizens as well as by representatives from the Boards 
and staffs of neighbouring towns and cities. I hope in the near future to see the 
Board make still further advance by the establishment of technical and vocational 
classes in this most promising centre for such work. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 57 

A new building was opened in Tweed also, when the former continuation school 
became a High School under most favourable conditions and with a very promising 
future. This building is modern in every particular and its opening marks a new 
era in the advancement of secondary education in this particular centre. The 
Chemical Company of Sulphide, whose manager is chairman of the High School 
Board in Tweed, made a generous grant of $500 towards supplying science equip- 
ment for the new school, and this same company furnishes a large motor bus for the 
free conveyance of pupils from Sulphide to Tweed. 

In Eenfrew the Board have again taken up the question of new accommodation 
and are making a determined effort to provide a building which will be in keeping 
with the high reputation of their school and with the general standing of the town. 

The changes made during the year in the detailed items of accommodation in 
the different schools have been so few that there is no need of a tabulated summary 
such as was given in my last report. Financial conditions have discouraged the 
incurring of large expenditures ; Boards of Education have been marking time, and 
have contented themselves with making only such changes and additions as were 
absolutely necessary for the proper carrying on of the work of the schools. What 
the future has in store it would be difficult to prophesy, but the period of recon- 
struction upon which the country is now entering will no doubt see carried to com- 
pletion many of the plans which had been formulated before the war began. It will 
be expected that towns, in which the accommodations had been reported as defective 
or insufficient, will at once make provision for the changes which, with the consent 
of the Department, had been held in abeyance until world conditions should become 
normal. 

Teachers' Work 

The general work of the teachers continues to be eminently satisfactory. In 
season and out of season their one aim seems to be the intellectual and moral 
advancement of those under their care; they spare neither time nor strength to 
accomplish their object; only those who come into intimate association with them 
can fully appreciate their self-denying efforts and whole-souled devotion to duty. 
I regret to say they do not always receive the support and encouragement they have 
a right to expect, and they often have to carry on their work under most adverse and 
discouraging conditions. One of the most serious handicaps in the way of satisfac- 
tory results is congestion in classes. Neither trustees nor parents yet realize the 
futility of attempting to teach classes numbering forty-five, fifty or fifty-five 
pupils. The average layman thinks fifty can be as easily taught as twenty, provided 
seats can be found for them. The usual excuse for congestion is lack of funds, but 
there is a saving in expense which is poor economy. -Solomon might well have been 
referring to certain present-day educational conditions when he declared, " there is 
that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty." 

The question of providing class-rooms, equipment and teaching power is largely 
a financial one. For good work classes should not exceed thirty pupils in the 
majority of subjects; many experts would place the number as low as twenty. To 
secure such a condition, especially in the larger towns and cities, means a much 
greater outlay than is made at present, but surely the country that has spent millions 
upon millions freely and willingly, for the defence of the highest ideals of human 
liberty and progress will not fail to provide funds for the education of those who are 
to uphold those ideals in the future. I have referred specially to the question of con- 
gestion, because to it may be attributed most of the failures found in the schools. 



58 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



The powers of even the best teachers are limited; they cannot accomplish 
impossibilities. 

Various Subjects 

In past years I have reported at length on the character of the work done in 
the various subjects placed on the programme of studies, and have indicated from 
time to time where improvement might be made. Defects still exist which might 
easily be remedied ; in Elementary Science instruction still takes the place of experi- 
ment and observation; in History the pupil still writes and memorizes what are 
really dictated notes, instead of being trained to read^and summarize for himself; in 
Mathematics and Science problems still take up hours of precious time at home 
which could be more profitably spent on the memory work necessary in language 
study; attempts are still made to carry on too many subjects at one time, with the 
inevitable result that few of them are well mastered. However, I have reason to 
hope that defects such as these are becoming the exception rather than the rule, and 
looking back over the past ten years one can see most marked evidence of progress, 
particularly in such subjects as Elementary Science, Art, Physical Culture and 
even in Mathematics and Languages. Teachers are learning that proper methods 
will secure as good examination results as the " stuffing " process, and will turn out 
a much superior finished product so far as ability to face the problems of life is 
concerned. 

Farm Labour 

The regulation which provided that pupils attending Public or High Schools in 
preparation for departmental or matriculation certificates might under certain con- 
ditions be granted their standing through employment on the farms ©f Ontario has 
had a very far-reaching effect upon the schools. The school year has been prac- 
tically cut down to eight months in the case of all those who took advantage of the 
Regulation. This means either that they did not complete their regular year's 
course, or that the review of work which is so necessary to round out the course was 
omitted. As a consequence we have at present in the schools very many pupils who 
are working at a decided disadvantage, and are going to require one or two years 
longer to complete their course than if there had been no interference with their 
regular work. The standing obtained by " farm labour " is in many cases proving 
a sacrifice, and not the gain which the pupil had anticipated. Even in the first 
forms there are many pupils who are not prepared to take full advantage of the 
High School course, and whose educational progress would be much more rapid 
had they come into the schools in the ordinary way. I have no doubt that in the 
Universities and the professional training schools similar conditions exist, ami we 
may expect to find a good many " starred " candidates during the next few years. 
Provision is made for the operation of similar regulations next spring, but for the 
sake of the schools it is to be hoped that there will be no necessity for continuing 
the present arrangement beyond the current year. 

Courses and Examinations 

There are three stock criticisms directed against secondary schools to which 
I would like to make brief reference, as it does not appear to me that any one of the 
three is justified. The first is that the course is overcrowded and the pupils over- 
burdened with the amount of work demanded; the second, that the schools are 
•'examination ridden," as a prominent educationist recently expressed it, and the 
'hud, that the work is not sufficiently practical and leads in the wrong direction 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 59 

for the majority of the pupils. I hope to shew that, if any one of these criticisms 
is justified in the case of any particular school, the fault lies in local conditions, not 
in the regulations which govern the schools. 

The High School regulations provide for (i) a general course for pupils who 
desire merely a general education, (ii) a course for those who desire to qualify as 
public school teachers, and (iii) a course for matriculation into the Universities, or 
into what are called the learned professions. The first two of these are controlled 
by the Department of Education, the third by the governing bodies of the various 
universities and colleges. The full High School course is planned to cover a period 
of six years, and is divided into three parts, Lower School, Middle School, and 
Upper School, each a two-year course. The complaint about overcrowding of sub- 
jects is practically confined to the first two years; I have yet to find any serious 
objection to the Middle or Upper School work from those who are willing to take 
the required time, and are not endeavouring to crowd two years' work into one, or 
adding to the obligatory subjects certain optional subjects which they hope may 
help them. 

The pupil who selects either the general course, or the course leading to the 
Normal Entrance, must take the following subjects in his first year : English Gram- 
mar, Composition and Literature, Arithmetic, Algebra, History and Geography, and 
what may be called the practical subjects, Art, Elementary Science, and Reading. 
It will be noticed that most of these are subjects he has already been taking in the 
Public School, and it is not necessary that all should be taken at the same time. 
In the second year the Reading, Grammar and Arithmetic may be dropped by the 
general course pupil, while Geometry is begun as a practical subject. During both 
these years there will be ample time for school study periods, and the amount of 
home-work will be very small, provided the five or five and a half hours in school 
are well employed. During his third and fourth years the general course pupil 
must take Composition, Literature, History, Algebra and Geometry, while to these 
the candidate for Normal Entrance must add Physics and Chemistry, practical 
subjects obligatory for teachers only. This cannot be called an overloaded curricu- 
lum even if the course in each subject is somewhat extensive. 

Candidates for matriculation into the Universities require Latin and French, 
possibly Greek or German, in addition to certain general course subjects. Certain 
optional subjects such as Book-keeping, Household Science, Manual Training. 
Agriculture, Latin and Art are allowed as Bonus subjects in the Lower or Middle 
School examinations for entrance to the Normal. Now comes the explanation of 
the overcrowding which I must confess exists in many places. Hundreds of pupils 
are taking double work, that is, are taking both the teacher's course and the matricu- 
lation course, are then adding to this one or more of the extra optional subjects 
referred to above, and, as if this were not enough, are endeavouring to cover the work 
of two years in a single year in order to save time. The bright, clever, physically 
strong pupil may carry the work through successfully without injury to himself; 
others struggle under the load, fail in the attempt, and then blame anything and 
anybody but themselves for the failure. Of course the burden was too great and 
they were ill-advised to attempt it. I have seen classes in their first two years taking 
all the compulsory subjects of the teacher's course, the Latin and French of the 
matriculation course, adding one or more of the Bonus subjects, and planning to 
cover the four years' work in three years. No wonder parents and pupils, in such 
case, declare the work too heavy, but why not place the responsibility where it 
belongs ? 



60 THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 

The question of the number of examinations is very simply disposed of. The 
general course pupil is not required to take a single examination in his whole school 
course except such as his teachers may give in the regular work to test his fitness 
for promotion, and the candidate for entrance to Normal has only two Depart- 
mental examinations, one at the end of his Lower School work, and another at the 
close of the Middle School course, which does not appear to be an over-testing of 
academic fitness to teach public school. The candidate for Junior Matriculation 
has one examination to pass at the end of his four-year course. 

The assertion that High School courses are not sufficiently practical raises at 
once the question of the function of the secondary schools, and on this point there 
is diversity of opinion. They must make provision for the academic training of 
those who are to become public school teachers, and they must prepare candidates 
for entrance into the learned professions, but they should justify their existence by 
appealing to a much wider constituency, and offering courses suitable for those 
going into business, agriculture, or the arts and crafts. That this is a part of High 
School work is now recognized and acknowledged, and accounts for the encourage- 
ment and support given to the establishment of classes in such practical subjects # as 
Manual Training, Art, Agriculture, Book-keeping, Elementary Science, Steno- 
graph}^ Household Science, Physics and Chemistry. Further extension of High 
School endeavour along these lines is largely a question of finance, and as soon as 
necessary funds are provided the work will expand. 

But in the final analysis a boy's education does not depend so much upon the 
subjects studied as upon the character of the training received. Almost any course, 
even the work in the gymnasium, may be made instrumental in developing leader- 
ship, power of organization, and initiative, and these are the qualities which spell 
success in either business or professional life. The business house of to-day is more 
concerned with the general knowledge, character and training of its prospective 
employees, than with the subjects they have studied. In illustration -of this I take 
the liberty of quoting a few sentences from a recent magazine article contributed 
by one of Toronto's leading business firms. 

" Not so long ago it was considered that if a lad were studious at school he 
should finish the school course in order to enter college to study for a profession. 
Perhaps it was thought that education was of no great advantage in business, 
especially as employers rarely insisted on any educational standard. This idea is 
rapidly changing. It is now realized that, whether in the business of production, 
or distribution, or finance, a liberal education is as necessary for the best success as 
it is in the professions. In the world of business, modern competition necessitates 
a study of organization, standardization, and the minimizing of waste. The prob- 
lems arising in these call for highly trained minds, and for clear thinking. There- 
fore in choosing the staff that is intended one day to fill important positions, 
progressive business men prefer the youths most likely to have the capacity for 
developing trained minds, in other words, the youths with good school records." 



II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR LEVAN 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the; honour to submit herewith a report of my inspection of 
High Schools and Collegiate Institutes for the year 1917-18. 

During the year I visited the Collegiate Institutes of Brantford, Chatham, 
Fort William, GTalt, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kitchener, London, Port Arthur, St. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 61 

Mary's, St. Thomas, Sarnia, Stratford, Strathroy, Toronto (Harbord), 
Toronto (Humberside), Toronto (Jarvis), Toronto (Malvern), Toronto 
(Oakwood), Toronto (Parkdale), Toronto (Eiverdale), and Windsor, and the 
High Schools at Amherstburg, Aurora, Aylmer, Dutton, Essex, Forest, George- 
town, Glencoe, Hagersville, Kenora, Leamington, Lucan, Oakville, Paris, Parkhill, 
Petrolia, Port Dover, Port Rowan, Ridgetown, Sault Ste. Marie, Simcoe, Streets- 
ville, Tillsonburg, Toronto (North), Vienna, Wallacebnrg, Wardsville, Waterford, 
and Watford. I also visited the night schools conducted in connection with the 
Collegiate Institutes at Hamilton, London, Toronto (Harbord), and Toronto 
(Jarvis). 

Acting under instructions, I also visited the following private schools to 
-examine and report on their work in Art, Science, and Bookkeeping and Writing :■ — 
De La Salle College, Aurora; Ursuline College, Chatham; Loretto Academy, 
Hamilton; St. Anne's Convent School, Kitchener; St. Angela's College, London; 
Alma Ladies' College, St. Thomas; Loretto Convent, Stratford; Moulton College, 
Toronto : Havergal College, Toronto ; St. Joseph's College Academy, Toronto ; and 
St. Mary's Academy, Windsor. 

School Buildings 

I doubt if there are in any other part of the Province buildings better suited 
for their purpose than some of those in the district of which I have had charge this 
year. Those recently erected have been planned with a regard for architectural 
appearance as well as for the comfort, convenience, and health of those who are to 
use them. Modern High School buildings require many accommodations that were 
not considered necessary in buildings of an older type: assembly halls, art rooms, 
gymnasiums, etc. In most of the newer buildings provision is made for all these 
requirements, and special care is shown in the provision for lighting, heating, and 
ventilation. 

But there still remain many schools of the older type, in which little care has 
been given to these matters, and where pupils are crowded together in poorly 
lighted and ill-ventilated class-rooms. Other schools have suffered from their pros- 
perity, their buildings, which were once suitable for smaller numbers, being now 
wholly inadequate for the increased attendance. During the war building opera- 
tions have, as a rule, been suspended. The abnormal conditions prevailing in the 
financial and labour markets have deterred boards from undertaking improvements 
which they concede to be necessary, and which will have to* be undertaken as soon 
as conditions improve. 

A notable exception, however, is to be found in Windsor, where a large addi- 
tion to the Collegiate Institute, which has been under construction for some time, 
was completed and occupied at the beginning of the new year. To make the older part 
conform with the new, extensive alterations were made in the interior arrangement, 
and the school is now housed in a building which, in the completeness and excel- 
lence of its accommodations, is the equal, if not the superior, of any I have yet 

!. The assembly hall is the finest I have vet seen. The laboratorie 
furnished with the latest and best equipment for the teaching of science. Pro- 
vision has been made for physical culture in two gymnasiums, with showers and 
swimming pool. Individual lockers provide storage room for clothing and books. 
An excellent system of heating and ventilation has been installed. And, in fact, 
no expense has been spared in providing for the comfort and health of pupils 
and teachers, and for facilities in carrying on the work of the school. The Board 
deserve the highest commendation for their liberality and enterprise in carrying 
out these improvements. 



62 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 



Reading, Writing and Spelling 

Following the usual custom, I have given practical tests in Beading, Writing, 
and Spelling in each school I have visited. The results of the tests, I regret to 
say, are not always encouraging. It would seem that, amid the pressure of all the 
subjects to be provided for, the importance of these is imperfectly realized, or 
difficulty is experienced in finding room for them on the time-table. The latter 
fact probably explains why the results in Spelling are usually less satisfactoiv 
in the Second Form than in the First. Where pupils have come into the High 
School with a poor grounding in Spelling, it is hard to give sufficient attention 
to the subject to remedy their defects; but it should not be impossible to provide 
for those who have no natural deficiency. The criticism frequently directed by 
business men against the High Schools, that their graduates are unable to spell, 
should stimulate the teachers to remedy the fault. 

The same is true of Writing. Many pupils enter the High Schools without 
having acquired a knowledge of so elementary a matter as the proper method of 
holding the pen, not to speak of the greater difficulty of mastering the knowledge 
of movement and form necessary to good penmanship. The correction of these 
defects demands infinite patience, so much patience, in fact, that the teacrrr fre- 
quently gives up in despair and allows the pupil to fall back into the old habits, 
where improvement becomes impossible. But where the pupi/s interest is aroused, 
excellent results are easily secured. I recall a school in which the penmanship 
was so good that I sought an explanation of this unusual state of affairs of the 
teacher. I learned that no more than two periods a week were apportioned to 
writing, but that the offer of two annual prizes by a resident of the town, of ten 
dollars and five dollars each, had aroused interest, and transformed the 
character of the writing throughout the school. 

Patience is no less necessary in the teaching of Reading, but enthusiasm also is 
necessary, together with a -knowledge of what constitutes good reading, and a con- 
stant alertness to detect and correct mistakes. It is unfortunate that this subject 
is not always assigned to the member of the staff who is best qualified to teach it, 
but, owing to the exigencies of the time-table, is often thrust on a teacher who has 
no special aptitude for it, and has enjoyed no special preparation for teaching it. 
I have, indeed, heard excellent lessons in reading; but far more frequently I 
listen to barren lessons, in which little interest is aroused, and no enthusiasm 
shown, either by teacher or by pupil. Mistakes in pronunciation of words in 
common use, indistinct utterance, slurring, errors in grouping or in emphasis, 
sing-song, and all other possible and impossible mistakes follow one another in 
rapid succession. Where such faults receive correction, progress is being made, 
but they are not always corrected. I have listened to a lesson in which the most 
glaring errors were passed over without a word of help or criticism; when one 
pupil finished, the teacher simply called on the next. One almost wishes for a 
Summer Course to help those teachers who would welcome help if they knew where 
to get it. 

English Literature 

The method of teaching English Literature in the Middle and Upper School 
classes is largely determined by the character of the papers set at; the Depart- 
mental and University examinations; and as these examinations require intensive 
study of the substance of the poems prescribed, the teaching, so far as it can be 
tested by written examinations, is in most respects satisfactory. But written ex- 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 63 

animation cannot test all the elements that enter into the profitable study of 
poetry. They cannot test the response that the pupil has given to the emotional 
appeal of the poem; nor the depth of his appreciation of the great truths that the 
poet enunciates. Nor can they test his power to give a sympathetic oral rendering 
of the poem that his hearers may feel its beauties. In respect to matters of this 
kind, the teaching is, in many cases, not so good. There is doubtless great value 
in dissecting the plot and analysing the structure of a play; but there is surely 
greater value in getting an appreciation of the finer values I have referred to 
above. When studying a poem , it is worth while to pause occasionally in the 
presence of a great thought and give time for its importance to sink into the mind ; 
worth while occasionally to let the poet's music ring in the ears and get the pupils 
to enjoy the melody of his language. It is worth while, too, to let the pupils do 
most of the oral reading, even though their efforts are halting and imperfect. 
I have sometimes asked teachers why they do not let th,e pupils do more of the 
oral reading, and have been answered that the pupils are unable to do it properly. 
As well might a teacher of Arithmetic do all the problems for his class, on the 
plea that he can do it better than they and can thus save valuable time. If pupils 
have no practice in reading poetry they will never learn to read it well, and will 
lose one of its main enjoyments. 

In the Lower School the selection of th ■■ Litiratu e to be read is left to the 
discretion of the teacher, and the choice is usually very satisfactory. The general 
practice is to make a selection of three books, a prose work, a drama, and a book of 
poems. Here the reading is less intensive than in the Middle and Upper School 
classes, and the lessons generally yield a great deal of enjoyment. But too little 
attention is given to the memorization of choice passages. For the young tjie 
memorization of poetry is seldom a burden, and it always carries its own reward. 

Lower School History 

There is no work in the whole curriculum so burdensome as the Lower School 
Course in History, and none that yields so poor a return for the time devoted to it. 
Up to 1'914 the prescribed work included all Canadian and all British History. 
Now the history of the Great War has been added, increasing the burden by one- 
half or at least one-third. What makes the situation harder to deal with is that 
History, not being a subject of the High School Entrance examination, is neg- 
lected in many of the Public Schools, and pupils enter the High School with little 
or no. knowledge of it. This difficulty will probably be removed by the new regu- 
lation which makes History an examination subject of the Entrance examination. 
But even so, the amount to be covered is far too great. The consequences are not 
hard to see. History, which should be one of the most interesting and useful of 
the subjects taught in the schools, is seldom liked, and pupils rarely carry away a 
desire for further reading on the subject. A reduction of the amount to be covered 
would afford time for better teaching, and would produce infinitely better results. 

The Cost of Text= books ' 

In my visit to the schools situated in the remote northern part of th/ 1 
Province, Port Arthur and Fort William, I found that the cost of text-books 
is made an unduly heavy burden on parents. From five to ten cents more 
than the authorized price is charged for each text-book, the dealers claiming 
that the cost of carriage is so great that they are unable to sell the books at the 
price set by the Department. Even in more favoured localities the cost of 



64 THE REPORT OE THE No. 17 

text-books is often a determining factor in deciding whether boys and girls are 
to have a High School education. Where the cost is thus increased it is not hard 
to see that many who would otherwise enjoy a High School education must be for- 
ever deprived of this benefit. Nothing could be more unjust than that a child, 
through the accident of being born in this remote district, should have such an 
obstacle thrown in the way of his education. It is hard to suggest a remedy. 
Boards may now, it is true, purchase text-books at wholesale prices and supply them 
to pupils at cost price or free of charge ; but they are reluctant to take this step as 
it would interfere with local trade. A better plan would be for the Department 
to establish local depots at these places and supply the books at the regular price. 
I believe that this plan could be easily worked out, and I would urge that in the 
interest of secondary education in these localities some such plan should be adopted. 

Teachers 

In my report of last year I gave the impression I formed of the High School 
teachers after working among them for six months. My association with them for 
another year has greatly strengthened that favourable impression. It is my con- 
firmed opinion that no other servants of the public are more conscientious in the 
discharge of duty, none more hard-working, more faithful to high ideals and more 
self-sacrificing in the effort to attain them than the teachers in the High Schools. 
With natural and acquired abilities that would well fit them for success in walks 
of life that yield substantial financial rewards, they are content to work on, under- 
paid, often misunderstood, sometimes misrepresented, but cheerfully spending 
their strength in a noble effort to inspire the boys and girls who come under their 
influence with high ideals of citizenship and life. And the character of the ideals 
they have inspired is written in letters of gold in the records of Elanders' fields 
and beside beds of pain and "suffering in the hospitals of Europe and Canada. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

I. M. Levan. 
December, 1918. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 65 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MANUAL TRAINING 
AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The Honourable H. J. Cody, M,A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my eighteenth annual report on 
Manual Training and Household Science as carried on in the schools of the 
Province. 

Previous Reports 

The reports for 1906-7-8-9, in addition to being printed in the report of the 
Minister, were published as separate pamphlets, were well illustrated with photo- 
graphs of the work of the schools and received a wide circulation. These pamphlets 
are now out of print, but can still be seen in the Minister's Reports for those years. 
From 1910, the reports consisted of a tabulated list of schools in which manual 
training and household science are taught. These tables contained information on 
the teachers, salaries, number of pupils, length of lessons, accommodations and 
equipment. 

Number and Location of Manual Training Centres 

There are now ninety-three Manual Training centres in actual operation. These 
are situated in the following places : Brantf ord, Brockville, Chatham, Collingwood, 
Cornwall, Fort William, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Kitchener, 
London, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Port Arthur, St. Thomas, Sault Ste. Marie, Smith's 
Falls, Stratford, Toronto, Walkerville, Windsor, Woodstock, North Bay, Peter- 
borough, Port Perry, Whitby, Oakville, Orangeville, and Listowel. 

Th3 larger cities — Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Windsor — each have a 
number of centres, while in the smaller places one or two centres afford sufficient 
accommodation. 

Co=Ope/ative Action of Smaller Towns 

There are still ten towns in the Province with a population of more than 5,000 
each, that are without facilities for giving instruction in manual training and 
household science. Owing to the expense, lack of accommodation and properly 
qualified teachers, it is a difficult matter to introduce these subjects into the smaller 
urban communities. We have not yet fully learned the lessons of co-operation that 
we might learn from the older countries of the world, and it is in learning these 
lessons that the solution of this difficult problem lies. In these small towns 
there are often not enough pupils to employ the whole time of one manual 
training or one household science teacher. Why should not such towns combine to 
employ a teacher ? He might spend one or two days in each place according to the 
size of the school population. The extension of radial railways and other transporta- 
tion facilities should render this possible. I am looking into this situation with a 
view of forming several groups consisting of small places within easy reach of each 
other, that could be reached from a common centre. 

5 E. 



66 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Character of the Work 

The character of the work being done in the manual training classes has under- 
gone considerable change during recent years. The early arguments urged for the 
introduction of manual training were deliberately designed to satisfy labour organiz- 
ations. It was loudly proclaimed that the subject had nothing to do with teaching a 
trade, that it had no connection with industry, and that it would not predispose 
boys to enter mechanical pursuits. The educational and " cultural " value of 
manual training has been stressed and the industrial value has been denied and 
ignored. Our industrial training should begin in the public schools. It is there 
and there only that the pupils can have given to them an industrial bias and bent 
which will lead them to consider productive industry as a profitable career and to in- 
vestigate the prospects that it has to offer them. It is there that the erroneous 
ideas they have regarding industry in general can be corrected, and if our indus- 
trial education is to have a solid foundation the effect of a sound scheme of manual 
training cannot be over-estimated. Properly handled, the subject can be made as 
educational as the traditional subjects of the curriculum, and at the same time play 
a decided part in the industrial development of the boy or girl. 

Manual Training and Household Science have both had to fight their way in the 
face of bitter opposition. Educational traditions were outraged, and therefore all 
those who had been reared on those traditions marshalled their forces, went forth 
valiantly to do battle, and in a large number of cases won the fight they 
waged. The idea that education could be given only through the classics long held 
sway, and it is not even yet dead ; even mathematics and science were awarded tardy 
recognition; and it was really too much to expect that another subject could be 
allowed equal place with either classics or science. 

Now, however, the subject is being increasingly recognized as both educational 
and industrial. Modified shop methods are being introduced into the schools. Visits 
to factories and various industries might be made. As far as possible the industries 
should be reproduced in the class-room, and every opportunity taken advantage of 
to relate the work closely to the industries of the locality. There should be given a 
proper appreciation of the value of time and the cost of material. To a large extent 
this is now being done, and the character of the projects constructed, all in vol vino- 
mechanical drawing, principles of mechanics and sound construction, suitability of 
materials, and proper finish, is gradually increasing in difficulty, beauty, and 
usefulness. 

Exhibitions 

Much good has been done by school fairs and exhibitions in various parts of the 
Province. Prizes are offered for work in manual training and household science. 
The work of the classes is often exhibited in a prominent store window and invari- 
ably arouses much interest. At the annual exhibition in Toronto, Ottawa, and 
London, space is allotted for an exhibition of work ; a corner is fitted up as a class- 
room and demonstrations are given daily of the procedure of the ordinary manual 
training room. These exhibitions and demonstrations invariably draw large and 
interested crowds, and in this connection I should like to see established a permanent 
educational building in connection with the Toronto Exhibition. Such a building 
should show typical work of the grades throughout the Province, while classes in 
various subjects could be seen actually at work. It is certain thai such a building 
would do much to stimulate interest in what is after all the chief business of the 
state — education. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 67 

i — — ~~ — " ' 

Hindrances to Manual Training 

While manual training in our schools is accomplishing much, the results are 
not what they ought to be owing to three handicaps under which it is working. 
These are: (1) The limited time allotted to the subject in the school curriculum, 
(2) the lack of elementary instruction, and (3) the scarcity of qualified teachers. 

The time devoted to manual training is usually one and a half hours per week. 
In one or two very exceptional cases the lessons are two hours in length. It will 
be seen that in this limited time much cannot be done. A lesson of ninety minutes 
has to include mechanical drawing, bench work, talks on timber and tools, and a 
number of other things. In a school year of forty weeks this will amount to only 
twelve days of five hours each. If this work is to accomplish the purpose for which 
it was introduced and benefit the pupil as it is capable of doing, this period of one 
and a half hours should be at least doubled. Teachers, however, complain of an 
over-crowded curriculum, and claim that the necessity of preparing for examin- 
ations makes it impossible for them to devote more of the school time to the work. 
Generally speaking the pupils are anxious to spend as much time as possible at the 
work, and in some schools are allowed to spend all their spare periods in the manual 
training room. In some schools largely attended, voluntary classes are held on 
Saturday morning and from four to six o'clock in the evenings. In one case a very 
well attended summer school lasting for five weeks was held, and this is a practice 
to be commended and should be followed in many localities. Notwithstanding all 
these out-of-school activities the fact remains that much more time should be de- 
voted to this subject on the ordinary time-table of the school. 

Pupils unfortunately enter the manual training classes with very little knowl- 
edge of measurement, simple geometrical problems, mechanical drawing, tools and 
materials, and the result is that the first year in the manual training workshop 
has to be spent very largely in elementary work that should have been done at an 
earlier period in the education of the child. The curriculum provides for construc- 
tive work in clay, paper, cardboard and other materials, and though this is carried 
on in a large number of schools in the Province there are many in which nothing 
of the kind is attempted, particularly in the rural schools, where it could be made 
most valuable as busy work for those periods when the pupils of the ungraded schools 
are waiting for the teacher. This work is, however, growing in usefulness and 
popularity. Its aims and objects are being understood by the parents, and its scope 
and function are being appreciated by the teachers. Trustees are becoming more 
willing to vote the small sums necessary to carry it on, and where introduced 
with moderation and tact much good is accomplished. The help that elementary 
manual training can give to the other subjects in the curriculum is, however, not 
yet fully understood. It is too often looked upon as an entirely new subject having 
no relation to others, and when introduced in this spirit, though perhaps some good 
is accomplished, probably the time could be better spent. The work may be closely 
related to almost every other subject in the curriculum, and the closer this relation- 
ship is made the better will be the results in all subjects. 

Every student now leaving the Normal Schools is well prepared to carry on 
this elementary manual training, having had a brief but thorough training in the 
use of simple tools and materials. These schools are well equipped for carrying 
on work of this kind, but I sometimes fear that the excellence of the equipment 
provided acts, in some cases, as a deterrent rather than as a stimulus. I am con- 
tinually meeting teachers who hesitate to introduce this work, on the grounds that 
the material required is not easily obtained, or that the equipment is too expensive 
for the ordinary school. 



68 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

It is not always the teacher with the most elaborate equipment and the most 
generous supply of material that accomplishes the best work. The art of makeshift 
is a useful study, and the resourceful teacher who is constantly on the lookout for 
ways and means is rarely at a loss. 

One teacher, who found it difficult to obtain just what she required, begged a 
number of wall paper sample books, and from these her pupils constructed a number 
of useful articles. 

Another teacher did the same from the covers of old copy and exercise books. 
These instances which could be multiplied are simply mentioned to show that in- 
ability to obtain the material usually employed, need be no barrier to the intro- 
duction of constructive work. This work is carried on in the ordinary class-room 
and usually assumes some form of modelling, cutting, and construction in paper 
and cardboard, sewing and weaving with various materials, and whittling in thin 
wood. A manual which is now in the process of revision, with special reference to 
the needs of the rural schools, is issued by the Department, and from this manual 
the willing teacher may obtain all the help she requires. In view of the importance 
of the subject and its influence both on general development and industrial educa- 
tion, the hope is expressd that the near future will see the introduction of some form 
of elementary handwork into every school in the Province. 

There is undoubtedly a shortage of manual training teachers and owing to this, 
temporary certificates have been granted in several cases. A one-year course for 
training teachers has been held at the Ontario Agricultural College for several 
years, but the number taking this course is small, and the demand for qualified 
teachers in our own Province is not being met. Many of our teachers have been 
battling for freedom and others have gone to the West, thus rendering the shortage 
still more acute. An Elementary certificate has been granted after attendance at a 
summer school for two years, and this, though doing something towards relieving 
the shortage, has not done all that we could desire and has not given us teachers 
for advanced form6 of work. In almost every country in the world it has been the 
practice to take men with the ordinary teacher's certificate, and in a course of one 
year or less, to give them the training which would make them efficient in the use 
of tools and capable of giving instruction in mechanical processes. That is we 
have been endeavouring to make a skilled artisan out of a teacher. This has been 
the traditional practice, but I am almost coming to the conclusion that the time 
has arrived for us to consider which will give us the better results — offering a train- 
ing in pedagogy to a skilled and educated artisan or giving a training in skill to the 
professional teacher. Some of the best men in the work to-day came to us straight 
from the shops. Many of our best teachers recognize the; need for shop training 
and are spending their Saturdays and holidays in various shops in order to acquire 
this training. Before specialist standing is granted the regulations require that a 
man shall spend one year in an approved shop. Many returned soldiers are enquir- 
ing how best to qualify as manual training teachers. Some of them are highly 
skilled. I have interviewed several of them and they impress me as desirable men 
to have in the schools. If the numbers warrant, we might consider whether a short 
course in pedagogy could not be established in order to qualify these men. 

Farm Mechanics in Connection with Agricultural Courses 

A recent departure has been the establishment of farm mechanics departments 
in connection with the agricultural departments of the High and Continuation 
Schools. So far, three of these have been formed— Whitby, Oakville and Port 
Perrv. The idea at the back of these departments is that the progress of agriculture 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 69 

and the success of farming operations depends very largely upon the condition of the 
material equipment of the farm. The work suggested for these departments is as 
follows : — 

(1) To make articles required on the farm or in the home, e.g., wood-box, book- 
shelf, milk-stool, saw-horse, poultry feed boxes, butter worker. 

(2) To put down cement sidewalks about the home; making cement fence 
posts, water troughs, etc. 

(3) To use the farmer's hand forge and to learn to make simple repairs. 

(4) To build, repair, and readjust farm gates. 

(5) To repair barns and sheds, replacing broken windows, floors, } artitions, 
steps, etc. 

(6) To plan, make out bill for material, purchase, and build new poultry 
house, pig pen or shed. 

(7) To build in new ventilators in stables. 

Liberal grants are provided by the department and the work is meeting with 
much success. The aim is to carry on only such work as has a definite Nation to 
that required on the farm. Mr. W. J. Black, when Commissioner of Agricul ure, 
inspected the work of these schools and expressed the opinion that the work being 
done was just the kind required. 

The method of procedure at Port Perry is interesting and instructive. The 
only accommodation available was an old woodshed, and it was decided to adapt this 
for the purpose. For several weeks the boys were divided into two classes of four 
each and they worked with the expert carpenters and cement men, and under their 
direction did a large portion of the work on what is to be th? Farm Mechanics 
building. They jacked up the woodshed, cleaned it ou f , prepi ed the foundation 
and the whole floor space, and put in a cement foundation and floor. 

The boys repaired and adjusted several pieces of furniture about ih> schcol, 
repaired a cupboard for the Household Science department and the tables and cl airs 
in the Agricultural class-room. Home projects received eons'derable attention, and 
among these, after due care and deliberation, some of the boys have decided to 
construct small outbuildings at home, one a woodshed, one a chicken house, and one 
a pig pen. Another boy is preparing to lay a cement floor in one of his home farm 
buildings. 

At Whitby, the farm mechanics shop is fitted with benches, tools, and forges. 
This room has proved too small for the work intended, and the boys are engaged in 
fitting up another shop. They have lined a part of the old gymnasium with building 
paper and are covering the walls with matched lumber. In this connection they 
will have to put in at least three doors and do the finishing around six windows. 
In addition to this each boy is planning to make a carpenter's bench for himself to 
take home at the end of the term. Other articles they made or have in the process 
of making at the present time are: fruit-picking ladder, saw-horse, trap nests, 
chicken fattening crates, nail boxes, etc. 

The class in Oakville has also done good practical work. They have built the 
work benches they use and have made various articles such as a cement scraper, 
cement trowel, chicken feeder, fattening crate, model of farm gate, saw-horse, etc. 
In each case they made a working drawing and freehand sketch and prepared a bill 
of the material required. 

Work of the character being done in these schools has a direct bearing upon 
the agricultural processes of the farm, and is viewed with great favour wherever it 
has been introduced. 



70 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Number and Location of Household Science Centres 

There are ninety household science centres in operation in urban municipali- 
ties. These are situated in the following places: Belleville,, Brantford, Brockville, 
Chatham, Collingwood, Cornwall, Fort William, Gait, Guelph, Hamilton, Inger- 
soll, Kingston, Kitchener, London, Niagara Falls, Niagara Falls, South, Ottawa, 
Owen Sound, Paris, Port Arthur, St. Thomas, Sault Ste. Marie, 'Smith's Falls, 
Stratford, Toronto, Walkerville, Windsor, Woodstock, 'Cobourg, Sarnia, Peter- 
borough, and Port Perry. 

Lack of Illustrative Material 

The schools are all well equipped in the traditional manner, but are usually 
lacking in what may be called illustrative material. In every household science 
department there should be a collection of food products, both in their raw and 
manufactured states. Various manufacturers send out specimens showing the pro- 
cesses in the manufacture of their goods. Charts, showing the chemical composi- 
tion of various food stuffs should be provided and every effort made to obtain such 
a collection of charts, illustrations and specimens as will give life and vitality to the 
multifarious problems with which Household Science should deal. Charts and 
models illustrating the principles of plumbing and ventilation should also be 
provided. 

Character of the Work 

The teaching of cookery is not simply the preparation of certain dishes, but 
includes much instruction in the nature and use of food, and the difficult art of 
choosing suitable nourishing and at the same time economical articles of food in 
order that the smallest incomes may stretch to meet the needs of even the largest 
families. As Ruskin says : " To be a good cook means the knowledge of all fruits, 
balms and spices and all- that is healing and sweet in fields and groves, savour in 
meats; it means carefulness, watchfulness, willingness, and readiness of appliance; 
it means the economy of great-grandmothers and the science of modern chemists ; 
it means much tasting and no wasting; it means English thoroughness, French 
art and Arabian hospitality ; it means in fine that you are to be perfect and always 
ladies (loaf givers) and you are to see that everybody has something nice to eat/' 

I am pleased to note a growing tendency to place a wide interpretation upon 
the term " Household Science." Up to a recent date there was a strong tendency 
in many quarters to regard it as cookery only. 

This branch is of great importance, but we do not live in the kitchen. The 
bed room, the bath room, the dining room, should also receive due attention, and 
for this reason the kitchen should not be regarded as the unit of equipment. The 
best schools in England and the United States are taking the whole house as a unit 
and their household science departments consist of kitchen, dining room, bed room, 
bath room, living room, etc. Several of the schools in the Province are adopting 
this plan. Some of the public schools in London and the Collegiate Institute in 
London have such apartments. In one or two of the Toronto schools, experiments 
are being conducted with a new type of equipment. A large room is divided by 
screens to represent the different rooms in the house and furnished accordingly. 
The girls are divided into groups and each group takes turn in working in the 
different rooms. This plan promises to give a more all round training than the one 
room used as a kitchen only. 

Sick room cookery and home nursing should be given an important place 
in the curriculum of these schools, for though teaching people how to keep well 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 71 



is one of the main purposes of household science, yet sickness will come and it 
is almost a commonplace to say that good nursing cures more patients than 
good doctoring. The care of young children is particularly important. Beyond 
doubt many children are sacrificed every year through want of attention — im- 
proper food and unsuitable clothing. A few straight heart to heart talks to the older 
girls, given by a tactful teacher, would be calculated to do much good. At the 
Girls' Technical High School, in New York, a very young baby is brought into 
the class and lessons given to the older girls on its bathing and general care. 
Though there is not perhaps the same necessity for instruction of this kind as 
exists in the crowded cities of England and the United States, there is still need for 
some of it, and as the towns and cities become more crowded the necessity will 
become more pronounced. 

Household science throws light on alh that group of facts and principles that 
has to do with a wise, economical and successful management of the household. 
It does not confine its interests to the chemistry of cooking or to nutritive values 
and comparative cost of various kinds of foods. It gives careful attention to pure 
water, pure food, personal and public hygiene, and to other topics that are closely 
concerned with health in the family and in the community. It deals also with 
lighting, heating, plumbing, sanitation and ventilation, and aims to show how the 
latest results of scientific research will contribute to greater economy in the home 
and longer useful service to society. Household Art has also an economic bearing 
upon individual and social life, and in addition to this, it has a refining influence 
upon the student because it helps to develop an appreciation of the beautiful and 
artistic and adds much to the capacity for enjoyment and service. These subjects are 
therefore of the highest importance because they bear an intimate relation to that 
most fundamental of all institutions — the home. Whatever ministers to its attrac- 
tiveness and comfort makes a valuable contribution to the highest welfare of society. 
It is the opinion of many sociologists that of late years the influence of the home 
has been on the decline, and everything possible should be done to furnish such 
training for the future homemakers so that they may be able to meet adequately 
their heavy responsibilities. 

Instruction in Sewing 



In the majority of centres above enumerated, efficient instruction is being 
given in plain sewing and exceedingly good results are being accomplished, as is 
shown by the various local exhibitions of the work of the schools. This work is 
organized better in the City of Ottawa than anywhere else in the Province, and the 
efforts made here, and the results accomplished. under the management of a special 
Supervisor of Household Science are well worthy of study by other Boards interested 
in this subject. The city of Hamilton has appointed a special director of sewing 
in the Public Schools and good results are expected from her work. 

There is, however, a large number of schools throughout the Province where 
no sewing is taught, and for many reasons this is much to be regretted. Every 
English elementary school devotes -at least two hours per week to this subject from 
the lowest grades to the end of the Public School course. The importance of the 
subject can scarcely be over estimated. The failure to teach it can hardly be under- 
stood, particularly when it is remembered that the equipment necessary is of the 
slightest and might reasonably be expected to be possessed by every girl. By needle- 
work is not meant ornamental work, but ordinary plain everyday sewing. Everv 
girl should be taught to use the needle, thimble and scissors well, quickly, and 
easily. This is far more readily accomplished when she is between seven and twelve 



72 THE RBPOET OF THE No. 17 

years old. The hand, the greatest and the most delicate of all instruments, is then 
supple and far more easily trained than at any other period. The mind is alert and 
the practice necessary to gain some degree of skill is not then looked upon' as 
drudgery, as is often the case in later life. 

Girls delight to' sew, especially with their companions, and are interested when 
a graded course is followed, which they can see begins with simple exercises and 
increases in difficulty step by step until they find themselves able to cut, make and 
fit a garment, first perhaps for a doll and then for themselves. 

Euskin says : " Learn the sound qualities of all useful stuffs and make every- 
thing of the best you can get, whatever its price, and then every day make some 
little piece of useful clothing sewn with your own ringers, as strongly as it can be 
stitched, and embroider it or otherwise beautify it moderately with tine needle- 
work such as a girl may be proud of having done." 

Rural Schools 

The manual training and household science dealt with so far in this rtport 
has concerned town and city schools, but the rural schools must not be neglected in 
this connection. If these subjects are as important as all educationists and in- 
telligent public men now think they are, is it not a lamentable fact that a large 
number of the children attending the rural schools are not reaping the advan- 
tages they are capable of conferring? In my report for 1906 it was noted that 
nearly fifty-eight per cent, of the school population was being educated in the rural 
schools. That percentage has now fallen to nearly forty-six, and may not the re- 
duction in the rural population indicated by these figures be attributable in part 
to the lack of educational advantages to be found in the country. It is neither 
Christian nor politic that nearly forty-six out of every hundred children should be 
deprived of the advantages of newer methods and modern practice which scientific 
researches in pedagogy have brought about. Of course the percentage of children 
not receiving manual training and household science instruction is much greater 
than this when it is remembered that many children in urban schools are not yet 
receiving this instruction, but it is the rural situation that is now being dealt with. 

Surely the country child has a right to as good an educational opportunity as 
the child attending the best town or city school, and in order that this result may 
be assured much more money must be spent on the country school and it must be 
spent in a better way. It is unfortunate that we cannot consider educational prob- 
lems without being hampered by the question of money, but we should at least look 
upon this expenditure in the right way. As a matter of fact, the money devoted to 
educational purposes, if spent wisely, is not expenditure. It is an investment in 
gilt-edged securities and will produce greater dividends than any bonds, stocks or 
shares, the world has yet known. The returns from this investment will be finer 
individual characters, more efficient men and women, and a higher type of citizens. 

The money spent on the rural school must not be spent with the idea of 
making it like the city school. This is neither necessary nor desirable. A different 
environment renders necessary certain differences in organization and method, but 
equal opportunity should be provided. The opinion has been frequently expressed 
that the boy in the country, the boy on the farm, does not need manual training, 
as he gets enough of it in performing his daily tasks. This opinion is based very 
largely on the assumption that manual training and manual labour are terms of 
like meaning. Calvin Milton Woodward, on<> of the pioneers of the manual train- 
ing movement, says on this point: "We are frequently told that the boy from the 
farm has had manual training, and it is true that he has had some manual train- 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 73 



ing, but he has had a great deal of manual labour with it. 1 know because I was 
a farm boy and learned everything that could be learned on the farm previous to 
my college course. I learned to use correctly the hoe, the shovel, the plough, the 
scythe, the cradle, and the axe, but I never learned the proper use of bench tools. 
T knew nothing of drawing, nothing of the mechanical arts properly so-called. 
Nineteen-twentieths of my time was spent simply in hard labour, which had no 
education beyond an incidental and imperfect knowledge of crops and soils and the 
market. Manual training would have been of great value and a few lessons would 
have saved me much labour, time, and money." 

The idea expressed in the above quotation is one that has hindered the spread 
of manual training in the rural schools. Another prevalent idea is that if the 
subject be taken the methods adopted must conform to those of the towns and 
cities. Any rural community that attempts to inaugurate this subject on the city 
plan is making a grave mistake. 

The rural school has its own problems, and these problems are essentially 
different from those presented by a town or city school. The country school is 
fortunate in many respects, but in none more so than in the fact that it is sur- 
rounded with material and means for the best kind of manual training. In my 
report for 1906 a drawing was given of a cheap and efficient bench, and in the 
Manual Training Manual, issued by the Department, full directions are given for 
making a bench. This manual is now being revised and the revision will lay special 
stress on the requirements and possibilities of the rural school. There is no reason 
why every rural school should not have at least one bench and a set of common 
tools. Much lasting good could be accomplished by these simple means. 

This work should keep in view the tools the boy will probably have at home 
and may well be directed to the making of articles which can be put to some 
immediate use at home or in the school. If in the school there are a number of 
large boys, the carpentry may well expand within a year or two so as to undertake 
the enterprise of building a small shop on the school grounds and fitting it up for 
working purposes. In several schools a light basement has been adapted to this 
purpose, and in others a bench has been built in one corner of the class-room. 

With the right kind of a teacher, exercises may be given in the sewing of 
leather and in the splicing of ropes and knotting finding practical application in 
the mending of harness, making of halters, etc., as the necessities of the farm may 
require. Some practical lessons in painting and glazing may be given, and oppor- 
tunities are not lacking for applying the knowledge and skill thus gained to the 
school or farm buildings. Tumbledown fences, broken window panes, sagging doors, 
broken locks or latches, ill-kept grounds, untidy paths, broken chairs and ricketty 
tables will not be found where all have pride in their school and the boys have 
been taught how to make things and do simple repairs. Many country schools in the 
Province are paying attention to these things, and with proper encouragement the 
outlook for the future is bright. 

Household Science in Rural Schools 

For the past twelve months my attention has been largely concentrated on the 
country schools, particularly in the direction of household science and the provision 
of a hot dish for the noon-day lunch of those pupils who are compelled by the dis- 
tance they live from the school to take their lunch packed in a box or other re- 
ceptacle. In this connection, I have addressed Teachers' Institutes, County and 
Township Trustees' Associations. Women's Institutes. Normal Students, and have 

6 E. 



74 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

visited a large number of rural schools in company with the Public School In- 
spectors and have met the trustees of individual schools. I have inyariably found 
the rural school trustee willing to listen, and in a large number of cases they are 
ready to allow the teacher liberty to work out the scheme of simple household teach- 
ing combined with the serving of a hot dish at noon. 

It may be of interest to outline in detail the steps that have been taken in this 
connection. 

Instruction in Normal Schools 

1. The instruction in this subject in the Normal Schools has, for the past eighteen 
months, been specially directed to the needs of the rural schools. Generally, methods 
have been outlined and worked out with the limited possibilities of the one room 
school in view. The instructors in the Normal Schools have been expected to visit 
the rural schools affiliated with the Normal in order that they might see the con- 
ditions that have to be met and to devise the best ways of meeting them. In this 
connection the Normal Schools should be regarded as a sort of clearing-house and a 
source of information for the teachers of the district. This idea is being worked in 
several of the schools. The work being done by the Hamilton Normal School may 
be taken as an example. Here, Dr. Morgan, Mr. Robinson, the Public School In- 
spector, Miss Elliott, the Instructor in Household Science, and Mr. Painter, the 
Manual Training Instructor, are all co-operating in an active campaign to introduce 
household science and manual training into every rural school in the County of 
Wentworth, and their efforts are meeting with the greatest success. A number of 
the teachers in the schools of this county have asked that Saturday morning classes 
be established in order that they may meet the instructors for the discussion of the 
difficulties and problems they meet with in the actual teaching of these subjects 
in their schools. When teachers are willing to give up Saturday mornings for 
professional improvement and in order that they may render better service to. the 
community in which they are working they should be given the greatest encourage- 
ment, and I recommend that such classes be formed wherever requested. In some 
of the Normal Schools such as Hamilton and Peterboro', the instructors devote part 
of their time to public school teaching of manual training and household science. 
They should be relieved of this work, and the time thus gained could be very pro- 
fitably spent in visiting the rural schools to assist the teachers of these schools. 
Notwithstanding the triteness of the saying, " As is the teacher so is the school," 
I very much question whether we even yet recognize its importance. These newer 
subjects depend almost entirely upon the sympathy, the initiative, and the resource- 
fulness 1 of the teacher, and I venture to say that, given a sympathetic, willing 
teacher, that there is not a school in the Province where much useful work along 
these lines may not be done. The suit-case teacher who packs her grip at noon on 
Friday, takes it to the school with her, catches the first train after or sometimes 
before four o'clock, and shakes the dust of the section from off her feet and puts 
all thoughts of her work out of her head till it is time for her to catch a train 
on Monday morning, is not unknown. Recognizing the importance of the teacher, 
no efforts should be spared to give our Normal students the fullest equipment in 
these newer subjects. The time that they are able to spend on manual training 
and household science is very limited, and some such plan as the Saturday morn- 
ing classes above referred to would do much to overcome this obstacle. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 75 

Special Equipments for Rural Schools 

2. Recognizing the fact that the introduction of household science into the 
rural schools has been hindered by the prevalent idea that a separate room, elab- 
orate equipments, plumbing, etc., were necessary, special equipments have been 
designed and a modified form of equipment suitable for use in the rural schools 
is in use for demonstration purposes in most of the Normal Schools. Such equip- 
ments were first designed in Hamilton and London Normal Schools by the co- 
operation of the manual training and household science teachers. These equip- 
ments are now in successful use in many rural schools. One firm in the Province 
is making a special effort to popularize these and has set apart a room in the 
store for the exhibition of both the manual training and the household science 
equipments. These exhibitions are continually being visited by interested teachers 
and trustees. The equipments consist of a two or three flame burner oil stove, 
enclosed in a cabinet, and a small cupboard containing the necessary utensils. 
When not in use, there is nothing to show the special character of the equipment. 
It occupies but a small space and can be placed in a corner of the ordinary one- 
room school. To the designing of this equipment, I attribute much of the success 
that has attended our efforts to introduce household science and the school lunch 
into the rural schools, and the thanks of the community are due to all who have 
co-operated in its production. 

Summer Schools 

3. In 1918, for the first time, a grant was provided to pay the expenses of 
teachers attending the summer schools in household science after they have taught 
the subject for one year. Previous to this year teachers attending summer schools 
in household science did so at their own expense. Under these circumstances the 
teachers were of course financially predisposed to take courses in Agriculture in 
which their expenses were paid rather than in Household Science, and this is a 
handicap no subject should be asked to work under. These subjects are equally 
important and some teachers are best fitted for one and some for the other, and 
they should be free to choose, unhampered by financial considerations. Manual 
training has still to meet this handicap, and this condition should be remedied in 
the arrangements that are being made for the next summer school. 

Grants in Aid 

4. Grants have been provided in order to aid trustees in installing the equip- 
ment and for its maintenance afterwards, and to encourage the teachers with an 
extra grant when a hot dish is served for the school lunch. The financial objection 
raised by trustees is thus almost entirely removed. The scheme now in force makes 
it possible for any teacher with a Normal School diploma to teach the subject, and 
the too frequent changes of teachers in the rural school will not interfere with the 
continuity of the work so much as formerly. 

Co=Operation of Public School Inspectors 

5. The introduction and success of these subjects depend very largely upon 
the sympathy and co-operation of the Public School Inspector. With the object of 
securing that sympathy and co-operation the Inspectors attending the Summer 
School in Agriculture at Guelph were addressed on the subjects and official circulars 
have been issued to them at various times. 

6. At the beginning of the school year, I planned to spend a week or more 
with Public School Inspectors visiting their schools, with the object of influencing 



76 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

the teachers and trustees in this direction. This plan was carried out in a number 
of cases, but many of the schools were closed for prolonged periods on account of 
the influenza epidemic, and this somewhat interfered with the scheme. I am con- 
vinced, however, that the most good can be accomplished by getting into active 
personal touch with the trustees and the teachers. This and other features of the 
work are growing to such an extent that I need assistance if the ground is to be 
properly covered. The Inspectors are remunerated at the rate of $8.00 per school 
in which agriculture is taught. No such condition exists in the case of manual 
training and household science. I will not draw any conclusion, but content myself 
with expressing the hope that the time is not far distant when inspectors will be 
paid an adequate salary, not depending on the fact that agriculture, manual train- 
ing, household science or 1 any other particular subject is taught in their schools. 

Manual on Household Science for Rural Schools 

7. In order to assist the teachers in equipping their schools for this work, 
teaching the subject and serving the school lunch, a manual has been prepared, 
entitled, " Household Science for Rural Schools." This gives the fullest inform- 
ation and help and has been well received. The Director of Women's Institutes 
has asked that two copies be sent to each Institute in the Province, and t is 
hoped in view of the influence and importance of these organizations that arrange- 
ments can be made to carry out this request. There is no other organization in 
the Province that can do so much for the rural school as the Women's Institutes, 
and I am taking every opportunity of addressing them on this subject and am 
ready at all times to accept invitations for this purpose. 

The Hot Dish for the Rural School Lunch 

1 attach great importance to the school lunch, and the hot lunch at noon offers 
one of the best methods of approach to household science. Owing to the fact that 
many pupils live far from the school, it is impossible for them to go home for the 
mid-day meal, and they are thus dependent upon lunches which they bring with 
them. Very frequently they are allowed to eat their lunches where and how they 
please, and the method chosen is conducive neither to comfort nor to health. 

In many cases the lunch does not attract the pupil. It is often carried without 
proper wrapping in a tin pail and it then absorbs the taste of the tin : again, it is 
often wrapped in a newspaper and is flavoured with printer's ink; occasionally 
it is wrapped in cloth not too clean. Conditions such as these are not fair to the 
pupils. They come a long way to school, often over poor roads ; and it is necessary, 
for both their physical and their mental development that they should receive 
adequate nourishment served as attractively as possible. In practice the advan- 
tages of the hot lunch have been proved to be as follows : — 

(1) It enables the pupils to do better work in the afternoon. 

(2) It adds interest to the school work and makes the pupils more ready to go 
to school in bad weather. 

(3) It gives some practical training and paves the way towards definite in- 
struction in Household Science. 

(4) It gives a better balance to meals, and as compared with a cold lunch it j 
aids digestion. 

(5) It teaches neatness. 

(6) It gives opportunity to teach table manners. 

(7) It strengthens the relationship between the home and the school. 






1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Consolidation of Rural Schools 

We shall not be able to do all we can in the rural school until we have a system 
of consolidated schools. However, it would not be wise to wait, but do what can be 
done under existing conditions, and there will always be certain districts where con- 
solidation is not feasible or for various reasons cannot be brought about. One of the 
earliest arguments urged in favour of consolidation was its greater economy as com- 
pared with the old district system. However, in the gross amount of money expended 
consolidation as a rule costs more, and this fact should be squarely faced, it has 
been proved beyond contradiction, however, that the cost per pupil per month at the 
small school before consolidation is greater than the corresponding cost after 
the consolidation. That method which is the most successful in getting the largest 
number of children into a good school for the greatest number of da\s is in 
the last analysis the cheapest. 

The farmer should not be told that consolidation costs less, but that he is 
getting better value for the money he is spending. He must be taught to apply to 
his expenditure for education the principles he applies when he is purchasing a 
binder, a plough, or any other piece of farm machinery. If by the expenditure of 
a few dollars extra he can get a much better article it is economy, as a rule, to 
purchase the article costing the larger sum. C [ 

There are enough examples of successful consolidation in the United States 
to prove that when properly conducted it will solve many of the problems of rural 
education. Admitting this, the next question is how it may be brought about. If 
our schools were) managed by county or township boards of trustees consolidation 
would be a comparatively easy matter. Under the present state of the law the 
people themselves must vote on its adoption. The voters in the districts where 
consolidation is most needed are often loath to change, unprogressive in educa- 
tional affairs, jealous of those living in other districts, and lacking a proper con- 
ception of the importance of the best educational facilities. It has been said 
u Progress by consent of the voters is a slow and arduous undertaking. Matters 
involving the fate of nations are often settled more easily than are proposals for 
the improvement of the rural schools/' Under these circumstances a campaign 
is generally necessary in order to induce the people to adopt the plan. First, the 
general school, situation in the county should be studied. Unless this be done, 
several very undesirable things are likely to happen: a few isolated one-room 
schools may be left too far from the central school ; schools may be placed in dis- 
tricts where the population is changeable, necessitating a change later to a more 
favourable location; and more consolidated schools are likely to be organized than 
are actually required. This latter danger should be more carefully guarded 
against than in the case of the school section, as a consolidated school unwiselv 
located may easily encroach upon the field of neighbouring schools and thereby 
become a source of permanent irritation and annoyance. 

The data to be obtained in the study of the county situation consist of in- 
formation regarding the location and value of each school and its equipment, the 
distances the schools are apart, the number of teachers employed, together with 
their salaries and qualifications, so as to obtain some indication of the educa- 
tional conditions of the community; the location of the farm homes, the condi- 
tion of the roads, topographical features, such as streams, hills, etc. the number 
of pupils, their ages and scholastic attainments, the population depending upon 
each school, and the distance at present travelled by each pupil to reach the nearest 
school. 



78 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The data should be indicated on a map of the county, with all proposed con- 
solidations, the suggested wagon routes, and the probable number of pupils to 
each school. Such a map will give a clear and comprehensive view of the school 
situation as a whole. The compilation of the data does not mean that a widespread 
agitation for consolidation throughout the whole county should be begun at once. 
This would be a most unwise proceeding and would probably lead to failure. There 
are many communities that would strenuously oppose such a movement; there are 
many others with an open mind toward consolidation. In many localities the 
subject is not understood. In some places the opposition is stronger than in others, 
and this opposition may be best overcome by an actual examination of a school of 
the new type. 

The adoption of consolidation depends not only upon the way the people 
regard it, but also upon the feelings that exist between the communities that are 
to be parties to the consolidation. A community in which the best educational 
spirit prevails should be chosen for the initial experiment. The agitation should 
not be sprung upon the people suddenly, nor should they be given the idea that 
consolidation is to be forced upon them. A small committee consisting of the 
teachers of the schools to be consolidated might first be formed. The early dis- 
cussions should be for the purpose of giving information and not for argument. 
This information can be given by visiting in the homes and by describing some 
good schools to the children. 

This quiet campaign of instruction may be followed by a series of educational 
meetings at the schoolhouse and the church, and discussions through the news- 
papers. The normal school, the church, the high school, and the agricultural 
college should all be called upon for aid. The chief point to be aimed at is the 
creation of a desire for co-operation, and a broader, closer relationship between 
the different communities ; and if this can be accomplished, many of the difficulties 
will vanish. 

By this time the district may be ready for a really aggressive campaign. It 
is an excellent plan to have at this stage a lecture illustrated by lantern slides, 
picture charts, etc., given by some person who has made a thorough study of con- 
solidation. The Department of Education should provide this. Meetings of the 
people should be held in every schoolhouse, and combined meetings of all the 
sections should be held later. At these meetings the methods proposed for adop- 
tion and the advantages to be gained should be laid clearly before the people, 
•questions being invited and the fullest discussion encouraged. 

If the district has any wealthy farmers it might be possible to induce them to 
look upon the consolidated school as a fit object on which to expend their wealth. 
Why should not the rural school be endowed as well as the university ? The whole 
agitation should be kept up until the people are thoroughly aroused, and the vote 
should be taken when the interest is well established. In view of the splendid 
possibilities for the efficient teaching of agriculture, manual training, and house- 
hold science, and the general reorganization of country life, which the consolidated 
school provides, any efforts that may lead the people to adopt consolidation will 
be amply repaid in the securing of a richer country life and a more decided voca- 
tional efficiency among the dwellers in the open country. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ™ 

Letters from Teachers 

I may conclude this report with quotations from letters received from teachers 
who have lately commenced the teaching of household science in connection with 
the hot lunch: — ■ 

" I must thank you for converting the trustees here. We have all the equipment 
for the hot lunches and began work last Tuesday. They have been successful so far, 
even though the cocoa did scorch once. At the annual meeting it was voted on and 
carried unanimously. Besides being good for the children, the honour even of giving 
out teaspoons is a goal to be sought for by the first class. So we all have the benefit. 
Thanking youfor your kindness." 

" I am one of the teachers who was present at the recent trustees' meeting in 
Shelburne, and wish to introduce the " Hot Lunch " system in my school. For that 
purpose we held a ratepayers' meeting to-night and the motion was! adopted with a 
large majority." 

" We have got the hot dish for lunch going. The Board did not favour it, but as 
the children were anxious we are going to manage it with no cost to the Board but 
the oil used in cooking. Our variety covers only three dishes yet — cocoa, apple sauce 
and soup — but by the end of the month we hope to have macaroni and cheese and 
scalloped potatoes. . . . The interest in what we have attempted so far has been 
excellent. The boys peel the apples and wash the dishes as cheerfully as the girls do." 

" A boy of twelve came to me last May who was known in the surrounding country 
as a ' tough one.' I soon discovered that he was on the downward road and travelling- 
very quickly. ... I am glad to say I can see a great improvement in him and I 
firmly believe that more was accomplished by securing his interest in school through 
manual training than any other way. He was very fond of using tools and has been a 
good help to me in successfully commencing the new work in our school. . . . The 
school is one-roomed, there being no basement. But with all we found plenty of room 
for the equipment. I am having a work-bench made by a carpenter in my section 
and have planned it so there will be a large drawer which can be locked, with compart- 
ments for the tools. ... I find that the children are very eareful with the equip- 
ment and take great pride in the care of it! Each child has a book in which his sewing 
is kept, also the recipes given in the cooking lessons. As the equipment itself costs 
more than the amount of the grant this year I am depending on the children to help 
with the supplies and they have not as yet needed a hint. Since the first sewing 
lesson contributions ranging from the finest silks to the coarsest material, not mention- 
ing the needles and thread of every hue, have been brought until I have to stop them. 
. . . I am very glad I put my boys in the sewing and cooking classes. They are as 
interested as the girls and are really doing the better work and the girls do enjoy the 
manual training. In the manual training we are spending the first few lessons in 
mending any broken furniture about the school. . . . One day the boys caught a 
rabbit at recess and the children begged to have that rabbit for dinner, so I superin- 
tended the dressing of it, and we roasted it in the toaster, and if you care for rabbit 
meat at all you would have enjoyed a morsel of that, because it really was delicious." 

" In our school we have a large table which we use each day' for dinner. Two girls 
spread the table cloth; another places the flowers in the centre. Each girl in II, III, IV 
grades has her work to do, and in five minutes the table is set." 

" It is such a splendid undertaking that I wish I could do ' missionary work ' along 
this line in every school in the vicinity. We need you, Mr. Leake, for this work. If 
you could visit every section we soon would have household science in every school. 
Truly it is ' missionary work,' for the heathen are not all in foreign lands. When the 
teachers who are real ' live wires ' have to deal with School Boards who are as ' dead as 
door nails/ believe me it is martyrdom. I explained this phase of the Household Science 
to my secretary-treasurer, and he seemed a little favourable. A week later I learned 
that he had interviewed the rest of the Board, and they opposed the entire scheme, call- 
ing it all ' new fangled nonsense,' and suggesting that the sooner such nonsense was 
stopped the better for the school. I requested a meeting of the Board. After I had 
preached my little sermon the entire Board was enthusiastic for the ' hot dinners ' and 
wrote out the $40.00 cheque for me with instructions to instal in the school room the 
necessary equipment at once. This we have done." % 



80 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



" The main obstacle, of course, was the financial one. Since the trustees could not 
be persuaded to furnish the money for utensils, I bought the necessary ones, and the 
children each brought a little money from home for the necessary supplies. . . . We 
made a very nice cupboard with several shelves in it. Each child has his own nail for 
his cup and place for his spoon. On one shelf we' keep supplies, on another towels, and 
utensils on another. Over the front we have a pretty curtain. . . . The children 
are all so interested in work of this description and appreciate the hot drink so much. 
It seems to make them more anxious to attend school, and I also find their afternoon's 
work is much improved." 

In concluding this report, I wish to thank you, sir, for the interest you have 
displayed in the work in which I am engaged and for the encouragement you have 
already given me in its prosecution. My thanks are also clue to the Deputy Minister 
and to the Superintendent, who have been always ready with reliable advice and 
helpful suggestions in dealing with situations that are often troublesome and 
difficult. 

T am, yours obediently, 

Albert H. Leake, 
Toronto, January, 1919. 



\ 






1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 81 



APPENDIX F 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ELEMENTARY 
AGRICULTURAL CLASSES 

To the Honoubable H. J. Cody, M.A., B.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sib, — I beg to submit for your consideration a report on the Elementary 
Agricultural Classes in connection with the schools of the Province for the year 
1918. 

I have the honour to be. 

Sir, 

Your obedient. servant, 

J. B. Dandeno, 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes, 
January, 1919. 



The duties of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes include: (1) 
The inspection of Agricultural classes in Collegiate Institutes, High Schools, Con- 
tinuation Schools and in Normal Schools; (2) a general supervision of the teaching 
of Agriculture in the Public and Separate Schools, including the approving of 
teachers' reports and trustees' statements; (3) attendance upon Teachers' Insti- 
tutes and taking part in the programmes as frequently as possible; (4) visiting 
Secondary Schools which have not yet introduced classes in Agriculture to discuss 
the situation; (5) addressing public meetings, such as township institutes, county 
trustees' associations, county councils and the like, with the object of explaining the 
situation with respect to the teaching of Agriculture in the schools; (6) a super- 
vision of the Summer Courses for teachers at the Ontario Agricultural College. 

Ungraded Schools 

Agriculture is quite rapidly becoming established throughout the Province of 
Ontario as one of the subjects of the Course of Study. The subject is optional 
and Boards of Trustees may introduce it or not as they see fit. There is a con- 
siderable feeling among Inspectors, Teachers and others that this subject should 
now be made an obligatory subject in all rural schools. As there always has been, 
and is still, a feeling among the farmers themselves in opposition to the introduc- 
tion of Agriculture, it would seem to be the wisest mode of procedure to break 
down this spirit of opposition by propaganda and argument, by example and illus- 
tration, rather than by a prescribed regulation. The work is making such satis- 
factory progress without any compulsion that, for the present, at least, it should 



82 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

be left as an optional subject. If the subject, as an option, becomes general we 
shall be justified in assuming that the country people are not only ready to support 
it, but are convinced of its importance as a regular subject for the curriculum of a 
rural school. The following quotation indicates something of the general 
situation : — 

When we started teaching agriculture the majority of the people were opposed to 
it. They are rapidly changing their opinion now. One of the most prejudiced men 
even invited me to take my class to see him pack his bees for winter. We went. . . 
. . . Next year we will have a school garden on the school grounds. 

M. A. Foley, Teacher, 

Hudson School, Nipissing. 

Opposition is rapidly passing away, and in a recently settled district, such as 
Nipissing, the work is especially applicable. 

If the young pupils are induced to take a greater interest in Agriculture the 
parents are also likely to do so. The following statement, not at all uncommon in 
reports from schools in which this subject is taken, calls attention to what is one of 
the best features of the work : — 

Pupils now look on farming as one of the most dignified and useful forms of labour 
in which they can engage. A. E. Scott, Teacher, 

Schumacher, Algoma. 

The influence upon the home life of the pupils may be inferred to a certain 
extent from this quotation : — 

I am sending you a few specimens of potatoes and other vegetables taken from our 
school garden. The pupils and comimunity have taken a great interest in our school 
garden and have given considerable time and energy to make it a success. We realized 
some $15.00 from the sale of the products. This is being utilized in getting pictures 
to decorate our school. A number of the pupils who will be leaving school next year 
are planning to have gardens of their own to make pocket money for themselves. 

MlNA CURRIE. 

S.S. No. 2, Devlin, Rainy River. 

The work of the school garden has therefore some direct influence upon the 
occupation at home. This being the case, pupils will likely see greater possibilities 
in farm life and, therefore, will not be influenced to so great an extent by the lures 
of the large city. 

To make the best out of the teaching of Agriculture in the rural schools, some, 
or all, of. the material grown in the school garden should be used in the school for 
the noon lunch. In this way a certain amount of domestic science of the very best 
kind can be carried on. Note the following: — 

Seme of the produce — two bags of potatoes — of the garden were kept for our hot 
noon lunch. . . . E'ach child brought a soup dish, cup, spoon, fork and table napkin. 
All but the largest of the cooking utensils as well as additional supplies were brought 
in. The Boardi supplied the oil stove. 

This is the best possible use that could be made of the produce of the school 
garden. In some schools certain material was canned for use in the classes. The 
foregoing related particularly to schools in the newer parts of the province. 

The school garden is rapidly becoming an essential part of the equipment for 
the teaching of Agriculture, and also an important factor in domestic science. The 
following taken from a rpport by the teacher bears out this point: — ■ 

I feel sure that the work was successful and that the pupils were; interested. We 
had a garden 100 feet by 150 feet, and in it we grew vegetables from which we sold 
about six dollars' worth, and the rest we put in the cellar for use by the domestic science 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 83 

class for noon lunches during the winter — one and a half bags; of potatoes, ten baskets 
of carrots, three baskets of beans, two baskets of parsnips, and two baskets of kohl rabi 
and salsify. The domestic science class canned six baskets of tomatoes and dried five 
dozen ears of corn all obtained from the garden. 

E. M. Moffatt, Teacher, 

Ancaster. 

It should be noted that the practical side, important in its way, is only 
secondary when compared to the educational side. The lessons in cultivation of 
the crops named and the experiments in canning both have to do with far-reaching 
problems in science. Quoting from another report: — 

Agriculture has been taught for several years in this school, with which there has 
been a school garden for experimental work. Bach year has shown an increased interest, 
not only of pupils, but also of parents, who have donated seeds, flowers, bulbs, etc., for 
vegetable and flower gardens. For two years the pupils have worked with a " cold 
frame " in which has been grown lettuce and radisb.es for early use and other plants 
for transplanting. The products of the garden were exhibited this year for the first 
time at the County Fair. 

A. L. Dunning, Teacher, 

Cumberland, Russell Co. 

As has already been pointed out, the work of the school in this direction 
particularly has an important bearing upon the homes : — 

A few out-door bulbs and hardy perennials grown at school have been so interesting 
and satisfactory that perennial borders are appearing in different parts of the section. 
Along with this might be mentioned a well-kept lawn that has set a good example which 
several have followed. 

C. E. Smith, Teacher, 

S.S. No. 3, Edwardsburg. 

Quoting from another teacher in the same county : — 

Our school grounds are about one acre in extent, and therefore will not permit of 
having a large school garden. The location of the grounds is, however, ideal, situated 
as they are on the banks of the St. Lawrence on the main highway between Brockville 
and Prescott. 

N. Powell, Teacher ■> 
iS.S. No. 1, Augusta, Blue Church School. 

W liar an influence for good is a well kept school ground on the main road. 
In some cases, where the Board has provided a lawn mower as part of the equip- 
ment, the boys have not only trimmed up the grass on the ground about the school 
building, but also the roadside in front. 

Occasionally we hear objections offered to the teaching of Agriculture on the 
ground that it might interfere with the work of the regular obligatory subjects. 
There is nothing in this objection as stated in the following : — 

We do not find that agriculture in any way interferes with other branches of study; 
on the other hand, it furnishes material for many lessons in other subjects— art, nature 
study, geography. 

F. Metcalf, Teacher, 

S.S. No. 11, Augusta. 

The improvement of conditions contributing to the education and develop- 
ment of rural school pupils is of far-reaching importance. The standing of Cana- 
dian citizenship in the future rests largely upon the boys and girls now in attend- 
ance at the rural schools. These boys and girls are now working in rural schools 
many of whose buildings and sanitary equipment are altogether inadequate. Even 



84 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

the lighting, heating, and ventilation are, in very many cases, not what one would 
expect to find. When these conditions in country schools are compared with 
similar conditions in our cities, we can ; easily see one reason why people move from 
the country to the city. Why should city children — many of them foreign— have 
so many more comforts than country children? It is not here contended that city 
children have better accommodations than should be provided, but rather that 
country children deserve something better than they now have. They should not 
be regarded as a by-product merely. 

Agricultural education is accomplishing something in the direction of im- 
provement in the matter of increased interest and enjoyment of the school pro- 
gramme and, to some extent, in beautifying the grounds and building; but much 
yet remains to be done. Farmers are sometimes willing enough to lend assistance 
when they are led to see what really can be done by a teacher who will lead. In a 
certain school, when the teacher asked for a fence in front of the school building, 
the trustee replied that he attended the same school, and if it was good enough for 
him it ought to do for his children. The teacher took the matter into her own 
hands, and with the aid of the pupils, boys and girls, levelled up the ground in 
front, cleared off stones, cans, and wire, and planted a flower bed. She had part 
of the land plowed up for a school garden. The change for the better was so 
noticeable that a new fence was put up the next year, new closets built, and in 
fact the teacher now can get what she asks for. 

The teaching of Agriculture has, as a rule, a tendency towards improvement 
of grounds and buildings. It has also a tendency to increase the interest of the 
farmers in their schools. 

It might be well to point out that the amount of money spent in the encourage- 
ment of the teaching of Agriculture in the rural schools is money wisely spent since 
it promotes, as I have already stated, not only the development of Agriculture and 
the consequent enrichment of the country, but it also encourages a keener appre- 
ciation of farm life. Moreover, through the school gardens and home project* 
of schools conducting classes in Agriculture,, an amount estimated from the reports 
of teachers and Boards at $120,000, was produced in 191*8. 

The Close of the War 

There is no institution upon which the war situation has so great an influence 
as that of the rural school; and rightly so, the children in the rural schools are 
truly Canadian, many of them with two or three generations of Canadian ances- 
tors, and these ancestors are very largely from the British isles. In the cities — 
the larger cities particularly — foreigners from other European countries are 
rapidly becoming an important part of the school population; not so in the case 
of the country schools. And there is nothing surer than that rural boys and girls 
will become leaders in the Province in the next generation. It will be largely 
these boys and girls who will shape the destiny of Canada. 

The war conditions have caused people to think as never before. People 
realize now that a large portion of the efforts of human lives have had to do 
with unessentials. To carry on the war these inessentials were brushed aside and 
people were brought face to face with fundamentals. 

The following list shows the graded and ungraded schools conducting classes 
in Agriculture during the whole or part of the year 1917. Graded and ungraded 
schools are not separated in this list: — 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



>:, 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year 1917 


Algoma — L. A. Green 


11 E. Luther 


6 Oxford 


1 Aberdeen & Galbraith 


4 Melancthon 


7 " 

8 " 
13 u 


2 Johnston 


6 - " 


4 Koran 


10 


1 Laird 


U 12 Mono & Amaranth 


16 


4 Laird & MacDonald 


U 13 '• & 7 Adjala 


17 


3 Lefroy 


1 Mulmur 




1 MacDonald 


4 " 


Glengarry—/. W. Crewson 


2 " 




1 Charlottenburg 


4 


Dund.vs — J. W. Forrester 


2 " 


1 Tarbutt 


Chestervllle 


3 
6 


2 " & Laird 


1 Matilda 


1 Tarentorus 


2 " 


10 


2 


4 " 


12 


3 


5 


13 


2 Thessalon 


6 


15 


4 


7 " 


17 


3 St. Joseph 


8 " 


18 


4 
Brant — T. W. Standing 


9 

9% & 15 Matilda 
10 Matilda 


U21& A. " 
9 Icenyon 
11 


14 Brantford 


12 u 


15 


23 


13 " 


16 " 

22 " 


15 Burford 


14 " 


21 " 


15 " 


2 Lancaster 


5 Oakland. 


16 
1 17 " 
18 "- 


5 


Brant — E. E. C. Kilmer 


6 
7 
17 
1 Lochiel 
5 " 

11 " 

12 " 
14 " 

Maxville. 


Brantford : 


19 ** 


Dufferin 
Ryerson 


23 " 

Morrisburg 




1 Mountain 


Brlxe-^7. McCool 


2 


7 Amabel 


3 & 14^ Mountain 


2 Brant 
2 Carrick 


4 Mountain 
5 


4 


6 




6 


7 


Grey— R. Wright 


13 




2 Bentinck 


Tara 


Grey — H. H. Burgess 


8 " 




2 Derby 


9 Egremont 


Bruce— W. F. Bald 


2 " & Sydenham 


9 Glenelg 


15 Bruce 
11 Culross 


4 Sullivan 
5 


16 Normanby 


2 Huron 

3 " 


12 Sydenham 
16 


Haltox, etc.— J. M. Denizes 


13 *' 


14 Beverly 


U3 Kincardine 


GitENVTLLE — T. A. Craig 


U.A.E. Etequesing 


8 Kincardine 


1 Augusta 


1 Esquesing 


9 " 


5 " & 19 Edwardsb 


urg 2 


1 Saugeen 


7 


3 
6 
3 Nassagaweya 


Carleton 1 — Thos. Jamieson 


9 

10 
11 
13 

1 Edwardsburg 

8 • " 
10 
13 


6 Fitzroy 


5 


3 Gloucester 


6 


5 
U3 North Gower 


3 Nelson 

4 '* 


11 Osgoode 


8 


1 Torbolton 
5 


11 " 


14 


15 " 


Dufferin — W. R. Liddy 


27 


2 Trafalgar 


3 Amaranth 


1 S. Gower 


3 ** 


5 


3 S. " 


6 


11 


1 Oxford & 5 Marlborough 7 


4 E. Garafraxa 


3 " 


8 


16 E. " & Amaranth 5 


18 



86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year 1917 — Continued 


Hastings — J. E. Minns 


1 Chatham & Camden 


12 Dover 


12 Huntington 


2 


14 " 


13 Hungerford 


4 


5 Raleigh 


6 Madoc 


18 


U6 " & Dover 


7 " 


1 Harwich 


7 


11 Marmora 


2 


9 


3 Rawdon 


2i/ 2 " & Raleigh 


12 


13 


3 


1 Romney 




4 


2 


Hastings — H. J. Clarke 


5y 2 " 


4 " & 12 Mersea 


2 Sidney (Avondale) 


6~ 


5 


2 " (Bayside) 


7 


7 


5 " 


9 


1 Tilbury B. & Raleigh 


13 " 


10 


2E " B. 


19 


11 


2W " B. 


20 


12 


3N " E., 


22 


13 


3S " E. 


23 " 


i3y 2 " 


3M " E. 


Hastings — H. J. Clarke 


14 
17 


4 " E. 
7 " EL 


1 Thurlow 


3 

9 " 


1 Howard 




2 


Lanark — F. L. Michell 


12 & 14 " 


3 


2 Bathurst 


20 


4 " 


3 


22 


10 


4 


4 Tyendinaga 
10 


12 
14 


5 
6 


11 " 


16 


12 


14 " 


2 Orford 


18 


15 


3&4" 


1 Burgess 


29 


9 


7 




10 


6 Dalhousie 


Huron — J. E. Tom 


11 


11 Drummond 


8 Ashfield 


12 


12 


Bayfield 


3 Raleigh 


13 


Exeter 


3 " & Harwich 


15 


4 Goderich 


4 


16 


2 Hay 


5 


17 


3 " 


10 


Lanark 


6 '* 


1 Zone 


8 Lanark 


7 " 


2 " 


12 


8 " 


H 3 " 


1 N. Sherbrooke 


14 " 


- 4 " 




6 Stanley 


5 " 


Lanark E. and Carleton W. 


14 




— W. C. Froats 


4 Usborne 


Kent— J. H. Smith 


4 Beckwith 


5 


1 Chatham 


5 


6 Usborne & Stephen 


2 


7 


2 W. Wawanosh 


3 


U10 


3 


5 


4 Goulburn 


17 


6 


5 


Huron — J. M. Field 


6 S. " 
7 
8 
9 
10 


6 

8 

10 
13 
16 " 


8 Gray 
11 " 

4 Morris & Turnberry 
11 " 


11 


1 Huntley 


Kent— W. H. 0. Colles 


14 


3 


3 Camden 


17 


6 Marlborough 


U3 " and Chatham 


19 


1 Montague 


4 


2 Dover 


2 


U4 


4 " 


4 


5 


5 " 


6 


8 


6 " 


15 


10 


8 " 


1 Pakenham 


12 


11 '* 


2 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



87 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year 1917— Continued 


6 Pakenham 


Lincoln — Geo. Care foot 


5 


London 


7 


6 Caistor 


8 


<< 


1 Ramsay 


1 Clinton & 2 Louth 


12 


" 


6&7" 


U3 Clinton & 4 Louth 


13 


« 


8 


3 Gainsborough 


14 


<« 


11 


4 


16 


<« 




1 Grantham 


17 


<« 


Lambton — Henry Conn 


2 & 8 Louth 


19 


(< 


8 Bosanquet 


3 


20 




7 Plympton 


6 


23 




1 Sarnia 


12 S. Grimsby 




Lucan 


3 


1 Louth 


3 


McGillivray 


6 Sombra 


Merritton 


5 


" 


11 


3 Louth, and 4 Clinton, 


8 


" 


19 


Vineland 


12 


«< 


Wyoming 




13 


<< 




Middlesex — H. D. Johnson 


14 


" 


Lambton — <N. McDougall 


6 Adelaide 

7 


15 

18 


I 


3 Brooke 




5 
17 


9 


1 


W. Nissouri 


11 


2 


" 


10 Dawn 


U 1 Caradoc & Ldbo 


3 


(C 


20 Etnniskillen 


2 

4 " 


6 

8 


<« 


22 " 

23 n 


8 


9 


<« 


1 Euphemia 
3 " 


12 
15 


10 
11 


it 




5 Ekfrid 


13 


It 




11 " 


1 


Westminster 


Lennox & Addington — M. R. 


3 Lobo 


3 




Reid 
6 Sheffield Con. 


6 " 

7 " 


4 
4 


" (Brick St.) 
" (Pipe Line) 




10 " 


5 


" 


Leeds — W. C. Dowsley 


1 Metcalfe 


7 


<« 


2 Elizabeth town 


3 


10 


« 


7 


6 


11 


it 


8 


14 


13 


" 


10 


11 Mosa 


14 


a 


13 


3 E. Williams 


15 


'* 


17 


■6 


17 


tt 


19 


10 W. Williams 


18 


" 


1 Kitley 




18 


& 21 Westminster & 


4 & 7 Kitley & Elmsley 


Middlesex — P. J. Thompson 




N. Dorchester 


13 Kitley 


4 & 12 Biddulph 


19 


& 5 Westminster & 


16 " 


5 Biddulph 




Delaware 


1 & 3 Young & Elizabeth 


6 


23 


Westminster 


Leeds — J. F. McGuire 
3 Bastard & Burgess S. 


1 Delaware 

2 

3 


Middlesex — C. B. Edwards 
Tecumseh, London 


7 


4 


Manitoulin — J. W. Haqan 


15 


5 


1 


Robinson 


2 S. Crosby 


6 






3 


2 N. Dorchester 


Muskoka — H. R. Scovell 


5 


3 N. 


2 Macaulay 


16 


4 N. Dorchester 




Port Carling 


5 S. Elmsley 
1 Leeds & Lansc 
4 " 

10 " 

13 " 


lowne Ft. 

< 


6 & 10 N. Dorchester 

7 N. Dorchester 

8 N. 
15 N. 

9 & 19 Westminster & 


Northumberland & Durhai 
—A. Odell 
3 Cavan 
10 Hamilton 
12 
7 Hope 


16 " 

17 " 


< 


Dorchester 
1 & 1 London and 


2 " 


Rr. 


N. Dorchester 


Northumberland — Root. 


4 " 


1 


1 London 




Boyes 


7 


M 


3&10" 


2 


Brighton & 3 Cram ah e 


8 


' 


4 


11 


Seymour 



ss 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year 1917— Con tin utd 


Norfolk — H. Frank 


Cook 


Oxford — R. A. Patterson 


9 


Blanshard 


11 Charlotteville 




2 N. Norwich 


10 


<< 


18 




U 5 S. Norwich, N. Norwich 


011 


" 


8 Houghton & 15 


Bayham 


& Dereham 


14 


" & Fullarton 


10 




2 W. Oxford 


3 


Downie 


4 Middleton 




7 " 


4 


" 


13 






5 


<< 


23 Walsingham 




Parry Sound — /. L. Moore 
Ul Chapman & Croft 


6 

7 


a 


Nipissing — D. M. Christie 




8 


" 


1 Ferris 




Port Arthur — J. Ritchie 


9 


" 


King Edward 


School 


Prospect Ave. 


10 


" 


(North Bay; 




: ' (Model) 


2 


S. Easthope 


5 Widdifield 




Peel — W. J. Galbraith 


4 


" 






6 Albion 


8 


M 


Ontario — R. A. Hh 


tchison 


10 Caledon 


16 


a 


4 E. Pickering 




13 


2 


Fullarton 


8 




14 


3 


•' 


11 




15 


4 


" & Downie 


9 Reach 




1 Chinguacousy 


5 


" 


2 Whitby 




4 


5 


Logan & Ellice 






10 


6 


Fullarton 


Ontario North — J. 


R. Fer- 


16 


1 


Hibbert 


guson 




22 


2 


" 


7 Brock 




4 Toronto Gore & Chin- 


3 


14 


1 Mara 




guacousy 


4 


" 


7 " 




8 Toronto 


5 


" 


10 " 




11 


6 


" 


5 Scott 




14 Toronto & 21 Chingua- 


7 


" 


3 Thorah 




cousy 




Stratford Schools: 


4 Uxbridge 




16 Toronto 




Avon 


6 




Perth — Wm. Irwin 




Brunswick St. 
Falstaff 


Oxford — J. M. Cole 




1 N. Easthope 




Hamlet 


4 Blandford 




2 




Romeo 


8 Blandford & 4 


Blenheim 


3 




Shakespeare 


1 Blenheim 




4 






2 " & 22 


Bur ford 


5 


Peterborough" — Richard Lees 


2 " & 3 Wilmot 


6 N. & S. Easthope 


3 


Dummer 


6 Blenheim 




7 N. Easthope 


13 Otonabee 


7 




8 N. Easthope & Ellice 


16 




9 
10 
11 




4 Ellice 
9 
10 


Peterborough — A. Mowat 




Queen Alexandra School. 


13 




1 El ma 


Prescott & Russell — John 


14 




9 " 




Nelson 


18 




U 9 " & Mornington 


4 


Cumberland 


24 




5 Logan 


5 


<< 


25 




U6 " 


10 


N. Plantagenet 


Embro 




8 " 






1 E. Nissouri 




10 " 


Prince Edward — B. E. Benson 


2 " " 




11 " 


2 Ameliasburg 


3 " " 




1 Mornington 


3 


" 


7 " " 




3 


11 


" 


11 " " 




4 


3 


Athol 


2 E. Zorra 




7 


5 


Hallowell 


6 " " 




12 


6 


" 


8 " 




20 Mornington, Peel, "Wei- 


7 


" 


10 " " 




lesley & Maryboro 


11 


" 


11 " " 




5 Wallace 


13 


" 


13 " " 






10 


Hillier 


15 " " 




Perth — Jas. H. Smith 




Mary St. 


2 W. Zorra 




3 Blanshard 


6 


N. Marysburg 


3 " " 




5 


5 Sophiasburgh 


5 " " 




6 


13 


'• 


8 " « 




7 




York St., Picton 






1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



89 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year, 1917 — Continued 



Renfrew — /. D. Breuls 

6 Alice 

7 Bromley 

6 Ross 

3 Wilberforce 
8 

Renfrew — G. G. McNab 

10 Admaston 
5 Horton 

1 McNab 

8 

Victoria, Renfrew 

Simcoe— Isaac Day 

8 Matchedash, & Tay 

4 Medonte 

2 Oro & Vespra 

5 " & Medonte 
8 " 

17 " 

19 " & Vespra 

2 S. Orillia 

3 N. 

11 N. 

15 N. 

Simcoe — J. L. Garvin 

7 Flos 

12 Tiny 

Stormont — Jos. Froats 

8 Cornwall 

Timiskaming — J. A. Bannis- 
ter 

1 Evanturel 
1 Hudson 

1 & 4 Kearns 
3 Savard/ 

2 Tisdale 

Victoria— W. H. Stevens 
2 Card en 

16 Mariposa 

6 Ops 

Victoria— G. E. Broderick 
5 Emily 

2 Smith 

3 " 

5 " 

7 Verulam 
9 

Waterloo — L. Norman 

4 Waterloo 
19 

12 Wilmot 
17 

Waterloo — W. F. Sheppard 

6 Waterloo 
4 Wellesley 



7 Wellesley 
8 
11 " & Woolwich 

6 Woolwich 

WELLAxiy— J. W. Marshall 
10 Bertie 
6 Crowland 
2 Devlin 
10 Humberstone 
U2 Stamford & Thorold 
4 
6 
9 
U 1 Thorold & Stamford 

Wellington — J. J. Craig 
4 Eramosa 
9 

2 Guelph 
3 
6% & 7 Guelph 

2 Nichol 

3 Puslinch 

Guelph — Wm. Tytlcr 
Torrance 

Wellington — R. Galhra itJi. 

1 Maryborough 

2 Minto 

4 Peel 

Wentwoeth — J. B. Robinson 
2 Ancaster 
5 

7 



10 
11 
12 
15 
U 3 Barton 

3 

5 

6 

6 

7 

3 

7 



& 20 Beverly 



(Ontiora) 
& Ancaster 
(U.James St. S. 
(Rychman's) 



Beverly 



Binbrook 

Burlington Beach 

E. Flamboro 

E. & W. Flamboro 

W. Flamboro 
<< << 

Glanford 
Salt, fleet 



(Lee School) 
(Pine Crest) 
Wellington St. School 
(Hamilton) 



York — A. A. Jordan 
Markham 

2 Markham 
6 

7 

8 
10 
12 
14 
17 
18 
19 
20 

1 Scarboro 

4 

5 

7 

9 
10 
12 
14 
lfi 

3 York 

4 " 

5 " 
7 " 
9 " 

11 " 

12 " 

14 " 

15 » 
23 " 

26 " 

27 " 

30 " 

York— C. W. Mullop 

4 Georgina 

3 B. Gwillimbury 

5 " 

5 N. 
10 Whitchurch 

York — A. Lr. Campbell 

5 Etobicoke 
10 
12 
13 
14 

5 Vaughan 

8 
17 
18 

19 York 
22 " 

28 " 

31 " 

32 " 

33 " 

York — Walter Bryce { To- 
ronto) 
Frankland School 



90 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Calendar Year, 1917— Continued 



R. C. Separate Schools 



Bennett, J. M. 
4 Asphodel 

4 Emily- 
Immaculate Conception 

10 Loughboro' 
3 Mara 
8 Otonabee 

5 Percy 

3 Seymour 
12 
5 Sheffield 
■St. Mary's (Lindsay) 
St. Peter's (Peterboro) 
Sacred Heart 
(Peterboro) 
St. Gregory's (Whitby) 

Finn, J. P. 

Eganville 



ze, W. J. 


1 Niehol 


6 Arthur 


8 Peel 


2 Ashfield 


12 " 


1 Carrick 


6 Stephen 


1 " & Culross 


7 Sydenham 


2 " & Culross 


St. James' (Huron) 


10 


iSt. Mary's (Barrie) 


14 


St. Patrick's (6 Proton) 


Collingwood (St. 


13 Waterloo 


Mary's) 


4 Wellesley 


6 Ellice 


10 W. Williams 


Elora 




5 Glenelg 
7 " 


Sullivan, J. F. 


Hanover 


3 Biddulph 


4 Hibbert 


6 


2 Hullett 


2 Maidstone 


4 Mornington 


6 McGillivray 


Owen Sound (St. 


5 Raleigh 


Mary's) 


7 Sandwich S. 



Owing to a change in the regulations requiring annual reports covering the 
school year instead of the calendar year as heretofore, -special reports are being 
submitted as indicated below and the graded and ungraded schools are listed 
separately : — 

Ungraded Schools Maintaining Classes in Agriculture for the School Year, 
September, 1917, to June, 1918 



Algoma — L. A. Green 

1 Lefroy 

2 St. Joseph 

Cableton — Willis Froats 
2 Huntley 

Dufferin — W. R. Liddy 
4 East Luther 

Durham — W. E. Tilley 
10 Darlington 

Elgin East — J. G. Smith 
14 Malahide 
4 Southwold 

Grey — H. H. Burgess 
7 (Sullivan 

Hastings — J. E. Minns 
10 Huntingdon 

Hastings — H. J. Clarke 
4 Thurlow 
9 Tyendinaga 

Huron — J. E. Tom 
U 3 E. Wawanosh & Morris 
4 W. 

10 E. 

Kent— W. H. G. Golles 
7 Camden 

11 Howard 
14 



Lambton — Henry Gonn 

4 Moore 

Leeds — J. F. McGuire 
11 Bastard 
11 Leeds & Lans. Ft. 

Middlesex — H. D. Johnson 
3 Caradoc 
1 Lobo 

Middlesex — P. J. Thompson 
16 N. Dorchester 

13 McGillivray 
7 W. Nissouri 

5 Westminster 
16 

Northumberland — R. Boyes 

1 & 5 Murray & Amelias- 

burg 

Ontario — R. A. Hutchinson 

2 Reach 

Perth — Wm. Irwin 
7 El ma 
U 3 Wallace, Elma & Grey 
3 
4 

Peterboro — R. Lees 
11 Dummer 

Prince Edward — J. E. 
Benson 

14 Hallowell 



Renfrew — 1. D. Breuls 

7 Bromley 

Simcoe — Isaac Day 

12 Matchedash 

3 Medonte 

8 Orillia 

9 Oro 

Temiskaming — J. A. 
Bannister 
1 Armstrong 

Waterloo — L. Norman 
21 N. Dumfries 

Welland — J. W. Marshall 

13 Bertie 

4 Wainfleet 

Wellington — R. Galoraith 

4 Peel 

Wellington — J. J. Graig 

1 Erin 

4% Guelph 

York — A. L. Campbell 

2 Vaughan & Markham 

York — G. W. Mulloy 

5 Georgina 

2 E. Gwillimbury 
19 King 

1 King & Whitchurch 

2 Whitchurch 
12 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



91 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture 


January=June, 1918 


Algoma — L. A. Green 


13 


Matilda 


7 Hope 


1 Aberdeem 


14 


«< 


12 


<< 


2 Johnson 


15 


" 


5 


Manvers 


3 Korah 


16 


" 


16 


<< 


4 


17 


" 






1 Laird 


18 


<< 


Elgin — J. C. Smith 


4 " & MacDonald 


19 


«« 


1 


Bayham 


1 MacDonald 


23 


" 


3 


" 


4 Plummer 


1 


Mountain 


4 


" 


1 Prince 


2 


<< 


6 & 7 " & Malahide 


3 St. Joseph 


3 


& liy 2 Mountain 


10 


<< 


2 Tarentorus 


4 


Mountain 


11 


" 


3 


5 


<< 


14 


" 


2 Tarbutt & Laird 


7 


« 


17 


" 


2 Thessalon 


9 


« 


8 


S. Dorchester 




10 


« 


1 


Malahide 


Brant — T. W. Standing 


11 


« 


2 


<< 


14 Brantford 


12 


<« 


3 


<< 


16 Burford 


13 
14 


«« 


5 


« 


21 & 5 Burford & Oakland 


u 


6 


<< 


Bruce — W. F. Bald 


15&17 " 


8 

9 

11 


«< 


15 Bruce 
6 Carrick 

13 
2 Huron 


16 
17 
18 


(« 


& 16 Malahide & Yar- 
mouth 


22&23 " 


16 
18 
21 
13 


Malahide 


13 


1 


Williamsburg 


<< 


3 Kincardine 

8 

9 


3 
4 


<< 


« 


5 


<< 


1 


Southwold 


1 Saugeeri 


6 

7 


<< 


3 

6 


a 


Carleton — Thomas Jamieson 


8 


«< 


8 


" 


6 Fitzroy 


9 


" 


9 


(i 


3 Gloucester 


10 


c« 


11 


" 


3 North Grower ' 


11 


« 


12 


' 


7 Osgoode 


12 


(< 


14 


" 


11 


13 


« 


15 


" 


1 Torbolton 


14 


<« 


19 


<( 


5 


16 


« 


21 






17&24 " 


6 


Yarmouth 


Dufferin — W. R. Liddy 


2 £19 " 


7 


<( 


3 Amaranth 


20 
21 


« 


8 


<« 


5 North Amaranth 


<4 


13 


<( 


12 Amaranth & Mona 


22 


<< 


17 


<< 


20 


4 


Winchester 


24 


<( 


4 E. Garafraxa 


5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 




27 


<< 


4 B. Luther 


<< 






11 E. 


« 


Elgin 


— J. A. Taylor 


2 Melanctho* 


«( 


1 Aldborough 


4 


<« 


2 


t 




10 
1 Mulmur 


<< 


3 

7 


i 




4 


12 


<< 


8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
14 
15 
1 


\ 




Dundas — J. ^f. Forrester 
1 Matilda 
2 
4 
5 
6 


14 
15 
16 
18 
20 
21 


<< 

<< 
<( 
<< 


Dunwi 


ch 


7 " 


Durham — W. E. Tillev 


6 


<< 


8 " 


4 


Clarke 


U6 


" & 22 Southwold 


9 


17 


" 


7 


«< 


9y 2 & 15 Matilda 


3 


Cavan 


9 


u 


10 Matilda 


17 


Darlington 


14 


" 


11 " 


10 


Hamilton 


14 


9. Dunwich 


12 " 


12 


(« 


Rodne 


y 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture, January=June, 1918 — Continued 


Essex — Dr. Maxwell 


10 Sydenham 


Huron— Dr. J. M. Field 


2 Colchester N. 


12 " 


8 Grey 


9 " N. 


16 " 


11 " 


12 " S. 


4 Sullivan 


7 Howick 


3 Gosfield S. 


5 


4 Morris & Turnberry 


4 Maiden 
1 Mersea 


Grey— Robt. Wright 


Huron — J. Elgin Tom 
8 Ashfield 
4 Goderich 
2 Hay 


1 Pelee Island 
5 Tilbury West 


13 Norma ii by 
16 


Fboxtenac — 8. A. Truscott 


Halton & Wentworth — J. M. 


3 - 

6 " 

14 " 


5 Portland 


Denyes 


Glengarry — J. W. Grewson 


14 Beverly 
15 


1 Stanley 
6 
14 


1 Charlottenburg 

4 

6 

7 
12 
13 
15 


1 Esquesing 


2 


5 Usborne 


3 


U 3 Wawanosh E. & Morris 


5 


8 E. Wawanosh 


6 


11 " " &Hullett 


U A.E. " 


11 " 


4 East Flamboro 


2 W. 


17 " 
18 


3 Nassagaweya 
5 " 


17 M 


1 Kenyon 


6 " 


Kent*— J. H. Smith 


4 
9 


3 Nelson 

4 

8 " 


2 Chatham 
3 


16 


5 " 


5 Lancaster 


15 


6 S " 


6 

7 


2 Trafalgar 

3 

6 " 


6 N " 
7 


8 


8 


17 


7 " 


9 


1 Lochiel 


8 " 


10 


5 


9 " 


11 


12 


18 


14 


13 


15 


14 




17 " 




Hastings — H. J. Clarke 


2 Dover 
4 


Grenville — T. A. Craig 


2 Sidney (Avondale) 


5 & 19 Augusta & Ed- 


2 " (Bay side) 
5 

7 


5 " E. 


wardsburg 


6 


9 Augusta 


8 " B. 


11 


13 


10 


13 


19 


11 


17 


20 


12 


1 Edwardsburg 


1 Thurlow 


14 


8 


3 " 


16 " & 23 Chatham 


10 


11 


5 & 16 Sombra & Chatham 


13 


12&14" 


4 Raleigh 


14 


20 


5 


27 


22 


6 " & Dover 


1 S. Gower 


4 Tyendinaga 


7 


3 


10 


9 


3 Oxford 


11 


12 


5 


14 


1 Romney 


6 


15 


2 


7 


29 


4 " & 12 Mersea 


8 




6 


16 


Hastings — J. E. Minns 


7 


17 


12 Huntingdon 


2 E. Tilbury E. 




11 Marmora 


2. W. Tilbury E. 


Grey — H. H. Burgess 


13 Rawdon 


3 N. Tilbury E. 


2 Derby 




3 S. Tilbury E. 


2 " & Sydenham 


Hastings — J. Colling 


4 Tilbury E. 


4 Sydenham 


3 Dungannon 


6 E. Tilbury E. 


5 " 


10 Hersr-hel 


7 Tilbury E. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



93 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture, January-June, 1918— Continued 


Kent— W. H. G. Colles 


Lambto.x— .V. McDougall 


1 


Leeds & Lansdowne 


3 Camden 


3 Brooke 


2 


Rr. 


U 3 " & Chatham 


17 " 


4 


" " " 


4 


6 Enniskillen 


6 


<< «< « 


U4 


22 


7 


Leeds 


5 


23 


8 


& Lansdowne Rr. 


8 


1 Euphemia 


10 


Ft. 


10 


3 


11 


<< H (« 


12 




13 


" " " 


1 Chatham 


Lanark — F. L. Michell 


16 


K <( << 


2 " & Camden 


1 Burgess & 2 Bathurst 


17 


it <( « 


4 " 


5 Bathurst 






IS 


6 & 6 Bafhurst & Drum- 


Lincoln — G. A. Carefoot 


1 Harwich 


mond 


3 


Gainsboro 


2 


12 Bathurst 


1 


Grantham 


3 " 


11 Drummond 


3 


« 


5y 2 " 


16 


6 


<c 


6 


17 " 


12 S. Grimsby 


7 


9 Lanark 


1 


Louth 


8 

9 & 14 Harwich & Howard 


Lanark & Carleton — Willis 


1 
2 
3 


& 2 Clinton & Louth 
& 3 " 
& 4 " 


C. Froats 
4 Beckwith 
5 
U10 


10 Harwich 


8 


& 2 Louth & Grantham 


11 






12 " 


6 Goulburn 


Middlesex — H. D. Johnson 


• 13% " 
13 


1 Montague 

2 


2 
3 


Adelaide 


17 
1 Howard 


1 Ramsay 
11 


7 
9 


u 


3 


14 


11 


it 


4 " 


6 Pakenham 


U 1 


Caradoc & Lobo 


5 " 

7 
10 


7 " & Darling 


4 




6 Marlborough 


6 
7 


« 


12 " 
16 

Moravian (Indian) 


Leeds — W. C. Dotvsley 


8 


<< 


2 Elizabethtown 


11 
12 


« 


2. Orford 


10 
13 


15 


it 


3 & 4 Orford 


1 


Ekfrid 


5 Orford 


16 


3 


(C 


7 " 


17 


6 


Lobo 


9 


19 


7 


«« 


10 " 


21 


10 


<< 


11 " 


1, 1, 5 Kitley, Elmsley & 


U2 


Ekfrid & Caradoc 


12 " 


Walford 

4 & 7 Kitley & Elmsley 

6 Kitley 
13 " 
16 " 


1 


Metcalfe 


21 Harwich and 2 Raleigh 
3 Raleigh 


2 
3 


« 


U 3 " & Harwich 
U4 " 


6 

7 


« 


5 

10 

1 Zone 
2* " 


U 17 & 10 Kitley & Yonge 


2 


E. Williams 


18 Kitley 
1 & 3 Yonge & Elizabeth- 


3 

5 


" ;; 




town 


6 




3 " 

4 " 


2 Rr. Yonge 

3 " 

10 Ft. " 


10 


w. 


5 " 


Middlesex — P. J. Thompson 


Lambton — H. Conn 


12 Rr. " & Escott 


5 Biddulph 


8 Bosanquet 




6 


' 


14 Moore & Sarnia 


Leeds — J. F. McGuire 


1 


Delaware 


19 " and 15 Sombra 


9 Bastard 


2 


« 


4 Plympton 


11 North Crosby 


3 


" 


7 


3 South 


4 


«< 


1 Sarnia 


5 " 


5 


« 


3 " 


16 " 


6 


f< 


6 Sombra 


5 " Elmsley 


2 


N. Dorchester 


19 " 


6 " 


3 


<< i< 



94 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture, January=J 


une, 1918— Continued 


8 N. Dorchester 


Northumberland — R. Boyes 


1 


Chinguacousy 


15 " 


2 & 3 Brighton & Cramah 


e 4 


" 


1 London 


11 Seymour 


10 


tt 


3 & 10 London & Biddulph 


16 


* 


4 London 


Ontario — T. R. Ferguson 


18 


& 4 Toronto 


5 


7 Brock 




■Gore 


8 


1 Mara 


22 


Chinguacousy 


13 


7 " 


8 


Toronto 


14 


10 " 


16 


" 


16 


5 Scott 






17 


3 Thorah 


Peterboro — Richard Lees 


19 


4 Uxbridge 


3 


Dummer 


20 


6 


13 


Otonabee 


21 




16 


*' 


22 


Ontario — R. A. Hutchison 






23 


8 Pickering 


Peterboro — G. E. Broderick 


1 & 1 London & 


11 


2 


Smith 


N. Dorchester 


17 


3 


<< 


3 McGillivray 


9 Reach 


5 


<i 


5 


>< 


2 Whitby 


Prescott — John Nelson 


. 6 


" 




10 & 3 N. & S. Plantagenet 


12 
14 
15 


t* 
u 

tt 


Oxford — R. A. Paterson 

1 & 2 E. Oxford & N. Nor- 
wich 


Perth — Jas. H. Smith 
3 Blanshard 
5 " 


18 " & Stephen 5 S. Norwich 


6 

7 


« 


1 West Nissouri 


2 W. Oxford 


" 


2 " 

3 " 


7 " 


8 
9 


u 


6 " 


Oxford — J. M. Cole 


11 

14 
3 


(t 


8 " 

9 " 


4 Blandford 

4 " & 8 Blenheim 


& Fullarton 
Downie 


10 " 


1 Blenheim 


4 
5 
6 




11 " 


2&3" & Wilmot 




12 " 


7 


u 


13 " 


9 


7 


l( 


1 Westminster 


10 


8 

9 

10 


,t 


3 


" 


11 


(( 


4 


< 


13 


II 


7 
10 




14 

18 


4 

7 

1 10 
V 5 


South Easthope 
<( tt 


11 


" 


25 


a tt 


13 


< 


2 & 22 Burford & Blenhein 


<< tt 


15 
17 
18 


t< 


1 East Nissouri 

2 " 

3 " 


Ellice & Logan 


u 


2 
3 


Fullarton 


23 
6&10 ' 


& Dorchester 2 West Zorra 


4 

5 

U 5 

U 6 

1 


& Downie 


8&21 
9&19 


< « 


3 " 
5 " 


& Ellice & Logan 


19 &6 " & Delaware 


8 " 
2 East 


Hibbert 


Manitoulin District — J. W. 


2 


" 


Hagan 


8 " 

10 " 

11 " 
13 " 
15 " 


3 


u 


1 Robinson 


4 


" 


Muskoka District — H. R. 


5 


(t 


Scovell 


6 


' j 


2 Macaulay 


7 


tt 


Nipissing District* — D. M. 


Parry Sound Dist. — J. L. 


Perth — Wm. Irwin 


Christie 


Moore 


4 


Ellice 


5 Widdifield 


U 1 Magnetawan, Chapman 


9 


tt 


1 Ferris B 


& Croft 


10 


" 


Norfolk — H. F. Cook 


Peel— W. J. Galbraith 


1 


Elma 


18 Charlotteville 


6 Albion 


2 


« 


8 & 15 Houghton & Bayham 10 Caledon 


U2 


" 


4 Middleton 


13 " & Erin 


9 


" 


13 




14 


U9 


& Mornington 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



95 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture, January=June, 1918— Continued 


1 North Easthope 


U 5 Oro & Medonte 


3 Barton 


2 " 


8 " 


5 " & Ancaster 


3 " 


9 " 


6 " 


4 «♦ " 


19 " & 16 Vespra 


3 Beverly 


5 " 


8 Tay. 


7 " 


6 " 




8 " 


7 " 


Stormont — James Froats 


3 Binbrook 


U 8 " " & El lice 


8 Cornwall 


6 " 


U 6 Logan & Elma 




3 E. & W. Flamboro 


8 " 


Thunder Bay District — 


5 W. Flamboro 


10 " 


• J. Ritchie 


6 " 


1 Mornington 


2 Scoble 


4 Glanford 


3 




1 iSaltfleet 


4 


Timiskaming — J. A. Bannister 3 


7 


1 Hudson 


6 


12 


2 A. Tisdale 


9 


20 "' Wellesley, Peel 






& Maryboro 


Victoria — W. H. Stevens 


York — A. L. Campbell 


1 Wallace 


2 Carden 


5 Etobicoke 
8 
10 


Prince Edward — J. E. BensoriViCTomA — G. E. Broderick 


2 Ameliasburgh 


5 Emily 


12 


3 


9 Verulam 


14 


7 




3 Vaughan 


11 


Waterloo — F. W. Sheppard 


5 " 


3 Athol 


6 Waterloo 


18 " 


5 Hallowell 


7 Wellesley 


20 " 


6 


Ull 


19 York 


11 


13 


31 " 


13 


16 


32 " 


10 Hillier 


6 Woolwich 


33 " 


6 N. Marysburg 






9 Sophiasburgh 


Waterloo — L. Norman 


York— C. W. Mullop 




4 Waterloo 


3 E. Gwillimbury. 


Rainy River District — Chas. 19 " 


5 " 


McDowell 


12 Wilmot 


5 N. 


2 Devlin 


17 " 


1 King & Whitchurch 
10 Whitchurch 


Renfrew — G. G. McNao 


Welland — J. W. Marshall 




5 Admaston 


10 Bertie 


York — A. A. Jordan 


1 Brougham 


13 * 


2 Markham 


9 Gratton 


6 Crowland 


4 " & 21 Vaughan 


5 Horton 


10 Humberstone 


6 


9 & 10 Admastor 


l 4 Stamford 


7 


1 McNab 


9 " 


,g 


8 " 




10 


9 ° 


Wellington — R. Galbraith 


14 




2 Minto 


17 


Renfrew — I. D. Breuls 


2 Peel 


18 


6 Alice 


i 


19 


6 Ross 


Wellington* — J. J. Craig 


21 


3 Wilberforce 


9 Eramosa 


22 




1 Guelph 


1 Scarboro 


Russell' — J. Nelson 


2 " 


4 


4 Cumberland 


3 " 


6 ^" 


5 


2 Nichol 


7 & 16 Scarboro 




5 Puslinch. 


8 Scarboro 


Stmcoe — J. L. Garvin 




9 


7 Flos 


Wentworth — J. B. Rooinson 10 " 


12 Tiny 


2 An caster 


12 




5 " 


14 


Sjmcoe — Isaac Day 


7 " 


15 


3 Medonte 


8 " 


3 York 


2 Orillia 


11 " 


4 " 


3 N. Orillia 


15 " 


5 " 


2 Oro & Vespra 


12 " & 20 Beverly 


9 " 



96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Ungraded Schools with Classes in Agriculture, January=June, 1918 — Continued 

11 York St, Peter's, Peterboro' 6 West Williams 

12 " Mark St. " 10 E, & W. Williams 
14 " 4 Emily 4 Hibbert 

is :: j. f. sumvan \ wn iir ; gton 

34 3 Biddulph 

6 " Whole Year, R.C. Separate 

R. C. Separate Schools 2 Neelon Schools (Sept., 1917, 

-/. M. Bennett W. J. Lee June ' 1918) 

5 Sheffield 1 Carrick 8 Huntley 

2 Howe Isiand 2 " & Culross 6 Carrick 

10 Loughboro' 10 " 12 Peel 

2 Wolfe Island 5 Glenelg 3 Admaston 

3 Seymour 7 1 Howe Island 
3 Mara 6 Proton 2 Loughboro' 

8 Otonabee 7 Sydenham St. Peter's S-chool, Peter- 

Sacred Heart, Peterboro' 3 McKillop & Hibbert boro' 

Graded Schools 

During the past year a very considerable advance has been made with re- 
spect to the introduction, and the success, of Agriculture in the graded schools of 
the cities and towns. It is to be expected that the subject will be just as applic- 
able to the schools of smaller towns and villages as it is in rural schools, 
but many of the schools in the larger cities, especially in the suburban districts, 
have carried on the work during the past year with good success. Practically all 
the large cities have now one or more schools conducting classes and are making 
provision for garden work. School gardens are not easy to secure in the city because 
of small school grounds, but to overcome this difficulty the Board of Education of 
the city of Ottawa purchased an acre of land close to three or four schools, paying 
$13,00*0.00 for the plot. 

The work is in its infancy yet, but enough has been done to show its possi- 
bilities. Quoting from Inspector Edwards of London: — 

I am especially well pleased with the work of Miss Hattie Chapman, who conducted 
the Lome Avenue School garden. ... I feel that there is a splendid opportunity 
for the work in our Public Schools. 

Some of the schools kept an account of the expenditure and the receipts, 
showing in many cases very creditable returns. As has already been pointed out 
the financial feature is not the most important, but, at the same time, satisfactory 
financial returns are always inspiring. Quoting: — 

We have in our school a Home Garden Club of fifty-<three members. These pupils 
bought their own seeds, did their own work and kept an account during the summer. 
The results show that they grew $265.01 worth of produce, which is an average of $5.00 
per pupil. A. A. McIntyre, Teacher, 

Ryerson School, Brantford. 

The schools of the city of Stratford are particularly well organized in this 
direction. Quoting from the report of Inspector Smith: — 

Six schools in the City of Stratford, ranging from a four-room school to two 
thirteen-room schools, took up the work. Each of these schools had a garden. The net 
profits from three of these gardens were: — 

Hamlet School $22 84 

Brunswick School 15 87 

Romeo School 15 84 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



97 



List of Graded Public Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Sept. 1917 to June, 1918 

Carleton — E. T. Slemon 



Bolton (Ottawa) 
Borden " 

Cambridge " 



First Ave. (Ottawa) 
George 
Hopewell 
QMutchmor " 
Rideau 



Kent— W. H. G. Colles 
Wallaceburg ' 

Peterborough 

Queen Alexandra 



Graded Public Schools with Classes in Agriculture, Jan. to June, 1918 



Brant— E. E. C. Kilmer 
Dufferin 
Ryerson 

Bruce 1 — J". McCool 
Tara 

Carleton — 

Normal Model (Ottawa) 

Dundas' — J. W. Forrester 
Morrisburg 
6 Mountain 
22 
Winchester 

Elgin — /. C. Smith 
18 Bayham 
18 Yarmouth 

Essex — D. A. Maxwell 
Essex 

Glengarry — J. W. Crewson 
Maxville 

Huron — J. E. Tom 
Hensall 
6 Usborne 

Kent— W. H. G. Colles 
4 Harwich 
2 Howard 

Lanark — F. L. Michell 
Lanark 

Leeds— W. G. Dowsley 
Brockville 



Lennox and Addington — 
M. R. Reid 
6 Sheffield Consolidated 

Lincoln — G. Care foot 
Merritton 

Middlesex — C. B. Edwards 
Byron Preventorium, 

London 
Lome Ave., London 
Tecumseh, London 
Riverview, London 

Muskoka District — H. R. 
Scovell 
Port Carling 

Nipissing District — D. M. 
Christie 
Mclntyre St., North Bay 
Worthington St., " 

Oxford*—/. M. Cole 
Plattsville 

Perth — J. H. Smith 

Brunswick ,St, Stratford 
Hamlet School, " 
Romeo School, " 
Shakespeare Ward, " 

Perth — Wm. Irwin 
Milverton 

Prince Edward — J. E. Ben- 
son 
Bloomfield 
Picton 



Renfrew — G. G. McNab 
Renfrew Model 
Victoria Ward 
Renfrew 

Thunder Bay District — 
Jno. Ritchie 
Prospect Ave., Port 
Arthur 

Welland — J. W. Marshall 
Stamford, Niagara 
Falls South. 

Wellington — J. J. Craig 
Drayton 

MacDonald Consolidated 
(Guelph) 

Wellington — W. Tytler 
Central, Guelph 
Torrance, " 

Wentworth — J. B. Rooinson 
Burlington Beach 
Dundas, Hamilton 
Lloyd George, " 

York — A. A. Jordan 
5 Scarboro 
Markham 

York — W. Bryce 

Frankland, Toronto 

York — A. L. Campbell 
22 York 



The Public and Separate Schools qualifying for grants commencing in 1903 
are given in the following table : — 



Year 


No. 
of Schools 


Year 


No. 

of Schools 


With 
School Gardens 


With 
Home Gardens 


1903 


4 

7 

6 

8 

2 

14 

16 

17 


1911 


33 
101 
159 
264 
407 
585 
989 
1,020 






1904 


1912 






1905 


1913 






1906 


1914 


208 
222 

324 

466 

588 


56 


1907 


1915 


185 


1908 


1916 


261 


1909 


1917 


523 


1910 


1918 


432 







7 E. 



98 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Until 1914, no distinctions were made in the reports respecting Home Gardens 
and School Gardens. 

Of the 989 schools teaching Agriculture in 1917, 375 were taught by teachers 
who held certificates in Agriculture, and 614 were taught by teachers with Second 
Class certificates. 

Of the 1,020 schools teaching Agriculture in 1918, 348 were taught by 
teachers who held certificates in Agriculture, and 672 were taught by teachers with 
Second Class certificates. 

Amount distributed in grants to Public and Separate Schools, calendar year 
1917:— 

Boards $8,140.61 

Teachers 22.270.66 

January to June, 1918: — 

Boards 6,641.03 

Teachers 16,237.54 

To Inspectors, 1917-18 6,670.00 

Amount Expended for Instruction : — 

Summer School, 1917 2,740.00 

Summer School, 1918 4,874.25 

Summer School Farm Mechanics, 1'917 402.00 

Summer School Farm Mechanics, 1918 402.00 

The fund set apart to be used to encourage the teaching of Agriculture in 
Ontario is administered as set forth in the following clause of the agreement between 
the Federal Government and the Province : — 

*' To provide for and to encourage the teaching of Agriculture, Manual Training, as 
applied to work on the farm, and Domestic Science in High, Public, Separate and Con- 
tinuation Schools and in Universities, to be available for grants, services, expenses and 
equipment, and travelling expenses of teachers, inspectors and others in attendance at 
Short Courses of other educational gatherings, and to be paid out on the recommendation 
of the Department of Education." 

The Agricultural Instruction Act 

Quoting from Sessional Paper 93. 1915 : — 

" On the 6th of June, 1913, assent was given to what is known as the Agricultural 
Instruction Act, which thereupon come into operation. This Act, as stated by the 
Minister of Agriculture, was intended to be a prompt and complete fulfilment of a 
promise made by the Prime Minister that he would provide for ' the granting of liberal 
assistance to the provinces for the purpose of supplementing and extending the work of 
Agricultural education and for the improvement of Agriculture.' " 

The Minister, in his introduction of the Bill, stated: — 

"Help given in an educational direction will mean not only better farming, but 
better farmers, and better and happier men and women. The particular form such 
assistance may take may vary with the special needs and conditions in each province. 
It will embrace the increasing of the efficiency and equipment of our agricultural 
colleges; the establishment of agricultural schools; of dairy and horticultural schools; 
of short courses in Agriculture; the initiation of agricultural teaching in the public 
schools; and work by travelling or located qualified instructors. It might well include 
the valuable educational work carried on by means of demonstration trains, training of 
teachers in nature study and the invaluable work of domestic science concerned with the 
women and girls of our communities, whose influence will always constitute one of the 
most potent forces in solving the problems we are considering." 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 99 

The arrangement respecting this appropriation is here given : — 

" The Act appropriated ten million dollars to be available during the ten years 
ending 31st March, 1923. Of this, $700,000 was available for the year 1913-14; $800,000 
for 1914-15; $900,000 for 1915-16; $1,000,000 for 1916-17; $1,100,000 for 1917-18, and for 
each of the subsequent five years." 

As these sums are divided on the basis of the population, Ontario will receive 
annually from 1917-23, $336,271.96. (Page 8, Agr. Instr. Act, 1915.) 

I wish to draw attention to reports made voluntarily by some of the* secre- 
taries of boards of trustees. These statements show more than any general de- 
scription the attitude of those rural schools that have made a beginning in 
Agriculture. 

These statements are taken here and there from a large number coming from 
all parts of the Province : — 

8.8. 11, Culross, Bruce Co., Gertrude Kelly. 

This school has taken a good interest in school garden work and Agriculture and 
won the shield in three successive years in School Fair work, and the scholars are 
benefiting by such education. 

Wm, Cronin, Secretary, 

Tees water ■ 
8.8. No. 5, Torbolton, Carleton Co., Mrs. R. W. Milford. 

The trustees spoke approvingly of the school garden and wish to have that branch 
of education continued. 

Wm. Brown, Secretary, 

Wooulawn. 
8.8. No. lJf, Tyendmaga, Hastings Co., Mabel B. Blakely. 

We intend to go more fully into agricultural work another year and no doubt there 
will be some expenditure. The past year it was undertaken as an experiment which has 
proved satisfactory. 

H. Swan, Secretary, 

Corbyville. 
U.S.S. No. 44. Morris and Turnberry, Huron Co., Laura E. Holmes. 

We have had a very successful year in our school, especially in Agriculture. We had 
a fine school garden, the pride of the section, and the children took a great interest in 
the work. We had a splendid school fair on the 13th of September. Our own school was 
the only school in it, as all the schools around would not go into it this year. We had a 
large crowd and everyone was surprised at such a grand exhibit. I think some of the 
other schools will join in with us next year. There are two grand things about a school 
fair: one is the education the children get from showing their exhibits, and the other is 
it helps the parents to take more interest in the children and school. 

George McDonald, Secretary, 

8.8. No. 5, Raleigh, Kent Co., Susie Smyth. 

The trustees think that the teaching of Agriculture and Horticulture is a good thing 
in the school and the children are interested. This year the teacher grew onions on the 
whole garden plot, but next year, 1918, we intend to have it divided into small plots 
which creates much interest in the children and they take pride in caring for their own 

C. A. Keil. Secretary, 

a a >r o r, ^ T • RR - 6 > Chatham. 

8.8. No. 3, Grantham, Lincoln Co., Beatrice M. MacKenzie. 

The trustees are thoroughly satisfied that the teaching of Agriculture in our school 
is in capable hands. It is a practical subject for rural schools and we look for good 
results. 

G. M. Armstrong, Secretary, 

vo „ a „ A , . „ . ,. R-R. 2, St. Catharines. 

8i8. No. 16, Otonabee, Peterborough Co., Sara Hamilton. 

m. *\ Rur al Schools there is no subject more deserving of a position of importance in 
the Public School curriculum than Agriculture. The children by means of their progress 
club are getting a training that will be of great benefit to them in many ways in the 
niture. We are sorry that the course of study is so crowded that more time cannot be 
taken on this work. 

Alex. Huston, Secretary, 

R.R. 11, Peterborough. 



100 THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 

8.8. No. 2, Amelias our gh, Prince Edward Co., Eva E. Johnston. 

Our school garden was a great success and a great many of the school section who 
were opposed to it on the start fell in with it and said they were glad we had started it, 
as it gave the children some employment and they showed a great interest in their work. 
The children were very carefully taught a great many useful things pertaining to Agri- 
culture by our teacher Miss Johnston. We hope to be able to improve our work next 
year so we have had the ground worked up in good shape this fall. 

Ernest E. Redner, Secretary. 

Rednersville. 
8.8. No. 19, Waterloo, Waterloo Co., A. L. Groh. 

The ratepayers of the section are much interested in the school garden 'and are 
satisfied much good is being derived from the teaching of Agriculture to the pupils. The 
school board will have the school-yard ploughed and levelled next spring to secure a better 
appearance and will be kept locked on days when there is no school during the garden 
season next summer. They will also plant more shade trees. 

C. I. Groh, Secretary, 

Hespeler. 
8.S. No. 5, Bathurst, Lanark Co., John Gamble. 

We have much pleasure in informing you that Agriculture has been taught by the 
teacher of this school as far as his time was limited. Since Agriculture has been taught 
we see improvement in school grounds and home surroundings. The pupils take great 
pride in flower gardening and also in vegetable gardening. In composition it also helps. 
The pupils are asked to write essays on subjects that have been taught. 

Harvey Miller, Secretary, 

R.R. 4, Perth. 
8.S. No. 3, Delaware, Middlesex Co., Norma B. Perry. 

The pupils showed great interest in their gardens and kept them clean. The appear- 
ance of them rather excelled any gardens in the neighbourhood. A school fair was held, 
jointly with a neighbouring school, at which prizes in money were given. A Christmas 
concert was held in order to provide prize money for a school fair in 1918. The amount 
realized was $10.15. 

C. R. Howlett, Secretary, 

R.R. 2, Southwold. 
8.S. No. 11, Pickering, Ontario Co., Nellie Spencer. 

We think we had the very best garden in the county, if not province, this year. Our 
children are very much interested in the work and are doing well. We think the school 
garden at the school house is the proper place for it and a good education for the 
children along that line. 

W. G. Barnes, Secretary, 

R. R. 1, Locust Hill. 
Torrance School, Guelph, Wellington Co., Jas. W. Benham. 

The work undertaken at Torrance School by 1 Mr. Benham 'has, I am sure, been pro- 
ductive of great good to all the school children, for those who did not take part were 
edified by what they came daily in contact with. The lawn flowers were the admiration 
of the section of the city. All gardening was well done and generally perfectly looked 
after. 

Wm. Tytler, Secretary, 

Guelph. 
8.8. No. 10, Bertie, Welland Co., Ernest 0. Bowen. 

I thoroughly approve of Agriculture being taught in rural schools, and think that all 
teachers should be encouraged to teach it. 

Berry Sherk, Secretary, 

Ridgeway. 
S.8. No. 22, S. York, York Co., J. A. Short and Hazel Anguish. 

In the opinion of the school trustees, the school garden forms an important depart- 
ment of instruction. Children and parents are alike interested and both are making use 
of the agricultural library. 

Fred. Hawke, Secretary. 

Swansea. 

Immaculate Conception Sep. School, Peterborough, Peterborough Co., Sr. Mary Adrle. 

This is to certify that our school garden was a great success. The pupils took great 
interest in the work, from which they received much personal benefit, as well as increas- 
ing the supply of vegetables considerably in our city. 

James Drain, Secretary. 

Peterborough. 






1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 101 

S.S. No. 5, Percy, Northumberland Oo., Nellie Doherty. 

We find Agriculture a good study in our school as the school is in better condition 
and kept tidy. The pupils have a better interest in farm work and a strife is set up 
among the pupils to make reports at school. 

P. J. Doherty, Secretary. 

R.R. No. 1, Dartford. 

Sep. Sch. No. 6, Biddulph, Middlesex Co., Katherine Crunican. 

We were well pleased with our garden this year. It presented a very fine appearance 
and was much admired by passers by. The products grown all turned out well. 

C. J. Crunican, Secretary. 

Birr. 
Sep. Sch. No. 2, Ashfield, Huron Co., Sr. M. Eugenia. 

We are well pleased with the work in Agriculture. Since our school has begun this 
wcrk, we notice a great improvement in the children's work on the farm. The work is 
done not only better, but the children seem to enjoy it. 

Peter Austin. Secretary, 

Kingsbridge. 

The statements given in these quotations serve to show that the teaching of 
Agriculture is gradually becoming a part of the work of the rural school. And it is 
well that the subject be carried on as an optional one until the people realize 
something' of its value. To force it into the schools at this stage would be a 
mistake. As stated by one of the teachers, it was first opposed, then tolerated, 
and now supported. This is the situation in not a few localities of the Province. 

Greater Production 

As was the case in 1917 the Schools of the Province, especially those main- 
taining classes in Agriculture, carried on work of considerable importance even 
from an economic point of view, though the educational aspect of such work is of 
much greater consequence than the economic. The arrangements concerning this 
work may be seen from the following two circulars : — 

Circular to Inspectors and Teachers. 

GREATER FOOD PRODUCTION FOR 1918 

As is seen by the Departmental returns the increase in food supply due to the efforts 
put forth in connection with the Agricultural classes of the Public and High Schools of 
Ontario in 1917, amounted to at least $55,000 in money value. The demand for food will 
be still greater in 1918, and it is expected that teachers and pupils will put forth increased 
efforts this year in the same direction. Teachers, in particular, are urged to increase, 
when practicable, the area under crop in the school plots, and the home projects in all 
their branches. 

Each teacher should consider herself a " food production officer," marshalling a 
regiment to fight against high pricesi and extreme scarcity. The 200,000 pupils now in 
schools where Agriculture is taught form a mighty host, which may be organized to win 
the war by increasing the food supply. 

Last year the aim was to grow potatoes, beans, or other vegetables; and to raise 
poultry from selected eggs. The only modification proposed for 1918 is to increase the 
amount in every way possible. Each teacher is also asked to direct the pupils, as a 
business proposition, to calculate, from market prices available in the neighborhood, the 
total food value produced by the pupils and insert the result in the space provided in the 
Agricultural Report in order that information may be obtained to show the success 
attending this effort. 

In 1916 the total amount expended in grants in connection with the Agricultural 
classes was $9,379.52, and the total amount of produce resulting directly from the work 
of the Agricultural classes was, as stated above, at least $55,000. 

The Public and Separate School Inspectors are hereby urged to give every encourage- 
ment in the direction above proposed, not only as a war measure, but as a means of 
education. 



102 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



For information respecting grants available for equipment, etc., those interested 
should write to the Department of Education. If a piece of rough sod is to be broken up 
for crop, write to the Inspector of Agricultural Classes for Agricultural Circular No. 2. 

J. B. Dandeno, 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes. 
Toronto, January 29th, 1918. 

To the Teachers of the Public and, Separate Schools in Ontario. 

GREATER PRODUCTION FOR 1918. 

The Public or 'Separate 'School Inspector will distribute these leaflets to the teachers 
concerned. 

By an arrangement with the Poultry Department of the O.A.C., Guelph, eggs for 
hatching can be supplied in a limited quantity for May delivery at $6.00 a hundred in 
100-egg lots to pupils of schools in which classes in Agriculture are maintained. The 
eggs are from an improved Barred Rock bred-to-lay strain, and the introduction of this 
breed into the rural districts is likely to prove of lasting benefit to the whole country. 

If the teachers are willing to take this matter up in connection with their classes, they 
should communicate with Professor Graham at the O.A.C., Guelph, and secure at one 
shipment the number of eggs required for their schools. Remit in advance to Professor 
W. R. Graham, Poultry Department, O.A.C., Guelph. 

It is suggested that part of the cost (say one-half) be borne by the School Board and 
part by the pupils, thus placing the cost to the pupil at so reasonable a figure that the 
project will be within the reach of all. The part of the expense borne by the School 
Board may be charged to the Agricultural account (Regulations 7 and 8, pages 6-8, 
Circular 13, 1917) as the hatching of eggs and rearing of the brood is a legitimate and 
useful home project for a pupil of the third, fourth or fifth form. About 40,000 eggs 
were distributed under a similar arrangement in 1917. 

J. B. Dandeno, 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes. 
Toronto, January 29th, 1918. 

From reports received the schools took hold of the matter referred to in these 
leaflets with very creditahle results. 

School Fairs 

The work of the School Fair may be estimated from the following quotation 
taken from a statement by Mr. Duncan, Supervisor of Ag ^'cultural Representa- 
tives. The origin of the School Fair and the progress made in 1915, 1916, and 
1917 is given in my report of 1918 : — 

The School Fair is one of the best means of arousing interest in the work of the 
school. It creates in the boy and the girl a greater love for farm work and is a big 
factor in bringing the school work in closer touch with the home life of the pupil. 
During the past few years the movement has been given a very severe test. It has gotten 
a mighty strong hold of the community and is gaining in popularity. 

School Fairs have registered a marked improvement over former years; particularly 
is this true of the quality of the exhibits. This may be attributed, first, to the pupils' ex- 
perience in selecting produce for the fair, and, secondly, to an awakened interest on the 
part of teachers and parents. A special part of the programme on Fair Day has been set 
aside for the judges to give reasons for their placing. The desirable type in vegetables and 
the manner of preparing exhibits were pointed out and emphasized. This had a wonderful 
effect on the exhibits the following year, the quality being much superior and the 
arrangement more attractive. 

During the past season 307 fairs were held in the Province of Ontario, and 2,868 
schools were included in the movement, with a total of 71,086 children taking part. This 
is an average of 9 schools for each fair and 25 pupils for each school. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 103 

The Department of Agriculture purchased and distributed in small packages to the 
pupils the following quantities and varieties of seeds: 

Oats O.A.C. No. 72 82% bus. 

Banner 12 

Barley O.A.C. No. 21 57 

Wheat Marquis 42 

Potatoes Green Mountain 858 

Irish Cobbler 482 

Field Peas Early Britain 495 lbs. 

Arthur 450 " 

Prince Albert 30 " 

Garden Peas Thomas Laxton 756 " 

Mangels Yellow Leviathan 4,240 packages. 

Bruce's Giant 365 

Our Ideal 440 

Yellow Intermediate 560 

Mammoth Long Red 125 

Turnips Purple Top Swede 725 

Garton's Model 800 

Carter's Invicto 1,880 

Good Luck 430 

Garton's Keepwell 125 

Beets Detroit Dark Red 6,860 

Carrots Chantenay '. . 8,120 

Onions Yellow Globe Denvers .... 6,910 

Parsnips Hollow Crown 3,920 

Asters Giant Comet 8,765 

Sweet Peas Giant Spencer 5,165 

Phlox Drummond 4,295 

Special precautions were taken to purchase the best quality of oats, barley, wheat and 
potatoes which could be obtained. This tended towards greater uniformity and resulted 
in many farmers getting a start in seed of the highest quality of the best varieties. 
Agricultural Representatives have been shown whole fields of grain and potatoes during 
the past few years which had as their origin the small package of seed distributed to 
the pupils of the schools during the past few years. The value, therefore, of the 'School 
Fair work in the distribution of pure seed through the county must be recognized. 

The number of eggs of a bred-to-lay strain of utility breeds of poultry distributed 
during the past three years may be summarized as follows: 

1916. 

Barred Plymouth Rocks 7,357 

Rhode Island Reds 406 

White Wyandottes 295 

Total 8,058 9,283 9,940 

A certain number of the eggs distributed was obtained from the Poultry Depart- 
ment of the Agricultural College at Guelph, but the greatest quantity was secured from 
the Poultry Breeding Stations which have been established in each county. The birds in 
the Breeding Stations are of the bred-to-lay strain and are mated with cockerels secured 
through the Poultry Department at the O.A.C, Guelph. Bach station is inspected and 
the flock culled in order to eliminate the poor birds. The eggs from these Breeding 
Stations are in great demand from farmers in the community and invariably command 
a much higher price than the eggs from the average neighbour flock. 

The School Fair organizations are doing- an immense amount of good in the 
rural schools and are assisting the teaching of Agriculture very materially. These 
organizations are under the charge of the Agricultural Eepresentative, in co- 



1917. 


1918. 


8,940 


9,670 


293 


140 


50 


130 



104 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

operation with inspectors and teachers. Russell and Perth are now the only- 
counties without a representative. 

For the information of teachers and inspectors the following list, correct to 
Jan. 1st, 1919, is here submitted: — 

Agricultural Representatives of Ontario Department of Agriculture 

County. Representative. Address. 

Algoma Ray Atkin Sault Ste. Marie 

Brant R. Schuy ler Paris 

Bruce N. C. McKay Walkerton 

Carleton W. D. Jackson Carp 

Dufferin H. A. Dorrance Orangeville 

Dimdas F. A. Wiggins Morrisburg 

Durham G. A. Williams Port Hope 

Elgin C. W. Buchanan Button 

Essex J. W. Noble Essex 

Frontenac A. W. Sirett Kingston 

Glengarry D. E. MacRae Alexandria 

Grenville W. M. Croskery Kemptville 

Grey H. C. Duff Markdale 

Haldimand Geo. L. Woltz Cayuga 

Halton W. F. Strong Burlington 

Hastings A. D. Mcintosh Stirling 

Huron S. B. Stothers Clinton 

Kenora '. D. Frejd Kenora 

Kent J. L. Dougherty Chatham 

Lambton W. P. Macdonald Petrolia 

Lanark Fred. Forsyth Perth 

Leeds W. H. Smith Athens 

Lennox and Addington G. B. Curran Napanee 

Lincoln D. Elliott St. Catharines 

Manitoulin I. F. Metcalfe Gore Bay 

Middlesex R. A. Finn London, Box 663 

Muskoka and Parry Sound. . .F. C. Paterson Huntsville 

Norfolk E. F. Neff Simcoe 

Northumberland H. Sirett Brighton 

Ontario R. M. Tipper Whitby 

Oxford G. R. Green Woodstock 

Peel J. W. Stark Brampton 

Peterborough F. C. McRae Norwood 

Prince Edward A. P. MacVannel Picton 

Rainy River R. E. Cumming Emo 

Renfrew M. H. Winter Renfrew 

Simcoe Allan Hutchinson Collingwood 

Sudbury D. J. Robicheau (Sudbury 

Thunder Bay — 

Port Arthur Section L. M. Davis Port Arthur 

Fort William Section G. W. Collins Fort William 

Timiskaming J. M. Mcintosh New Liskeard 

Victoria '. A. A. Knight Lindsay 

Waterloo J. S. Knapp Gait 

Welland E, K. Hampson Welland 

Wellington R. H. Clemens Arthur 

Wentworth W. G. Marritt 18 Market St., Hamilton 

York J. C. Steckley Newmarket 

The work carried on by means of the School Fairs links up very well with 
that of the teaching of Agriculture and of the School Garden. In some cases 
these fairs are held in graded schools of cities. I attended one of such fairs held 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



105 



in the Frankland School of the City of Toronto, where an exceedingly large 
number of entries were made, as follows : — 

Product. Number of Entries. 

Beets 179 

Potatoes 23 

Cabbage 76 

Carrots 130 

Onions 16 

Cucumbers 14 

Salsify 8 

Tomatoes 103 

The School Fair has always been popular and is becoming more and more a 
factor in education. The following statements represent the situation: — 

Ryerson Public School, Brantford. 

We have in our school a home garden club of fifty-three members. These pupils 
bought their own seeds, did their own work and kept an accurate account during the 
summer. The results show that they grew $265.01 worth of produce, which is an average 
of $5.00 per pupil. 

We also have a School Fair. The children have their own Fair Board, do all the 
business in a business way, handle all money and prizes — in fact, do it all under my 
supervision. A number of boy and girl judges are selected to act with the regular judges 
and learn why an exhibit deserves first prize, etc. Fair Day is one of the biggest days 
for the pupils in the school year. 

A. A. McIntyre, Prin. Ryerson P. 8. 

Cumberland Public School. 

This year the school exhibited for the first time at the County Fair. Intense interest 
was shown by parents in this. The mothers having expressed a desire that they might 
see the exhibit before it was taken to Russell, the teachers had it displayed in the 
teachers' room at the school, where they invited the parents to visit them the day 
previous to the fair. When all had assembled and some time had been spent in conversa- 
tion, the teachers, with the aid of two girls from the senior fifth, served refreshments. 
This social hour was thoroughly enjoyed by both parents and teachers and served as an 
opportunity for both to become better acquainted. 

The exhibit consisted of vegetables from school garden, some illustrating experi- 
mental work, canning (done by the girls of the Girls' Progress Club), green and ripe 
tomatoes, carrots, beets and corn, and pupils' collections of weeds and insects. 

Alice L. Dunning, Teacher. 

High Schools 

Schools commencing the work for the first time were visited twice during the 
year, and the other schools at least once. The following list shows in a general 
way, not only the Secondary Schools visited officially, but also other institutions 
concerned : — 



Schools Visited in 1918 

Spring Term, 1918: 



Brockville 

Cobourg 

Essex 


Exeter Port Hope 
London Smith's Falls 
Oakville Uxbridge 

Fall Term, 1918: 


Whitby 
Winchester 


Arthur 

Cobourg 

Ingersoll 


Leamington Port Hope 
London Port Perry 
Oakville St. Thomas 


Whitby 
Wingham 



8 E. 



106 THE REPORT OP THE No. 17 



Public Schools with a Fifth Class taking Part I of the Lower School Course of the 
High Schools: Gorrie. 

Normal Schools: Toronto, Peterborough, Ottawa. (The other Normal Schools were 
visited in the Fall of 1917.) 

School Fairs: Cooksville, Pickering, Frankland School (Toronto). 

Teachers' Institutes: Three Inspectorates of Grey (Owen Sound), Hastings 
(Belleville). 

Boards of Education at: St. Thomas, Collegiate Institute; Ingersoll, Collegiate Insti- 
tute; Guelph (B. of E.); Fergus (H.S.B.); Dundas (B. of B.); Fenelon Falls. 

Schools which had not yet introduced Agriculture, Secondary Schools: St. Thomas 
C.I., Ingersoll C.I.. Guelph C.I., Brampton. Public Schools : Guelph, Ottawa 
Normal Model, Winchester. 

Mr. W. J. Black, Commissioner under the Agricultural Instruction Act, sug- 
gested that he, in co-operation with the Inspector of Agricultural Classes, visit a 
number of schools in which Agriculture was taught so that the Commissioner might 
gain a knowledge at first hand of the actual working out of the scheme in Ontario. 
Acting upon this suggestion an itinerary was arranged and the following schools 
visited: High Schools — Whitby, Oakville, Smith's Falls, Brockville. Normal 
School — Toronto. Public Schools: York Co. — Agincourt, 10 Scarboro, Birch Cliff, 
Russell Hill Ed.; Halton Co.— Palermo, Omah; Ontario Co.— Whitevale, Green 
River; Leeds Co. — Eastward, Brockville, Elizabeth, Flat Rock; Lanark Co. — 1 
Burgess, 5 Bathurst; Dundas Co. — Winchester Springs, 5 Matilda. 

As has already been pointed out in former reports, the chief problem con- 
fronting us is the lack of legally qualified teachers of Agriculture. It is quite 
probable that there will be a considerable improvement in that direction now that 
the war is over. Another difficulty lies in the fact that the subject is optional 
and can only be used as a bonus on examinations. The curriculum is fairly well 
filled with subjects that are obligatory, and the other subjects that are optional 
are required or may be used on matriculation or other examinations. Agricul- 
ture has, therefore, a severe handicap. Schools have still the passing of examin- 
ations as one of the chief aims, and unless a subject is on the examination list it 
will always be regarded as only secondary. However, it may be said to the credit 
of many Principals of Secondary Schools, that if they were free to make certain 
modifications in the programme they would be glad to introduce Agriculture as 
one of the regular studies of High Schools, especially of those in rural or semi- 
rural districts. 

Pressure is brought to bear upon Principals of schools by pupils and parents, 
and when this pressure is emphasized by the demands of universities, colleges, and 
other institutions of College standing, one is led to sympathize with the Prin- 
cipal in his efforts to organize his school with satisfaction to all. 

As was the case with the Public and Separate Schools, the Secondary Schools 
in the interest of greater production by means of both Home Projects and School 
Gardens, accomplished something reasonably worth while. The following state- 
ment from the Ridgeway Continuation School shows the results obtained by one 
class in that school, both girls and bo}^: — 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



107 



" Brtef Summary of Agricultural Projects of First and iSecond Forms, 

Continuation School. 

Main Aim — Greater Production. 



RllXiKWAY 



Name 




Estimated 
cost 



Estimated 
returns 



Estimated 
net profit 



Brown, Jessie 


1,500 sq. ft. 
400 " " 


$ c. 
12 90 
2 20 
5 80 


$ c. 
24 00 
21 00 
53 00 


$ c. 
11 10 


Ellsworth, Marion 


18 80 


Hershey, Wilfrid 


47 20 


Mann. Marion 


Home garden 
4,000 sq. ft. 
1,200 "■ " 
5,200 " " 
| acre onions, 
beets and beans. 

>ject Work — Sunn 

300 sq. ft. 




Millington, V 


3 50 
2 40 

1 20 

4 00 

nary 

55 

own seed 

c, in farm 

90 seed 

14 hrs; at 

20c, 2 80 

4 251abour 

4 75seed 

garden 

85 seed 
t report no 

2 73 
9 00 
4 20 

ur care for 
20 38 


"15*68 

18 00 
39 50 

69 00 

4 50 
27 20 

work as pe 

21 80 

17 25 

30 90 
t in yet 
20 40 
30 00 

19 85 
her garden 

58 72 


12 18 


Misiner, Orlin 


15 60 


Snyder, George 


38 30 


Ott, Harold 




First Form— Pre 
Austin, Maurice 


65 00 
3 95 


Barnhard, Clinton 


27 20 


Benner, Arthur , 


Helped father, et 
1,500 sq. ft. 

1,500 sq. ft. 
Helped in home 


r attached 


Ellsworth, Ruth , 


report 


English, Wilfrid 


18 10 




9 25 


Learn, Mary 


30 05 








Moyer, Melvin 


17 67 




9 sq. rods 
550 sq. ft. 
Helped a neighbo 


21 00 


Tavano, Dominick 


15 65 






Young, Wilfrid 


38 34 










389 39 



In 'addition to the individual home projects the students also took part in the school 
garden. A half acre of this we put into potatoes, but the results were not good, only 
about thirty bushels being harvested. For next season we are trying to get a more 
favourable plot for our garden." 

A. M. Woodley, Principal. 

Each High School works out its own special problems, some giving attention 
to one branch and others emphasizing other branches. Some of the schools entered < 
experimentally into the problem of seed production of certain biennial vegetables, 
such as turnips, cabbage and mangels. The following quotations refer to similar 
experimental work: — 

The experimental plots were devoted chiefly to growing seeds, as follows : 

" A cabbage plant bore two and a half ounces of seed. Four sugar mangels gave two 
pounds of seed. Three beets produced one pound of seed. One carrot produced two 
ounces of seed. Parsnip seed was easily grown. We have one pound. In every case we 
found that the. seed germinated very well. We found that onion sets could be success- 
fully grown. We believe that every school could grow enough seed to supply the pupils' 
homes." (W. A. Porter, Niagara Falls South.) 

" In the first place we secured the garden plot at the greenhouse, just outside the 
town limits, up the street leading to the railway station, for a potato plot. The green- 
house has not been in operation for a couple of years, so the garden was also idle. The 
preceding year one of our school trustees had put potatoes on it, he being the agent in 
charge, but he got nothing off it, and he told me I'd get nothing off it because the. soil 
was too rich for potatoes. However, I had an idea that the soil was not in fault, but that 
it needed cultivation to keep the weeds from choking out the crop, so, in spite of his 



108 



THE BEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



warning, we proceeded to plant our potatoes, and, although we had anything but a 
favorable season, it being so continuously wet, yet from this one-seventh of an acre o? 
ground we took on 1st of October, 2ly 3 bags of marketable potatoes and only about % of 
a bag that were unmarketable. Thus we demonstrated that the rich soil did not prevent 
the raising of a crop of potatoes." (I. E. Dobbie, Principal of Continuation School, New 
Liskeard, Ont.) 

The progress of the work in the Secondary Schools is indicated by the follow- 
ing table, which shows where the work was introduced and how long continued. 
The word " Yes " means that the work was carried on successfully through the 
term, and the word " No " indicates that the work was temporarily dropped. The 
reason assigned in each case for dropping the subject was because of the impossi- 
bility of securing a legally qualified teacher to teach Agriculture : — 





1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


Schools 


Jan.- Sept- 
June Dec. 


Jan- 
June 


Sept.- 
Dec. 


Jan- 
June 


Sept.- 
Dec. 


Jan.- 
June 


Sept.- 
Dec. 



Collegiate Institutes — 
Brockville 








yes 
yes 


yes 

yes 


yes 
no 


yes 
no 


yes 


Clinton 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


Ingersoll 


yes 


London 












yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 


Picton 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 


Renfrew 


yes 


Smith's Falls 

St. Thomas 




yes 


yes 


yes 

yes 


VankleekHill 

High Schools- 
Arthur 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


no 

yes 
yes 

no 
yes 
yes 

■ no 
no 

yes 


no 

yes 
yes 
no 
yes 
yes 
no 
no 
yes 


yes 
yes 


Athens 


yes 


Bowmanville 

Cobourg 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


no 
yes 


Essex 








yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


no 


Georgetown 








no 


Hagersville ; . 




yes 


yes 


no 


f Kincardine 




yes 


Leamington 








yes 


Niagara Falls, S.... 

*Oakville 

Port Hope 


yes 
yes 


yes 

yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 


*Port Perry 












yes 


Uxbridge 












yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


no 


*Whitby 








yes 


yes 


yes 


Williamstown 








no 


Winchester 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Wingham 


yes 


Weston 












yes 


Continuation Schools— 
Cannington 




yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 
yes 


no 
yes 

no 
yes 

yes 


no 
yes 

no 
yes 

• yes 


no 


*Drayton 


yes 
yes 

yes 


yes 


Exeter 


yes 


New Liskeard 

Ridgeway 


yes 
yes 


Public Schools with 
Form V— 

Gorrie (Huron Co.).. 


yes 


Florence (Lambton 
Co.) 
















yes 





















♦Separate Departments of Agriculture. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



109 



The chief difficulties in introducing and in maintaining classes in Agriculture 
in the Secondary Schools is the lack of legally qualified teachers. 

The number of High Schools qualifying for grants since 1915 are here 
given : — 



No. Schools With Plots 



No Plots 



1915 

January-June 

September-December 

1916 

January-June 

September-December 

1917 

January-June 

September-December 

1918 

January-June 

September-December 



11 




11 


15 




15 


15 


1 


14 


20 


1 


19 


20 


7 


13 


21 


7 


14 


21 


16 


5 


26 


18 


8 



The Training of Teachers for High Schools 

As has been pointed; out the chief difficulty in the way of introducing Agri- 
culture into the Secondary Schools of Ontario is the lack of qualified teachers. 
Courses are provided at the Ontario Agricultural College covering two consecu- 
tive summers of five weeks each. These courses were introduced in 1913 and the 
following teachers so far have qualified : — 



1914 



John A. Bell. 

George A. Campbell. 

Geo. A. Clark. 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Queen's, A.M. 

Ph.D., Harv. 
James L. Mitchener, B.A., McMaster. 
Wm. J. Morrison, B.A., Toronto. 



Wm. Bowden. 
*Wm. G. Butson. 
Edward J. Corkill, B.A., Queen's. 
Robert W. Fleming. 
**Chas. S. Gulston. 

John P. Hume, B.A., Queen's. 



John G. Adams, B.A., Queen's. 

Edwin T. Bell, B.A., McMaster. 

Geo. W. Bunton, B.A., Queen's. 

Geo. E, Copeland, M.A., Queen's. 

Isabella E. Dobbie. 

Wm. Donaldson, B.A., Toronto. 

Clarence Elliott. 

F. V. Elliott, B.A., Western. 



1915 



1916 



Alex. R. McRitchie, B.A., Toronto. 
Alex. Pearson, B.A., Toronto. 
Edmund Pugsley, B.A., Victoria. 
Fred Sine, M.A., B.Sc, Queen's. 
Arthur M. Wood ley. 
Wm. B. Wyndham, B.A., Toronto. 



John A. Macdonald. 

Geo. O. McMillan, M.A., B.Paed. 

Queen's. 
Muriel A. iShook. 
Geo. B. Spark, B.A., Toronto. 



Hugh H. Graham, B.A., McMaster. 
Hugh J. Haviland, B.A., Toronto. 
Gideon A. Miller, M.A., Queen's. 
W. A. Porter. 

Walter E. Shales, M.A., Queen's. 
Daniel E. Smith, B.A., Queen's. 
Christopher Summers. 



♦Killed at Vimy Ridge. 



**Enlisted in the Naval Service. 



110 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



1917 



J. A. Anderson, B.A., Queen's. 

Norman Davies, B.A., McMaster. 

W. M. Erwin, B.A., Queen's. 

Ishbel A. Foster. 

Helen E. Foster. 

W. D. Hay, B.A., Queen's. 

G. S. Johnson, B.A., McMaster. 

A. J. Madill, B.A., McMaster. 



F. J. Barlow, B.A., Toronto. 
Jas. 0. Burchell, B.A., Queen's. 
J. F. Calvert, B.A., Toronto. 
R. D. P. Davidson, B.A., Queen's 
J. W. Emery, B.A., D.Psed., Tor. 



1918 



G. E. Pentland, M.A., Queen's. 

H. B. Ricker, M.A., Queen's. 

P. M. Shorey, B.A., B.Sc, Queen' 

J. A. Short. 

F. P. Smith, M.A., Queen's. 

T. C. Smith, B.A., Queen's. 

D. A. Welsh, B.A., Toronto. 



Thomas Firth, M.A.. Toronto. 
J. W. Forrester, M.A., Queen's, 

D.Paed., Toronto. 
John H. Short. 
David Whyte, B.A., Toronto. 



Part III for Specialists, 1918 



J. A. Anderson, B.A., Queen's. 
G. E. Copeland, M.A., Queen's. 
Norman Davies, B.A., McMaster. 
W. M. Erwin, B.A., Queen's. 
G. S. Johnson. B.A., McMaster. 



A. R. McRitchie, B.A., Toronto. 
Alex. Pearson, B.A., Toronto. 
F. P. Smith, M.A., Queen's. 
J. G. Adams, B.A., Queen's. 



Farm Mechanics. 1917 



G. A. Clark. 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Queen's. A.M., 

Ph.D., Harv. 
Norman Davies, B.A., McMaster. 
Isabel E. Dobbie. 
F. V. Elliott, B.A.. Western. 



W. D. Hay, B.A., Queen's. 

G. S. Johnson, B.A.. McMaster. 

A. J. Madill, B.A., McMaster. 

P. TVT. Shorey, B.A., BjSc, Queen's. 

W. B. Wyndham. B.A., Toronto. 



Farm Mechanics, 1918 



J. G. Adams, B.A., Queen's. 
J. A. Anderson, B.A., Queen's. 
G. E. Copeland, M.A., Queen's. 
R. D. P. Davidson, B.A., Queen's. 
Ishbel A. Foster. 



Helen E. Foster. 
A. R. McRitchie, B.A., Toronto. 
J. L. Mitchener, B.A., McMaster. 
Alex. Pearson, B.A., Toronto. 



Summary. Including Farm Mechanics 

Queen's 34 

Toronto 17 

McMaster 12 

Western 2 

Victoria 1 

With University Degrees 66 

Without Degrees 23 

The names and addresses of Public and Separate School Inspectors who 
successfully completed Part I and II respectively arc given below: — 



Inspectors 
Part I. Intermediate, 1918 



Benson, J. E Picton 

Boyes, R Campbellford 

Campbell, A. L Weston 

Clarke, H. J Belleville 

Colles, Rev. W. H. G... Chatham 

Conn, Henry Sarnia 

Cook, H. F Simcoe 

Froats, Jas Cornwall 

Galbraith, W. J Brampton 



Galbraith, Robt Mount Forest 

Garvin, J. L Barrie 

Green, L. A SaultiSte. Marie 

Hagan, J. W Gore Bay 

Huff, S Meaford 

Irwin, Wm Stratford 

Jordan, A. A Toronto 

Longman, E Barrie 

McDougall, N Petrolia 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



111 



Marshall, J. W Welland Slemon, E. T. 

Mills, G. K Toronto Smith, J. H. . . 

Moore, G. L. Parry Sound Smith, Jas. H. 

Mulloy, C. W Aurora Standing, T. W. 

Nelson, J Vankleek Hill Stevens, W. H. 

Reid, M. R Sharbot Lake Taylor, J. A. 

Scovell, H. R Bracebridge Truscott, S. A. 

Sheppard, P. W Kitchener 



. . .Ottawa 
. . .Chatham 
. . . Stratford 
. . . Brantford 
. . .Lindsay 
. . .St. Thomas 
. . .Kingston 



Bald, W. F. . 
Bennett, J. M. 
Breuls, I. D. . 
Bryce, Walter 
Burgess, H. H 
Carefoot, Geo. A 
Christie, D. M 
Cole, J. If. ... 
Colling, Jas. . . 
Craig, T. A. 

Craig, J. J. 

Crewson, J. W. 
Day, Isaac .... 
Dowsley, W. C. 
Ferguson, T. R. 
Field, John M. 
Finn, J. P. ... 
Froats, Willis 
Jamieson, Thos 
Johnson, H. D. 
Jones, Jas. EL . 
Kilmer, E. E. C. 



Part II. Intermediate, 1918 

. .Port Elgin Lee, W. J Toronto 

. . Toronto Lees, Richard Peterborough 

. . Pembroke Liddy, W. R Orangeville 

. .Toronto Maxwell, D. A Windsor 

. .Owen Sound Michell, F. L Perth 

. . St. Catharines Minns, J, E, Tweed 

. . Sudbury . Moshier, D. D Toronto 

. .Woodstock McCool, Jno Walkerton 

. .Bancroft McGuire, Jas. F Westport 

. .Kemptville McNab, G. G Renfrew 

. .Fergus Norman, Lambert Gait 

..Alexandria Paterson, R. A Ingersoll 

. .Orillia Power, J. F Toronto 

. . Brockville Ritchie, Jno Port Arthur 

..Uxbridge Robinson, Jno. B Hamilton 

. .Goderich Smith, J. C St. Thomas 

. .North Bay Sullivan, J. F London 

. .Carleton Place Thompson, P. J London 

..Ottawa Tom, J. Elgin Goderich 

. .Strathroy White, R. Minden 

..Ottawa Wright, Robt Hanover 

. . Brantford 



Research for Specialist's Certificate in Agriculture 

As stated previously, nine men completed Pari HI for specialist standing in 
Agriculture in 1918, and have undertaken problems in research as follows: — 

G. S. Johnson. Principal of Whitby High School. 

Problem: Rural Credits as Operating in Ontario County. 
Norman Davies, Science Master, Renfrew Collegiate Institute. 

Problem: The Lime Factor in Soils. 
W. M. Erwin, Science Master, Brantford Collegiate Institute. 

Problem: The Water Solubility in Various Arsenates with Reference to 
Their Use as Fungicides. 
J. A. Anderson, Science Master, Wingham High School. 

Problem: A Study of the Actual Weight and Number of Eggs Produced 
by Different Strains of Bred-to-Lay Hens. 

F. P. Smith, Science Master, Brockville Collegiate Institute. 

Problem:. The Effects of Illuminating Gas on House Plants, with a 
view to Obtain Resisting Varieties. 

G. E. Copeland, Science Master, Port Hope High School. 

Problem: Causes of Variation in the Percentage of Fat in Milk. 
A. R. McRitchie, Principal of Arthur High School. 

Problem : The Determination of the Available Constituents of Basic Slag 
as a Fertilizer. 
A. Pearson, Principal, Weston High School. 

Problem: Hot-house Management. 
J. G. Adams, Substitute Teacher, Faculty of Education. 

Problem: The Effects of Climatic or Soil Conditions on the Quality 
of Flour. 



112 THE EEPORT OF THE -No. 17 



Slides for Demonstration 

In order to assist the schools in securing illustrative material for class work, 
sets of lantern slides are now provided by the Department of Education. These 
slides are sent to such Secondary Schools as have lantern facilities, and also to the 
Normal Schools. The schools have been grouped into three circuits, as indicated 
in the following lists given below. Nine sets of slides in all have been sent out. 
After these sets will have made the rounds of the schools they will be returned 
to the Department of Education. 

It is to be hoped that motion picture machines may be secured with a view 
towards having them sent from school to school in the form of a circuit, the films 
to be supplied by the Department of Agriculture. 

Eegarding the use of the slides referred to, I give the following quotation: — 

" I have had two boxes of slides. I had to keep them, longer than the week as I 
received the first box when the school was closed and the second one the day school 
opened. They are splendid. The pupils took great interest in them. Those on poultry 
and poultry houses were splendid to show the pupils what would otherwise have been 
difficult to show them, as it is impossible to show them the different breeds and houses. 
I like the slides very much. They are a great help in the work." (H. Wing, Teacher of 
Agriculture, St. Thomas Collegiate Institute.) 

Instructions regarding High School Circuits and the use of Slides for 
Agricultural Classes 

Three circuits have been arranged and boxes of slides will be sent from the 
Department as follows: — 

One box will be sent out on the same date to each of the three schools first 
named in each circuit, collect. Each of these schools will make use of the 
slides in such a way as best suits the requirements of the school, keeping the 
parcel for a week. Each will then ship) this box down the circuit to the next 
school named. When the boxes will have reached the school last named and ha 
been used by that school, they will be forwarded one by one (when used) to the 
school named at the first of the list, and so on until each school will have »used 
each of the three boxes. The circuit is then completed and the boxes will then be 
shipped, without delay, one by one, to the Department of Education. 

The boxes must all be shipped collect, then each school will have paid one 
express carriage for each box. 

Each shipper will give name of shipper and school from which box is shipped, 
and will give dates of receipt and of shipment on the paper kept within the box, 
so that each teacher concerned will have knowledge of the whole situation and will 
lend a hand to make it a success. 

As soon as the slides will have been received at the Department of Education, 
at the close of the first round, those from Circuit No. 1 will.be sent to the first 
school on Circuit No. 2, then forwarded to the second school and so on down the 
circuit. Those received from Circuit No. 2 will similarly be sent to No. 3 and 
those from No. 3 to No. 1. When the boxes will have made the second round they 
will be returned to the Department. 

At the close of the second round the boxes will all be returned to the Depart- 
ment of Education. Immediately these slides will be sent out for the third round, 
that received from No. 1 circuit will be sent to No. 2, and those from No. 2 sent 
to No. 3, and those from No. 3 will be sent to No. 1. When the boxes have gone 
through the third time all slides will be sent to the Department of Education. 
Each school will then have used nine boxes. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 113 

Circuit No. 1 
School Name of Teacher 

Leamington H.S G. A. Campbell 

St. Thomas C.I Henry Wing 

London C.I J. F. Calvert 

Ingersoll C.I W. B. Shales 

London Normal O. W. Hofferd 

Kincardine H.S P. M. Shorey 

Wingham H.S J. A. Anderson 

Stratford Normal J. N. Emery 

Arthur H.S A. R. McRitchie 

Circuit No. 2 

Whitby H.S G. S. Johnson 

Port Hope H.S G. E. Copeland 

Cobourg C.I R. P. D. Davidson 1 

Picton C.I H. H. Graham 

Peterborough Normal A. J. Madill 

Port Perry H.S Thos. Follick 

Oakville H.S W. B. Wyndham 

Dundas H.S W. H. Tuke 

Hamilton Normal , G. A. McMillan 

Niagara Falls S W. A. Porter 

Circuit No. 3 

New Liskeard I. E. Dobbie 

North Bay Normal H. E. Ricker 

Renfrew C.I Norman Davies 

Ottawa Normal G. A. Miller 

Vankleek Hill C.I G. E. Pentland 

Athens H.S J. A. Burchill 

Brockville C.I F. P. Smith 

Smith's Falls C.I G. W. Bunton 

Winchester H.S F. J. Barlow 

Amendments have been made to the Regulations recently whereby a teacher 
may qualify for Specialist standing in both Science and Agriculture. Here is the 
Regulation : — 

" A Specialist's Certificate in both Agriculture and Science may also be obtained on 
the following qualifications: A First Class Grade A or a High School Assistant's Cer- 
tificate, granted on the Science option under the Amended Regulations of 1917, with the 
degree of B.S.A. after the prescribed course at the Ontario Agricultural College." (Amend- 
ments to Regulation of 1918, p. 66.) 

Note. — The Courses for the degree of B.Sc (Agr.), provided for in Circular 47 A, 
will not be given hereafter except in the case of those students who have already begun 
the Courses therefor. 

• It is expected that a number of capable men who have taken the B.S.A. 
degree may be secured to enter the High Schools and Collegiate Institutes. The 
degree of B.Sc. (Agr.) as indicated will no longer be given, chiefly because very 
few seemed to be attracted to this course, only one man qualified since the estab- 
lishment of the course in 1912. 

It has also been made possible to obtain Specialist standing in Agriculture 
as follows, taken from the Amended Eegulations of 1918, page 6'6 : — 

THE SPECIALIST'S CERTIFICATE IN AGRICULTURE 

The provisions of Circular 47 (A) of September, 1912, have been amended, 
and, as announced in the Summer School Syllabus for 1918, the following are 
the courses for the Specialist's certificate in Agriculture obtainable by the holders 
of Permanent or Interim Specialists' certificates in Science. 



114 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 

(1) The two Summer School Courses for the Intermediate Certificate in 
Agriculture (including a course in Farm Mechanics). 

(2) A third Summer School Course in the following: 
Applied Science: 

(a) Botany : Plant diseases ; chemistry : soil fertility, stock foods ; bacteri- 
ology; plant diseases, dairy bacteriology; common diseases of farm animals (may 
be taken with (c) below). 

Field Husbandry : 

(b) Grain judging, including field crops, seed selection; Horticulture; hybrid- 
ization; fruit judging; plant breeding (may be taken with (a) above) ; methods 
of producing seeds of vegetables. 

Animal Husbandry : 

(c) Stock judging: feeds and feeding (may be taken with Chemistry in (a) 
above); poultry judging, poultry economics; dairying: butter and cheese judging, 
separator -work and testing. 

(3) A problem in research, covering at least the first year following that in 
which the third Summer School Course was taken. 

The grants provided for maintaining classes in Agriculture in Secondary 
Schools and the requirements for earning these grants are set forth in the follow- 
ing regulations: — 

Agriculture and Horticulture 

LOWER AND MIDDLE SCHOOL 

11. On the report of the Director, that the Eegulations have been satisfac- 
torily complied with, the Department will pay the following grants: 

(1) An annual grant, not exceeding $100.00 in each case, will be paid to 
the Board for carrying on the Lower and the Middle School Courses respectively. 

(2) (a) An annual grant of $1*20 will be paid to the holder of a High School pro- 
fessional certificate and the degree of B.Sc. (Agr.), or to the holder of a Specialist's 
certificate in Agriculture, for carrying on the Lower and Middle School courses 
respectively, 1 for the calendar year, or of $60 for each course carried on to the 
end of June, or of $40 for the remainder of the year. 

(b) An annual grant of $80.00 will be paid to the science teacher who holds 
an Intermediate certificate, or to a District Agricultural Eepresentative or an 
Assistant District Agricultural Eepresentative of the standing of the Third year 
in the Ontario Agricultural College, for the Lower and Middle School courses 
respectively carried on for the calendar year, or of $40.00 for each course carried 
on to the end of June, and of $30.00 for the remainder of the year. For carrying 
on the course in more schools than one, the Agricultural Eepresentative will be 
paid two-thirds of the regular grant for each additional school. 

(3) For conducting experimental and demonstration plots on the school 
grounds in connection with the class-room and laboratory instruction in the Lower 
and Middle School courses respectively, a grant of $25.00 additional will be paid 
to the teacher or Agricultural or Assistant Agricultural Eepresentative in addition 
to the salary paid by the School Board, and) a grant not exceeding $25.00 for 
each course, to the Board. 

(4) The grants will be apportioned on the reports for the calendar year. 

(5) The accounts for the work shall be kept separate from the general school 
expenditure, and a financial statement shall be submitted on a special form by the 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 115 

Secretary to the Minister at the end of December. The totals of the receipts and 
expenditures shall, however, also be included in the General Financial Statement 
of the Board to the Department of Education. No grants can be paid to a school 
until these reports are received. 

(6) The legislative and any municipal grants to the School Boards for Agri- 
cultural Education are made solely for the purpose of promoting the cause of 
Agriculture and Horticulture in the community through the work of the school, and 
may be expended as follows : — 

(a) The grant of $100.00 for the general work : 

For agricultural or horticultural books or charts, for subscriptions to journals 
on farming, dairying, gardening, beekeeping, poultry keeping, etc. ; for the pur- 
chase of Babcock milk testers, spraying equipment, pruning and grafting appli- 
ances, school bee-hives, accessories for handling bees, incubator and models for 
poultry equipment, apparatus for soil, bacteriological or chemical experiments; 
for providing vegetable and flower seed or seed grain required by pupils in their 
home projects; for printing instruction sheets, announcements regarding plans for 
work, competitions, etc.; for meeting the expenses of the teachers or committee 
acting with the teacher in the supervision of the work, and for such other purposes 
as may be approved by the Minister. 

(b) The special grant of $25.00 for the support of the special experimental 
and demonstration plots at or in connection with the schools : 

For preparing the ground by manuring, cultivating or draining; for the 
rental or leasing of additional land adjacent to the school grounds; for the 
purchase of equipment such as tools, lines, labels, hot bed, cold frame or such 
other things as may be needed in carrying on the experiments; for the purchase 
of fertilizers or planting material, such as! ■ seeds, roots, bulbs, seedling trees or 
shrubs, or cuttings to be used in experiments or demonstrations; for the expense 
of caring for the plots during the summer holidays; and for such other purposes 
as may be approved by the Minister. 

A certificate of having completed the First Course for an Intermediate or for 
an Elementary certificate, with an undertaking by the holder thereof to complete 
the second course in the following year will entitle the holder to qualify for the 
grants specified. 

These grants will be paid also to the holder of a High School or First Class 
certificate and the degree of B.S.A. 

Agricultural Departments in High Schools 

The details respecting the maintenance of a Department of Agriculture in a 
Secondary School are given in a bulletin entitled " Recommendations and Regula- 
tions for the Establishment, Organization, and Management of Agricultural and 
Household Science Departments/' issued in 1915 by the Department of Education. 
Up to the present four schools have each established a Department of Agriculture : 
Whitby High School, Oakville High School. Port Perry High School, and Drayton 
Continuation School. 

In a measure, these schools are extending the meaning and usefulness of the 
High School, inasmuch as they are providing something that appeals directly to 
the welfare of the locality in which they are situated. To a certain extent this is a 
new departure in High School work, and it remains to be seen how this works out. 

Farm Mechanics as a division of the work in Agriculture has been introduced 
into three of these schools: Whitby, Oakville, and Port Perry. This feature of 
Agricultural education is already proving of great value as an educational feature. 



116 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



These schools are already extending the work of the High School by providing 
a short winter course suitable to the needs of the community. 

Moreover, one of these schools (Whitby) makes use of a motion picture 
machine in giving demonstrations of certain Agricultural operations, not only in 
classes in this school, but also in surrounding public schools for evening meetings. 
A storage battery makes it possible to provide light sufficient to operate the machine 
even in the most out-of-the-way places. This feature of High School work links 
up the High School with the rural school to the advantage of both institutions. 
Motion pictures are rapidly becoming important factors in education, and the 
Department of Agriculture has already a considerable library of films which may 
be made use of by the schools. 

It is expected that schools maintaining Departments of Agriculture may 
become the real Agricultural High Schools of the future. 

The regulations respecting grants to such schools are here given: — 

DISTRIBUTION OF GOVERNMENT GRANTS 

19. Continuation or High Schools or Collegiate Institutes shall be entitled 
to grants from the Department of Education for their Agricultural or Household 
Science department or for both departments in accordance with the following 
scheme, provided they have complied with the Regulations in regard to accom- 
modations, equipment, courses, staffs, and organization (1) of said department or 
departments, and (2) of the class of school to which said department or depart- 
ments belong. 

I. Agricultural Department 

Fixed Grants 

(1) An annual fixed grant of $150 for each year of the course in Agriculture. 

Equipment 

(2) (a) Fifty per cent, of the value of the equipment for Farm Mechanics 
for the first year and twenty-five per cent, of the value of said equipment for each 
of the two years thereafter — maximum total grant $750. 

(b) Fifty per cent, of the value of the rest of the Agricultural equipment for 
the first year and twenty-five per cent, of the value of said equipment for each of 
two years thereafter. Maximum total grants for the three years $500. 

Accommodations 

(3) An annual grant on special accommodations, as follows: — 

Agricultural Classroom 



Room 



Water 
Supply- 



Tables Black-boards 



Lighting 



Heating 



Ventilation 



Store 
Eoom 



Grade I . . 

II.. 

" III.. 



$ c. 
15 00 


$ c, 
6 00 


$ c. 
9 00 


11 25 


4 50 


5 75 


7 50 


3 00 


4 50 


3 75 


1 50 


2 25 



$ c. 
2 00 

1 50 

1 00 

50 



$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


4 50 


4 50 


4 50 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 



$ c. 

10 00 

7 50 
5 00 
2 50 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



ll r 



Experimental Plots 

Grade I, $50; grade II, $37.50; grade III, $25.00; grade IV, $12.50. 



Workshop 



Room 



Water 
Supply 



Black- 
board 



Lighting 


Heating 


Ventilation 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


4 50 


4 50 


4 50 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 



Stock room 



Grade I . . 


$ c. 
15 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


II.. 


11 25 


4 50 


" III.. 


7 50 


3 00 


" IV.. 


3 75 


1 50 



$ c. 
2 00 

1 50 

1 00 

50 



$ c. 
10 00 

7 50 

5 00 

2 50 



Salaries 



(4) Annual grants as follows : 



(a) (i) Fifty per cent, of the expenditure for the salaries of the staff of the 
Agricultural department when the whole course is taken up; maximum, $750. 

(ii) When Farm Mechanics is not taken up, the maximum grant shall be 
$600. 

(6) Fifty per cent, of each of the following payments, on the recommenda- 
tion of the Advisory Agricultural Committee : 

(i) To the teacher of Agriculture for supervising the Home projects as pre- 
scribed by Regulation, at the rate of $5.00 a day of five and a half hours, including 
the time spent in travelling. For each year's class, the grant shall be : for supervision 
during the school year, maximum $100; for supervision during the Summer holi- 
days, maximum $50. 

(ii) To the teacher of Agriculture for travelling expenses in connection with 
the supervision of each year's class, maximum $100. 

(iii) To the special lecturer or lecturers in the Agricultural subjects, maximum 
grant $50. 

II. Household Science Department 

Fixed Grants 

(1) A fixed annual grant of $150 for each year of the course. 



Equipment 



(2) Fifty per cent, of the value of the equipment for the Household Science 
subjects for the first year and twenty-five per cent, of the value of said equipment 
for each of the two years thereafter. Maximum total grant for the three years, 
$500. 



118 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



Accommodations 

(3) An annual grant on the special accommodations, as follows: — 



Kitchen 


Tables 


Water 
Supply 


Black- 
boards 


Light- 
ing 


Heat- 
ing 


Ventila- 
tion 


Storeroom, 

pantry, 

cupboa rd 


\ Dining- 
room 



Laun- 
dry 



Grade I 


$ c. 
15 00 


$ c. 
9 00 


$ c, 
6 00 


$ c. 
2 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
6 00 


$ c. 
10 00 


$ c. 
15 00 


•' II 


11 25 


5 75 


4 50 


1 50 


4 50 


4 50 


4 50 


7 50 


11 25 


" III 


7 50 


4 50 


3 00 


1 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


5 00 


7 50 


" IV 


3 75 


2 25 


1 50 


50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


2.50 


3 75 



$ c. 
15 00 

11 25 

7 50 
3 75 



Salaries 

(4) An annual grant of fifty per cent, of the expenditure for the salaries of 
the staff of the Household Science department if the whole course is taken up. 
Maximum total grant $600. 

(5) If the supervision of the Home projects of the Agricultural subjects 
of the Household Science department is under the charge of the teacher of such 
department, the grants for such supervision shall be on the same bases as those 
provided for in Regulation 19 (4) (b) (i) and (ii), above. 

Note. — To suit the re-organization of the work in Agriculture formerly done under 
the Ministers of Education and Agriculture, Section 33 (2) of the High Schools Act 
and Section 8 .(4) of the Continuation Schools' Act have been rescinded. By amend- 
ments made to the High and Continuation Schools Acts, County Councils may make 
grants in aid of the Agricultural and Household Science departments. As the grants 
offered in this Circular are provided toy the Dominion Government, County Councils are 
not required to provide equivalent grants. 

Agriculture in Normal Schools 

The teaching of Agriculture in the Normal Schools is rapidly becoming estab- 
lished as one of the regular features of Normal School work. Owing to the large 
classes in these schools, and also to the fact that when the schools themselves were 
established very little thought, if any, was given towards making provision for the 
teaching of Agriculture. The difficulties arising out of this lack of special pro- 
vision for the teaching of this subject are being met by making use of neighbour- 
ing farms, stock barns, and such other institutions as may be found in the city, 
for demonstrating certain farm operations. 

In nearly all the Normal Schools larger grounds have been, or soon will be, 
secured for demonstrations in vegetable gardening and also for experimental work 
in connection with Field Husbandry. In the illustration here given of a portion 
of the garden; of the Hamilton Normal School, intercropping and other garden 
problems are being worked out. 

Laboratories are also being equipped for certain phases of Agricultural work. 
A considerable portion of such work may be done in the ordinary Science labora- 
tory if provided with suitable simple equipment. The illustration showing a class 
at work on soil may serve to show how such a laboratory may be used for work in 
Agriculture. Such work is, of course, closely related to other subjects — notably 
physics, chemistry and geology; and practice in this character of work often gives 
vitality and interest to the ordinary High School physics and chemistry. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 119 

When the High Schools of the Province provide a course of study in both the 
Lower and Middle Schools, obligatory for those who expect to attend the Normal 
Schools and become teachers, less elementary work will then be needed, and conse- 
quently more time can be devoted to methods of management. In the meantime a 
good deal can be done under the conditions in which we are now placed, as may 
be seen from the following statement by Mr. McMillan, teacher of Agriculture in 
the Hamilton Normal School: 

" During the session of 1917-18 two hundred and thirty teachers-in-training received 
the regular Normal School Course in Agriculture and Horticulture at Hamilton. As very- 
few of the teachers-in-training have received a school course in Agriculture before enter- 
ing the Normal School it has been necessary to treat each topic first in an academic way, 
and discuss it from the standpoint of method. Throughout the session the course in 
Agriculture and Horticulture was closely correlated with the work in Nature Study and 
Elementary Science. 

"The expenditure of $276.00 for permanent Agricultural equipment facilitated 
the work immensely. Students were enabled to experiment individually. Each 
teacher-in-training made the Babcock test for butter fat in milk. By the use 
of lactometers they detected watering and skimming of milk, and by the aid 
of the O.A.C. dairy bulletins calculated approximately the extent of each. Through the 
kindness of Mr. Forster, Manager of the Pure Milk Co. or" Hamilton, we were permitted 
to spend two Saturday forenoons in a dairy plant. Nearly all the students availed them- 
selves of the opportunity and saw the milk delivered from the farms, examined, weighed, 
clarified, pasteurized, cooled, bottled and placed in' cold storage ready for delivery. 
Other interesting features were the pasteurization of cream, the process of washing 
bottles, the artificial cold storage plant, ice-cream manufactured, and the bacteriological 
department. 

" For candling eggs each desk in the laboratory was equipped with two egg candles. 
Each consisted of an oak stand carrying an electric light globe above and covered with 
cardboard case supplied by the Poultry Branch, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. 
These were used by the students in candling fresh and stale eggs and in testing eggs from 
our incubator for fertility. One coal-oil lamp was equipped and used similarly to demon- 
strate a method for rural schools. The lantern slides and class work on varieties of 
poultry were supplemented by a visit after school to the Hamilton Poultry iShow, where 
a large variety of birds were seen. By special arrangement approximately 130 students 
attended in a body under the children's admission fee. 

" In the study of farm animals, use was made of the lantern slides supplied by the 
International Harvester Company and of others, the property of the school. One Saturday 
forenoon was spent at the Asylum barns, where valuable assistance was given by Mr. 
Grey, farm superintendent. Here we saw a root-cellar, a silo and many features of a 
good dairy barn. After the good points of a dairy cow had been demonstrated, an 
animal was taken into the yard, and the students judged it by the use of score cards. 
The characteristics of light and heavy draught horses were also pointed out. 

" The weed seeds collected on excursions in the autumn were examined, drawn and 
described by the students in class. 

"Considerable equipment for soil studies was secured during the year and the 
laboratory course on soils was applied in garden work in the spring term. 

" Early in March, cabbages, tomatoes, celery, etc., were started in flats indoors, 
These were later transferred to hot-beds prepared and cared for largely by the students. 
The students also prepared cold frames into which many seedlings were transplanted 
when crowded. In this way were produced all the young plants required by both the 
students and Strathcona School pupils in our school gardens. 

" In our school garden the system of intercropping was followed to a great extent 
and has proved very successful. 

" In the garden work the students gain experience in certain operations in their own 
plots. Each then assists one or more public school pupils with the same work in the 
children's garden. In this way the teachers-in-training get experience that may help 
them later in their own schools. 

" To carry out this scheme successfully each of the five classes of teachers-in-training 
should be given charge of a public school class for the garden work of the spring term. 
This would demand a large amount of garden space. Last session one hundred and sixty 
public school pupils received individual garden plots under the direction of the Normal 
students. The total garden area approximated forty-eight square rods. There remained 
perhaps one-sixth of an acre for students' plots and for demonstration work. The 
addition of another city lot to our garden this year will assist materially. But if satis- 
factory work is to be done in horticulture and floriculture permanent provision should 
be made for fruit trees, small fruits and a greenhouse." 



120 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



The last statement given by Mr. McMillan touches a very important feature 
of the accommodation — a greenhouse. Every Normal School should be provided 
with a greenhouse, not so much for ornamental plants as for a sort of laboratory in 
which Agricultural and Horticultural problems can be worked out. 

The accommodation and equipment for teaching Agriculture are not yet all 
that could be desired. The following list shows, to a certain extent, the value of 
the equipment : — 

Equipment for Agriculture in Normal Schools 



Normal School 


Equipment 


Books 


Other material 


Hamilton 


$ c, 
276 00 
101 50 
182 94 


$ c. 
10 05 
18 00 
28 71 
36 63 


$ c. 
117 92 


London 


168 50 


North Bay 




Ottawa 




Peterborough 


66 11 

259 90 
344 83 


22 08 


Stratford 


30 00 


50 00 


Toronto 


44 85 









The rural schools affiliated with the Normal Schools are given in the following 
list. It is much to be regretted that the officers in charge of these schools have not 
been able to secure teachers with certificates in Agriculture. 

Teachers of Agriculture in the different Normal Schools 

Hamilton G. O. McMillan, M. A., B.Paed., Queen's 

London G. W. Hofferd, B.A., Queen's 

North Bay H. E. Ricker, M.A., Queen's 

Ottawa G. A. Miller, M.A., Queen's 

Peterborough A. J. Madill, B.A., McMaster 

Stratford J. W. Emery, B.A., D.Paed., Toronto 

Toronto David Whyte, B.A., Toronto 



All of these men except Mr. Hofferd hold Intermediate Certificates in Agri- 
culture. Mr. Hofferd holds Part I of this certificate, and will complete the course 
by taking Part II in 1919. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



SUMMER COURSES, 1918 
Ontario Agricultural College 

Whatever may be the tendency regarding increase or decrease of attendance in 
schools and colleges during the war, there is no uncertainty about the progress in 
the Summer Courses for teachers given at the Ontario Agricultural College. In 
1918, all told, there were 368 teachers and 79 inspectors. The following schedule 
shows the attendance since 1911: — 

Attendance at the Ontario Agricultural College Summer Courses in Agriculture, 

1911=1918 





Elementary 


Intermediate 


I nspectors 


Farm 
Mechanics 




Year 




I 


II 


I 


II 


III 


I II 


— 


Total 




Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


— 


— 




1911 


8 

16 
14 

8 

15 
11 
15 

6 


75 
65 
64 
55 
39 
99 
138 
187 


1 
2 
5 
5 
5 
9 
7 
7 


16 
23 
36 
27 
18 
31 
81 
119 
















100 


1912 
















106 


1913 


23 
13 
17 
15 
9 
20 


4 
4 
1 
3 
1 
11 












146 


1914 .... 


14 

9 

14 

13 

9 










126 


1915 .... 


1 
1 
2 








105 


1916 .... 








183 


1917 .... 






10 
9 


276 


1918 .... 


9 


79 


456 



The foregoing table indicates a marked tendency since 1915 towards an appre- 
ciation of the Courses provided by the staff of the Ontario Agricultural College, 
under the direction of the Department of Education. The table shows the number 
in actual attendance at the College, but omits, of course,. to give the number who 
made application for admission. More than three hundred applied for admission to 
Part I of the Elementary Course in 1918, but the College was unable to accommo- 
date only two hundred in this class, consequently, over a hundred candidates were 
disappointed in their endeavour to secure further education along agricultural 
lines. It is hoped that in 1919 arrangements may be made to accommodate, at 
other centres than Guelph, if necessary, all who wish to take these courses. In some 
respects the people of Ontario are only commencing to understand the importance 
of this great movement to increase the efficiency of the Ontario educational system. 

As shown in the table above, 79 inspectors attended the courses in 
1918 and took the work provided for the classes which take the courses leading to 
an Intermediate certificate. These men should be equipped not only to direct the 
work of the teachers, but also to take an active part in this propaganda of rural im- 
provement. As is the case with the teachers, the inspectors will complete the work 
leading to an Intermediate certificate in 1919. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



1 O' 



A considerable number of those who enter Part I of the course leading to an 
elementary certificate, for some reason or other do not complete the course by taking 
Part II. The following shows the percentage of shrinkage : — 



Number taking Part I 


Number completing Part II 
the following year 


Decrease 
per cent. 


1911 


83 
81 
76 
63 
54 
100 
158 


1912 


24 
41 
32 
23 
40 
88 
126 


71 


1912 


1913 


50 


1913 


1914 


58 


1914 


1915 


64 


1915 


1916 " 


26 


1916 


1917 


12 


1917 


1918 


20 









These figures show a very marked improvement in 1916 and 1917, with respect 
to the dropping out referred to. 

An interesting feature of the Summer Course in 1918 was the presence of 
28 " Sisters," teachers from E. C. Separate Schools. Though handicapped some- 
what in the garden work by their method of dress-, they accomplished manfully 
all the regular work, in class, laboratory and garden, with praiseworthy success. 

On account of the large number in attendance, dormitory or boarding accom- 
modation could not be provided for the men, consequently, the courses for all con- 
cerned lost much of their charm and something of their efficiency. Going back 
and forth down town consumed much time, and in most cases this prevented 
attendance upon evening meetings. 

As was the case last year, the swimming tank provided an opportunity to learn 
to swim, and also a means of enjoyment to those who had previously learned. 

A pageant put on by a number of teachers under the direction of the Instructor 
in games was very much appreciated and enjoyed by all. A collection on this occa- 
sion produced $43.00, which was sent to the Fresh Air Fund of the " Daily Star." 

Though the work was strenuous and the weather hot, the teachers and in- 
spectors enjoyed the work, and no doubt will carry away much of experience that 
may be useful in their regular spheres of labour. 

In addition to the regular class work six special lectures were given on Con- 
solidated Schools by Mr. Lee L. Driver, of Winchester, Indiana. Consolidation of 
schools in Ontario is now, and is likely to be for some time, a live question in 
rural communities in Ontario. Information along this line received at first hand 
from Mr. Driver is highly appreciated. 

Opportunity was also provided for the High School teachers in attendance to 
learn the method of operation and the usefulness in Agricultural education of the 
motion picture machine. It is expected that in the near future the Department of 
Education may provide a few such machines to be sent from High School to High 
School where Agriculture is being taught, along with sets of films illustrating 
different topics of Agriculture. Having this in view, it was deemed wise to give 
the teachers of Agriculture practice in operating motion picture machines. 

The social features in 1918 were not so effective as formerly because of ^ the 
fact that the men roomed down town. However, two enjoyable and profitable ex- 
cursions, one. to Eockwood and the other to the convalescent hospital, were carried 
through very successfully. 



-* 124 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

A pageant given by the boys and girlsi of the neighbourhood provided con 
siderable amusement. 

But, perhaps best of all, was a picnic outing on the afternoon of August 1st 
to which all those in attendance — inspectors, teachers, and rural leaders — wen 
invited. 

These courses are improving year by year, and the College staff spares no paint 
in providing the very best the College can supply. The teachers and inspectors 
appreciate very highly the splendid efforts put forth by those in charge. 

Dr. Cody, the new Minister of Education, spent a day visiting the class-rooms 
and expressed his whole-hearted sympathy with the work of the staff, and realized 
that those in attendance upon the classes were gaining much that will increase the 
efficiency of the rural schools. At the close of the afternoon session he delivered an 
inspiring address in the gymnasium to the inspectors, teachers, and others — 
about 600. 

A new Manual on Elementary Agriculture and Horticulture has recently been 
published, which will prove, no doubt, of considerable assistance to the teacher. 
This manual may also serve to bring more fully to the minds of the Instructors of 
the Summer Courses in Agriculture the body of material to be made use of, and the 
character of instruction likely to be most serviceable in Forms III and IV (Grades 
5 to 8) of our Public and Separate Schools. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 125 

APPENDIX Q 
THE LIBRARY OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit the Report of the Library of the Department of 
Education for 1918. 

The Library of the Department of Education is, in the main, a pedagogical 
library. It serves two classes of persons: (1) The staff of the Department, the 
inspectors and teachers at work in the various classes of schools, and persons read- 
ing for degrees in pedagogy or investigating problems in education. (2) The 
students-in-training in the Toronto Normal School. 

It contains over 35,000 books covering every phase of school work; reports and 
official publications of Departments of Education in the British Empire, United 
States, etc.; and bulletins and monographs from such institutions as the Bureau 
of Education in Washington, and the Teachers' College in Columbia University. 
Its list of 126 periodicals includes the leading British, American, and Canadian 
Educational journals; and magazines devoted to literature, art, history, geography, 
science, mathematics, economics, psychology, etc. New books are added from month 
to month. 

To persons in class (1) above, books are loaned for a period of two weeks, 
which may be extended on request, provided there are no other applicants in the 
meantime. The Department pays the postage out and the borrower the return 
postage. 

A number of inspectors and teachers use the library frequently, but there 
are many who either do not know that it is at their service or do not realize how 
helpful it can be. To illustrate its usefulness : 

In reply to requests for information there have been sent out recently books, 
bulletins, and periodicals dealing with supervision and inspection of schools; state, 
city, and township surveys; consolidation of schools; vocational, industrial, and 
technical education; open air schools; medical inspection of schools; the school as 
a social institution; housing; education of the feeble-minded; bilingual teaching; 
ralue of the classical languages in education, supervised study; scales for the 
measurement of intelligence ; standardized tests for determining progress in various 
school subjects; experimental studies in the psychology of various school subjects; 
history of education in different countries; bibliographies on questioning and on 
professional books and school journals for teachers of rural schools. To these may 
be added requests for books on methods of teaching- the various school studies, for 
books to supplement the school texts, for books to be read for degrees in pedagogy, 
and for books of service to students taking courses in the Ontario College of Art. 

There is, of course, a steady demand for books on literature, history, biography, 
travel, science, the useful arts, etc. 

If there were a general catalogue of the books in the library, or if catalogues 
of separate departments such as education, language, literature, art, mathematics, 
science, history and biography, geography and travel, etc., were published and 
distributed, inspectors and teachers would know what the library contains and 
would take advantage of the opportunities offered them for studying the best books 
on education and increasing the range of their own reading. 



126 THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 

For students-in-training in the Normal School, the library has a large supply 
of reference books — dictionaries, encyclopaedias, gazetteers, atlases, concordances, 
books of quotations, year books, readers' guides, etc. It offers them a wealth of 
material to supplement the instruction given in the lecture rooms and in their text- 
books. It supplies them with ample information on subjects which they are 
assigned to teach and with suggestive methods of presenting such subjects to their 
pupils. It provides them with opportunities to become acquainted with standard 
literature — history, biography, poetry, fiction, etc. — works of inspiration and re- 
creation. Through the use of the periodicals, they may keep in touch with the 
intellectual, social, and political life of the time, and with current thought and 
practice in education. 

But it is to be regretted that the usefulness of the library is lessened because 
so many students do not know how to consult, intelligently and quickly, dictionaries, 
encyclopaedias, atlases and other reference books. Few are aware of the variety 
and extent of the information contained in a modern dictionary. Many are unable 
to interpret accurately the diacritical marks and signs used to indicate the pro- 
nunciation of words in one or more dictionaries, or to make a correct choice of 
definitions and synonyms. They have not had direct, definite, and systematic in- 
struction in the use of reference books, especially the dictionary. The habit of 
consulting such books has not been established nor is their value appreciated. 

Many do not know how to use advantageously, tables of contents, indexes, 
chapter headings — those technical devices by which the reader obtains, with reason- 
able economy of effort and time, the purpose and plan of a book, a general idea 
of the topics treated in it, and whether it is likely to be of service or interest to him. 

The student who is not given this instruction and training during his high 
school course is, to that extent, impeded in his studies, is unable to take full 
advantage of the help which the school library offers, and is handicapped when he 
enters a normal school or college. 

Many students do enter on their normal school course without this training, 
and the lack of it becomes very evident when they attempt to use the library to 
supplement lectures, to prepare lessons for practice teaching, or to search out for 
themselves information needed to solve some problem or to justify some opinion. 
These students need, for immediate service, a little instruction and considerable 
individual practice in the use of reference books, on how to find books on the 
shelves, and on the distinctive characteristics of leading periodicals. 

But there is a further training to be provided for. The young teacher, when 
he completes his normal school course, will, in all probability, have charge of one 
of the 5.381 rural school libraries in this province, and its success or failure will 
depend mainly upon him. The rural school library is not simply a supplementary 
agent, but a vital factor in school work. What practical preparation for this 
important phase of his work does he receive during his professional training? 

The course prescribed for Literature includes the following: 

" Principles to be kept in view in selecting works for the school library ; 
methods of making use of the school and the public library; means of securing 
the co-operation of the home in the pupil's reading. 

Bases of selection of material for the different grades; lists of suitable fairy 
tales, fables, nature stories, etc.. adapted, to the lower grades, and of works suitable 
for the higher grades; complete wholes versus extracts. 

The course shall include a course in literature, in part based on selections 
in the Readers; directed sessional private reading course; suggestions for future 
reading." 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 127 

However excellent the lectures on principles to be kept in view in selecting 
books for the library and on methods of using them, such instruction must be 
followed by carefully supervised practice work in the library if it is to be effective. 
To select several books, to evaluate each in the light of the purpose it is to serve, 
and to say in what class each should be used is one of a series of practical problems 
the solution of which will help to show how far the principles of selection have been 
grasped by the student. But it is the personal element in such work that is vital. 
]t is the discussion of a book with a student or group of students, from time to 
time, that arouses interest, that evokes personal opinion, that shapes criticism, that 
develops a taste for good literature and tends to establish the library habit. 

It does not appear that provision has been made for instruction in library 
organization, that is, in purchasing, accessioning, classifying, and card-indexing 
(cataloguing) books or in recording circulation and returns. This work is essential 
in every library if business methods are to be employed and intelligent direction 
and continuity of policy secured. 

In all, or nearly all, of the state normal schools in the United States there are 
definite courses in library training, varying in length from a few weeks to a two- 
year term with a lesson period each day. 

The majority of the students who complete the courses of study in our normal 
schools each year begin to teach in the rural schools, and it is evident that the 
preparation which they receive for the practical management of rural school 
libraries is insufficient. 



The number of books added to the library during the year was 1,038; of these 
817 were purchased, 43 were donated, and 121 were bound magazines. 

" The number of books given out as loans was 16,862, and the number drawn 
for reference in the library 5,165, in all 22,027. 

The number of periodicals subscribed for was 126 and the number of loans 
1,998. With some exceptions, illustrated periodicals — art journals especially — are 
not given out as loans. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. GOGGIN, 

Departmental Librarian. 

The Departmental Library, 

Toronto, January 11, 1919. 



128 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX H 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC 
LIBRARIES 

To the Honourable H. J. Cody, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of your Public Libraries 
Branch for 1918, and the statistics, etc., of the Public Libraries of the Province for 
1917; also a statement of the grants paid in 1918 to Public Libraries, and to 
Historical, Literary, and Scientific Societies. 

Summary of Matters Worthy of Special Notice 

1. During the period of the European war, with every loyal Canadian perform- 
ing war service either overseas or at home, when peace of mind was unnatural, when 
many enforced demands were being made on the public, and a slackening of effort 
in non-war work was excusable, our public libraries made notable progress. Expen- 
diture increased 44 per cent, and the use of books 53 per cent. 

2. On the initiative of the Honourable Dr. H. J. Cody all of the military 
camps in Ontario — fifteen in number — were supplied with libraries. 

3. Several military hospitals were furnished with libraries. 

4. The circulation of travelling libraries shows an increase of fourteen per 
cent., exclusive of libraries sent to military camps and hospitals. There is a large 
field that invites an extension of our travelling library system. 

5. A successful training school for librarians and assistants was held. 

6. The public library problem requires that our professional training system 
be placed on a more permanent basis, and that it provide a longer course for 
specialists and for librarians of city libraries, also a shorter course for librarians of 
smaller libraries. 

7. The circulation of books through public libraries for 1917 was increased 
by 450,000 volumes over the previous year. 

8. Four additions have been made to the free libraries' list, and six association 
libraries were organized. 

9. Notable progress has been made by several of our larger town and city 
libraries in raising their standard of service. All important appointments and 
promotions were given to trained persons, and the majority of them on the recom- 
mendation of the Inspector of Public Libraries. 

10. The salaries of the librarians and assistants in a number of libraries 
were appreciably increased. In every case where qualified librarians and assistants 
were required to fill vacancies, the salaries that were offered were considerably 
higher than were formerly paid for the respective positions. 

11. Experiments were made in organizing new association libraries by sending 
a member of the Inspector's staff to three communities where prospects seemed 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 129 

favourable for library establishment. In each case a library was organized during 
the day of the staff-member's visit, funds were secured for books and furniture 
within a few days after the visit, and all three libraries are now serving their 
communities. 

12. The greater interest that small libraries are showing in careful and 
systematic book selection is serving as a test to prove (1) that the book trade 
is either unwilling, or considers it unprofitable to fill satisfactorily small orders 
of well-selected books suited to the needs of small town, village and rural libraries, 
(2) that some action should be taken by the Department to secure for the smaller 
libraries a satisfactory means of-securing the books best adapted for their needs. 

13. The public library situation calls for more professional service from the 
Department, notably in professional training, library inspection, and editorial work. 

14. The staff of the Public Libraries Branch requires to be strengthened 
by the addition of a few trained assistants. The responsibilities already assumed 
by the Branch can not be met successfully by the present organization. A large 
and progressive programme including more adequate inspection, a satisfactory 
training system, extension of travelling library service, and better editorial work, 
makes an urgent demand for strengthening and reorganizing the Branch's forces. 

15. The two rooms occupied by the Public Libraries Branch are unsuitable and 
altogether too small. The work is seriously retarded for the want of proper accom- 
modation; four times our present floor-space should be available for travelling 
libraries alone. Thousands of books are now kept in small boxes in the basement 
of the building. It is impossible to assemble our book collection. All of our 
equipment for library school purposes must be packed in boxes between school 
periods; the school work is made unnecessarily difficult for the want of more 
accommodation. 

16. The Inspector of Public Libraries was unsuccessful in an attempt to 
arrange a system of co-operation with the Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-estab- 
lishment, Dominion Government, for the purpose of serving returned soldiers with 
books to supplement their vocational instruction. 

17. Five library training schools in the eastern United States invited the 
Inspector of Public Libraries to give a lecture to their respective classes. The 
Schools visited were : New York State School, Albany ; New York Public Library 
Training School, New York ; Pratt Institute School of Library Science, Brooklyn ; 
Simmons College Library Training School, Boston; Library Training School, 
University of Syracuse, Syracuse. 

The Public Libraries are Progressing 

All indications point to progress on the part of our public libraries. Several 
have made notable advances, a large number have shown appreciable progress, and 
too many have " marked time." On the whole there is reason for congratulation. 

We have a certain number of libraries that will compare favourably with the 
best on the continent in building, books, organization, service, and results; a 
larger number are doing fairly good work, and the majority have not reached a 
reasonable standard. I believe that the Public Libraries Branch is making progress 
toward the realization of a higher average standard of public library service for 
the people, and that with a stronger organization, better facilities, and new legisla- 
tion and regulations, a high standard should obtain in the near future. 

9 e. 



130 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 

Former reports have referred to the limitations under which the majority of 
libraries have been working, and also to desirable policies for adoption by the 
Department; these with matter dealt with in this report will be placed in proper 
form before the Minister during 1919 in the hope that satisfactory means of 
solution will be provided for the several problems. 

Libraries for Soldiers=in=Training 

One of the first acts of the Minister after accepting his portfolio was to 
instruct the Inspector of Public Libraries to place libraries in all of the military 
camps in the Province for the use of the soldiers-in-training. A large file of 
letters from officers-commanding and others testifies to the popularity of the 
libraries and to the appreciation of all who made use of the books. 

Each camp was visited by a representative of the Public Libraries Branch 
for the purpose of studying conditions and of arranging for the reception of the 
books and for their circulation. The purchase of the books, their preparation 
for use, shipping, etc., were all done within a few weeks. 

About 8,000 volumes were purchased and 2,500 were received as gifts. The 
libraries sent out ranged from 250 to 2,500 volumes each. 

The camps served were: 

Niagara Camp. Camp Borden (Quarantine Camp). 

Petawawa, Artillery Camp. Camp Rathbun (R.A.F.). 

Pe taw awa, Infantry Concentration Camp. Camp Mohawk (R.A.F.). 

Petawawa, Siberian Force. London Camp. 

Deseronto, Headquarters Camp. Beamsville, School of Aerial Fighting. 

Leaside (R.A.P.). Armour Heights (R.A.F.). 

Fort Henry Camp. Brockville Camp. 

Camp Borden (R.A.F.). 

Thirty-five ladies, members of the Toronto Public Library staff, very kindly 
assisted in preparing books for circulation. 

The Toronto Public Library presented the Department with 2,000 volumes 
secured in a " book-drive " for the use of soldiers, and the Peterborough Public 
Library contributed 500 books. 

Libraries for Military Hospitals 

Several military hospitals and institutions used by returned soldiers were 
supplied with travelling libraries through the year, and after the signing of the 
armistice in November, the camp library books were called in and sent out. for the 
use of returned men. 

The following places are using Departmental libraries: 

Whitby Convalescent Hospital. 

St. Andrew's Convalescent Hospital, Toronto. 

Davisville Orthopaedic Hospital. 

Guelph Military Hospital. 

Mowat Sanatorium, Kingston. 

Wellington Street Barracks, Ottawa. 

Imperial Munitions Board, Beamsville. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Settlement, Kapuskasing. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Training School, Monteith. 

Freeport Hospital. 

Fort Henry Hospital. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 131 

Ontario Libraries and War Service 

During the period of the war our librarians, assistants, and trustees as a 
class, took prominent parts in various kinds of war service, and in supplying 
literature for soldiers-in-training. The libraries that were situated near training 
camps and winter quarters welcomed the soldiers to their libraries, and many 
of them sent books for use in the camps. 

The conditions under which Canada went into the war and trained her men 
did not favour the formation of a library organization from the beginning that 
would serve the soldiers in the way librarians would have liked. We entered the 
war early in August, 1914. We knew so little about war that many thought it 
would not last long, and that the first contingent might be the last one to cross 
the Atlantic. Our first contingent men were mobilized, their clothing was made, 
they received a certain amount of training, and left our shores on or about the 24th 
of September, 1914, for England. When the men who were to form the second 
contingent were marching on our streets, many Avondered if they would ever see 
the firing-line, so little did we realize the great problem that was before us. 

Our men were not trained in permanent camps. The places that were to be 
chosen for training and for winter quarters were very uncertain. The whole 
scheme was of such a nature that the best kind of library seryce could not be 
performed. How different it was with our friends across the border with two 
years of study and experience of war conditions, with their large permanent 
cantonments — conditions which favoured the wonderful library organization of 
the American Library Association which served the soldiers-in-training for a 
year and a half. Our libraries did their best under existing conditions. During 
1918 the libraries furnished by the Department of Education gave an adequate 
service to all of the camps in Ontario. 



Travelling Libraries 

The circulation of travelling libraries has increased somewhat. This division 
of the Branch was turned to good account in serving soldiers in camps and 
hospitals. There is a tremendous field in Ontario for extending the benefits of 
travelling libraries, but the work is hampered in every .conceivable way. More 
accommodation is required for this work; it is impossible to assemble the collection 
of books in the small room in which most of the books are kept. More room, 
more books, and sufficient trained help are required. The Department has a 
big travelling library problem. 



Professional Training 

The Department has advanced creditably in the professional training of 
librarians. The work of the last three schools has been highly appreciated by a 
large number of libraries throughout the Province, and a keener interest is being 
shown by library boards for securing the services of assistants and librarians who 
have been trained in the Departmental school. This phase of our work requires 
the best consideration of the Minister. The course extending over nine weeks 
such as was given in 1917 and in 1918 has produced excellent results, especially 
with unusual students and those that had experience under good conditions. After 
the experience of 1917 and 1918 I am convinced that the course is too intense 
for the average library school student; the majority found it verv difficult. The 



132 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

course contained nothing that was not required in an elementary course ; therefore, 
the only satisfactory change that can be made is to lengthen the term to three 
months. This would give us a course part way between a short course and a 
full course. 

Conditions in Ontario really require three types of library training schools 
(1) a short course covering one month for the training of librarians in small 
towns and general assistants in town and small city libraries ; ( 2 ) a course similar 
to the one given in 1918 but extended over three months; (3) a full course 
covering an academic year. A school could be organized that would include the 
features of these three courses. The cost would be about $4,500 more than the 
amount that is provided at present for the nine weeks' course. I have good 
reason to believe that a full-term course covering 'approximately eight months, 
would be highly appreciated by the libraries of Ontario, and would be patronized 
to an extent that would justify the establishment of such a school. This would 
be the ideal course for all those wishing to take library training, but for economic 
reasons the majority of students require a shorter course. 

A three months' course would be of considerable value and would for some 
time attract a large number of students. It would service well for training 
general assistants, and librarians for large towns and small cities. 

A one-montlf course would serve to train those who could not take a longer 
course, and would give the kind of training that should be demanded of the 
librarians in the smaller towns. 

In the classes of 1916, 1917 and 1918, the primary object was to train those 
who had library positions, and in organizing the course we assumed that each 
student would, through experience, have gained an insight into librarianship, but 
the great majority of the students had little or no experience, and a number of 
them had a kind of experience that was of little value to them in the study of 
modern librarianship. The ones that had had experience that was really worth 
while were very few in number, but they proved to be the most desirable students 
in that they left the school capable of doing excellent work according to modern 
standards. 

The cumulative effect of our work in professional training, and the emphasis 
that we have placed on the necessity for a higher standard of librarianship have 
brought us to the point where a permanent patronage is assured for library train- 
ing classes. If regulations are to be brought gradually in force calling for the 
certification of librarians, a more adequate and permanent system of professional 
training should be decided upon during the year 1919. 

Publications 

The Ontario Library lieview and Book-Selection Gruide, has been published 
each quarter. 

Late in the year we published a pamphlet "Filing Rules for Dictionary 
Catalogues," by Miss Winifred 0. Barnstead. 

Several new pamphlets for the instruction and guidance of librarians and 
trustees are required. It is the intention to recommend the preparation and pub- 
lication of such works from time to time. 

Small Libraries Require a more Satisfactory Source from which 
to Purchase Books 

Progress is seriously retarded in the large number of small libraries throughout 
the Province for the want of the right kind of bookselling service. The im- 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 133 

portance of this matter deserves immediate attention. The Department should 
establish a book-room for serving libraries that are established under the laws 
of the Province, or arrange for the organization of a satisfactory private store and 
collecting agency. 

The smaller public libraries, fully 350 in number, and, I believe, the several 
thousand school libraries throughout the Province, are faced with the difficulty 
of not being able to obtain reasonably good service when they want to purchase 
the best kind of books for their purpose. The Public Libraries Branch and, I 
know, the school authorities have done good work in encouraging wise book- 
selection, and catalogues have been compiled, and carefully selected lists have been 
issued from time to time, for the use of public libraries and schools. Such work 
can not produce satisfactory results if library boards and school boards can not 
.procure the books they select, except through an exceedingly difficult process — 
so difficult that not one library or school in fifty will adopt it. The buying power, 
or perhaps the buying humour of small libraries of all kinds is not as great as 
though the securing of the right books were reasonably easy. 

Our libraries of all kinds should be representative libraries, that is, they 
should represent the book needs of their possible patrons. It is obvious that every 
lot of books purchased should help to form and contribute to the building of a 
representative library. The book-trade in Ontario does not offer the kind of 
service required by small library " builders/ 5 

The stocks of wholesale dealers merely represent the few books whose sale 
is being especially promoted. If one were to visit every dealer in Toronto at a given 
time, he could collect a fair number of good new books, that is, each volume might 
be a worthy one, but as a collection they would not form a wise three months' 
purchase of new books for a library ; many classes of books required for library 
use would be unrepresented. The situation was well stated by one of our library 
school students in answer to the following examination question : 

" You have used several representative reviews recently, and you lave seen 
the books that represent the stocks of recent publications offered for sale by 
Toronto publishers and wholesale dealers. Assuming that the stocks are typical 
representations of what the dealers offer for sale, discuss concisely the respective 
merits of selecting from the best reviews and from dealers' shelves." 

The answer : " There is no comparison, to my mind, between a list of books 
chosen from representative reviews and selection guides — such as we have used 
lately, and from the publishers' stocks. I should say that not more than one-tenth 
part of the new books was exhibited; there was an absence of a large number 
of recent desirable books, and there was an insufficient variety of classes. Of 
course it is an advantage to see the books one is selecting from, but when the 
books available for examination do not represent the best in all classes and kinds 
they do not serve as a safe source for selection for a library. Good reviews and 
selection guides are written usually by competent reviewers, and book-selectors ; 
with a wise choice of such guides for systematic perusal, and a discriminating 
use of them, one may select from a wide field of books in every class of literature 
and secure the quality and variety of books required by one's community. It 
seems to me absolutely senseless to depend upon the few unrepresentative books 
that can be seen. I would use reviews systematically and compile a list of my 
selections. I would examine the books I could see, and when so doing I would 
keep in mind the books on my list chosen from the wide field and from all classes. 
I would be influenced by my list and my knowledge of the field of available books, 
and not by dealers and travelling salesmen whose sole object is to sell, sell, sell, 



134 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

and from their own ' favourites.' I would make my own selections and patronize 
a firm or adopt a system that would ensure my getting the books selected." 

The answer given by the student is a good one. By following the method 
described her selections from new looks would, in all probability, be representative. 
If she were a librarian in a town, village or rural library, her chief difficulty 
would be in obtaining the books selected. 

I have before me a list of 168 new books suitable for a town library. They 
were all published between August and December, 1918, and represent 56 different 
publishers. Less than half of them were obtainable in Toronto in January, 1919. 
and among the books absent from dealers' stocks were many popular ones of the 
highest educational value. It would be interesting to make a list of the best books 
that were on sale in Toronto nine months or a year ago, and try to discover how 
many of them are purchasable there now. A case comes*' within our experience 
where a librarian selected eighty books that he considered the best eighty for a 
small library from the publications of the preceding twelve months; only eleven 
of them were obtainable in Toronto at the time the list was made. As the average 
small library purchases its books at rare intervals, it will be readily seen that it 
must depend upon something more than the stocks of Toronto dealers for pro- 
curing the right new books. 

It is quite apparent that small libraries can not obtain from Ontario whole- 
salers' and publishers' stores representative selections of new books even by keep- 
ing in continuous touch with what is on sale. But our libraries can not keep 
constantly informed. A small library is a small and infrequent purchaser. It 
depends usually on one or two dealers who prefer to sell the books in which they 
have a special interest. They are usually willing to collect other books on an 
order-list from other dealers in their own city; but at the best they can only 
secure locally the books that happen to be on hand at a particular time. If a 
list contains the best selections covering a period of several months, there is a 
temptation for the dealer to offer substitutes; experience has proven that small 
libraries are rarely favoured by having books imported for them. The average 
small library order being small, importing for it is evidently not looked upon 
as desirable business under present conditions. The library in turn does not 
care to receive promptly the few books that are picked up easily, and then receive 
others at intervals thereby adding extra express and postage charges, and at 
the same time being uncertain as to whether some of the books will ever be 
received. 

The results that obtain with a very large number of our libraries are not 
the best that might be expected even under the undesirable conditions referred 
to. Our records show that the majority of the small libraries are victims of 
firms that send nothing but books from one stock, and the ones that happen 
to be in the shop at the time of shipment. The dealer sends a box of books on 
approval, and several months' purchase money is expended for books from the 
said box. To the exclusion of what other dealers have to sell at the time, and 
what none of them have to sell except by importation, the library makes its 
choice from a narrow, unrepresentative selection consisting of a few good books 
and others not so good, with many classes absent. It will be easily seen that 
repetitions of this method of selection and purchase year after year will not 
contribute to the building of a well-balanced, representative library. The small 
libraries are partly to blame for this. There has been a notable improvement 
of late, but the difficulty in securing carefully selected books is a hindrance to 
our work in encouraging better book-selection. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 135 

The preceding remarks will show that the small public libraries and the 
school libraries are not provided with a satisfactory means of obtaining what 
they require from the output of newly published books. But new books are not all 
that are wanted. 

Books other than those of current publication form a substantial part of a 
well-managed library's selections for a year. Replacements are always needed, 
and classes and departments require strengthening, therefore, books one, two, five, 
and ten years old are wanted, and also selections from the books of all time. 
There are several hundred titles representing all classes of books that should never 
be unobtainable in Toronto. Copies of them would sell in numbers ranging from 
a few to a few hundred every year. 

Difficulty in securing desirable books other than new ones discourages the 
average library from selecting from the whole field of approved books. When 
4ke books were being selected in 1918 for the use of the soldiers-in-training in 
Ontario camps, the Department was unable to procure the kind that would form 
good, representative camp libraries. Several classes were represented by a few odd 
new books, a few classes had nothing in them ; there were many kinds for which the 
demand would have been very great, but they were not procurable in Toronto. 
The libraries that were sent to the camps were, through necessity, purchased 
within a few days, there was no time to wait for books to be imported. The 
result was that we secured a few thousand attractive volumes that would please 
readers who did not want any kind of books in particular but just something- 
interesting. There was a striking dearth of literature in natural science, useful 
arts, religion, sociology, history, and travel ; in fact, the only .works that were 
obtainable in quantities were the most recent fiction, reprints of popular fiction, 
and war books. One would expect that sixteen camp libraries of a representative 
character could be purchased in Toronto — the centre of the Ontario book-trade, 
but such was not the case. 

The following will briefly describe the book-trade in Toronto — apart from 
the retail stores: 

We have about sixteen firms that sell regularly either directly or indirectly 
to libraries: 

1. The publisher who publishes a few books each year in Canada, but the 
chief part of his business is to serve as the Canadian branch of an English or 
American publishing house. He may have the agency for two or three other 
houses that are not — in the strict sense — competing firms. There are six of 
these firms in Toronto. 

If one wished to secure the books on the typical small library list of 168 
quoted above, where 56 publishers are represented, it is obvious that firms of this 
type would not give satisfactory service. The objection to small libraries dealing 
with firms of this kind is that the zealous salesman is likely to sell to almost 
the limit of a small library's book fund to the exclusion of desirable books pub- 
lished by tens and hundreds of other publishers. A carefully selected order of 
books for a small library would contain very few works by any one publisher. 

2. The publisher who publishes a few books each year in Canada and acts 
as the general agent for a few English and American firms. This kind of dealer 
rarely, if ever, handles anything but the books published by himself and the 
firms he represents. There are six of this type in Toronto. 

It is perfectly clear that the small library orders with their great variety 
cannot get satisfaction by dealing directly and exclusively with a firm of this kind. 



136 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 



3. The firm that publishes a few books each year in Canada; purchases 
certain books in large quantities and rs granted the privilege of having its imprint 
on them; holds the agency for several English and American firms (principally 
the latter), and claims to do a general wholesale business, that is, secure for 
purchasers the books of all publishers. There are three firms of this kind in 
Toronto. 

It would appear on the surface that this type of dealer could serve the small 
library satisfactorily. It should be able to do so, but it does not. These firms 
carry very little variety of books in stock. They should be able to collect for small 
libraries books required from the English and American markets, but this kind 
of work receives but scant attention, and libraries have not received satisfactory 
service. The books that can be picked up in Toronto will be supplied with fair 
satisfaction by these houses, but the same can not be said about other books. 
This type of firm is becoming more and more interested in its own specialties 
and less and less in the general wholesale business. The small library order 
requesting one copy of each book on its list is not looked upon with favour as 
compared with trade orders of a hundred copies of one book or with large library 
orders of several copies of a number of books. Experience has proven that the 
service from these firms is inadequate for the smaller libraries, and the records 
in the Department show that these dealers have been trying to fill the smaller 
libraries with the books they are anxious to sell. 

4. The retail dealer has not been an important factor in supplying libraries. 
The real book-seller who knows books and is the guide and friend of the book- 
buyer is hard to find ; his class is almost extinct, one could count its representatives 
in the Province on the fingers of one hand. I recall but four retailers who sell 
more than a few books to public libraries, and the service given is better than 
the average. One of these men has sold " remainders " and other bargains to a 
few libraries, and he would gain on the whole if a Departmental scheme were 
adopted, in that larger quantities of his specialties would be likely to find a 
market. The retail dealers' business with public libraries is so small that this 
type of house would lose little if a central warehouse were established. The 
consideration of the little loss would be entirely outweighed by the great benefit 
to the libraries. 

Among the 408 public libraries in the Province 255 expended last year less 
than $100 on books, 90 between $100 and $300, 23 between $300 and $500. 
The ones that expend more than $500 are not as seriously affected by the 
condition of the book trade as the smaller buyers. In addition to the public 
libraries, we have more than 5,000 rural school libraries that should expend 
$10 or more each annually for books. In view of the large number of small 
purchasers among the public and school libraries — and the former should 
not confine themselves to purchasing once a year — it is obvious that the number 
of small purchases that should be made from time to time is very large. It is 
apparent also that with the small purchaser it is not practicable to deal with 
individual publishers or with several booksellers. Every library's purchases for 
the year should include: 1. New fiction — the best and most select. 2. Children's 
books, some new and many not new. 3. New books in the several classes. 4. Books 
other than those of current publication. The variety that books of this character 
would represent calls for a kind of bookseller's service that is not in successful 
operation in Ontario at the present time. 

The publishers and dealers, no doubt, know their own business and are 
working along the most profitable lines. Filling orders for small libraries may 



L918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 13? 



lot be as desirable as other kinds of business ; the sum total of it may not justify 
i firm in specializing in it, and there may be good reasons for dealers not offering 
rood service to libraries. The book men have often complained of the purchasing 
labits of the small public and school libraries and no doubt there have been 
pounds for complaint. The libraries say that they can not get carefully selected 
jooks when they place orders; there is considerable truth in their statement. 
There is no doubt but the libraries as a class as well as the dealers are to blame 
for the kind of service that obtains, but the fact remains that small libraries that 
play their part properly can not get dealers to do likewise. It is perfectly clear, 
however, that there is little use in guiding libraries in book-selection with facili- 
ties for securing the best selections in their present state. 

I have never met an Ontario dealer who shows evidence of an understanding 
of the public library problem, or one who has really gained the public library 
!point of view. There have been plenty of opportunities for publishers and dealers 
to study the real needs of public libraries but, evidently, the matter has not been 
considered of very great importance. I should say further that I have yet to learn 
of any dealer maintaining a good office system for adequately dealing with library 
orders. Surely with 408 public libraries and 5,000 school libraries Ontario should 
have at least one place where persons conversant with library affairs are employed 
for the purpose of dealing with library business. 

As no firm in the business is giving satisfaction to the small libraries, is it not 
time for the Department to take steps to secure adequate service for them? 

The most satisfactory solution of the book-purchasing problem for small 
libraries and other small book-purchasers among institutions established under 
Ontario statutes would be to establish a " Department of Education Book Room." 

A Departmental book-room is desirable for the reasons that : 

1. The room would be maintained for the betterment of libraries and not 
for financial gain. 

2. It would have a representative stock of books containing at least those 
recommended for public and school library purchase including new books and 
ones not of current publication that are required from time to time by libraries. 

3. Nothing but approved books would be sold. 

4. The kind of service would encourage book-buying and better book-selection. 

5. The Department would be kept in continuous touch with the work of the 
libraries in book-purchasing. 

6. The small libraries would likely buy at rates as low or lower than charged 
at present; all books imported for stock would come free of duty by reason of 
their being for library use only. Books imported by libraries or especially for them 
are duty free. Those that* are purchased by dealers for their stocks are not 
free; therefore, duty is paid on all books that are purchased from stocks. 

7. Books by Canadian and other British writers would be available in Ontario 
in greater proportions than formerly. 

8. The benefit of bargains in publishers' remainders could be extended to 
all libraries. 

9. Publishers and wholesalers as a class would welcome a Departmental book- 
room. They would prefer to sell in quantities to the Department rather than 
in single copies to libraries. They would gain by the total increased sales that 
would be more to the smaller buyers through the establishment of a central 
book-room. 

10 E. 



138 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 



The investment for establishing a Departmental book-room that would serve 
town, village, and rural public libraries and school libraries would be about $40,000. 
This would provide for annual sales of $100,000 or more. The nature of the 
business would hardly justify an estimate for a " turnover " of more than three 
times a year. First cost plus twelve and a half per cent, would be a sufficient charge 
for books to cover cost of books and of handling, etc. After the establishment of 
a book-room it should pay its own way; the only expense to the Government 
should be the invested capital, and the furnishing of rent, light, and heat. 

I believe that the Government would be more than justified in opening a 
book-room. Better service for libraries is a necessity; I trust that some action 
will be taken to establish a book-branch or to secure service that will give equally 
good results. 

Public Libraries and Technical Education 

Credit in good measure is due to our public libraries for work accomplished 
in promoting the use of technical books. During last year 120,000 books classified 
as " Useful Arts " were lent by the public libraries of the Province. An inestimable 
amount of good has been done by our libraries in a quiet way in assisting men 
and women in vocational study, and we hear too little about it. The libraries are 
entitled to be rated as an essential part" of our technical educational system. 
It is to be hoped that all who have vocational training at heart will remember the 
library, and encourage the use of the printed page. 

The libraries serve a larger number of people with technical books than will 
ever be reached by technical schools. 

The libraries can provide books on subjects that are not commonly taught 
in technical schools. 

The libraries can supplement the work of instruction given in technical schools. 

The libraries can assist technical schools in organizing libraries of their own. 

The libraries offer service in places where there are no technical schools. 

The libraries can serve men and women who can not attend a technical school. 

Public Library Board and Chief Librarian of Toronto 

The Toronto Public Library Board and the Chief Librarian, Mr. George H. 
Locke, placed ideal rooms in the Reference Library at the service of the Depart- 
ment for the library training school, and gave unasked the use of the several 
departments of their system for practising privileges for the students. The school 
has enjoyed the same kind of assistance from the Toronto library for the last 
three years. The Board and Mr. Locke do not confine their interest to the city 
of Toronto; they are always willing and anxious to assist the library movement 
throughout the Province; in many ways they have been a source of strength to the 
Public Libraries Branch. 

Special Libraries and Library Associations 

The Ontario Library Association. — This association is enjoying progress and 
is contributing appreciably to the library movement. The leaders have officially 
expressed a strong desire to play their part in developing better conditions in the 
rural districts of the Province, and cherish the hope that the public library will 
receive due consideration in any future scheme for educational advancement/ The 
members arc at all times ready to assist the Public Libraries Branch in the 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 139 

interest of better libraries. The present library system owes a great deal to the 
Ontario Library Association. 

Reading Camp Association. — Mr. Alfred Fitzpatrick, Superintendent, reports 
as follows: 

"The Reading Camp Association endeavours to develop the frontier toiler's mind 
Eind the scholar's body. Horace Mann, long ago, said that: The labour of the world 
has been performed by ignorant men, by classes doomed to ignorance from sire to son. 

" The charge has also been made that the so-called educated classes lack proper 
physical development and not infrequently degenerate into mere 'refined gossips.' 

" The Association endeavours to bring these two classes together. It tries to get 
the student and educationalist to share the excessive burdens of the woodsman, navvy, 
miner and fisherman; and to bring to him as much light and learning as, the limited 
spare time at his disposal will permit the worker to receive. 

" Like mercy, this effort on the part of the teacher ' is twice blest. It blesseth him 
that gives and him that takes.' The instructor who grasps the work, like a man of 
metal, usually returns not only with a vastly broader outlook on life and a; kindlier 
feeling towards his fellows, but with greatly improved physique. 

" During the last twelve months, 19 camp teachers were employed in the Province 
Df Ontario. These were supplied with small libraries, night school outfits, current maga- 
zines and newspapers. 

" As owing to the war we were unable to secure our full quota of instructors, we 
tried to make up for this lack by supplying literature fortnightly to forty-five camps at 
which no teacher was located." 

Canadian National Library for the Blind. — The librarian. Mr. Sherman C. 
Swift, makes the following statement : 

"Concerning the operation of the Canadian National Library for the Blind for the 
pear 1918, I have the honour to report as follows: 

Books and music issued 9,737 

Circulation for Ontario 5,101 

Total number of volumes added 759 

Value of same $578.08 

New members added 59 

Total membership, December 31st, 1918 572 

" You will notice that nearly 54 per cent, of the total circulation for Canada and 
Newfoundland was accredited to Ontario. 

" The total number of volumes added does not indicate the number of volumes 
ordered. We have one for $500 worth of books placed in Great Britain, which has not 
yet been filled. The value of books actually received is in some instances given from 
the catalogue, since the whole consignment has not yet been invoiced to us. 

"Our printing department has printed the Ontario Public School Primer for the 
Ontario School for the Blind, using the Braille system. It is proposed to publish the 
whole series of public school texts. On December 14th the members of the Library in 
general assembly voted to affiliate with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind 
and to act henceforth as the library department of the organization. This step was 
found necessary in order to simplify administration, avoid friction, and to lessen the 
possibility of confusion in the minds of the public. 

" The operation of the printing department will shortly mean considerable additions 
to our staff of employees. We, therefore, trust that the Government may see its way 
clear to a large increase in its grant to the Canadian National Library for the Blind." 



140 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Statistics 

I present herewith a statement of the statistics of the Public Libraries of 
the Province and a statement of the grants paid to Historical, Literary, and 
Scientific Institutions. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. 0. Caeson, 

Inspector of Public Libraries. 
Toronto, January 25th, 1919. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



141 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



Total 
Expenditure 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circulation 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1918 



Admaston 

Agincourt I 

Alma I.... 

Almonte j R 

Alton I .... , 

Angus 

Arkona 

Assiginack 

Athens ! 

Atwood j 

Auburn R 

Badjeros : 

Bath R 

Bayfield I 

Bayham '. . . . 

Baysville I.. .. 

Beachville [ .. .. 

Beaverton ! R 

Beechwood '.... 

Belwood ' . . . . 

Blenheim \ R 

Bloomfield ! 

Blyth I.... 

Bobcaygeon | R 

Bolton j.. .. 

Bowmanville j R 

Bridgeburg i 

Brigden . . .. 

Brooklin 

Brownsville 

Brucefield j 

Burgessville j 

Burlington ! R 

Burnstown ..-.., 

Caledon 

Cambray 

Canfield ; 

Cannington j R 

Capreol 

Cargill i 

Chatsworth j 

Cheapside , 

Chesterville 

Claremont ' 

Clarksburg | R 

Claude 

Cobourg R 

Colborne I R 

Coldstream R 

Coldwater 

Comber R 

Cookstown , 

Copleston , 

Copper Cliff 

Delta 

Depot Harbour , 

Don 

Dorchester 

Drumbo 

Duart 

Dundalk 



I $ c. | 

No annual report for 1917 

Organized November 20th, 1918 



250 
700 
700 
400 
429 



29 25 
153 46 
110 24 

75 15 
124 12 



1,548 

4,238 

5,085 

890 

2,718 



1,482 
5,620 
3,235 



No annual report for 1917 



77o 

600 
250 
Rural 
366 
400 
300 
168 
500 

1,060 

Rural 

183 

1,500 
800 
750 
952 
628 

3,500 

2,019 
500 
Rural 
250 
200 
200 

2,431 



141 14 

61 74 

110 23 

45 72 

152 25 

147 94 

96 79 

54 92 

72 70 

167 50 

143 77 

129 33 

509 30 

27 47 

41 20 

247 10 

67 63 

355 50 

384 80 

83 20 

132 18 

134 58 
74 25 

135 77 
468 30 



1,649 

1,215 

1,596 

733 

1,128 

590 

934 

853 

1,639 

1,838 

1,037 

2,659 

5,128 

1,384 

2,442 

3,290 



1,960 

^1,318 
1,073 
1,599 

618 
4,278 
2,875 

367 
1,254 
1,535 

967 

763 

2,887 

13,380 

1,603 



3,160 



4,468 
3,006 
1,095 
3,190 
1,188 
1,859 
900 
4,372 



No annual report for 1917 



200 

Rural 

165 

750 



95 05 

107 75 

63 86 

95 75 



3,122 

2,174 

965 

2,003 



6,586 
6,440 



Organized, December 5 th, 1918 



400 
374 
100 



215 00 

65 49 

66 93 



3,463 
1,592 
2,367 



No annual report for 1917 
325 f 110 35 2,615 

600 338 47 2,011 

Rural 47 48 3,415 

4,800 660 51 5,073 

1,020 100 54 2,150 

100 87 74 1,984 

600 125 51 2,101 

700 226 22 3,134 

475 36 36 1,767 

No annual report for 1917 
Reorganized March 5th, 1918 
400 | 67 65 J 793 

No annual report for 1917 



Rural 
500 
400 
130 
750 



94 57 
86 80 

134 17 
41 55 

240 31 



1,599 
1,692 
2,700 
2,238 
2,814 



3,301 
2,644 
1,628 
1,240 
4,015 

1,570 

1,412 

693 

2,048 

4,841 

840 

1,400 

1,583 
2,398 

792 
16,773 

874 
1,838 
3,923 
2,634 
2,073 



1,739 

764 
2,033 
2,421 

312 

2,387 



$ c. 



53 34 
38 89 
26 71 
28 99 

55 80 
10 00 
42 27 



19 85 
63 08 
41 00 
17 98 



42 50 

65 18 

38 05 

107 28 



10 00 
80 07 



86 13 
134 69 
10 00 
42 82 
34 54 
10 00 

30 18 
47 72 

31 23 
36 82 
16 38 
24 19 

79 58 



27 78 

36 87 
140 01 

21 73 

144 10 

47 29 

37 98 
19 27 
65 83 
12 71 



20 16 

28 08 
15 72 
67 56 



35 96 



142 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



Total i Volumes 
Expenditure ; Lib ^ ry 



Circulation 



Legislatire 

Grant paid 

in 1918 



R 



R 



R 



R 



Dungannon 

Dunnville 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Embro 

Emo 

Emsdale 

Ennotville 

Espanola 

Ethel .' 

Fenelon Falls . . 

Flesherton 

Fonthill 

Forwich I . . . . 

Forester's Falls ....... 

Fort Erie 

Frankford \ R 

Fullarton j . . . . 

Glamis 

Glanworth 

Glen Allan 

Glen Morris 

Gore Bay 

Gore's Landing 

Gorrie 

Grafton 

Haileybury 

Haliburton 

Harrietsville . . . 

Harrington 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Hawkesbury 

Hawkesville .... 

Hepworth 

Highland Creek ... 

Hillsdale 

Hillview 

Holstein j . . . . 

Honeywood 

Huntsville R 

Inglewood 

Inwood 

Iroquois 

Islington 

Jarvis R 

Kars 

Kemble 

Kingston R 

Kinmount 

Kirkfleld — 

Kirkton 

Komoka 

Lake Charles [ 

Lefroy i 

Linwood ! 

Lucan 

Lyn R 

Madoc 

Mandamin I . . . . 



R 



$ c. 

Rural 95 99 2,433 

3,250 407 79 ! 4,550 

750 95 10 2,456 

Rural 130 70 1 1,431 

500 211 00 4,839 

450 89 82 463 

No annual report for 1917 

Rural | 149 35 J 4,357 

Organized March 28th, 1918 
Rural 67 12 1,909 

1,015 357 02 5,761 

482 62 64 

600 137 45 

450 12 00 

250 87 71 

1.200 177 59 

900 201 90 

179 29 73 

Rural 54 05 

50 73 49 

100 21 82 

200 138 27 

713 282 29 

200 32 57 

400 50 19 

410 95 91 

No annual report for 1917 
990 I 71 48 1 1,768 

Rural I 106 40 I 720 

No annual report for 1917 
500 I 235 34 i 1,779 
704 I 29 00 ( 1,198 

Reorganized Sept. 21st, 1918 
250 I 18 64 | 924 

No annual report for 1917 



,152 

3,824 

2,210 

1,300 

4,033 

980 

450 

954 

400 

1,330 

2,973 

1,540 

1,586 

2,100 

1,031 



350 
360 
294 
300 
100 

2,135 
400 

Rural 
800 
205 
600 
200 
81 

23,023 
450 
100 
187 
300 

Rural 
337 
450 
700 
200 
1,100 
200 



33 80 

119 01 
9 75 

98 75 

59 80 

308 43 

113 05 

153 27 

72 26 

168 77 

107 19 

78 05 

95 56 

3,664 61 

120 56 



109 11 

83 61 

82 30 

64 54 

34 50 

177 71 

128 22 

273 34 

157 13 



1,713 
1,915 

521 
2,121 

828 
4,255 
1,236 
1,528 
1,818 
2,903 
3,678 
1,689 
1 ,356 
9,557 
1,046 
2,428 

&20 
1,333 
2,470 

947 

811 
1,442 

744 
3,172 
1,323 



2,077 
11,531 
1 ,519 
2,014 
3,720 
700 

1,078 

2,615 

3,485 

587 

3,616 

602 

1,577 

2,669 

1,717 

1,016 

629 

690 

761 

801 

"1,482 

829 

335 

1,127 

1,665 
1,225 

2,301 



1 



305 

882 
,315 

440 
2,575 

504 
7,537 

736 
2,516 
1,500 
3,959 
1,682 
1,624 

955 

45,509 

3,112 



916 

1,370 
1,580 
1 , 286 
586 
1 ,346 
1,031 
2,817 
1,610 



$ c. 

21 73 
93 70 
40 14 
40 34 
83 21 
23 56 

57 82 

17 57 
43 74 
16 41 
51 41 

'3515* 
27 38 
38 63 

10 00 

11 77 
62 35 
90 03 
10 00 

"304i 

19 75 
40 25 

40 15 



5 00 

5 00 

21 54 

18 10 
29 02 

22 90 
68 92 
64 37 
60 84 

19 53 
67 31 

23 42 
31 06 

260*Oo' 
10 00 



34 41 
26 68 

'21*47" 

ii 73' 

37 20 
43 75 

74 83 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



143 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Population 


Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1918 


122 


Manilla 




200 


$ c. 
229 27 


4.790 


2,003 

478 

1,775 
9,995 
1,079 
2,170 
1,210 
1,088 
4,120 
1,412 
524 

733 
1,581 
18 

3,743 

1,022 

1,984 

535 

646 

13,651 


$ c. 
98 11 


123 


Manotick 




No annual report for 1917 

2o0 I 108 23 f 914 

No armna.l rp.nnrfc fnr 1917 




1?4 


Maple 




41 08 


19^ 


Marksville 






1?fi 


Martintown 




Rural 

2,600 

196 

460 

900 

Rural 

1,950 

300 

350 


189 26 
668 83 
39 94 
85 27 
37 54 
41 96 
182 62 
74 83 
36 71 


721 
4,515 
1,254 
1,104 
2,567 

832 
4,697 
2,025 
1.409 


29 43 


1?7 


Meaford , 


R 


96 51 


1?8 


Melbourne 


10 67 


1?Q 


Metcalfe 




5 00 


130 


Mildmay 




10 00 


131 


Millgrove 




10 64 


13? 


Milton 


R 


48 64 


133 


Minden 


20 36 


134 


Monkton 




10 00 


135 


Mono Centre 




No annual rennrt for 1917 




136 


Mono Mills 




Rural 
Rural 


70 98 
48 90 


f 762 
1.401 




137 


Mono Road 






138 


Moorefield 




Organized Deeemher 10th. 19 




139 
140 


Morrisburg 

Morriston 


R 


1,500 
2,733 
550 
400 
Rural 
3,000 
Rural 


393 45 
45 32 

166 53 

462 08 
43 12 

836 77 
24 29 


3,439 
1,405 
1,225 
1,184 
2,260 
8,218 
489 


99 42 
10 00 


141 
142 


Mount Albert 

Mount Brydges . . . 


R 


49 45 


143 


Nanticoke 




11 31 


144 


Napanee 


R 


130 70 


145 


Napier 


15 78 


146 


Newburgh 




No annual rp.nnrt, fnr 1917 


1,965 

1,600 

80 

13,090 

2,424 




147 


Newbury 




375 

350 

300 
1,695 

500 
1,900 

400 

800 
2,974 

700 
No a 

550 
Rural 
Rural 

600 
80 

600 

335 

855 


49 15 
120 48 

39 19 
396 47 

93 71 

42 90 
185 60 
123 30 
752 68 
141 58 


1,212 
1,146 
1,063 
8,834 
1,232 
466 
2,295 
2,514 , 
5,622 
1.472 


16 38 


148 
149 


New Dundee 

Newington! 


R 


60 80 
14 33 


150 


Niagara 


R 


133 20 


151 


Norland 


10 00 


152 


North Cobalt 






153 


North Gower 




3,088 
1 ,593 
7,762 
4,037 

1,282 
1,110 
1,428 
1,260 
942 
3,609 
1,805 
1,993 

3,228 
2,146 
4,162 
2,599 
898 

1,879 


33 40 


154 


Norwood 




36 17 


155 


Oakville 


R 

R 


112 28 


156 


Odessa 


34 86 


157 


Omemee 


nnual report for 1917 




158 


Orono 




34 58 

52 56 

92 09 

124 09 

41 00 

192 61 

104 76 

77 00 


1,645 
830 
452 
1,859 
2,111 
2,595 
1,269 
3.940 


18 35 


159 


Pakenham 




5 00 


160 


Parkhead 




16 05 


161 


Pickering 


R 


36 22 


162 


Pinkerton 


10 00 


163 
164 


Plattsville 

Plympton 


R 


66 57 
37 98 


165 


Point Edward 






166 


Port Colborne 




No annual rennrt for 1917 




167 


Port Credit 




944 

1,150 

1 ,200 

831 

600 


148 21 
144 88 
403 92 
173 37 
101 67 


2,738 
1,617 
2,383 
2,064 

440 
for 1917 
2,958 

846 
4,098 
2,532 
1,503 

805 
3,602 
2,206 

359 I 


48 84 


168 
169 
170 


Port Dover 

Port Perry 

Port Stanley 


R 
R 


39 18 
76 63 
42 14 


171 


Powassan 




41 49 


172 


Princeton 




No annual rannrti 




173 


Queensville 




400 

1,385 

2,000 

800 

400 

800 

Rural 

Rural 

700 


125 11 

126 11 
225 00 

60 22 
34 64 
101 01 
119 11 
221 45 
186 52 


42 07 


174 


Rainy River 




30 02 


175 
176 


Ridgetown 

Ripley 


R 


5,446 
1,665 
1,758 

532 
1,009 
7,955 

321 


83 04 


177 


Riversdale 




18 62 


178 


Rodney 




20 64 


179 


Romney . . . .' 




50 38 


180 


Runnymede 




78 39 


181 


Russell 


R 


15 00 



144 



THE REPORT OF THE 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Concluded 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



No. 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



Total 
Expenditure 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circulation 



182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 



St. George 

St. Helen's 

Saltfleet 

Scarboro 

Scotland 

Shedden 

Shetland 

Singhampton . . 

iSmithville 

Solina 

Southampton . . . 
South Mountain 

Sparta 

(Speedside ...... 

Stevensville 

Strathcona 

Strathroy 

Sydenham 

Thamesford 
Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Tiverton 

Tottenham 

Trout Creek . . . 

Tweed 

Underwood 

Unionville 

Vankleek Hill .. 

Victoria 

Victoria Mines . 
Victoria Road . 

Walton 

Wardsville 

Warkworth 
Waterdown 

Welland 

Wellesley 

Westford , 

West Lome 

White Lake 

Wiarton 

Williamstown . . 

Winchester 

Woodville 

Worthington . . . 
Zephyr , 



Total 



700 

Rural 

Rural 

Rural 

400 

350 

250 

Rural 

600 

Rural 

1,680 

420 

120 

260 

365 

550 

2,816 

200 

400 

742 

600 

No 

285 

350 

600 

500 

1,400 

216 

550 

No 

Rural 

1,500 

255 

Rural 

206 

500 

722 

7,243 

600 

150 

651 

350 

1,728 

Rural 

1,042 

386 

600 

400 



$ c. 
234 40 
102 38 
158 89 
158 46 
100 47 
118 05 

125 49 
28 75 

242 91 

44 08 
206 44 

37 70 

"64*46* 
110 00 
67 33 
632 67 
214 73 
162 97 
267 18 

126 01 
annual report for 

172 77 

72 60 

83 58 

5 00 

234 03 

144 96 

95 26 

annual report foi 

107 91 

97 36 

37 96 

64 80 
113 95 

89 00 
266 43 
455 24 

44 77 

8 63 

128 68 

37 01 
372 57 

34 25 
169 .71 
279 65 
165 33 
100 37 



5,284 
2,239 
2,356 
4,820 



153,315 



32,627 73 



1,887 
2,119 

779 

302 

949 

401 
5,543 
1,200 
2,569 
1,578 

680 
1,575 
9,003 
1,726 
1,825 
2,434 
3,187 
1917 

596 
1,034 
2,543 
1,138 
2,101 
2,689 
1,622 
1917 
3,674 
1,288 

408 
1,331 
2,028 
1,487 

601 
4,960 
2,588 
1,855 
1,321 

863 
3,310 
2,358 
1,742 
2,605 

415 
1,388 



438,569 



1,510 

1,588 

3,091 

1,765 

1,403 

1,465 

575 

247 

2,618 

752 

5,682 

1,075 



634 
1,204 

612 

22,418 

2,540 

821 
1,185 
3,228 

5,527 
1,189 
1,499 
162 
6,426 
2,146 
1,597 

3,254 
1,819 
98 
1,018 
2,357 

505 
2,702 
7,763 
2,568 
1,610 
1,584 

984 
4,877 

994 
4,109 

904 

395 
1,642 



515,794 



27 44 


37 


13 


11 


59 


128 39 


10 


00 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



1-15 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



No. 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



Total 
Expenditure 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circulation 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1918 



1 
2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



R 



R 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig 

Amherstburg 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Barrie 

Beamsville 

Beeton 

Belleville 

Belmont j 

Bothwell j . . . . 

Bracebridge | R 

Brampton R 

Brantf ord j R 

Brighton j R 

Brockville i R 

Brussels ! R 

Burk's Falls j R 

Campbellf ord j R 

Cardinal | R 

Carleton Place R 

Cayuga \ 

Chatham \ R 

Chesley i R 

Clifford 

Clinton R 

Collingwood R 

Cornwall R 

Delhi R 

Deseronto R 

Drayton R 

Dresden : R 

Dundas R 

Durham R 

Elmira R 

Elora R 

Erin ! .... 

Essex I ■ R 

Exeter R 

Fergus | R 

Forest R 

Fort Frances I R 

Fort William I R 

Gait R 

Gananoque ..... j R 

Garden Island | .. 

Georgetown R 

Glencoe 

Goderich j R 

Grand Valley R 

Gravenhurst 

Grimsby R 

Guelph R 

Hagersville R 

Hamilton R 

Hamilton Branch . . R 

Hanover j R 

Harriston j R 

Hensall i R 





$ c. 






$ c. 


2,000 


383 28 


3,799 


10,485 


89 59 


586 


125 00 
1,386 34 


3,199 
4,200 


4,273 
16,643 


42 57 


2,400 


85 39 


4,300 


298 58 


3,722 


4,175 


102 70 


1,000 


281 70 


3,622 


4,647 


86 14 


2,700 


453 01 


3,188 


6,489 


52 01 


2,300 


873 64 


8,297 


14,009 


218 33 


780 


528 89 


3,896 


6,385 


115 49 


6,846 


8,791 99 


5,588 


25,509 


250 92 


1,019 


441 00 


5,069 


8,743 


90 81 


600 


136 75 


2,349 


2,342 


40 60 


12,080 


3,318 89 


8,716 


34,115 


260 00 


Free by vote of ratepayers Jan. 10th, 1918 




650 


230 70 


2,909 


4,503 


62 95 


2,506 


1,006 65 


5,375 


13,145 


146 06 


4,160 


1,388 68 


7,586 


22,155 


243 31 


27,800 


8,816 51 


29,852 


89,571 


260 00 


1,315 


253 93 


3,968 


2,973 


48 57 


9,240 


1 ,687 02 


14,612 


17,562 


221 08 




470 07 


4,185 


4,989 


91 19 


1,000 


426 63 


3,065 


3,180 


105 85 


3,200 


1,051 53 


3,475 


15,598 


105 71 


1,111 


148 70 


2,692 


3,241 


35 60 


3,706 


565 58 


7,067 


14,285 


155 96 


800 


168 14 


1,867 


1,218 


26 78 


13,943 


3,390 92 


10,261 


55,711 


260 00 


1,860 


449 17 


3,737 


5,288 


116 99 


600 


158 60 


4,240 


4,303 


37 04 


2,300 


1,114 94 


7,553 


11,871 


260 00 


7,619 


2,374 23 


9,323 


15,810 


251 21 


6,947 


1,119 11 


5,254 


12,173 


196 08 


900 


310 11 


2,307 


3,126 


93 49 


2,061 


310 04 


6,748 


8,196 


83 64 


792 


287 61 


3,662 


5,465 


89 84 


1,500 


724 47 


1,823 


5,574 


39 03 


5,016 


2,077 98 


8,953 


35,168 


230 33 


1,600 


499 23 


3,758 


6,939 


45 25 


2,200 


664 32 


4,855 


7,703 


176 10 


1,005 


928 41 


8,307 


7,871 


103 15 


525 


154 51 


2,971 


3,927 


58 06 


1,385 


632 36 


3,574 


5,514 


95 29 


1,502 


848 52 


5,186 


8,329 


99 83 


1,750 


1 ,063 57 


5,443 


7,809 


94 01 


1,446 


637 59 


3,977 


10,609 


78 35 


2,950 


912 68 


2,648 


10,114 


93 30 


17,911 


11,748 21 


22,599 


70,760 


260 00 


12,500 


3,971 54 


9,829 


b5,482 


260 00 


3,769 


925 30 


5,407 


19,026 


155 21 


80 




5,000 






2,000 


658 59 


3,629 


10,155 


85 26 


950 


107 35 
886 63 


2,100 
5,312 




10 00 


4,700 


13,398 


141 27 


576 


487 02 


3,116 


5,296 


112 53 


2,000 


114 89 


2,585 


1,076 


32 60 


2,000 


1,411 60 


4,036 


17,800 


163 34 


16,308 


4 ,934 35 


18,397 


69,407 


260 00 


1,200 


387 56 


2,037 


1,487 


125 67 


100,461 


44,241 66 


46,932 


447,625 


260 00 


3,321 


697 29 


3,080 


10,014 


169 85 


1,490 


868 94 


3,665 


17,293 


137 23 


800 


225 36 


1,907 


7,204 


90 13 



146 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1918 



No. 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



Total Vol " mes 

Expenditure! Library 



Circulation 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1918 



63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

120 

121 

122 



Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

Kemptville 

Kenora 

Kincardine 

Kingsville 

Kintore 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Little Britain 

London 

London Branch . . 

Lucknow .* 

Markdale 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Midland 

Millbrook 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell ... 

Mount Forest 

New Hamburg . . . 
New Liskeard . . . 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Norwich 

Oakwood 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa Branch, S. 
Ottawa Branch, W. 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene . 

Perth 

Peterborough .... 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Carling 

Elgin 

Hope 

Rowan 



Port 

Port 

Port 

Port 

Prescott 

Preston 

Renfrew 



X23[ Richmond Hill 



2,999 
5,200 
1,084 
5,319 
2,306 
1,700 

280 

19,695 

1,033 

628 

700 
3,652 
7,500 
2,600 

300 
55,887 



990 
1,000 

950 
2,450 
7,250 

800 

940 
1,965 
1,706 
2,500 
1,612 
2,000 
3,600 
12,000 
9,197 
1,200 

300 

2,381 

8,854 

9,051 

101,549 



500 
11 ,968 

745 
2,200 
4,383 
1,500 
4,500 
7,721 
4,000 
3,800 
20,598 
3,500 
14,424 

256 
1,500 
4,586 

750 
2,820 
5,000 
6,611 

930 



rt> c. 

512 55 

1,618 75 

491 28 

1,741 36 

490 88 

467 61 

86 50 

7,342 49 

211 19 

61 33 

383 78 

1,314 44 

1,984 84 

1 ,073 78 

241 07 

16,032 55 

3,250 92 

288 01 

660 89 

281 28 

214 29 

1,599 30 

400 04 

705 56 

1,439 18 

648 13 

530 19 

613 74 

1,455 42 

658 51 

4,944 05 

3,470 97 

413 62 

120 43 

1,129 82 

1,900 96 

1,711 15 

28,986 43 

1,109 90 

1,390 84 

165 70 

3,195 23 

325 68 

627 44 

1,281 39 

734 21 

556 89 

2,331 03 

947 12 

1,162 08 

6,294 24 

1,579 87 

7,851 90 

168 79 

641 33 

1 ,357 14 



545 66 

2,527 49 

949 51 

317 16 



4,720 
6,185 
3,911 
5,287 
4,447 
3,169 
1,765 

14,619 
2,225 
1,987 
4,859 
5,430 
7,010 
4,846 
2,960 

39,246 
4,631 
3,205 
3,441 
2,500 
2,686 
7,238 
2,821 
2,585 
2,664 
5,408 
4,078 
2,749 
3,949 
4,589 

14,588 
5,798 
3,570 
2,049 
6,436 
6,872 
5,216 

59,980 
1,486 
3,225 
2,126 
8,049 
5,458 
2,844 

11,378 
2,467 
3,326 
5,187 
6,3^9 
4,214 

14,222 
7,224 

13,254 
1,564 
4,984 
6,998 
1,994 
6,588 
8,480 
3,393 
4,354 



9,423 

20,215 

7,423 

17,145 

4,729 

8,237 

2,000 

57,564 

4,867 

1,939 

1,386 

21,791 

24,321 

9,176 

1.S84 

221 ,007 

50,613 

5,194 

6,573 

1,000 

7,497 

36,870 

7,704 

3,021 

12,084 

6,118 

21,822 

6,650 

9,528 

8,021 

54,140 

22,275 

8,117 

1,218 

15,260 

22,410 

18,403 

256,699 

10,903 

19,119 

3,783 

40,451 

7,919 

7,875 

18,928 

2,029 

4,878 

20,476 

10,695 

15,924 

56,025 

21,334 

74,565 

1,375 

12,575 

17,137 

1,132 

12,099 

21,014 

12,368 

5,486 



$ c. 
101 07 
182 70 

138 65 
133 00 

70 78 
93 45 
28 91 
260 00 
93 29 

' *57*08* 

253 42 
241 91 
112 60 

97 53 
260 00 
260 00 

85 64 

61 04 

20 00 

35 60 

111 35 

107 50 

121 10 

146 46 

84 57 
61 22 
52 20 

124 02 
130 59 
260 00 
260 00 

98 36 
31 10 

139 41 
253 12 
209 93 
260 00 
236 25 
241 28 

66 92 
260 00 

85 87 
44 63 

245 82 
66 87 
101 30 
260 00 
137 32 
93 81 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

57 60 

58 64 
141 67 

34 05 
106 60 
172 34 
123 31 

61 52 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



1-17 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Concluded 
Statistics, 1917, showing Legislative Grants paid In 1918 



No, 



Library 



124|Ridgeway 

125 St. Catharines . . 

126 St. Mary's 

127 St. Thomas 

128 Sarnia 

129i Sault Ste. Marie 

130 Sohreiber 

131 Seaforth 

132 Shelburne 

133: Simcoe 

134; Smith's Falls . . 
135! South River 

136 Springfield 

137 iStayner 

138 Stirling 

139 Stouffville 

140 Stratford 

141 Streetsville 

142 Sudbury 

143 Sundridge 

144 Sutton West . . . 

145 Tara 

146 Tavistock 

147 Teeswater 

148 Thorold 

149 Tilbury 

150 Tillsonburg 

151 Toronto, Beaches 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Population 



152 
153 

154 

155 

156 

157 " 

158 

159 

160 

161 " Q 

162' " 

163 

164 

165 

166 Trenton . . . 

167 Uxbridge . . 

168 Walkerton, 

169 Walkerville 

170 Wallaceburg 

171 Waterford . 

172 Waterloo . . 

173 Watford . . 
174! Weston . . . 

175 Whitby . . . 

176 Windsor 



Church 

College 

Deer Park . 
Dovercourt . 
Earlscourt . 
Eastern 
High Park . 
Municipal . . 
Northern . . . 
ueen & Lis gar, 
Riverdale . . 
Western . . . 
Wychwood . 
Yorkville . . 



177 
178 
179 



Wingham 

Woodstock 

Wroxeter 

Total 



700 

19,078 

3,821 

17,216 

12,323 

20,000 

1,200 

2,000 

1,100 

4,032 

6,268 

580 

412 



850 

1,020 

17,420 

585 

6,953 

425 

815 

560 

1,025 

875 

4,548 

1,706 

3,200 

473,829 



1,638 
3,000 
5,725 
4,107 
1,050 
4,908 
1,221 
2,283 
3,400 

28,064 
2,474 

10,027 
370 



1,377,544 



Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


$ c. 






154 63 


2,540 


2,415 


6,327 85 


9,989 


48,453 


1,296 44 


8,822 


23,884 


5,229 06 


15,780 


62,037 


4,306 23 


11,928 


45,475 


3,357 73 


4,319 


27,256 


709 92 


1,565 


1,024 


927 37 


5,254 


13,052 


686 87 


4,248 


5,494 


1,750 95 


9,580 


21,365 


1,888 84 


5,960 


20,396 


91 35 


1,103 


1,362 


59 61 


1,449 


1,676 


No annual report for 1917 


621 67 


2,067 


4,911 


408 38 


5,770 


10,304 


2,803 83 


14,168 


65 031 


277 32 


3,056 


5,826 


5,093 13 


1,508 


474 


64 80 


999 


462 


135 02 


1,661 


5,597 


372 56 


1,866 


4,336 


1 ,049 88 


4,200 


10,007 


510 13 


4,717 


3,d25 


1,141 66 


6,309 


7,768 




32 

4,324 


32 


1,354 44 


21,318 


8,892 48 


8,268 


110,113 


15,019 33 


56,162 


89,206 


114,390 27 


116,431 


414,389 


6,705 16 


8,420 


48,524 


15,254 81 


15,369 


222,734 


5,793 80 


6,936 


66,565 


8,103 92 


3,775 


19,617 


24,187 57 


8.834 


138,547 


3,889 07 


1,123 


7,609 


5,514 34 


6,600 


29,209 


6,534 60 


11,086 


85,992 


10.474 52 


lb, 371 


177,413 


7,525 00 


11,319 


91,609 


6,210 72 


8,452 


80,192 


5,321 76 


12,816 


69,641 


No annu 


al report fc 


r 1917 


550 21 


6,622 


10,258 


1,021 37 


4,311 


8,003 


4,634 64 


8,870 


30,285 


1,548 04 


3,820 


22,065 


72 30 


1,170 


1,350 


2,053 59 


11,234 


18,428 


478 38 


4,347 


6,728 


1 ,393 54 


3,916 


14,573 


1,070 78 


3,497 


14,116 


6,451 68 


28,566 


113,472 


928 20 


6,279 


8,810 


3,209 72 


11,252 


49,635 


199 36 


5,466 


1,836 


557,044 59 


1,309,928 


5,074,571 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1918 

"$~~c: 

40 96 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

20 20 
175 77 

74 32 

246 56 
167 90 

22 87 
16 45 

"87*91" 

108 60 

260 00 

76 05 

54 91 

35 51 

53 75 

73 85 

81 29 

134 11 

32 92 

'"221*13" 
230 00 
260 00 
260 00 
235 00 
260 00 
217 75 
205 00 
230 00 
131 14 
211 00 

247 50 
260 00 
245 00 
213 00 
250 00 

" 106*36" 

89 27 

260 00 

100 22 



260 00 
95 53 
178 87 
135 59 
260 00 
244 08 
260 00 
67 68 



24,913 18 



14* 



THE REPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



NOTES FROM PUBLIC LIBRARIES REGISTER 

Five libraries were added to the list of Free Libraries : Belmont, Schreiber, 
Tilbury, South Eiver, South Branch, London; all but the last mentioned were 
formerly Association libraries. 

Three Association Libraries were organized: Agincourt, Capreol, and Moore- 
field. Two Association libraries were re-organized: Copper Cliff and Hawkesbury. 

GRANTS TO HISTORICAL, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS 

The following Historical, Literary and Scientific Institutions, etc., duly reported 
according to the requirements of the Act, and received the undermentioned grants 
during the fiscal year ended October 31st, 1918: 



Name of Institution 



Grant 
Paid 



Brant Historical Society 

Elgin Historical and Scientific Association 

Essex Historical Society 

Huron Institute 

Kent Historical Society 

Kingston Historical Society 

L'Alliance Prancaise, Ottawa 

Lennox and Addington Historical Society A 

Lundy's Lane Historical Society 

London and Middlesex Historical Society 

Niagara Historical Society , 

Ontario Historical Society 

Thunder Bay Historical Society, Fort William . , 

Wentworth Historical Society , 

Women's Canadian Historical Society of Ottawa , 
Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto 

Women's Wentworth Historical Society 

Hamilton Scientific Association 

Canadian Institute 

Club Litteraire Canadien Frangais, Ottawa 

L'Institut Canadien Frangais, d'Ottawa 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' ,Club 

Royal Astronomical Society, Toronto 

Society of Chemical Industry 

Ontario Library Association 

Reading Camp Association 

St. Patrick's Literary Association of Ottawa 

Canadian. Free Library for the Blind 

Waterloo Historical Society 

United Empire Loyalists 

York Pioneers 

Ottawa Association for the Blind 

Institut Jeanne D'Arc, Ottawa 



$ c. 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
800 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
300 00 
400 00 

.,500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
400 00 

!,500 00 
200 00 
700 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 

,000 00 
100 00 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 149 



APPENDIX I 

STATISTICS OF PUBLIC, SEPARATE, CONTINUATION 

AND HIGH SCHOOLS 



Summary 

I. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

a. Public Schools 

i 
Number of Public Schools in 1917 6,103 

Increase for the year 12 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public 
Schools during the year (exclusive of Continuation 
and Night School pupils) 457,616 

Increase for the year 456 

Average daily attendance of pupils 295,652 

Increase for the year 3,047 

Percentage; of average attendance to total attendance.. 64.59 

Increase for the year .31 

Number of persons employed as teachers in the Public 

Schools : men, 1,219 ; women, 10,055 ; total 11,274 

Increase for the year 297 

Number of teachers who attended Normal School 8,509 

Increase for the year 388 

Number of teachers who attended Normal College or 

Faculty of Education 1,006 

Increase for the year 8 

Number of teachers with a University degree 130 

Decrease for the year 16 

Average annual salary for male teachers $1,039 

Increase for the year $82 

Average annual salary for female teachers $650 

Increase for the year $24 

Average experience of male teachers 14.73 years 

Average experience of female teachers 7.67 years 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries . . . . $7,763,361' 

Amount expended for Public School houses (sites and 

buildings) $1,725,541 

Amount expended for all other purposes $3,309,210 

Total amount expended for Public Schools $12,798,112 

Increase for the year $689,536 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $27.96 

Increase for the year $0.43 



150 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1917.. 548 

Increase for the year 9 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages 70,048 

Increase for the year 783 

Average daily attendance of pupils . 46,919 

Increase for the year 722 

Percentage of 'average attendance to total attendance . '. 66.98 

Increase for the year .29 

Number of teachers 1,488 

Increase for the year 34 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $635,089 

Amount expended for school 'houses (sites and buildings) $262,103 

Amount expended for all other purposes $416,531 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools .... $1,313,723 

Increase for the year ; $70,394 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $18.75 

Increase for the year $0.80 



c. Protestant Separate Schools 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with 

Public Schools, \a) in 1917 6 

Number of enrolled pupils 447 

Increase for the year 32 

Average daily attendance of pupils , . . 299 

Increase for the year 20 



d. Night Public Schools 

Number of Night Schools in 1917-18 13 

Decrease for the year 4 

Number of pupils enrolled 820 

Decrease for the year ''65 

Number of teachers engaged 26 

Decrease for the vear ■ • • 8 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



151 



II. SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
a. High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 

Number of High Schools (including 47 Collegiate Insti- 
tutes) 1917-18 162 

Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools 29,097 

Increase for the year ' 264 

Average daily attendance of pupils 22,740 

Decrease for the year 41 

Percentage of average to total attendance 78.15 

Decrease for the year .86 

Number of teachers in High Schools 1,051 

Increase for the year 13 

Average annual salary, Principals $1,884 

Increase for the year $45 

Average annual salary, Assistants $1,412 

Increase for the year $36 

Average annual salary, all Teachers $1,484 

Increase for the year $36 

Highest salary paid $3,500 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries 1917 $1,554,049 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $277,544 

Amount expended for all other purposes $587,382 

Total amount expended on High Schools, 1917 $2,418,975 

Decrease for the year '. $69,279 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance (approximate) .... $83.00 

Decrease for the year $3.00 

b. Continuation iSchools 

Number of Continuation Schools, 1917-18 137 

Increase for the year 5 

Number of pupils in attendance 5,104 

Increase for the year 22 

Average daily attendance of pupils 3,734 

Increase for the year 5 

Percentage of average to total attendance 73 . 1 5 

Decrease for the year .22 

Number of teachers 241 

Increase for the year 7 

Average annual salary, Principals $1,117 

Increase for the year $24 

Average annual salary, Assistants $778 

Increase for the year $21 

Highest salary paid $2,000 

Amount expended on teachers' salaries, 1917 $228,362 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $32,328 

Amount expended for all other purposes $63,931 

Total amount expended on Continuation Schools, 1917. . $324,621 

Increase for the year $18,473 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance (approximate) .... $63.00 

Increase for the vear $3.00 



152 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



c. Night High Schools 

Number of Night Schools in 1917-18 23 

Increase for the year 9 

Number of pupils enrolled 3,927 

Increase for the year . . 460 

Number of teachers engaged 151 

Increase for the year 32 



III. GENERAL 
Elementary and Secondary Schools 

*Total population of the Province 2,652,000 

Pupils enrolled in elementary schools, 1917 528,484 

Pupils enrolled in secondary schools, 1917-18 38,128 

Total enrolment, all schools 566,612 

Average daily attendance 369,516 

Percentage of total population enrolled 21 

Total expenditure $16,855,431 

Average cost per head of total population in 1917 $6.35 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all Schools 





1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


Teachers' salaries 


$7 63 
97 
2 80 


$10 44 
2 86 
4 40 


$14 26 
5 90 
5 34 


$17 10 
4 70 
6 77 


$17 97 


Sites and buildings 

All other expenses 


4 05 
7 72 






For all purposes 


11 40 


17 70 


25 50 


28 57 


29 74 



Average Cost per Pupil (average attendance) in all Schools 





1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


Teachers' salaries 


$13 34 
1 70 
4 89 


$17 78 
4 86 
7 50 


$23 26 
9 63 
8 71 


$26 36 

7 24 

10 44 


$27 55 


Sites and buildings 


6 22 


All other expenses 


11 84 






For all purposes 


19 93 


30 14 


41 60 


44 04 


45 61 



'Estimated 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



153 



Comparative School Statistics, 1867=1917 



I. PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

These tables, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, include 
Roman Catholic and Protestant Separate Schools. The tables A, B, C, D and E 
give the statistics of the Public Schools including Protestant Separate Schools; 
the statistics of the R. C. Separate Schools are given in Tables F and G; those 
of the Protestant Separate Schools appear in Table N; and the Night Schools in 
Table 0. 



1. School Population and Attendance 

The school population (5 to 16 and 5 to 21 years) of the Province, as ascertained 
by the assessors, and the school attendance are given in the following table : 





CO 


CO 

u 


T3 








cd pj 






cd 


o 






-± 


ta 3 S 




>> 

CO 


t» 



0) 






d 
2 


cdj^ o 
& ceo 




tH 


CVJ 


<4-H 








£ += CO 

5 o 




o 


o 


o 








cd +S &jd 




-(-3 


-*-=> 


u 






>> 


«n O.S 




to 


to 


a> 








OWr^ 


Year 




S3 


,3 






a 


eo <u d 








a 






•n 


bo 3 ® 




'■+3 
c3 


'+3 


s-a 






9 <» 


cd d;£ 
"t 3 cd ^» 

d-§ * 




P 

P. 
o 


p 
ft 
o 


r-^ ft 

cd 2 


CO 


CO 


2 § 


S d * 




Ph 


Oh 


Eh 


m 


O 


««i 


Ph 


1867 


447,726 




401,643 


213,019 


188,624 


163,974 


40.82 


1872 


495,756 




454,662 


238,848 


215,814 


188,701 


41.50 


1877 


494,804 




490,860 


261,070 


229,790 


217,184 


44.25 


1882 


483,817 




471,512 


246,966 


224,546 


214,176 


45.42 


1887 





611,212 


493,212 


259,083 


234,129 


245,152 


49.71 


1892 




595,238 


485,670 


253,091 


232,579 


253,830 


52.26 


1897 




590,955 


482,777 


251,677 


231,100 


273,544 


56.66 


1902 




584,512 


454,088 


232,880 


221 , 208 


261,480 


57.58 


1907 




590,285 


448,218 


229,794 


218,424 


266,503 


59.45 


1912 




609,127 


467,022 


239,187 


227 , 835 


291,210 


62.35 


1916 


511,324 


632,527 


508,975 


259 358 


249,617 


328,846 


64.61 


1917 


512,562 


628,996 


527,664 


266,255 


261,409 


342,571 


64.92 







NOTE.— Continuation School attendance is excluded from the above table in 1912 and 
thereafter. Kindergarten attendance is not included except for the year 1917. There was a 
total increase of 1,239 for the year in these elementary schools. 



154 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



2. Classification of Pupils 



Year 



1867 
1872 
1877, 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1916 
1917 






«. 



3£ 



M 



Oh 2 






17,450 
16,515 



2,793 



115,657 
114,932 
110,567 
107,441 
112,552 
126,100 
128,748 
125,321 



~*^4 




n o 




CS O 




eucq 


• 


^3 


M 


c3 Jh 
U o 


o 




rd 


03 


a 


1—1 


CM 


* 79,365 


98,184 


*160,828 


100,245 


*153,630 


108,678 


*165,834 


106,229 


76,704 


100,533 


73,015 


96,074 


70,808 


91,330 


69,062 


85,732 


60,194 


84,622 


67,368 


92,728 


73,208 


106,201 


73,996 


106,034 



83,211 

96,481 

135,824 

117,352 

108,096! 

99,345! 

99, 682 j 

90,630 

89,371 

88,811 

102,270 

105,062 



68,896 
67,440 
72,871 
71,740 
81,984 
88,934 
89,314 
83,738 
85,752 
85,213 
91,824 
91,989 






Or- 

£ la 



71,987 

29,668 

19,857 

10,357 

10,238 

13,370 

21,076 

17,485 

15,727 

t 6,802 

t 6,724 

f 5,954 



The following table classifies the pupils in the various forms, as to rural and 
urban schools : 

Rural Schools 



Year 


a 
So 

H 

0) 

s 


d 


First 
Reader 
Part I 

or 
Primer 


First 

Reader 

Part II 

or First 

Book 


Second 
Book 


Third 
Book 


Fourth 
Book 


Fifth 

Book or 

beyond 

Fourth 

Book 


Totals 


1904 






60,784 
60,470 
62,712 
60,360 
58,290 


36,941 
31,538 
30,293 
31,630 
1 30,657 


47,930 
46,219 
43,775 
45,712 

44,407 


50,297| 47,289 
48,247 46,815 


9,892 
8.958 


253,133 


1907 






242,247 


1912 






42,450! 44,049; f3,984 
44,457 42,3881 f3,182 
43,8341 41,321 t2,926 


227,263 


1916 






227,729 


1917 




75 


221,510 



Urban Schools (cities, towns and incorporated villages) 



1904 






1907 






1912 






1916 

1917 


17,450 
16,515 


"2,*7i8 



44,456 


27,800 


37,299 


52,082 


28,656 


38,403 


63,388 


37,075 


48,953 


68,388 


41,578 


60,489 


67,031 


43,339 


61,627 



39,814 
•41,124 
46,361 
57,813 
61,228 



35.815 
38,937 

41,164 
49,436] 

50,668 ! 



6,304 

6,769 

t2,818 

f3,542 

t3,028 



191,488 
205,971 
239,759 
298,696 
306,154 



* In 1st Reader. 



t Exclusive of Continuation School pupils. 



The following table compares the attendance and gives the percentages from 
rural and from urban municipalities for several years : 



Year 


Attendance in Rural 
Schools 


Attendance in Urban 
Schools 


1903 


260,617 or 57.88% of total 
242,247 or 54.05% 
227,263 or 48.66% 
227,729 or 43.25% 
221,510 or 41.97% 


189,661 or 42.12% of total 


1907 


205,971 or 45.95% 


1912 


239,759 or 51.33% 


1916 


298,696 or 56.74% 


1917 


306,154 or 58.02% 







Note. — Kindergarten attendance for years previous to 1916 not available for the 
above tables. The first Kindergarten returns received were for the year 1892. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



155 



3. Teachers' Certificates 



Year 


■3 a 

5 






o 

en 

rH 


ISO 

CO 

o 

a 

CM 


co 

en 

o 

CO 


jyj OB 

M 


CD 

be 

<D 

d 

3 


Other certificates, 
including old 
County Board, 
Dist. and Temp. 


Number of teachers 
who attended 
Normal School 

♦Normal College 
or Faculty of 
Education 


1867 

1872 

1877 

1882 

1887 

1892 

1897 

1902 

1907 

fl912 

U916 

tl917 


4,890 

5,476 

8,468 

6,857 

7,594 

8,680 

9,351 

9,614 

10,170 

11,128 

12,465 

12,762 


2,849 
2,626 
3,020 
3,062 
2,718 
2,770 
2,784 
2,294 
1,783 
1,511 
1,386 
1,317 


2,041 
2,850 
3,448 
3,795 
4,876 
5,910 
6,567 
7,320 
8,387 
9,617 
11,079 
11.445 


1,899 

1,337 

250 

246 

252 

261 

343 

608 

715 

674 

1,084 

1,106 


2,454 
1,477 
1,304 
2,169 
2,553 
3,047 
3,386 
4,296 
3,887 
6,419 
8,559 
8,784 


386 
2,084 
3,926 
3,471 
3,865 
4,299" 
4,465 
3,432 
3,452 
1,804 
1,346 
1,317 


66' 


'266 

223 
247 
277 
371 
371 
310 


151 

578 

988 

971 

924 

873 

934 

1,031 

1,839 

1,860 

1,105 

1,108 


666 
828 
1,084 
1,873 
2,434 
3,038 
3,643 
4,774 
4,587 
6,705 
8,789 
9,203 


614 
1,042 
1,053 



NOTE . — 33 Manual Training and 38 Household Science teachers are included in above table 
for the year 1917. 



The men engaged in teaching in these schools in 1917 formed 10.31 per cent. 
of the whole number. 

The number of teachers and the class of certificates, in the Public Schools 
abne, in each County and District of the Province will be found in Table C of this 
Appendix. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural and urban 
schools: 



Rural Schools, 1904 

Rural Schools, 1907 

tRural Schools, 1912 

tRural Schools, 1916 

tRural Schools, 1917 

Urban (cities, towns and incorporated 
villages), 1904 

Urban, 1907 

tUrban, 1912 

tUrban, 1916 

tUrban, 1917 



Teachers 



Total 



5,974 
6,038 
6,143 
6,409 
6,455 

3,580 
4,132 
4,985 
6,056 
6,307 



Male 



1,469 

1,201 

894 

731 

655 

606 
582 
617 
655 
662 



Female 



4,505 
4,837 
5,249 
5,678 
5,800 

2,974 
3,550 
4,368 
5,401 
5,645 



Certificates 



1st 

Class 



152 
180 
165 
346 
343 

483 
535 
509 
738 
763 



2nd 
Class 



1,944 
1,542 
3,002 
4,161 
4,232 

2,248 
2,345 
3,417 
4,398 
4.552 



3rd 

Class 



3,107 
3,079 
1,463 
1,150 
1,129 

289 
373 
341 
196 

188 



* For the years previous to 1912 the numbers who attended Normal College or the 
Faculty of Education are included in the preceding column. 
t Exclusive of Continuation School teachers. 



156 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



4. Teachers' Salaries and Experience 
Teachers' Salaries 







03 


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$ 


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$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


% 


$ 


1867. 


1,350 
1,000 
1,100 
1,100 
1,450 


346 
360 
398 
415 
425 


226 
228 
264 
269 
292 


532 
628 
735 
742 
832 


243 
245 
307 
331 
382 


464 
507 
583 
576 
619 


240 
216 
269 
273 

289 






261 
305 
379 
385 
398 


189 
213 
251 
248 
271 






1872. 










1877. 








I 


1882. 








1887. 






I 


1892. 


1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
1,900 


421 
391 
436 
596 


297 
294 
313 
420 


894 

892 

935 

1,157 


402 
425 
479 
592 


648 
621 
667 
800 


298 
306 
317 
406 






383 
347 
372 
458 


269 
254 
271 
379 




1897. 










1902. 










1907. 


659 


372 


907 


453 


1912. 


2,200 


788 


543 


1,320 


703 


977 


519 


779 


492 


566 


493 


1,141 


618 


1916. 


2,400 


957 


626 


1,535 


789 


1,115 


603 


855 


549 


654 


561 


1,334 


710 


1917. 


2,500 


1,039 


650 


1,637 


795 


1,166 


628 


908 


573 


686 


580 


1,425 


731 



incorporated villages included from 1867 to 1902 inclusive. 

Increase in salaries in the cities, towns, villages and rural schools are shown 
in the above table. In Table C the average salaries for 1917 of the Public School 
teachers of the various Counties and Districts are given separately, and summarized 
for the cities, towns and villages. This table also states the salaries paid to 
teachers according to the grade of certificate held, and illustrates to what extent the 
teacher with the higher certificate commands the higher salary. The average 
salaries for the Province are as follows : 





Male 


Female 




1912 


1916 


1917 


1912 


1916 


1917 


First Class certificates 


$1,340 
757 
524 


$1,434 
874 
541 


$1,548 
916 
562 


$634 

587 
458 


$681 
654 
483 


$728 


Second Class certificates 


673 


Third Class and District certificates 


507 



Teachers' Experience 

The length of service or experience of the teachers engaged in the Public 
Schools is also shown in Table C, where the numbers who have taught from less 
than one year up to forty years and over are given for each year, and where the 
experience of the teachers, according to the grade of certificate held, is given. 

The average experience in the Public Schools at the end of 1917 was as 
follows : 

Male teachers, 14.73 years. 
Female teachers, 7.67 years. 
All teachers, 8.44 years. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



157 



5. Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


CO 
-fa 



a 

u 
ctt 

CO 


CO 


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CX CO 

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s « 

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CO 
CO 

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CO 




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S CO 

2 ed 


Lergy res 
balances 
sources 


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a 
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3 

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$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1 $ c- 


1867. 


187,153 


1,151,583 


331,599 


1,670,335 


1,093,517 


149.195 


31,354 


199,123 


1,473,189 


3 67 


1872. 


225,318 


1,763,492 


541,460 


2,530,270 


1,371,594 


456,043 


47,799 


331,928 


2,207,364 


4 85 


1877. 


251,962 


2,422,432 


730,687 


3,405,081 


2,038,099 


477,393 


47,539 


510,458 


3,073,489 


6 26 


1882. 


265,738 


2,447,214 


757,038 


3,469,990 


2,144,449 


341,918 


15,583 


525,025 


3,026,975 


6 42 


1887. 


268,722 


3,084,352 


978,283 


4,331,357 


2,458,540 


544,520 


27,509 


711,535 


3,742,104 


7 59 


1892. 


283,791 


3,300,512 


1,227,596 


4,811,899 


2,752,629 


427,321 


40,003 


833,965 


4,053,918 


8 40 


1897. 


366,538 


3,361,562 


1,260,055 


4,988,155 


2,886,061 


391,689 


60,585 


877,335 


4,215,670 


8 73 


1902. 


383,666 


3,959,912 


1,422,924 


5,766,502 


3,198,132 


432,753 


86,723 


1,107,552 


4,825,160 


10 62 


1907. 


655,239 


6,146,825 


2,455,864 


9,257,928 


4,389,524 


1,220,820 


213,096 


1,732,739 


7,556,179 


16 85 


1912. 


842,278 


9,478,887 


3,936,887 


14,258,052 


6,109,547 


2,777,960 


167,755 


2,218,698 


11,273.960 


24 14 


1916. 


831,988 


11.010,356 


4,237,738 


16,080,082 


7,929,490 


2,232,110 


192,212 


2,998,093 


13,351,905 


26 23 


1917. 


907,846 


12,193,439 


4,168,000 


17.269,285 


8,398,450 


1,987,644 


290,207 


3,435,534 


14,111,835 


26 74 



The increase for the year in the amount paid as teachers' salaries was $468,960. 
The total expenditure increased by $759,930. 

These tables show the expenditure per pupil for the years as given below : 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 



Teachers' salaries . 
Sites and buildings . 
All other expenses . 

For all purposes 



1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


$7.04 


$9.79 


$13.08 


$15.58 


$15.91 


0.95 


2.72 


5.95 


4.38 


3.77 


2.63 


4.34 


5.11 


6.27 


7.06 



10.62 



16.85 



24.14 



26.23 



26.74 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) 



Teachers' Salaries 
Sites and buildings 
All other expenses 



1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


$12.23 


$16.47 


$20.98 


$24.11 


$24.52 


1.65 


4.58 


9.54 


6.79 


5.80 


4.57 


7.30 


8.19 


9.70 


10.87 



For all purposes 



18.4, 



28.35 38.71 



40.60 



41.19 



The expenditure per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1917 in the Public 
Schools alone will be found in Table E, and for the R. C. Separate Schools in 
Table F. The expenditure will there be shown as to rural schools, cities, towns, 
and villages separately. 



158 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



II. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 



Year 



Schools, Teachers and Attendance 



o 



be pj 



■m-3 e3 S 

be co „ ;_, o 
?8 be 9 tofl 



>• fl P 
e8 e3 fl, 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1916 
1917 



161 
171 
185 
190 
229 
312 
340 
391 
449 
513 
539 
548 



210 

254 

334 

390 

491 

662 

752 

870 

1,034 

1,237 

1.454 

1,488 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
51,502 
61,297 
69,265 
70,048 



15,376 


14,997 


19,169 


18,297 


21,342 


20,278 


23,314 


22,650 


26,420 


25,082 


31,126 


30,171 


35,410 


33,855 


35,036 


35,012 



8,606 
10,584 
12,549 
13,574 
16,866 
21,560 
24,996 
28,817 
33,500 
39,735 
46,196 
46,919 



45.47 
49.44 
50.29 
51.91 
55.52 
57.54 
60.05 
62.69 
65.04 
64.82 
66.69 
66.98 



Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


o 


al school 
» and as- 
ents 


s, sub- 
d and 
sources 


CO 

p. 
o 


- CO 

co a> 


d build- 
lool 


CO 

3 co 6 

» c3 « 


CO 


93 

U 

T3 


p 

P 




Si 

co d 


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grants 
sessm 


alance 
scribe 
other 


2 

o 


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tes an 
ing sc 
house 


ibrarie 
appar 
prizes 


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£- p 


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-*» 
CO 




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cq 


H 


H 


GO 


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< 


H 


O 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ C. 


1867.. 


9,993 


26,781 
41,134 


11 854 


48,628 


34,830 






t7,889 


42,719 


2 26 


1872.. 


12,327 


15,349 


68,810 


45,824 






fl5,993 


61,817 


2 88 


1877.. 


13,607 


72,177 


34,482 


120,266 


70,201 


24,510 


2,811 


17,284 


114,806 


4 60 


1882. . 


14,382 


97,252 


55,105 


166,739 


84,095 


36,860 


1,303 


32,082 


154,340 


5 13 


1887.. 


16,808 


147,639 


65,401 


229,848 


112,293 


48,937 


3,624 


46,369 


211,223 


6 95 


1892., 


21,043 


206,698 


98,293 


326,034 


149,707 


65,874 


2,922 


71,335 


289,838 


7 74 


1897.. 


26,675 


224,617 


84,032 335,324 


168,800 


41,233 


5,786 


86,350 


302,169 


7 26 


1902. . 


30,472 


293,348 


161,6831 485,503 


210,199 


100,911 


6,158 


118,173 


435,441 


9 47 


1907.. 


40,524 


442,316 


308,540 791,380 


281,484 


186,908 


15,991 


229,793 


714,176 


13 86 


1912.. 


51,846 


757,255 


377,713 


1.186,814 


456,800 


308,193 


15,207 


263,024 


1,043,224 


17 01 


1916.. 


45,836 


899,938 


467,759 


1,413,533 


535,661 


395,289 


17,709 


294,670 


1,243,329 


17 95 


1917.. 


63,127 


1 ,066,253| 


370,346 


1,499,726 


635,089 


262, 103 


24,836 


391,695 


1,313,723 


18.75 



tlncluding all expenditure except for Teachers' salaries. 



An increase of 783 in the enrolment and of $70,394 in the expenditure in 
1917 are noticed in the above tables. The expenditure per pupil of enrolled attend- 
anoe increased from $17.1)5 to $18.75. Detailed statistics in reference to these 
schools will be found in Table F and G. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



159 



III. PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of the 
Province: — No. 4 Grattan, No. 2 Hagarty, No. 1 Tilbury North, L'Orignal, and 
Penetanguishene (two schools). 

They were attended by 447 pupils in 1917. The whole amount expended for 
their maintenance and permanent improvements was $11,318.66. One teacher held 
a First Class certificate, nine teachers held Second Class, and two held Third 
Class certificates. 

Complete statistics for these schools will be found in Table N. 



IV. CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

The following table gives statistics of the " Continuation Classes, Grade A," 
up to and including 1907. Thereafter they are known as fC Continuation Schools." 
Formerly the statistics of these schools were included with the statistics of the 
Public and Separate Schools, consequently certain items- for the years 1897-1907 
cannot be given. 





CO 

o 

o 
W 


to 

o 
o 

4=1 
O 

co 

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<V 

■8 

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09 

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4=i 

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to 

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4=1 
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CO 
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O 

42 

a 

55 


Keceipts 


Expenditure 


Total value of Equip- 
ment 


CO 

"S 

=3 
Oh 

«H 

O 

d 


9 

CO ° 


Year 


a 

c<3 

Sh 
COD 
CO 

CO 

"3 


CO 

Q 

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W 

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2 M 

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p.. 


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(=1 
ft 


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' O O 

£ d d 
a d d 

§££ 

g c3 c3 

Ph 


1897 


27 

59 

91 

138 

132 

137 


20 
46 
65 
54 
33 
36 


7 

12 
24 
73 
96 
99 


1 
2 
11 
3 
2 


34 

73 

119 

226 

*234 

*241 


$ 

2,700 
8,350 
25,610 
64,081 
64,753 
65,733 


$ 


$ $ 


$ 


1,275 
1,856 
3,993 
6,094 
*5,082 
*5,104 




1902 


1 






1907 

1912 


295,261 
337,852 
360,431 


73,325 

202,875 
224,464 
228,362 


265,087 
306,148 
324,621 


26,345 
75,556 
87,901 
93,228 


61.97 


1916 

1917 


*73.37 
*73.15 



*For school year ended six months after the caltrdar year srecified. 

Of the enrolled attendance for 1917-1918, 3,858 pupils were in the Lower 
School and 1,246 in the Middle School. The total attendance was made up of 
1,989 boys and 3,115 girls. 



Average Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance (approximate) 

1916 1917 

Teachers' salaries $44.17 $44.74 

Sites and buildings 4.94 6.33 

All other expenses 11.13 12.53 

For all purposes 60.24 63.60 



1G0 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



Average Cost per pupil (average attendance) 

1912 1915 

Teachers' salaries $53.71 $51. 39 

Sites and buildings 4.17 8.68 

All other purposes 12.30 12.64 

For all purposes 70.18 72.71 



1916 


1917 


$60.19 

6.73 

15.17 


$61.15 

8.66 

17.12 



82.09 86.93 



Statistics in detail for 1917 in reference to the Continuation Schools will be 
found in Tables H, I and J. 



V. COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

The following table gives comparative statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes 
and High Schools from 1867 to 1917, inclusive:— 



1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 



Year 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1916 
1917 









Receipts 




Expenditure 




-*» 
a 
a 
u 

CO 

> 


H 

o 


CO 

ft 

°3 
o 


"co 

M 

o 

♦j CO 


a 

CO 

* 8 


CO 

u 

d 

d 
ft 




u 






cu 


U't* 


u .9 


X 




CO 

o 


-d 


Jh 


d 
d 


u 






<v 


CO 


o 






o 


c8 


^ la 


T3 3 


cO 


•52 


-d 


e3 


be 

CO 


a 


O 


* M 


"CI- 


o 


a 


OQ 


H 


J 


< 


Eh 


PLH 


PLH 


Eh 


Ph 






$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




102 


159 


54,562 


15,605 


139,579 


94,820 


*19,190 


124,181 


5,696 


104 


239 


79,543 


20,270 


223,269 


141,812 


*31,360 


210,005 


7,968 


104 


280 


78,762 


20,753 


357,521 


211,607 


*51,417 


343,710 


9,229 


104 


332 


84,304 


29,270 


373,150 


253,864 


*19,361 


343,720 


12,348 


112 


398 


91,977 


56,198 


529,323 


327,452 


*73,061 


495,612 


17,459 


128 


522 


100,000 


97,273 


793,812 


472,029 


*91,108 


696,114 


22,837 


130 


579 


101,250 


110,859 


767,487 


532,837 


*46,627 


715,976 


24,390 


134 


593 


112,650 


105,801 


832,853 


547,402 


44,246 


769,680 


24,472 


143 


750 


158,549 


138,396 


1,611,553 


783,782 


193,975 


1,213,697 


30,331 


148 917 


209,956 


145,685 


2,414,128 


1,232,537 


327,982 


1,953,061 


32,273 


160!tl038 


185,245 


160,755 


3,043,075 


1,509,227 


398,791 


2,488,254 


f28,833 


162 


tl051 


184,088 


154,825 


3,051,684 


1,554,049 


277,544 


2,418,975 


129,097 



55 

56 

56 

53 

59 

60 

61 

58.97 

60.94 

62.80 
t79.01 
t78.15 



^Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 

fFor the school year ended six months after the calendar year specified. 



Average cost per pupil, enrolled attendance (approximate) 

1916 1917 

Teachers' salaries $52.34 $53.41 

Sites and buildings 13.83 9.54 

All other expenses 20.12 20.18 

For all purposes 86.29 83.13 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



161 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) 





1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


Teachers' salaries 


$ c. 
37 93 

3 07 
12 34 


$ c. 
42 40 
10 49 
12 76 


$ c. 
60 81 
16 18 
19 37 


$ c. 
66 25 
17 50 
25 47 


$ c. 
68 34 


Sites and buildings 

All other purposes 


12 20 
25 83 






For all purposes 


53 34 


65 65 


96 36 


109 22 


106 37 



Number of Pupils in the three grades of schools in the Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools 

1916-17 1917-18 

Lower School 20, 185 20, 190 

Middle School 7,105 7, 336 

Upper School 1,543 1,571 

Total enrolment 28,833 29, 097 

Total number of boys 12,339 12,353 

Total number of girls 16,494 16,744 

2. Occupation of Parents of Pupils attending High Schools and Collegiate 

Institutes 

1916-17 1917-18 

Commerce 6,300 6,516 

Agriculture 8 , 492 8, 449 

Law, Medicine or the Church 1,498 1,531 

Teaching 471 511 

The Trades 5,610 5, 734 

Labouring Occupations 2,257 1,899 

Other Classes 4,205 4,457 

3. Destination of Pupils, and Number of Schools Charging Fees 



Year 





Destination of Pupils 




GO 






t-> 










o 






o 


a> 




CD 






A % 


>— < 


<u 


$* 




to 


■ £ 






•H O 








88 


B 

o 


CO 2 


a 

3 


1 




fH 


t* 


fc 2 


§ 


03 


a* 




< 


a* 




Eh 


C3 ^ 
1° 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1916 
1917 













67 
28 
35 
37 

58 

77 


486 


300 
328 
646 
882 
1,006 


213 
564 
751 
1,189 
398 






555 






881 






1,141 






1,111 


1,527 




1,368 


1,133 


409 


2,056 




87 


1,573 


743 


388 


1,238 




82 


1,982 


803 


401 


1,436 




81 


2,178 


855 


370 


1,490 


531 


82 


2,725 


1,335 


413 


1,205 


775 


84 


2,742 


1,557 


339 


1,407 


667 


85 



36 
76 
69 
67 
54 
51 
43 
52 
62 
66 
76 
77 



The statistics in detail of the various Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 
of the Province for 1917, will be found in Tables K, L, and M. 
11 e. 



162 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



VI. TEACHERS' INSTITUTES 
This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for forty =one years : 





CO 




o o 




Receipts 




Expenditure 




0> 

CO 




Oh £ 


















a 

o 

t-> CO 


a 

o 


co 

> 


- 


■■a 

<D 

'a 


Year 


CO 

<u • 

o 
c9 

CO 

o 


u 
«o 

a 

<4-l 

o 


of Teachers in 
nee. (High Sc 
s not included 


CU U 

<o fl 
o a> 

CD fl 

s « 

s ► 

O o 


.£ be 
g| 

SI 


CO <g 

§a 


co 

o 
o 

a 
o 

a 

cS 


o 
el.2 


CD 

» 

3 
o 

15 




d 


d 


• •r 1 m 

o >• <o 


a * 


0S 


aa 


o 


a^ 


o 




% 


£ 


2; 


-3 


<J 


< 


H 


-5 


H 










$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1877.... 


42 
62 


1,181 

4,395 


6,468 
6,857 


1,412 50 
2,900 00 


100 00 
300 00 


299 75 
1,088 84 


2,769 44 
9,394 28 




1,127 63 


1882.... 


453 02 


5,355 33 


1887.... 


66 


6,781 


7,594 


1,800 00 


1,879 45 


730 66 


10,405 95 


1.234 08 


4,975 50 


1892.... 


69 


8,142 


8,680 


1,950 00 


2,105 00 


875 76 


12,043 54 


1,472 41 


6,127 46 


1897.... 


73 


7,627 


9,351 


2,425 00 


2,017 45 


901 15 


12,446 20 


1,479 88 


6,598 84 


1902.... 


77 


8,515 


9,614 


2,515 00 


1,877 50 


1,171 80 


13,171 26 


1,437 18 


7,188 45 


1907.... 


81 


9,319 


10,170 


2,850 00 


1,920 00 


1,671 32 


14,824 09 


654 16 


7,487 41 


1912.... 


83 


*9,913 


11,128 


3,800 00 


2,100 78 


1,961 10 


22,120 70 


1,359 24 


10,120 89 


1916.... 


88 


*12,729 


12, 465 


5,875 00 


3,596 31 


3,107 97 


31,847 73 


3,314 52 


20,469 44 


1917.... 


94 


*12,460|12,762 


5,475 00 


3.701 62 


3.821 23 


27,712 01 


3,173 12 


13,977 20 



•Registered attendance of members. 



See Appendix H for details for 1917. 



VII. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, Etc. 

Table showing the Number of Teachers in Training at Provincial Normal 
Schools, and the Pupils at the Normal Model Schools 
in connection therewith, etc., 1877=1918 



Year 


No. of Normal 
School teachers 


No. of Normal 
School students 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten teachers 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten pupils 


1877 


13 


257 


8 


643 


1882 


16 


260 


15 


799 


1887 


13 


441 


18 


763 


1892 


12 


428 


22 


842 


1897 


13 


407 


23 


832 


1902 


16 


619 


31 


958 


1907-08... 


*35 


428 


*38 


979 (1907) 


1912-13... 


*69 


986 


*38 


914 (1912) 


1916-17... 


*78 


1,293 


*43 


971 (1916) 


1917-18... 


*78 


1,514 


*43 


938 (1917) 


1918-19... 


*76 


1,100 


*41 


929 (1918) 



^Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Normal Model School. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



1G3 



2. High School Entrance Examinations, 1877-1918 



Year 


Total number of 

Candidates 
examined and re- 
commended by 
Principals 


Number 

granted 

certificates 


Per- 
centage 


Certificates granted 
under Regulations 

in reference to 
farm employment 


1877 


7,383 
9,607 
16,248 
16,409 
16,384 
18,087 
^ 22,144 
22,679 
23,135 
21,975 
21,178 


3,836 

4,371 

9,364 

8,427 

10,502 

13,300 

15,430 

13,977 

15,357 

15,751 

16,734 


51.95 
45.49 
57.63 
51.35 
64.09 
73.53 
69.68 
61.62 
66.37 
71.67 
79.01 




1882 




1887 




1892 




1897 




1902 




1907 




1912 




1916 

1917 

1918 


1.140 
2,711 

3,366 



3. Departmental Academic and Matriculation Examinations, 1918 





<4-H 
O 


T3 




T3 






Examinations 


otal number 
Candidates 


umber pass 


umber of 
Appeals 


umber passe 
on appeal 


)tal number 
passed 


o 




H 


Z 


53 


53 


H 



SeniorPublic School Graduation 
Senior High School Entrance . . 

Model Entrance (June) 

English-French Model Entrance 

(June) 

Model Entrance (August) 

English-French Model Entrance 

(August) 

Lower School 

Middle School (June) 

Middle School (August) 

Upper School, Part I 

Upper School, Part II 

Upper School, Parts A ; B, C, D 

(June) 

Upper School, Parts A, B, C, D 

(August) 

Junior Matriculation 

Supplemental Matriculation... 



Totals 



43 
63 
51 

80 
71 

2 

3.372 

2.277 

25 

322 

263 

39 

64 

2.397 

329 

9,398 



16 

28 

17 

54 
43 



1 . 492 

1,243 

13 

225 

229 

22 

44 

1,504 

84 



5,016 



2 

1 
1 


1 



50 

42 

1 

8 



1 
46 

16 



176 



14 



Number of Honour Matriculation Candidates 

Number of Scholarship Matriculation Candidates 



16 
29 
17 

54 
44 



1.495 

1,245 

13 

225 

230 

22 

44 
1.509 

85 



5.030 



37.20 
46.03 
33.33 

67.50 
61.97 

100.00 
44.33 
54.67 
52.00 
69.87 
87.45 

56.41 

68.75 
62.95 
25.83 



53.52 



407 
102 



The number of candidates granted standing under Regulations re Enlistment for Overseas 
Service was 82, and re Farm Employment, 3,193. 



*Obtained either complete or partial Junior Matriculation. 



164 



THE BEPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
I. TABLE A— SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 



Rural Schools 



2<~ 
2 o 

co co 



lO 






pi 


o 




CD 






<u 






is 


c3 




*a 


<D 




0) 


>. 




,2 


r-H 




CO 


CI 












T3 


0) 


S 





■8.3 



2 

£ P. CO 






M 



O 



J^ ° 

&fi r d CO 



<a m « 
ft ^^ 

<*> crt r* 



1 Brant • 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland & Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay, etc 



Totals 346 204 , 410 



3,562 
5,552 
5,747 
2,438 
2,665 
4,120 
5,469 
4,189 
2,940 
7,206 
2,494 
1,504 
2,155 
6,302 
6,095 
5,989 
5,179 
2,854 
5,620 
3,135 
3,165 
6,580 
3,520 
6,305 
4,859 
4,879 
2,556 
4,426 
3,219 
3,110 
2,041 
5,838 
8,414 
2,778 
3,463 
3,778 
4,253 
4,465 
5,372 
13,669 
3,009 
494 
1,737 
2,821 
1,805 
3,692 
1,163 
2,775 
2,941 
2,068 



3,565 
5,555 
5,754 
2,450 
2,677 
4,133 
5,474 
4,202 
2,950 
7,212 
2,495 
1,509 
2,156 
6,311 
6,098 
5,992 
5,183 
2,856 
5,637 
3,145 
3,174 
6,584 
3,522 
6,307 



861 
881 
,558 
426 
,221 
124 
2,045 
5,857 
8,420 
2,781 
3,466 
3,791 
4,260 
4,470 
5,373 
13,672 
3,023 
494 
1,740 
2,827 
1,861 
3,700 
1,166 
2,789 
2,951 
2,070 



1,814 
2,885 
2,866 
1,296 
1,420 
2,113 
2,870 
2,086 
1,505 
3,748 
1,313 
757 
1,103 
3,205 
3,194 
3,073 
2,742 
1,400 
2,816 



582 

580 

390 

821 

269 

527 

535 

310 

346 

623 

605 

029 

939 

299 

1,414 

1,759 

1,993 

2,255 

2,324 

2,688 

6,932 

1,513 

256 

891 

1,453 

926 

1,907 

582 

1,325 

1,505 

1,026 



751 
670 



,154 
,257 
,020 
,604 
2,116 
1,445 
3,464 
1,182 
752 
1,053 
3,106 
2,904 
2,919 
2,441 
1,456 
2,821 
1,563 
1,594 
3,194 
1,701 
3,038 
2,334 
2,346 



,248 

,080 

,598 

,519 

,016 

,918 

121 

1,367 

1,707 

1,798 

2,005 

2,146 

2,685 

6,740 

1,510 

238 

849 

1,374 

935 

1,793 

584 

1,464 

1,446 

1,044 



12 204,768104,810 99,958120,563 58.87 



,299 
,495 
,354 
,425 
,689 
,541 



3,142 



2,159 
1,556 
4,214 
1,663 

711 
1,244 
3,778 
3,888 
3,528 
3,325 
1,764 
3,367 
1,729 
1,703 
4,369 
2,093 
3,772 
2,871 
3,128 
1,527 
2,878 
1,898 
1,843 
1,260 
3,095 
4,746 
1,624 
2,094 
2,572 
2,378 
2,765 
3,113 
8,384 
1,538 

235 

903 
1,528 

998 
1,853 

609 
1,402 
1,452 
1,061 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 






165 


THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
I. TABLE A— SCHOOL ATTENDANCE— Continued 


Cities 


to 

U 4) 

<o tie 

TJ to 
d o 

CO co 

r3 *■* 

"q. TO 


© 
£ TO 

<u >, 

2* d be 


CM 4) 

4) TO 
>■ V-H 

o o 

CO CO 

*>> 


bo 

4) P 
J5 4) 

d « 


CO 

>> 

o 


CO 

'3 


>> o 

*£ <*> 
i§ ° 
^ d 

bxi'o co 
to d^ 

fc-2 ft 

P^ d 

-to A 


TO 

«_, O 
o ^ 
43°8 
TO 0) TO 

d to a 
<o s-i 53 


1 Belleville 




1,966 
4,342 
2,253 
3,225 
2,140 
2,410 

16,576 
3,348 
2,856 
9,397 
1,755 

10,394 
5,178 
2,555 
2,735 
2,470 
1,948 
2,221 


"*3 

1 
"i 


1,966 
4,342 
2,253 
3,225 
2,140 
2,428 

16,637 
3,388 
2,856 
9,397 
1,755 

10,779 
3,178 
2,555 
2,736 
2,470 
1,948 
2,236 
2,565 

75,035 
1,580 
3,417 
1,475 


1,010 
2,142 
1,143 
1,598 
1,062 
1,205 
8,349 
1,684 
1,464 
4,718 

883 
5,362 
1,612 
1,248 
1,379 
1,283 

956 

1,127 

1,306 

37,507 

816 
1,731 

752 


956 
2,200 
1,110 
1,627 
1,078 
1,223 
8,288 
1,704 
1,392 
4,679 

872 
5,417 
1,566 
1,307 
1,357 
1,187 

992 

1,109 

1,259 

37,528 

764 
1,686 

723 


1,332 
3,262 
1,528 
2,319 
1,556 
1,683 

12,397 
2,274 
2,138 
6,255 
1,291 
7,496 
2,289 
1,732 
1,946 
1,944 
1,430 
1,556 
1,908 

51,337 
1,004 
2,485 
1,078 


68 


2 Brantford 




75 






68 


4 Fort William 




72 


5 Gait 




73 


6 Guelph . 


15 
60 
40 


69 


7 Hamilton • 


74 


8 Kingston 


67 


9 Kitchener 


75 


10 London . 




67 


11 Niagara Falls . 




74 


12 Ottawa 


385 


69 


13 Peterborough 


72 


14 Port Artnur 




68 


15 St. Catharines 




71 


16 St. Thomas 




79 


17 Sarnia 




73 


18 Sault Ste. Marie 


15 


70 


19 Stratford . ... 


2,5651 


74 


20 Toronto 


71 

8 


74,960 

1,572 
3,417 
1,475 


4 


68 


21 Welland 


63 




73 


23 Woodstock 




73 








Totals 


594 


159,758 


9 


160,861 


80,337 


80,024 


112,240 


69.99 






Towns 




75 
264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
460 
69 

1,361 
336 
191 
27 
119 
634 
542 
741 
391 

1,438 
193 
433 
150 
688 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
656 
317 

1,342 
672 
578 


.... 


75 
264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
504 

69 

1,361 

336 

191 

27 
119 
634 
542 
741 
391 
1,438 
193 
435 
150 
688 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
656 
317 
1,342 
672 
578 


32 
119 
186 
148 
283 
239 
232 

29 
667 
160 

75 

15 

66 
312 
254 
379 
211 
711 

99 
218 

65 
316 
401 

69 
195 
179 
435 
311 
145 
656 
337 
284 


43 
145 
177 
124 
268 
234 
272 

40 
694 
176 
116 

12 

53 
322 
288 
362 
180 
727 

94 
217 

85 
372 
409 

35 
174 
192 
417 
345 
172 
686 
335 
294) 


46 
186 
225 
J62 
e*76 
346 
333 

52 
910 
229 
105 

12 

83 
404 
382 
533 
271 
1,037 

99 
313 

96 
452 
550 

39! 
267 
285 
554 
436 
190 
980 
512 
423 


61 


2 Alliston 




70 






62 


4 Amherstburg 




60 






68 


6 Aurora 




73 




44 


66 


8 Bala 


75 






67 


10 Blenheim 


68 






55 


12 Bonfield. . .* 




44 






70 


14 Bowmanville 




64 


15 Bracebridge 




71 


16 Brampton 




72 






69 


18 Brockville 




72 






51 


20 Burlington 


2 


72 




64 


22 Campbellford 




66 


23 Carleton Place 




68 


24 Charlton 




37 






72 


26 Clinton 




77 






65 


28 Cobourg 




66 


29 Cochrane 




60 


30 Collingwood 1 


74 




76 


32 Cornwall [ . . . . 


73 



166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
I. TABLE A— SCHOOL ATTENDANCE— Continued 



Towns— Continued 



38 
39 
40 
41 



52 
53 

54 
55 

56 
57 



33 Deseronto 

34 Dresden 

35 Dryden 

36 Dundas 

37 Dunnville 

Durham 

Eastview 

Englehart .... 
Essex 

42 Ford 

43 Forest 

44 Fort Frances.. 

45 Frood Mine . . . 

46 Gananoque . . . 

47 Goderich 

48 Gore Bay . 

49 Gravenhurst. . 

50 Haileybury . . . 

51 Hanover 

Harriston 

Hawkesbury . . 

Hespeler 

Huntsville 

Ingersoll 

Iroqaois Falls 

58 Kearney 

59 Keewatin 

60 Kenora 

61 Kincardine . . 

62 Kingsville . . . . 

63 Latchford 

64 Leamington . . 

65 Lindsay 

66 Listowel 

67 Little Current 

68 Massey 

69 Matheson 

70 Mattawa 

71 Meaford 

72 Midland 

73 Milton 

74 Mimico 

75 Mitchell 

76 Mount Forest . 

77 Napanee 

78 New Liskeard 

79 Newmarket .. . 

80 Niagara 

$1 North Bay.... 

82 Oakville 

83 Orangeville . . 

84 Orillia 

85 Oshawa 

86 Owen Sound . . 

87 Palmerston .. . 

88 Paris 

89 Parkhill 

90 Parry Sound. . 



d *Z 
^ a» 



a 2 

s § 

a*! 



a) a 

O o 
CO CO 



474 
284 
259 
834 
541 
322 
352 
209 
288 
187 
263 
318 
12 
832 
665 
152 
386 
554 
504 
285| 

210! 

584; 
531! 
919! 
263 

136| 
304 
996 
267 
392 
61 
578 

1,130 
383 
287 
106 
127 
48 
522 

1,512 
448 
546 
261 
250 
557 
485| 
643^ 
218 ! 

1,272 
543 
366 

1,534; 

1,750 

2,506 
33l| 
628 
143 

1,152 



u> 




«4-l fl 




o — ■< 








M 




a co^i 








Total 
pupi 
scho 


CO 

m 


474 


235 


284 


143 


259 


120 


834 


399 


541 


264 


322 


137 


352 


167 


209 


98 


288 


143 


187 


89 


263 


116 


318 


151 


12 


7 


832 


414 


665 


333 


152 


73 


386 


187 


554 


288 


504 


233 


285 


165 


211 


107 


584 


311 


531 


257 


919 


468 


263 


141 


136 


651 


304 


161 1 


996 


4871 


267 


139! 


392 


220 


61 


37 


578 


289 


1,130 


553 


383 


192 


287 


147 


106 


64 


127 


76 


48 


22 


522 


274 


1,514 


726 


448 


199 


546 


261 


261 


127! 


250 


125 


557 


293 


485 


230 


643 


335 


218 


120 


1,272 


644 


543 


283 


366 


178 


1,534 


773 


1,750 


874 


2,507 


1,279 


331 


168 


628 


315 


143 


62 


1,152 


567 



u 



^ a 

0)03 
CUTS to 

%£ ft 

Z o3 P. 



v- O 

o -^ 

O 4) 



239 


291 


141 


181 


139 


170 


435 


619! 


277 


373! 


185 


225: 


185 


210 


111 


116 


145 


214 


98 


93 


147 


164! 


167 


202j 


5 


6 


418 


600! 


332 


470! 


79 


118 


199 


220] 


266 


369! 


271 


378 


120 


188 


104 


126 


273 


417 


274 


344 


451 


651 


122 


95 


71 


77! 


143 


190 


509 


686! 


128 


199! 


172 


253| 


24 


34J 


289 


406! 


577 


822 


191 


252 


140 


161 


42 


86 


51 


54 


26 


28 


248 


392 


788 


1,021 


249 


296 


285 


358 


134 


193 


125 


170 


264 


362 


255 


339 


308 


456 


98 


153 


628 


964 


260 


362 


188 


288 


761 


1,076 


876 


1,251 


1,228 


1,837 


163 


241 


313 


454 


81 


122 


585 


744 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



167 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
TABLE A— SCHOOL ATTENDANCE— Concluded 



Towns — Concluded 


n 2? 

fl o 
0, 


Pupils between 
5 and 21 years 
of age 

Pupils over 21 
years of age 


Total number of 
pupils attending 
school 


Boys 


CO 

1* 

3 


Average daily 
attendance of 
pupils 


Percentage of 
average to total 
attendance 


91 Pembroke 




900 


Qnn 


461 
403 
181 
302 
259 
382 

80 
136 
418 
171 
336 
169 

53 
300 
127 
154 
425 

78 
528 
152 

94 
538 
242 
100 
396 
198 

74 
233 

74 
322 
168 
502 

55 
108 

83 
131 
484 
338 
344 

79 
292 
222 
229 
210 


439 
432 
210 
286 
247 
388 

92 
142 
399 
183 
286 
199 

35 
256 
105 
168 
411 

87 
544 
164 

94 
499 
234 
115 
368 
212 

82 
228 

78 
303 
150 
537 

42 

95 

77 
135 
508 
367 
373 

78 
269 
191 
225 
252 


638j 71 
554 66 


# 92 Penetanguishene 




835 
391 
588 
506 
770 
172 




835 
391 
588 
506 
770 
172 
278 
817 
354 
622 
368 
88 
556 
232 
322 
836 
165 

1,072 
316 
188 

1,037 
476 
215 
764 
410 
156 
461 
152 
625 
318 

1,039 
97 
203 
160 
266 
992 
705 
717 
157 
561 
413 
454 
462 


93 Perth 




2461 63 


94 Petrolea 




418 71 


95 Picton 




375 1 74 


96 Port Hope 




569 74 


97 Powassan . . 




115 67 


98 Prescott ... 




278 


218! 78 


99 Preston 




817 
354 
617 

368 

88 

556 


614! 75 


100 Rainy River 




213 60 


101 Renfrew 


5 


396 64 


102 Ridgetown 


259! 70 


103 Rockland 




56! 64 


104 St. Mary's.. 




431 78 


105 Sandwich. . 




232! 
3221 

829.... 
165 
1,072 .... 
3161 


206! 89 


106 Seaforth 




205! 64 


107 Simcoe 


7 


565 1 68 


108 Sioux Lookout 


88 53 


109 Smith's Falls 




784: 73 


110 Southampton 




232 73 


111 Stayner 




188 .... 

1,037 .... 

476 .... 


134 71 


112 Steeiton ... 




694 67 


113 Strathroy 


.... 


3431 72 


114 Sturgeon Falls 




215 .... 
764 .... 
410 .... 


150 70 


115 Sudburyf 




565 74 






270 ! 66 


117 Thornbury 




156 


108! 69 


118 Thorold 




461 
152 
R13 


.... 


295 64 


119 Tilbury 




108 71 


120 Tillsonburg.. 


12 


421 ! 67 


121 Thnmins 


17 301 


172 54 


122 Trenton 

123 Trout Creek 




1,039 
97 


605 58 
66 68 


124 Uxbridge 

125 VankleekHill 




203 .... 
160 ... . 
266;.... 
992! 

705 .... 
717 .... 
157| 

561!.... 
413 .... 


167 82 
107 67 






193 73 


127 Walkejville 

128 Wallaceburg 




665 67 
459 65 


129 Waterloo 




570 79 


130 Webbwood 




101! 64 


131 Weston 




396' 71 


132 Whitby 




272! 66 


133 Wiarton .... 




454!.... 
462 - - - 


309! 68 


134 Wingham 




284 61 




91 








Totals 


67,727 




R7.818 


33,790 


34,028 


46, 691 ! 68.85 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


i 




346 
594 


204.410 
159,758 


12 204,768 

9 160,361 

.... 67,818 

1 24.669 


104,810 
80,337 
33,790 
12,282 


99,958 
80,024 
34,028 
12,387 


120,563| 58.87 
112,240 69.99 


3 Towns 


91 


R7 . 727 


46,691 68.85 


4 Villages 


23! 24,645 


16,158 63. 49 








5 Grand Totals, 1917 


1054! 456.540 

i 


22 


457,616 


231,219 


226,397 


295,652 64.60 


6 Percentages 


.23 99.76 






50.52 


49.47 


64.60 .. 















;: Including Protestant Separate School. 



168 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Rural Schools 


Kindergarten- 
Primary 




o 

o 

m 

CO 

T— 1 


o 
o 

pq 
d 

CM 


o 

o 

cq 

U 

CO 


o 
o 

ra 

-d 


1 Brant 


58 


856 

1,252 

1,609 

575 

676 

876 

1,506 

1,231 

881 

1,567 

585 

471 

540 

1,606 

1,160 

1,549 

1,155 

679 

1,343 

845 

828 

1,288 

859 

1,385 

1,278 

977 

653 

776 

952 

981 

469 

1,759 

2,182 

705 

785 

774 

1,244 

850 

1,452 

3,849 

1,002 

161 

542 

791 

649 

1,204 

357 

1,298 

1,076 

774 


457 

725 
748 
288 
318 
505 
974 
492 
346 
916 
317 
223 
293 
897 
747 
791 
712 
385 
718 
412 
391 
917 
479 
795 
618 
730 
283 
546 
397 
402 
295 
849 

1,113 
319 
447 
467 
499 
542 
705 

2,301 
372 
106 
195 
383 
384 
607 
163 
380 
437 
335 


686 

1,017 

1,067 

505 

454 

869 

1,143 

781 

655 

1,442 

496 

292 

415 

1,411 

1,297 

1,236 

892 

564 

1,038 

614 

664 

1,406 

839 

1,406 

877 

998 

549 

701 

708 

599 

396 

1,143 

1,827 

571 

643 

912 

783 

795 

1,094 

3,108 

688 

92 

362 

572 

372 

713 

216 

445 

548 

349 


812 

1,224 

1,134 

531 

519 

885 

991 

800 

619 

1,647 

477 

248 

392 

1,271 

1,241 

1,075 

1,102 

602 

1,133 

609 

608 

1,401 

727 

1,306 

1,008 

1,073 

526 

1,229 

619 

476 

428 

1,008 

1,650 

567 

763 

970 

886 

1,088 

1,104 

2,587 

514 

95 

309 

543 

272 

605 

186 

379 

495 

331 


671 


Bruce 


1,247 


3 Carleton 




1,175 


4 Duff erin 




532 


5 Dundas 




625 


6 Elgin 




921 


7 Essex 




845 


8 Frontenac 




876 


9 Glengarry 




426 


10 Grey 




•1,567 


11 Haldimand 




591 


12 Haliburton 




254 


13 Halton 




504 


14 Hastings 


1,063 


15 Huron . 


1,399 


16 Kent . 


1,260 


1 / Lambton 


1,197 


18 Lanark 


612 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


1,361 


20 Lennox and Addington 


642 


21 Lincoln 


647 


22 Middlesex 


1,443 


23 Norfolk 


588 


24 Northumberland and Durham 


1,309 


25 Ontario . 


1,000 




1,050 


27 Peel 


526 




1,104 


29 Peterborough 


519 




595 


31 Prince Edward . 


435 




1,036 


33 Simcoe 


1,556 




610 


35 Victoria . . ! 


749 




626 


37 Welland . ! 


800 






1,083 


39 Wentworth . , 


17 


919 




1,775 


41 Algoma 




400 






39 


43 Manitoulin . 




322 






483 


45 Nipissing 




178 






500 


47 Rainy River . . 




215 






269 


49 Timiskaming 




388 






254 










75 


52,862 


27,721 


41,250 


41,065 


39,186 







1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



169 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION 





•** 








0> 


p 
o 


S-t 


p»> 
u 
o 

CO 

a 




12 ^ 

O 
O O 




p. 
u 


o 


2 


'55 
o 
a 


o3 

8 
B 


00 




t»CQ 


+3 


o 


OT 
3 


£ 


8 

o 


g 






pq 


< 


O 


£ 


3 


O 


o 


w 


1 


25 


3,286 


2,724 


3,009 


2,859 


3,053 


771 


1,278 


2 


90 


5,236 


4,369 


4,643 


4,830 


4,412 


1,599 


1,898 


3 


21 


5,614 


4,778 


4,590 


4,944 


5,003 


1,303 


2,787 


4 


19 


2,340 


1,927 


1,761 


2,130 


2,098 


586 


757 


5 


85 


2,382 


1,945 


1,563 


2,076 


2,161 


912 


956 


6 


77 


4,015 


3,176 


3,815 


3,918 


3,918 


1,150 


1,471 


7 


15 


5,413 


3,952 


3,667 


5,127 


5,217 


1,811 


1,353 


8 


22 


4,202 


2,989 


3,306 


4,202 


4,202 


895 


1,829 


9 


23 


2,736 


2,240 


2,154 


2,412 


2,511 


560 


1,232 


10 


73 


6,926 


5,738 


5,065 


6,140 


6,017 


1,897 


2,698 


11 


29 


2,420 


1,904 


1,857 


2,015 


2,017 


982 


946 


12 


21 


1,458 


969 


833 


1,354 


1,151 


362 


439 


13 


12 


2,025 


1,588 


1,449 


1,871 


1,774 


597 


612 


14 


63 


5,971 


4,995 


5,143 


5,586 


5,494 


1,181 


1,772 


15 


254 


5,616 


4,924 


4,356 


5,197 


5,198 


1,914 


2,115 


16 


81 


5,565 


4,456 


4,206 


4,711 


4,439 


1,752 


2,179 


17 


125 


4,959 


3,859 


3,712 


4,663 


4,888 


1,386 


2,908 


18 


14 


2,821 


2,396 


1,853 


2,519 


2,540 


801 


1,074 


19 


44 


5,544 


4,332 


4,158 


4,909 


4,939 


1,513 


2,224 


20 


23 


3,017 


2,426 


2,410 


2,781 


2,761 


781 


1,258 


21 


36 


3,077 


2,498 


2,869 


2,733 


2,727 


969 


1,024 


22 


129 


6,481 


5,354 


4,680 


5,718 


5,950 


2,029 


2,562 


23 


30 


3,424 


2,777 


3,040 


3,103 


3,167 


627 


1,183 


24 


106 


6,072 


4,836 


4,126 


5,347 


5,324 


2,072 


2,027 


25 


80 


4,839 


3,605 


4,253 


3,567 


3,641 


1,198 


1,883 


26 


53 


4,809 


4,284 


3,903 


4,563 


4,559 


1,269 


1,970 


27 


21 


2,485 


1,920 


2,004 


1,672 


2,120 


605 


734 


28 


70 


4,273 


3,679 


3,848 


3,894 


3,809 


1,784 


1,636 


29 


26 


3,111 


2,390 


2,628 


2,700 


2,698 


715 


1,274 


30 


71 


2,922 


2,094 


2,301 


2,482 


2,644 


698 


1,220 


31 


22 


2,045 


2,045 


1,415 


2,045 


2,045 


530 


756 


32 


62 


5,727 


5,141 


4,535 


5,304 


5,470 


1,153 


2,768 


33 


. 92 


8,329 


6,771 


4,511 


7,641 


7,472 


1,982 


2,524 


34 


9 


2,584 


2,205 


2,246 


2,300 


2,239 


767 


1,087 


35 


79 


3,311 


2,793 


2,271 


3,016 


2,974 


911 


1,147 


36 


42 


3,673 


3,149 


3,490 


3,791 


3,791 


818 


1,100 


37 


48 


3,996 


3,060 


2,977 


3,287 


3,329 


1,117 


1,148 


38 


112 


4,088 


3,258 


3,337 


3,565 


3,457 


1,917 


1,739 


39 


82 


5,256 


4,161 


4,812 


4,724 


4,423 


1,307 


1,989 


40 


52 


13,447 


12,288 


12,749 


12,835 


12,824 


2,891 


3,184 


41 


47 


2,934 


2,118 


1,874 


2,322 


2,310 


580 


772 


42 


1 


494 


831 


494 


494 


494 


135 


135 


43 


10 


1,704 


1,241 


1,207 


1,373 


1,372 


357 


626 


44 


55 


2,529 


2,056 


1,428 


2,462 


2,264 


777 


1,020 


45 


6 


1,813 


1,315 


1,501 


1,460 


1,460 


263 


659 


46 


71 


3,626 


2,019 


2,784 


3,288 


3,284 


641 


968 


47 


29 


1,055 


788 


675 


819 


867 


322 


36b 


48 


18 


2,577 


1,619 


2,378 


2,091 


2,060 


387 


768 


49 


7 


2,746 


2,102 


2,388 


2,428 


2,269 


479 


722 


50 


27 

2,609 


2,035 


1,463 


1,938 


1,861 


1,874 


540 


573 




197,008 


159,047 


156, 212 


177,129 


176,710 


52,593 


71,350 



12 E. 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Rural Schools 


o 

3 

a 



o 


Physiology and 
Hygiene 


Nature Study 


=3 

U 
o 

'cfl 

>> 


Bookkeeping 


Arithmetic and 
Mensuration 


1 Brant 


1,432 

2,351 

3,080 

1,912 

978 

1.460 

2,072 

1.912 

1,345 

3,239 

1,164 

651 

760 

2,066 

2,773 

2,457 

2,963 

1,286 

2,558 

1,371 

1,159 

3,215 

1,424 

2.358 

1,918 

2,107 

846 

2,095 

1,362 

1,499 

838 

2,967 

3,238 

1,152 

1,316 

1,543 

1,348 

2,040 

2,306 

3,888 

953 

135 

735 

1,274 

947 

1,270 

484 

939 

988 

646 


2,238 
4,221 
4,855 
1,968 
1,587 
3.895 
5,239 
4,198 
2,012 
5.616 
1.845 

981 
1 , 555 
5.280 
4.417 
4.218 
4,473 
2.303 
5.080 
2,591 
2.507 
4,932 
2,985 
4. 455 
2.088 
4,200 
1,859 
3.446 
2,542 
2,436 
1,804 
5.139 
6,871 
1,889 
2,855 
2,956 
2,756 
3,506 
3,107 
12,430 
2.411 

494 
1.631 
1,907 
1,577 
3,261 

927 
2,000 
1,466 
1,986 


3,058 
4,790 
5,362 
2,264 
1,940 
3,946 
5 , 255 
4.199 
2,351 
6,530 
2,360 
1,197 
1 , 855 
5,721 
5,261 
4,785 
4,968 
2,506 
5,431 
2,749 
3.053 
5,572 
3,220 
5,405 
4,775 
4,587 
2,341 
3,970 
2,967 
2,758 
- 1,835 
5,394 
7,941 
2,318 
3,176 
3,482 
3,798 
4,007 
4,728 
13,096 
2,812 
494 
1,687 
2,161 
1,668 
2,378 
982 
2, 186 
2,546 
2,006 


3,305 
4.452 
5.642 
2.240 
2,335 
4,073 
5.459 
4.202 
2,755 
6,893 
2,353 

826 
2,085 
6,188 
5.748 
5,729 
5,082 
2,774 
5,477 
2,978 
3.130 
6,148 
3,454 
5,949 
4.839 
4,686 
2.479 
4,359 
3,043 
2,984 
1,984 
5,718 
7,860 
2,675 
2,950 
3,455 
3,718 
4,127 
4,619 
13,574 
2.799 

494 
1.729 
2,076 
1,821 
3,194 
1,094 
2,445 
2,797 
2,015 


13 
164 
16 
17 
83 
67 
28 
15 
16 
55 
23 
15 

2 

86 

210 

68 

97 

1 
13 
29 
48 
136 
18 
59 
58 
25 

1 

42 
17 
56 

2 

21 

134 

2 
90 
48 
13 
45 
58 
41 
29 


13 


2 Bruce 


71 


3 Carleton 


16 


4 Dufferin 


8 


5 Dundas 


83 


6 Elgin 


71 


7 Essex 


11 


• 8 Frontenac 


21 


9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 


22 
51 


11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 


25 
21 


13 Halton 




14 Hastings 


52 


15 Huron 


193 


16 Kent 


65 


17 Lambton 


146 


18 Lanark 


4 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


35 


20 Lennox and Addington 


12 


21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham . . 


32 

103 

21 

81 
59 


26 Oxford 


54 


27 Peel 


12 


28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 


55 

20 


30 Prescott and Russell 


76 




2 


32 Renfrew 


32 




62 


34 Stormont 




36 Waterloo 


57 
41 


37 Welland 


38 


38 Wellington 


68 


39 Wentworth 


74 


40 York 


41 


41 Algoma 


40 


42 Kenora 






3 
42 

6 
66 
21 
19 
27 
68 


9 


44 Muskoka 


121 


45 Nipissing 


6 


46 Parry Sound 


62 


47 Rainy River 


28 


48 Sudbury 


18 




8 


50 Thunder Bay, etc 


25 






Totals 


84,820 


160,990 


183,871 


192,811 


2,213 


2,175 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



171 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 



3 


Geometry 


Latin 


French (beyond 4th 
Book) 


French (Primer to 
4th Book, incl.) 


German (beyond 
4th Book) 


German (Primer 
to 4th Book, incl . ) 


Elementary Science 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Agriculture 


04 

a 


Household Science 

i 


1 


12 
61 
14 

8 

83 
57 
12 
16 
18 
43 
17 
21 

8 

47 

192 

64 

110 

4 
20 
12 
24 
94 
21 
79 
60 
35 
10 
50 
21 
75 


1 

45 
12 

6 

78 
9 


7 
5 

14 

8 i 




6 
2 

3* 

57 








6 
23 
14 

3 

83 
45 

9 

5 

12 
19 
21 

8 


4 
19 

"i2* 
17 

1 

"io' 


75 

407 

636 

389 

1,504 

1.361 

348 

45 

1.092 

701 

82 


22 

381 

77 




2 
3 


2 

12 


2 




22 


4 








5 








95 
1,104 
436 
185 
263 
368 
182 


7 


6 








185 


7 


2 


531 






109 


8 


2 

3 

26 
10 

3 

2 
14 
96 
27 
60 

1 
11 

2 

9 
33 

5 
44 

5 
15 

1 
33 
16 
20 


3 

16 

21 
5 








q 


6 

7 


112 
2 

4 






61 


10 






96 


ii 








i? 








18 


5 

7 
63 

5 
54 

"i 

5 

34 


if; 

4 

38 
3 
1 
2 


2 
2 

8 

204 

1 








547 

1,111 
811 

2,609 
703 
710 

1,302 

2 

436 

2,730 
348 
792 
300 
793 
430 

1,622 
75 
431 
467 
232 
499 
325 


278 
1.415 

139 

731 
1.359 

288 
61 


16 


14 






13 

149 

22 

90 

3 

3 

2 

25 

47 

6 

12 

56 

42 

7 

10 

4 

62 


2 

33 
5 

60 

"3' 

2 

11 

28 

"u 

. 24 
39 

"3* 
3 

10 

2 

17 

28 


106 


15 
16 


2 




65 
62 


17 






220 


18 






62 


19 


3 






15 


20 








21 








46 

2,291 

408 

248 

88 
313 




22 

28 


21 


25 




1 


546 
167 


24 

25 


43 

11 

5 


5 
1 


15 
4 


1 




110 



26 







17 


27 










28 


26 

9 

47 


2 

8 
33 




8 






151 


16 


29 








30 


1,021 






391 
1,996 


25 


31 






164 


32 


20 

62 

4 

56 
41 
36 
67 
71 
41 
39 


16 
29 

"33* 

19 
23 

28 


2 

8 
2 
1 

8 

18 
41 
62 








20 
27 




33 

34 


3 


164 j 1 




551 


33 


35 


4 







3 

18 
28 
35 
67 
41 
18 






3b 
37 


**4 "'2' 




20 

7 

9 

30 

"3' 


495 
398 
413 
1,786 
1,706 
863 


389 
356 
312 
303 
392 
130 




38 


14 

40 






32 


39 


2 






21 


40 






370 


41 


8 


2 








25 


42 










43 


9 
40 

6 
59 
27 
18 

8 
21 


6 

7 


3 

7 


3 




1 




6 
30 

5 

54 
18 

7 

2 

16 


3 

8 

"i3" 
"1 

"is 


13 

104 
54 
55 

47 

12 
290 






44 


2 

763 
12 






131 
121 
65 
34 
325 
421 


8 


45 








46 


20 

12 

3 

2 

22 


13 
5 
2 
2 
1 


"i* 








47 






11 


48 








8 


49 






47 


50 


1 


r 




















1,913 


817 


664 


286 


3,324 8 


13 


1,196 


457 


30.151 


16,846 


2,626 



172 


THE REPORT OF THE 






No. 17 






II. TABLE B- 


THE PUBLIC 
-NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 


Cities 


| 

d 


i 

a 


§ 

Oh 






CQ 
w 


14 



M 

a 

CM 





« 
-a 

CO 





pq 


1 Belleville 






551 

1,011 
322 
660 
452 
501 

2,847 
740 
417 

1,367 
482 

1,427 
745 
549 
643 
500 
377 
438 
421 
13,076 
359 

1,197 
415 


270 
670 
292 
470 
214 
275 

2,393 
467 
361 

1,106 
251 

1,351 
384 
400 
412 
309 
331 
335 
345 

8,489 
246 
565 
245 


403 
771 
365 
555 
505 
379 

4,131 
436 
703 

2,144 
321 

2,104 
604 
507 
379 
420 
415 
369 
393 
15,453 
323 
714 
216 


373 
992 
461 
594 
456 
517 

3,494 
733 
589 

1,976 
361 

1,913 
502 
519 
567 
592 
461 
516 
657 
16,068 
280 
556 
296 


369 

466 ! 

418 ! 

509 

361 

426 
2,136 

671 

462 
1,752 

340 
2,054 

508 

360 

526 

451 

364 

361 

532 
12,303 

202 

385 

303 


2 Brantford . 


53 
238 
437 

36 
199 
1,413 
341 
280 
844 


379 
157 

"ii6* 

44* 

208 


3 Chatham 


4 Fort William 


5 Gait 


6 Guelph 


7 Hamilton 


8 Kingston ... 


9 Kitchener 


10 London 


11 Niagara Falls 


12 Ottawa 


1,327 
435 
220 
165 


182 

44' 

198 


13 Peterborough 


14 Port Arthur 


15 St. Catharines 


16 St. Thomas 


17 Sarnia 




18 Sault Ste. Marie 


182 


35 
217 






19 Stratford 


20 Toronto 

21 Welland 


9,007 
170 


22 Windsor 


23 Woodstock 









Totals 


15,347 


1,580 


29,497 


20,181 


32,610 


33,473 


26,259 


Towns 
1 Alexandria . 




21 

82 

100 

86 

119 

105 

49 

20 

307 

108 

58 

9 

23 

153 

178 

199 

82 

443 

78 

96 

34 

89 

275 

50 

83 

82 

315 

116 

110 

253 

312 

152 


8 
43 
79 
40 
59 
72 
48 
12 

165 

54 

30 

4 

15 
92 
66 

126 
62 

194 

9 

68 

22 

108 

144 
12 
42 
53 

122 
95 
54 

197 

108 
68 


12 

53 

45 

45 

102 

114 

88 

10 

310 

61 

31 

4 

28 

147 

85 

148 

78 

208 

40 

70 

40 

142 

107 

15 

97 

44 

189 

154 

58 

250 

101 

126 


14 

42 

76 

45 

122 

103 

85 

8 

235 

47 

36 

4 

25 

119 

135 

167 

118 

284 

41 

87 

24 

126 

191 

13 

76 

81 

154 

101 

46 

280 

90 

108 


20 
44 
63 
56 

149 
79 

118 
18 

221 

66 

36 

5 


2 Alliston 






3 Almonte . 






4 Amherstburg 


















7 Aylmer 


63 


53 


8 Bala . . 


9 Barrie 




123 


10 Blenheim 




11 Blind River 






12 Bonfield 






13 Bothwell 






28 








123 








78 








101 








51 


18 Brockville 






309 


19 Bruce Mines 






25 


20 Burlington . 




54 


60 






19 


22 Campbellford 

23 Carleton Place . 


101 




122 
93 
14 
71 

111 
72 

112 
45 

240 
61 

124 


24 Charlton 






25 Cheslev 






20 Clinton 






27 Cobalt 






28 Cobourg 


78 






30 Collingwood 

31 Copper Cliff 


122 




32 Cornwall 1 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



173 



SC HOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION 



-Continued 



1 

■a* 

p o 


< 


be 
o 
<v 


"53 

S3 


& 
3 



.2 

"53 


P. 

B 




Grammar 


English History 


Canadian History 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 131 

7 223 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 421 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 639 

21 

22 

23 


1,966 
4,342 
2,161 
2,788 
2,069 
2,074 

15,176 
3,047 
2,576 
8,345 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,335 
2,571 
2,403 
1,948 
2,091 
2,565 

65,400 
1,410 
3,417 
1,475 

144,109 


1,966 
4,342 
1,731 
2,128 
2,069 
1,869 

13,675 
2,307 
2,576 
8,115 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,335 
1,884 
2,403 
1,948 
1,780 
2,565 

35,456 
1,051 
1,655 
1,060 


1,966 
4,342 
2,161 
2,788 
1,929 
1,824 
16,520 
3,047 
2,576 
8,345 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,335 

"2, 403* 
1,948 
2,091 
2,565 

66,553 
1,580 
3,417 


1,966 
4,342 
1,858 
2,788 
2,069 
2,211 

14,614 
3,047 
2,576 
8,345 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,335 
1,884 
1,966 
1,948 
2,054 
2,565 

64,303 
1,580 
2,220 
1,060 


1,966 
4,342 
1,963 
2,788 
2,069 
2,015 

14,868 
3,047 
2,576 
8,345 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,335 
1,884 
2,403 
1,948 
2,054 
2,565 

65,147 

1,580 

2,220 

815 


369 
466 
415 
509 
401 
557 

3,165 
671 
462 

1,752 
375 

2,246 
508 
360 
788 
451 
364 
361 
436 
21,104 
477 
385 
303 


1,145 

725 

802 

1,103 

622 

1,031 

5,894 

657 

1,935 

3,887 

254 

3,558 

1,010 

879 

1,472 

565 

825 

413 

939 

20,847 

477 

385 

303 


1145 

718 

684 

1,103 

917 

1,036 

7,994 

747 

2,518 

4,889 

291 

3,526 

1,614 

879 

1,472 

711 

825 

514 

1,195 

28,660 

477 

941 

303 


1,414 


106,865 


142,340 


139,681 


140,880 


36,925 


49,728 


63,159 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 1 

9 

10 

11 

12 1 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 11 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 4 

30 

31 

32 


75 
264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
380 
69 

1,361 
336 
191 
26 
119 
634 
542 
741 
362 

1,438 
193 
331 
150 
587 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
578 
317 

1,220 
672 
578 


54 
182 
363 
272 
551 
368 
380 

69 

1,361 

228 

191 

14 

96 
634 
288 
536 
348 
1,438 
184 
231 
150 
587 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
462 
317 
1,167 
360 
578 


75 

264 
363 
216 
551 
473 
504 
69 
1,361 

i9i" 

23 

119 
634 

"iii* 

350 
1,438 
193 
331 
150 
587 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
578 
317 
946 

*578' 


54 
264 
363 
272 
551 
368 
380 

49 

1,238 

336 

191 

18 

81 
634 
542 
536 
362 
1,438 
184 
331 
150 
587 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
462 
317 
1,056 
466 
578 


54 
264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
380 
49 

1,238 
336 
191 
19 
81 
634 
327 
741 
362 

1,438 
193 
285 
150 
587 
535 
104 
369 
371 
852 
578 
317 

1,049 
360 
578 


20 
44 
63 
56 

149 
79 

203 
49 

456 

66 

36 

6 

53 

242 

128 

101 
51 

499 
25 

147 
30 

122 
93 
14 
71 

111 
72 

213 
49 

435 

151 

124 


54 

45 
184 

56 
200 

79 
203 

37 
456 
113 
191 

12 

28 
134 
213 
268 
291 
1,438 

52 
118 ; 

54 1 

93 

93 
104 
296 
236 
604 

81 
152 
553 

61 
135 


54 

94 
184 
101 
271 
103 
203 

37 

752 

113 

191 

5 

28 
242 
213 
268 
240 
1,438 

71 
136 

94 
248 
191 
104 
332 
371 
676 
128 
152 
788 
109 

97 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Cities — Concluded 







<u 






TS 




2 " 




fl CO 





>, 


*-» 




.2 -a 


h3 

w 
2 


=3 

o 


em 
d 

'p. 
a> 


CO >» 


2 


CO 


M 


5 4) 


£w 






o 

o 




Oh 


&5 


Ph 


m 


<! 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William . . . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls . . 

12 Ottawa. 

13 Peterborough . . . 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines . . 

16 St. Thomas..... 

17 Sarnia 

18 Sault Ste. Marie. 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Welland 

22 Windsor 

23 Woodstock 



1,966 
4,342 
1,858 
2,788 
2,069 
1,842 

14,046 
3,047 
2,518 
8,345 
1,509 
9,452 
2,743 
2,555 
1,472 
2,358 
1,948 
2,091 
2,542 

63,813 

997 

3,417 

303 



Totals 138,021 



t 
2 
3 
4 
5 

8 

9 

10 

11 



Towns 

Alexandria 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg 

Arnprior 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Bala 

Barrie 

Blenheim . 

Blind River , 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell , 

14 Bowmanville , 

15 Bracebridge 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Brockville 

19 Bruce Mines 

20 Burlington 

21 Cache Bay 

22 Campbellford .... 

23 Carleton Place 

24 Chariton 

25 Chesley 

26 Clinton 

27 Cobalt 

28 Cobourg 

29 Cochrane 

30 Collingwood 

31 Copper Cliff 

32 Cornwall 



Jo 

264 
263 
272 
551 
473 
504 
49 
752 
174 
191 
23 
119 
634 
241 
536 
362 

1,438 
106 
285 
139 
587 
535 
104 
369 
371 
852 
462 
317 

1,117 

61 

578 



966 
342 
253 
788 
140 
994 
881 
047 
576 
345 
668 
452 
743 
555 
736 
358 
948 
147 
565 
560 
580 
417 
096 



1,966 
4,342 
2,253 
2,788 
1,908 
2,227 

16,637 
3,047 
2,856 
8,345 
1,755 
9,452 
2,743 
2,555 
2,736 
2,358 
1,948 
2,147 
2.565 

66,410 
1,580 
3,417 
1,475 



143,157 147,510 2,146 



131 
223 



131 
223 



413 



1,379 



75 
264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
504 
49 

1,361 
174 
191 
23 
119 
634 
542 
536 
362 

1,438 
193 
285 
139 
587 
535 
104 
369 
371 
852 
578 
317 

1,220 
466 
578 



75 

264 
363 
272 
551 
473 
504 I 
69 

1,361 
336 
191 
23 
119 
634 ! 
542 l 
741 I 
98 | 

1,438 
106 
282 
150 
587 
810 
104 
369 
371 
852 
578 
317 

1,220 
672 
578 



421 



668 



639 



2,082 



223 



610 



833 



11 
122 



11 



11 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Ho 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION-Continued 



u 

4) 

S 

o 

4) 


Latin • 


12 

%-* 

£ o 


M 1 © 

-d-a 


o 
>> 

w o 

g* 
J* 


German (Primer 
to 4th Book, incl.) 


Elementary- 
Science 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Agriculture 


Manual Training 


Household 
Science 


1 






I 1 1 


20 
180 


1 

1,224 
781 

1,958 
242 
176 
449 

1 . 602 

3,047 


140 


9 






' ; ! 1 


436 


3 








747 


4 











267 


5 








175 


6 







131* 
223 


72 


482 


7 74 

8 






..! 


1.944 










479 


9 











118 
1.214 


129 


10 










176 


1 , 344 


[1 







i 




....... 




12 




.... 




224 


42i i 


3.014 


L3 










172 
145 


171 


14 












75 


215 


15 














16 












240 


292 


17 






1 I 








18 










I 


1.222 

592 

60,253 


236 


19 












1.067 
742 


522 


20 388 








50 


635 


40,158 


21 






! 












! 


444 


497 


23 






::::;-: 


176 


137 












462 








274 1,410 2.332 


77,047 


51 , 385 



























2 






:::::::::::::::::::: 






















4 






i i 













i 








6 










40 






7 










1 






185 
27 




8 












1 


27 


















[0 






i 


















... i 






[2 


1 


. l 


'i 


"i 




22 






i 


i 






4 


























! 




6 






i 






























.8' 














282 


316 


















>0 






i 

















11 















•••••;•••• 
















>4 








i 




















>6 




















i 






852 , 




>8 


















>9 








... 

! 








317 

468 




to 














2Q2 


ii :.. 





















J2 1 






1 






446 


233 



176 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Towns — Continued 



1- 



i >» 

5) fl (j 

^s a 



39 

40 
41 



53 
54 
55 

56 



33 Deseronto 

34 Dresden 

35 Dryden 

36 Dundas 

37 Dunnville 

38 Durham 

Eastview 

Englehart 

Essex 

42 Ford 

43 Forest 

44 Fort Frances . . . 

45 Frood Mine 

46 Gananoque 

47 Goderich 

48 Gore Bay 

49 Gravenhurst . . . 

50 Haileybury 

51 Hanover 

52 Harriston 

Hawkesbury . . 

Hespeler 

Huntsville 

Ingersoll 

57 Iroquois Falls . . 

58 Kearney 

59 Keewatin 

60 Kenora 

61 Kincardine 

62 Kingsville 

63 Latchford 

64 Leamington 

65 Lindsay 

66 Listowel 

67 Little Current. 

68 Massey 

69 Matheson 

70 Mattawa 

71 Meaford 

72 Midland 

73 Milton .'. 

74 Mimico 

75 Mitchell 

76 Mount Forest . . . 

77 Napanee 

78 New Liskeard . . . 

79 Newmarket 

80 Niagara 

81 North Bay 

82 Oakville 

83 Orangeville 

84 Orillia 

85 Oshawa 

86 Owen Sound . . . 

87 Palmerston 

88 Paris 

89 Parkhill 

90 Parry Sound . . . 

91 Pembroke 

92* Penetanguishene 



23 



126 



100 



52 



61 



47 



256 



61 



149 


80 


80 


85 


105 


57 


44 


41 


56 


47 


54 


54 


111 


107 


107 


221 


133 


95 


96 


95 


95 


53 


54 


46 


139 


53 


80 


44 


85 


34 


31 


28 


84 


45 


44 


65 


73 


16 


53 


16 


55 


55 


41 


46 


83 


42 


57 


75 


6 


2 


1 


2 


248 


97 


160 


184 


137 


67 


118 


144 


29 


21 


34 


38 


120 


51 


94 


53 


144 


88 


130 


131 


97 


54 


176 


113 


59 


47 


58 


71 


57 


30 


18 


46 


94 


81 


139 


123 


174 


92 


88 


97 


122 


136 


131 


243 


91 


52 


59 


42 


42 


14 


22 


25 


58 


43 


54 


91 


250 


* 135 


215 


227 


38 


37 


56 


58 


111 


53 


73 


87 


18 


6 


20 


7 


161 


76 


123 


102 


281 


141 


251 


239 


25 


53 


43 


107 


106 


34 


57 


35 


41 


5 


26 


12 


52 


23 


17 


22 


9 


9 


12 


8 


100 


81 


111 


100 


422 


295 


348 


245 


122 


99 


66 


87 


119 


58 


121 


99 


33 


32 


36 


75 


67 


41 


39 


68 


152 


74 


134 


91 


144 


95 


104 


64 


200 


75 


126 


135 


54 


33 


50 


39 


282 


137 


255 


261 


122 


91 


64 


136 


79 


52 


63 


83 


318 


240 


346 


315 


480 


342 


409 


256 


389 


354 


536 


472 


117 


60 


79 


4/ 


122 


75 


105 


189 


30 


17 


26 


24 


337 


200 


213 


262 


199 


126 


153 


223 


257 


1 05 


200 


151 



Including Protestant Separate School. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



177 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 



o 

n3 o 

acq 

H 



o 



«o o 



33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 



10 



12 



13 



34 



474 


474 


474 


474 


284 


284 


284 


284 


259 


203 


259 


203 


834 


587 


834 


708 


541 


427 


313 


427 


322 


227 


322 


322 


352 


308 


352 


213 


209 


209 


209 


209 


288 


288 




288 


187 


187 


187 


114 


263 


208 


263 


263 


318 


318 


318 


318 


12 


4 


12 


4 


832 


584 


637 


832 


642 


593 


642 


593 


152 


123 


152 


152 


386 


362 


274 


386 


554 


410 


554 


410 


504 


504 


504 


504 


285 


226 


285 


285 


211 


211 


211 


211 


584 


584 


584 


584 


531 


4bl 


531 


531 


819 


819 


100 


819 


263 


172 


263 


263 


58 


80 


136 


136 


246 


304 


304 


304 


996 


996 


996 


996 


267 


267 


267 


267 


392 


228 


392 


392 


61 


37 


61 


37 


578 


341 


578 


417 


1,1 tu 


849 


1,130 


1,130 


383 


258 


383 


342 


287 


181 


287 


181 


106 


83 


106 


106 


127 


75 


127 


75 


48 


40 


48 


33 


522 


522 


522 


522 


1,514 


1,514 


1,514 


1,514 


448 


326 


388 


448 


546 


427 


546 


546 


261 


196 


261 


261 


250 


200 


250 


200 


557 


557 


557 


557 


485 


485 


485 


485 


643 


443 


643 


643 


218 


218 


218 


218 


1,220 


938 


1,220 


1,220 


541 


431 


541 


541 


366 


287 


366 


287 


1,534 


1,369 


1,534 


1,534 


1,750 


1,245 


1,750 


1,498 


2,251 


1,898 


1,915 


2,013 


331 


331 




331 


628 


628 


628 


628 


143 


143 


143 


143 


1,152 


815 


1,152 


1,152 


839 


839 




839 


835 


I 775 


782 


835 



474 
284 
203 
708 
541 
322 
321 
209 
288 
114 
263 
318 
4 
832 
642 
152 
386 
554 
504 
285 
211 
584 
461 
819 
263 
136 
304 
996 
2b7 
392 
37 
578 

1,130 
342 
287 
106 
75 
33 
522 

1,514 
388 
546 
261 
200 
557 
485 
643 
218 

1,220 
541 
287 

1,534 



750 
898 
331 
628 
143 
152 
839 
835 



80 

78 

102 

480 

169 

120 

36 

99 

115 

29 

66 

61 

1 

143 

225 

30 

83 

61 

64 

121 

60 

86 

80 

187 

19 

33 

58 

169 

78 

155 

17 

218 

218 

215 

55 

22 

35 

9 

130 

204 

115 

149 

160 

35 

106 

78 

107 

81 

285 

130 

89 

315 

263 

498 

75 

137 

46 

288 

138 

183 



165 

78 

102 

331 

115 

174 

201 

59 

50 

98 

112 

136 

4 

255 

425- 

68 

87 

322 

367 

50 

106 

86 

183 

87 

61 

58 

149 

611 

32 

68 

10 

104 

622 

116 

115 

8 

13 

9 

187 

174 

115 

112 

85 

35 

197 

485 

115 

131 

404 

140 

172 

912 

277 

495 

75 

628 

70 

628 

340 

288 



i:s 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Towns — Continued 



II. TABLE B 



THE PUBLIC 
NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



-d 








^ ,H 


d 


>> 






^ S 


ea 


T3 




be 


cJ.2 


Is 

r-H OJ 

.2 -a 




0) 


a 

"p. 
o> 
<u 


.Sg 

d w 




3 
c3 


3<§ 


3 
o 
o 


C 1 ^ 


PL, 


55 


Ph 


OQ 


<1 



33 Deseronto 

34 Dresden 

35 Dryden 

36 Dundas 

37 Dunnville 

38 Durham 

39 Eastview 

40 Englehart 

41 Essex 

42 Ford 

43 Forest 

44 Fort Frances 

45 Frood Mine 

46 Gananoque 

47 Goderich 

48 Gore Bay 

49 Gravenhurst 

50 Haileybury 

51 Hanover 

52 Harriston 

53 Hawkesbury 

54 Hespeler 

55 Hunts ville 

56 Ingersoll 

57 Iroquois Falls 

58 Kearney 

59 Keewatin 

60 Kenora , 

61 Kincardine 

62 Kingsville 

63 Latchford 

64 Leamington 

65 Lindsay 

66 Listowel 

87 Little Current 

68 Massey 

69 Matheson 

70 Mattawa 

71 Meaford 

72 Midland 

73 Milton 

74 Mimico 

75 Mitchell 

76 Mount Forest 

77 Napanee 

78 New Liskeard 

79 Newmarket 

80 Niagara 

81 North Bay 

82 Oakville 

83 Orangeville 

84 Orillia 

85 Oshawa 

86 Owen Sound 

87 Palmerston 

88 Paris 

89 Parkhill 

90 Parry Sound 

91 Pembroke 

92" Penetanguishene 

including Protestant Separate School. 



474 


474 


474 


284 


284 


284 


259 


203 


259 


834 


834 


834 


541 


541 


541 


322 


322 


322 1 


352 


352 


352 j 


59 


209 


209 


288 


288 


288 


187 


187 


187 


263 


263 


263 


318 


318 


318 


12 


12 


12 


832 


832 


832 


225 


642 


642 


152 


152 


152 


386 


386 


386 


554 


554 


554 


504 


504 


504 


285 


235 


226 


211 


211 


211 


238 


584 


584 


271 


401 


531 


819 


819 


819 


263 


263 


263 


58 


136 


136 


304 


304 


304 


996 


996 


996 


267 


267 


267 


392 


392 


392 


43 


43 


43 


578 


578 


578 


1,130 


1,130 


1,130 


342 


383 


383 


287 


287 


287 


96 


102 


106 | 


75 


75 


127 


28 


48 


48 


522 


522 


522 1 


930 


1,514 


1,514 1 


448 


448 


448 


115 


512 


546 


160 


261 


261 


250 


250 


250 


557 


557 


557 


485 


485 


485 


664 


664 


664 


218 


218 


218 


1,220 


1,220 


1,220 


541 


541 


541 


277 


366 


366 


1,534 


1,534 


1,534 


1,750 


1 , 750 


1,750 


2,136 


2,136 


2,251 


331 


331 


331 [ 


628 


628 


628 j 


143 


143 


143 


1,152 


1,152 


1,152 


839 


839 


839 


679 


835 


835 1 



176 



10 

'si' 



12 



140 



46 



10 



12 



13 



34 



10 



12 



L3 



34 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



179 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 



>> 
u 

<v 

S 

o 




a 

o ^ 


French (Primer 
to 4th Book, 
incl.) 


German (beyond 
4th Book) 


German (Primer 
to 4th Book, 
incl.) 


a a 

a? a) 

So 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Agriculture 


Manual 
Training 


Household 
Science 


33 






i 














309 


34 






















35 






















36 























37 
























38 






















39 






















40 
















38 
65 






41 




















42 




















43 























44 
















.... 






45 























46 






















47 























48 























49 






















50 























51 






















52 






















53 






















54 10 












10 


10 








55 



















56 


















207 


223 


57 


















58 12 


7 


6 








12 








59 
















60 






















61 






















62 


13 










13 




4 




..... 


63 














64 






















65 


















44 




66 


















64 


67 


















68 2 


4 










4 






46 




69 



















70 






















71 






















72 






















73 






















74 


34 


34 








34 


34 








75 














76 


















77 






















78 


















205 




79 




















80 























81 






















82 
















83 






















84 














....:::: 






85 






















86 ^ 



















305 


329 


87 


















88 




















628 


89 




















90 


































483 




92 1 





















180 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Towns— Continued 





i 

a 
a) 

"Eh 










60 






44 


o 
o 


pi4 ■ 


U 




B 
'u 
Oh 


o 

o 

pq 


o 


g 


.S& 


-^> 


T3 


t* 


W 


W 


CO 


d 

CVI 


CO 



93 Perth 






93 

156 

99 

214 

34 

61 

122 

127 

147 

101 

20 

154 

50 

57 

132 

35 

340 

81 

38 

362 

'98 

44 

267 

59 

34 

145 

37 

60 

94 

342 

33 

59 

40 

65 

227 

205 

93 

56 

44 

105 

73 

69 


48 
67 
60 

117 
32 
27 

117 
52 
61 
44 
12 
50 
70 
46 

116 
30 

124 
29 
22 

155 
53 
49 

135 
73 
13 
67 
25 

101 
22 

214 
15 
24 
19 
40 

163 

107 
90 
15 

101 
34 
72 
63 


97 
70 
94 

112 
34 
51 

209 
81 

118 
53 
15 
84 
46 
62 

229 
29 

201 
64 
50 

199 

103 
41 

143 

106 
33 
90 
24 

163 
58 

141 
12 
42 
24 
47 

198 

115 

165 
37 

109 
93 

126 
58 


69 

162 
87 

172 
33 
71 

171 
51 

126 
99 
24 

154 
54 
55 

127 
34 

170 
64 
35 

194 

100 
36 

110 
55 
31 

107 
28 

111 
43 

165 
19 
45 
32 
60 

158 

137 

176 
22 

134 
89 
97 

142 


84 


94 Petrolea 






133 


95 Picton 


26 


28 


112 


96 Port Hope 


155 


97 Powassan 






39 


98 Prescott 






68 


99 Preston 




62 


136 


100 Rainy River 




- 21 


101 Renfrew 

102 Ridgetown 


51 




119 

71 


103 Rockland 






17 


104 St. Mary's 






114 


105 Sandwich 






12 


106 Seaforth 


32 


"ioa 

16 


70 


107 Simcoe 


129 


108 Sioux Lookout 




21 


109 Smith's Falls 




237 


1 10 Southampton 






78 


Ill Stayner 






43 


112 Steelton 






127 


113 Strathroy 






122 






45 


115 Sudbury 1 




109 




46 


71 


117 Thornbury 


45 


118 Thorold 




52 


119 Tilbury 1 . 




38 


120 Tillsonburg 


41 
48 




149 


121 Timmins 


48 


122 Trenton 


177 


123 Trout Creek 




13 






33 


125 Vankleek Hill 




45 






54 


127 Walkerville 


88 


158 


128 Wallaceburg 


141 


129 Waterloo 


72 




121 


130 Webbwood 


27 


131 Weston | 


42 


131 


132 Whitby 


92 


133 Wiarton 






86 


134 Wingham 


42 




88 






Totals 


1,168 


849 


16,742 


9,858 


13,328 


13,477 


12,272 


Totals 
1 Rural Schools 




75 

1,580 

849 

289 


52,862 

29,497 

16,742 

5,947 


27,721 

20,181 

9,858 

3,463 


41,250 
32,610 
13,328 

4,887 


41,065 
33,473 
13,477 

4,981 


39,186 


2 Cities 


15,347 
1,168 


26,259 


3 Towns 


12,272 


4 Villages 


4,849 








5 Grand Totals, 1917 

6 Grand Totals, 1916 


16,515 
17,450 


2,793 


105,048 
108,452 


61,223 
61,414 


92,075 
92,402 


92,996 
90,209 


82,566 
82,264 


7 Increases 




2,793 








2,787 


302 


8 Decreases .... 


935 


3,404 


191 


327 










9 Percentages 


3.60 


.61 


22.95 


13.37 


20.12 


20.32 


18.04 



1918 



DEPABTMENT OF EDUCATION 



181 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 



M 


















o 














>» 


o 


o 














u 




cq 










o 

+3 




o 


CO 


3 




^ 






8 


co 

a 




o 




P. 

M 


o 


3 

-(-3 


co 
o 

p. 


,4 

co 


5 


>> 


+■3 




to 


0) 


c3 


bo 


ca 


0) 


U 


a> 


SJ 




o 


Jh 


a 


'- 1 


cq 


< 


O 


s 


3 


O 


o 


a 


o 



93 




391 


250 


391 


250 


298 


84 


84 


L5 


94 




588 


350 


473 


420 


588 


168 


314 


314 


95 




452 


452 


452 


452 


452 


112 


75 


37 


96 




770 


556 


770 


770 


556 


327 


245 


327 


97 




172 


138 


172 


172 


172 


39 


72 


72 


98 




278 


217 


278 


278 


278 


68 


139 


70 


99 




817 


755 


817 


817 


633 


136 


307 


307 


100 


22 


354 


227 


354 


354 


354 


43 


55 


73 


101 




571 


424 


571 


571 


571 


119 


169 


226 


102 




368 


368 


368 


368 


368 


71 


88 


153 


103 




88 


88 


88 


88 


88 


11 


56 


25 


104 




556 


442 


392 


556 


442 


114 


114 


392 


105 




232 


232 


232 


232 


232 


18 


68 


68 


106 




187 


233 




233 


233 


125 


125 


125 


107 




836 


733 


836 


733 


733 


129 


420 


529 


108 




165 


131- 


165 


131 


114 


21 


46 


33 


109 




1,072 


608 


1,072 


608 


608 


407 


152 


255 


110 




316 


316 


316 


316 


316 


78 


177 


157 


111 




188 


128 


138 


128 


150 


43 


96 


91 


112 




1,037 


520 




520 


520 


127 


127 


127 


113 




476 


325 


476 


325 


476 


222 


222 


222 


114 




215 


152 


215 


171 


171 


45 


81 


122 


115 




764 


764 


764 


7fi4 


764 


109 


219 


219 


116 




410 


305 


410 


410 


410 


71 


45 


• 26 


117 




156 


122 


156 


122 


122 


61 


45 


76 


118 




461 


388 


461 


461 


461 


83 


132 


132 


119 




152 


115 


152 


115 


115 


90 


90 


90 


120 




625 


625 


625 


625 


625 


149 


159 


218 


121 


5 


318 


270 


318 


270 


270 


53 


144 


202 


122 




1,039 


910 


1,039 


1,039 


1,039 


217 


233 


514 


123 


5 


97 


74 


60 


74 


74 


18 


32 


97 


124 


fe 


203 


203 


203 


203 


203 


33 


120 


120 


125 




160 


160 


79 


160 


160 


61 


77 


77 


126 




266 


266 


266 


221 


221 


54 


85 


153 


127 




963 


514 


992 


677 


677 


158 


137 


316 


128 




705 


500 


705 


705 


705 


141 


338 


393 


129 




645 


645 


645 


645 


645 


297 


99 


205 


130 




157 


157 


157 


157 


157 


27 


146 


141 


131 




561 


475 


561 


561 


475 


265 


265 


134 


132 




413 


308 


413 


274 


299 


92 


181 


181 


133 




454 


381 


399 


381 


309 


86 


55 


86 


134 




420 


420 


420 


420 


420 


230 


188 


188 


124 


66,246 


56,261 


59,753 


61,319 


61,522 


16,249 


24,358 


29,829 


1 


2,609 


197,008 


159,047 


156,212 


177,129 


176,710 


52,593 


71,350 


84,820 


2 


1,414 


144,109 


106,865 


142,340 


139,681 


140,880 


36,925 


49,728 


63,159 


3 


124 


66,246 


56,261 


59,753 


61,319 


61,522 


16,249 


24,358 


29,829 


4 


253 


24,384 


20,843 


20,568 


21,418 


21,933 


7,796 


9,643 


12,074 


5 


4,400 


431,747 


343,016 


378,873 


399,547 


401,045 


113,563 


155,079 


189,882 


6 


4,969 


428,334 


368,756 


374,437 


395,635 


395,484 


117,296 


160,579 


194,071 


7 




3,413 




4,436 


3,912 


5,561 








8 


569 




25,740 








3,733 


5,500 


4,189 












9 .96 


94.34 


74.95 


82.79 


87.31 


87.63 


24.81 I 


33.88 


41.49 



182 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Towns — Concluded 


1 

>> 

fl 

o a> 


>> 


u 

S3 

+=> 

o 

1 

CO 

>> 


cm 

£ 
p. 

a> 
<x> 
M 
M 
o 
o 

cq 


Is 


c3 
U 

<u 

do 

< 


93 Perth 


153 
314 
452 
327 
172 
278 
755 
354 
571 
368 
88 
392 
232 
125 
733 
131 
608 
316 
128 

1,037 
476 
152 
264 
232 
156 
346 
115 
625 
202 

1,039 
97 
203 
160 
171 
514 
705 
552 
157 
413 
299 
183 
230 


391 

588 
452 
770 
172 
278 
817 
354 
571 
368 
88 
392 
232 
233 
836 
131 

1,072 
316 
188 

1,037 
476 
152 
764 
410 
156 
322 
115 
625 
270 

1,039 
97 
203 
160 
192 
992 
705 
645 
157 
561 
274 
381 
420 


391 
588 
452 
770 
172 
278 
817 
354 
571 
368 
88 
556 
232 
290 
836 
165 

1,072 
316 
188 

1,037 
476 
171 
764 
410 
156 
461 
152 
625 
318 

1,039 
97 
203 
160 
266 
992 
705 
717 
157 
561 
413 
454 
420 




1 


94 Petrolea 






95 Picton 






96 Port Hope 




::::::::i:::::::: 


97 Powassan 






98 Prescott 







99 Preston 







100 Rainy River 




22 


22 


101 Renfrew 




102 Ridgetown 








103 Rockland 








104 St. Mary's 








105 Sandwich 








106 Seaforth 








107 Simcoe 








108 Sioux Lookout 








109 Smith's Falls 








110 Southampton 








Ill Stayner 








112 Steelton 








113 Strathroy * 


122 

27 












115 Sudbury 














117 Thornbury 








118 Thorold 








119 Tilbury 








120 Tillsonburg 








121 Timmins 




5 


5 


122 Trenton 




123 Trout Creek 


5 


5 


1 


124 Uxbridge 




125 Vankleek Hill 








126 Walkerton 








127 Walkerville 








128 Wallace burg 








129 Waterloo 








130 Webbwood 








131 Weston 








132 Whitby 








133 Wiarton 
























Totals 


57,237 


64,444 


66,207 


111 


124 


117 






Totals 
1 Rural Schools 


160,990 

138,021 

57,237 

19,259 


183,871 

143,157 

64,444 

23,176 


192,811 

147,510 

66,207 

23,554 


2,213 
2,146 

111 
257 


2,175 

2,082 

124 

283 


1,913 


2 Cities 


833 




117 


4 Villages 


228 






5 Grand Totals, 1917 


375,507 
370,271 


414,648 
409,964 


430,082 
420,700 


5,393 
5,923 


4,664 
4,448 


3,091 


6 Grand Totals, 1916 


3,684 






7 Increases 


5,236 


4,684 




9,382 


"536' 


216 




8 Decreases 


593 










9 Percentages 


82.05 


90.61 


93.98 


1.17 


1.01 


.67 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION 



1S3 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Cancluded 



>> 
u 

<o 

B 

o 




5 

<* 


o 

e 

r0^ 


French (Primer to 
4th Book, incl.) 


German (beyond 
4th Book) 


o 

-^> 

s — \ 

B0 

'$4 „ 

O 
3« 

I* 1 

C5 


Elementary 
Science 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Agriculture 


Manual Training 


o 



.23 

'o 
W 

-n 

o 

,0 
CD 
CO 

O 


93 


















94 














! 




95 















199 ! 452 

l 




96 












1 




97 . 














i 




98 . 














139 ! 139 


99 














100 13 


13 


13 






22 




1" 


101 








98 


102 














103 














88 ! 


104 














105 
















106 






:::::: 










107 






i 










108 . 


















109 . 


















180 | 227 


110 . 


















Ill . 
















t ■ 

| 


112 . 


















113 














1 
















i 


115 




















* 












1 


117 


















118 












! 




287 


119 






































i 


121 














5 


43 


318 i 265 
















333 


123 1 












5 


5 






124 
















125 




































127 


















153 ! 163 


128 


















129 


















34 58 


130 
















131 














I 


















133 












1 




134 












1 


i 












































2 462 








8 




274 
183 


457 

1,410 

55 

98 


2,332 
1,744 


16,846 

77,047 

8,515 

1,653 


2,626 
51,385 




138 


68 








4,029 


4 124 


285 






102 










5 1,446 


874 


408 


3,609 


8 


13 


1,764 


2,020 
2,180 


35,149 |104,061 


58,142 
45,840 


















7,610 8,926 12,302 


8 599 


52 




463 


10 


34 


24 


160 


9 .31 


.19 


.08 


.78 







.38 I .44 1 7.68 22.73 ; 12.70 



184 



THE KEPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Teachers 


Salaries 


Rural Schools 


U <D 

5 & 


1 — 1 


1 

r° 


<U 2 <V 


<u 2 <3 

£j e8 g 


^ 2 «>-£ 


O cc 


1 Brant 


89 

175 

152 

93 

82 

118 

127 

144 

79 

228 

77 

61 

61 

190 

199 

142 

176 

127 

232 

118 

77 

200 

104 

211 

130 

130 

82 

121 

105 

98 

77 

164 

227 

82 

114 

99 

102 

151 

118 

284 

79 

19 

48 

109 

55 

129 

46 

63 

76 

65 


7 
24 
10 

9 
12 
10 
20 
12 

4 

2 

25 

30 

10 

16 

5 

14 

7 

8 

21 

9 

28 

14 

17 

6 

10 

8 

7 

8 

7 

26 

6 

13 

26 

12 

15 

16 

37 

4 

3 

7 

7 

3 

15 

11 

9 

14 

16 


82 

151 

142 

84 

70 

108 

107 

132 

74 

202 

72 

57 

59 

165 

169 

132 

160 

122 

218 

111 

69 

179 

95 

183 

116 

113 

76 

111 

97 

91 

69 

157 

201 

76 

101 

73 

90 

136 

102 

247 

75 

16 

41 

102 

52 

114 

35 

54 

62 

49 


$ 

1,450 

1 , 000 

1,200 

675 

900 

1,000 

1,025 

600 

675 

800 

875 

900 

750 

900 

900 

800 

1,000 

625 

800 

600 

950 

825 

800 

900 

900 

900 

750 

800 

600 

950 

700 

750 

1,000 

725 

900 

900 

1,800 

1,250 

1,200 

1,600 

750 

750 

700 

650 

800 

1,000 

900 

1,100 

1,100 

1,400 


$ 

950 
750 
850 
675 
725 
750 
800 
700 
660 
750 
700 
600 
800 
750 
900 
800 
750 
700 
700 
700 
750 
800 
750 
800 
700 
800 
775 
800 
900 
800 
800 
800 
750 
675 
725 
800 
825 
700 
800 
1,100 
825 
700 
650 
800 
800 
800 
750 
900 
1,050 
1,000 


$ 
832 
623 
767 
626 
719 
722 
716 
474 
570 
641 
688 
706 
725 
666 
654 
685 
674 
553 
577 
532 
787 
659 
658 
661 
684 
766 
662 
735 
550 
647 
609 
607 
670 
654 
673 
713 
917 
747 
811 
846 
687 
667 
604 
486 
608 
600 
639 
856 
759 
647 


$ 

626 


2 Bruce 


591 


3 Carleton 


604 


4 Dufferin.. 


600 


5 Dundas 


610 


6 Elgin 


612 


7 Essex 


616 


8 Frontenac 


485 


9 Glengarry 


565 


10 Grey , 


582 


11 Haldimand 


598 


12 Haliburton 


414 


13 Halton 


626 


14 Hastings 


570 


15 Huron 


596 


16 Kent 


638 


17 Lambton 


612 


18 Lanark 


507 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


541 




497 


21 Lincoln 


614 




608 


23 Norfolk 


595 


25 Ontario 


601 
597 


26 Oxford 


628 


27 Peel 


616 




613 


29 Peterborough 


564 

528 


31 Prince Edward 


583 




532 


33 Simcoe 


599 


34 Stormont 


578 


35 Victoria 


582 


36 Waterloo 


621 


37 Welland 


609 


38 Wellington 


606 


39 Wentworth 


627 


40 York 


641 


41 Algoma 


548 


42 Kenora 


548 


43 Manitoulin 


489 




437 


45 Nipissing 


470 




487 


47 Rainy River 


580 




568 


49 Timiskaming 


647 




629 


1 Totals, Rural Schools 


6,035 
3,367 
1 , 354 
518 
1 1VJ74 
10,640 


636 

362 

140 

81 


5,399 

3,005 

1,214 

437 


1,800 
2,500 
2,025 
1,800 


1,100 

2,200 

1,300 

800 


686 
1,637 
1,174 

908 
1,038 

957 


580 


2 " Cities 

3 " Towns 

4 " Villages 


795 
628 
573 


5 Grand Totals, 1917 

6 Grand Totals, 1916 


1,219 

1,294 


10,055 
9,346 


2,500 
2,400 

100 


2,200 
2,200 


650 
626 


7 Increases 










81 


24 


8 Decreases . . . 














To. 81 


89.18 











'Kindergarten, Household Science and Manual Training teachers included for 1917 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



185 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 



Salaries — Continued 



Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with I Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with I Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with II Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with II Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with III or 
District 
certificates 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with III or 
District 
certificates 


Average 
salary Kin- 
dergarten 
Primary 
teachers 


1 


$ 


$ 

682 

602 

700 

625 

617 

700 

658 

581 

550 

647 

637 


$ - 
862 
648 
816 
629 
719 
722 
745 


$ 

621 

611 

618 

610 

610 

613 

629 

608 

597 

600 

603 

525 

628 

625 

599 

638 

617 

584 

579 

571 

619 

607 

606 

621 

606 

622 

619 

614 

600 

579 

612 

597 

614 

584 

614 

626 

606 

610 

623 

646 

655 

700 

608 

556 

606 

578 

641 

682 

712 

714 


$ 

650 

492 

575 

585 


$ 

550 

504 

523 

557 


$ 
625 


a 






3 






4 
5 . 


637 





6 




533 
540 
444 
503 
528 
529 
446 
550 
510 
535 
615 
534 
450 
491 
459 
559 


500 


7 


800 


619 
482 
550 
475 




8 . 




9 


612 
648 
710 
825 
725 
735 
653 
694 
677 
581 
643 
550 
805 
659 
666 
677 
688 
775 
645 
733 
600 
717 
630 
683 
680 
654 
677 
712 
945 
723 
763 
830 
667 
625 
640 
650 
737 
783 
733 
886 
765 
655 




10 


681 
600 
700 




11 




^?, 


475 




1R 


627 

631 

640 

642 

621 

605 

620 

608 

645 

627 

606 

635 

617 

691 

608 

685 

608 

700 

675 

683 

612 ' 

600 

583 

675 

625 

630 

679- 

632 




14 


656 
667 
750 
800 


568 




15 




16 


550 
617 
587 
504 
542 




17 




18 




19 


550 




?,0 




21 


758 




?? 






83 


600 
546 
625 


525 
533 
516 
650 
450 
500 
521 
503 
519 
489 
540 
490 
491 
541 
571 
559 




24 


787 




BR 





26 


625 
750 

750 




27 






28 






29 , 


533 
540 
575 
533 
625 




30 


750 




31 , 




82 


600 
600 




33 




34 . 




35 


700 
717 
600 
1,250 
1,017 
950 
750 


600 




36 




37 




38 






39 






40 




522 
514 
550 
481 
438 
483 
463 
595 
522 
570 
608 




41 






42 . 




750 
575 
517 




43 






44 


600 




45 




46 


750 


489 
610 
800 




47 




48 


700 
883 


825 
842 
700 




49 




50 . 


669 




1 
2 


762 
1,777 
1,357 

950 
1,548 
1,434 

114 


641 
834 
654 
613 


715 
1,447 
1,138 

886 


614 

805 
628 
576 


563 


502 
792 
581 
522 


562 
690 


3 

4 


650 
400 


632 


5 
6 


728 
681 


916 

874 


673 
654 


562 
541 


507 
483 


674 


7 


47 


42 


19 


21 


24 




8 . 




9 















186 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
(II. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 







Salaries — Continued 






Rural Schools — Continued 


Average 
salary Kin- 
dergarten . 
teachers 


Average 
salary 
Manual 
Training 
teachers 


Average 
salary 
Household 
Science 
teachers 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with 

Temporary 
certificates 


Average sal- 
ary, female 
teachers 


>> CO 

o « 

ill 


1 Brant 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2 Bruce 








525 




487 


3 Carleton 








459 


4 Dufferin 












5 Dundas 












6 Elgin 












7 Essex 












8 Frontenac 








450 
525 
500 




384 


9 Glengarry 






514 


10 Grey 








505 


11 Haldimand 










12 Haliburton 












370 


13 Halton 












14 Hastings . 








500 




472 


15 Huron 








450 


16 Kent 












17 Lambton 












550 


18 Lanark , 








425 


395 


19 Leeds and Grenville 








481 












433 


21 Lincoln 






















23 Norfolk 
























492 


25 Ontario 








500 














27 Peel 
























29 Peterborough 












433 












445 


31 Prince Edward 






















428 


33 Simcoe 










567 


34 Stormont 












35 Victoria 












450 


36 Waterloo 










450 


37 Welland 




















550 




39 Wentworth... 










40 York 












41 Algoma 












455 


42 Kenora 










515 


43 Manitoulin 








450 

350 
437 
600 


408 











385 


45 Nipissing 








396 


46 Parry Sound 








439 


47 Rainy River 








534 










455 


49 Timiskaming 








617 

505 


522 










533 


1 Totals, Rural Schools 








435 


2 " Cities 


684 
555 


1 . 505 
1,350 


859 
662 




3 " Towns 






567 


4 " Villages 




412 


5 Grand Totals, 1917 

6 Grand Totals, 1916 


676 




848 


464 


436 
409 


7 Increases 








41 


27 


8 Decreases 























1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



187 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 



Continued 



N umber who have 
ever attended a 
Model School in 
Ontario 


Number who 
have ever at- 
tended a Normal 
School in Ontario 


Number who 
have ever at- 
tended the 
Normal College 
or F. of E. in 
Ontario 


Number of 
University 
Graduates 






Certificates 


S £ 

co d 
c« a 

i-H 


co -r 1 co 
fl o:vi 


CO 

CO 

e* 

3 

t 

CO 


o 

CO 


H 

g 




is 

a* 




t3 

-^ 2 

CO 2 


b 

c* 

O 
A 

a 

Eh 


1 15 


80 

148 

134 

75 

79 

114 

101 

46 

51 

177 

65 

7 

54 

105 

180 

126 

160 

58 

125 

42 

66 

194 

88 

157 

113 

118 

75 

116 

73 

44 

58 

79 

167 

74 

93 

92 

91 

128 

108 

251 

27 

4 

12 

13 

12 

33 

11 

27 

33 

17 


7 
9 
2 
5 
3 
2 
7 
4 


2 


7 

9 

2 

5 

3 

2 

7 

4 

" 1 

12 

7 

1 

6 

12 

15 

13 

14 

3 

12 

6 

8 

6 

10 

15 

6 

10 

7 

3 

3 

5 

4 

4 

16 

2 

4 

6 

8 

15 

11 

28 

1 


79 

135 

129 

70 

79 

112 

98 

41 

49 

159 

63 

6 

53 

94 

169 

126 

150 

59 

115 

37 

61 

194 

.80 

151 

111 

119 

74 

116 

64 

42 

46 

70 

165 

75 

84 

88 

90 

118 

107 

249 

25 

3 

11 

11 

10 

28 

10 

25 

33 

16 


2 
22 
15 

18 


"4 




1 








2 25 








5 


3 18 








6 


4 12 












5 18 




l"** 








6 16 


3 
21 
35 
20 
51 

7 
10 

2 

65 
14 

3 
11 
34 
95 
26 

8 


"i 

30 

1 




1 








7 19 








8 78 








34 

5 


9 20 




I 






10 45 


15 

7 

1 

6 

12 

14 

13 

13 

3 

11 

6 

9 

6 

11 

14 

6 

10 

7 

4 

3 

5 

4 

4 

15 

3 

4 

6 

5 

15 

11 

28 

1 


"i 

*3 

"i 

1 

"i 

2 

"i 

"i 

i 

i 

l 








11 12 










12 21 


16 








28 


13 14 










14 75 


8 








11 


15 37 


1 . . . . 






1 


16 6 




1 _ ... . 








17 18 












1 


18 50 


10 

1 

20 










21 


19 92 










9 


20 49 










29 


21 17 












22 20 














23 32 


14 

34 

12 

1 

1 

2 

22 

23 

27 

55 

43 

5 

19 

4 

4 

17 














21 39 


1 










10 


25 10 










1 


26 13 














27 














28 9 














29 31 


5 
1 










11 


30 43 










27 


31 19 


[.... 


.... 




32 76 


17 








18 


33 56 










3 


34 21 












35 18 


5 










2 


38 18 










1 


37 22 














38 16 












1 


39 16 














40 63 


7 
32 

9 
17 
42 
23 
52 

7 

13 
12 
36 












41 41 


11 

2 

13 

25 

2 











10 


42 11 










5 


43 29 














7 


44 57 


2 




1 










30 


45 31 










20 


46 74 


2 
1 

3 

9 

1 




2 


26 











21 


47 21 


10 

7 

11 

7 










19 


48 23 




3 
9 
1 






15 


49 21 






. .^. 




11 


50 43 










5 


1 1,530 


4,301 
2,576 
1,192 
440 
8,509 
8,121 


329 

508 

118 

51 


16 

98 

13 

3 


329 

549 

125 

49 

1.052 

1.035 


4,099 
2,400 
1,160 
444 
8,103 
7,893 


995 
10 
27 
19 


234 

2 

2 


2 

50 
14 








376 


2 1.581 

3 525 

4 171 


290 
20 


32 

1 


36 
2 


"3 
4 


5 3,807 

6 3,955 


1,006 
998 


130 
146 


1,051 
1,092 


238 

280 


66 


310 


33 


38 


383 
340 


7 


388 


8 


"it> 


17 


210 


— 










43 


8 148 


41 
9.32 


42 












9 33.76 


75.47 


8.92 


1.15 


9.33 


71787 


2.11 


" 


".58 


2.75 


.29 


.33 


3.39 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 



Experience 



Si a 



2: ° 
>> d 
4> 



CDr3 

d * 



M g OS 

ill 

>. d <a 
<1 



4). 



Q. fH CO 

brf d ^ 

^ B 0) 
° >>rd 

s.a| 

g «>hS 

£ S d 



"It 
£ g 

£d 



-S 1 
^.-^ 

P CO 
CD U 
**-t CD 

-,d 

<d o 
d <u 



r3 

I o 

M_5> 



O 4) CD 



o? « 



CD £ ju - 4^ 

+s S O m L 



ro 




rfi 




d 








u 






co 




4) 






rd 


m 




o 


E 


eg 


Cfl 


Ph 


!m 


4> 


CD 


O 



X rH 
4. £ 



!__, CO 

KH «D 

H^> 

rd o5 

4) += O 

«> £ 

4) O 



d 

4) 



CO 



d d 

2o 



1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 

Average experience in 
years, 1917 



10.95 
18.58 
19.54 
18.89 



14.73 



4.14 
12.72 
10,56 

8.60 



7.67 



4.85 
13.35 
11.49 
10.24 



1.44 



17.80 

21.39 

5.21 



15.79 



3.31 
8.12 
7.09 
2.94 



5.96 



12.69 
20.98 
19.26 
20.19 



15.76 



4.54 
13.52 
10.80 

9.06 



8.45 



Experience — Continued 



— 


N amber of 
teachers 
who at end 
of year had 
taught less 
than a year 


One year, 
but less than 
two years 


2 years, but 
less than 3 
years 


d** 

^d 
.. d 

gs 

r*» CD 


"5»o 

^ d 

cOpd 
f-t +* 

£ CO 

bl co 


d<° 
£ d 

co pd 

rH += 

d CO 
pD CO 

P-) CD 
1 — 1 

10 


co rd 

rH +=> 

0? CO 

S* M 

>5 CD 

CD'" ' 


*°2 

4» CO 

>5 4) 

1 — 1 


1 Totals, Rural Sch's 

2 " Cities .... 

3 " Towns . . . 

4 " Villages.. 


1,248 
79 
56 
33 


1,125 
112 

80 
42 


768 

171 

99 

54 


612 

208 

96 

44 


386 

174 

109 

46 


454 

174 

91 

35 


236 

170 
75 
21 


197 

155 

58 

17 


5 Grand Totals, 1917 

6 Grand Totals, 1916 


1,416 
1,510 


1,359 
1,256 


1,092 
1,127 


960 
873 


715 
735 


754 
574 


502 
454 


427 

467 


7 Increases 




103 . 


"35* 


87 


20* 


180 


48 




8 Decreases 


94 


40 










9 Percentages 


12.55 


12.05 


9.68 


8.51 


6.34 


6.68 


4.45 


3.78 






dS 
^ d 

z£ 

d +* 

0) CO 

>5 CO 

(»« 

r— 1 


-£0 

■*« 

co d 

rH rd 

d •+= 

>s CO 
rH 


H-= 1— 1 

CO 5 

rH rd 
d^ 

Si «« 

P>! CO 

CM^ 1 


H-3CM 

d cxi 

co d 
d^ 

O) CO 

F*s CO 

CM ^ 


43 

co o3 
|h^-4 

03 H-3 

£ CO 

>5 CO 

CM^ 
CM ^ 


co d 

rHrd 

d h-= 
S? «j 

P*a CO 
M« 
CM ^ 


4« 

co d 
dn-^ 

<U CO 
>> CO 

CM" -1 


co d 

rHpd 

dn^> 

» CO 
r>S CO 

in® 

CM - ' 


dCM 

co d 

rH rd 

d-^ 

CD CO 
>i CO 

CM 


1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities v . . . . 

3 Towns 


34 
64 
22 

8 


24 
76 
21 

8 


31 
67 
29 
10 


25 

52 

18 

9 


20 
34 
16 

7 


23 

50 

21 

6 


21 

62 

17 

3 


14 

50 

11 

5 


16 

45 

17 

3 


4 Villages 




5 Grand Totals, 1917 

6 Grand Totals, 1916 


128 
130 


129 
112 


137 
132 


104 

77 


77 
88 


100 
94 


103 
72 


80 
88 


81 
66 


7 Increases 




17 


5 


27 


""ii" 


6 


31 


....... 


15 


8 Decreases 


2 
















9 Percentages 


1.13 


1.14 


1.21 


.92 


.68 


.88 


.91 


.70 


.71 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



189 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC.— Concluded 



Experience — Continued 



Average experi- 
ence, male teach- 
ers with III 
Class or District 
certificates 


Average experi- 
ence, female 
teachers with III 
Class or District 
certificates 


Average experi- 
ence. Kinder- 
garten-Primary 
teachers 


Average experi- 
ence, Kinder- 
garten certificates 


Average experi- 
ence. Manual 
Training- 
certificates 


Average experi- 
ence, Household 
Science teachers 


Average experi- 
ence, male teach- 
ers with Tempor- 
ary certificates 


Average experi- 
ence, female 
teachers with 
Temporary 
certificates 


7.67 


3.89 
37.25 
18.72 
12.48 


.50 
8.92 
7.71 






1.47 


1.41 


12.02 13.85 
9.02 13.00 


10.56 

8.25 




23.50 
17.50 




1.33 




5.68 












7.94 


4.66 


8.41 


11.83 


13.83 


10.44 


1.47 


1.46 



Experience — Continued 









-*-=» CM 


+=> CO 


♦^<* 


■+= lO 


+J CD 


+=!>. 


4JOO 


^^ 


■^S 


3H 


2rH 


2rH 


£3 r-f 


arH 


&T* 


d rH 


3H 


rO a 


£ a 


^a 


^ a 


^a 


■°o 


^a 


^a 


^a 


-° a 


co -ca 


co J3 


iS 


rJ 


bM 


SJ 


S-2 


a"J 


^ 


SJ3 


f-4 ■+= 


FH -t-a 


cd^ 


cc^ 


a ^ 


ca^ 


ca^ 


c«^ 


ca*" 


CO ^ 


*$. CO 


$ co 


CO CO 


CO CO 


f> CO 


CO CO 


S? «J 


S? co 


CO CO 


co w 


£ w 


£ « 


>i co 


>> CO 


>3 CO 


>3 CO 


>3 CO 


>> CO 


>5 CO 




►*» CO 


►"*> 4J 


,—> V 


rn3 


CM ,3 


co^ 


^r±! 


to^ 


CO^ 


t^ 03 


OO 


OS 


i— 1 


T— 1 


i— 1 


^H 


rH 


1—1 


1— 1 


i— I 


145 


91 


85 


66 


71 


46 


32 


38 


47 


36 


192 


148 


129 


115 


98 


102 


78 


107 


83 


82 


65 


55 


49 


38 


31 


27 


28 


27 


23 


26 


19 


19 


21 


7 


10 


11 


11 


8 


7 


5 


421 


313 


284 


226 


210 


186 


149 


180 


160 


149 


392 


286 


237 


203 


191 


166 


156 


178 


151 


130 


29 


27 


47 


23 


19 


20 


•y 


2 


9 


19 




















3.73 


2.77 


2.51 


2.00 


1.86 


1.64 


1.32 


1.59 


1.41 


1.32 



3 CO 
^CM 


CO c§ 

ca -^ 

03 CO 
>a CO 

CM 


a co 

co cj 
!-l — 
c3-^ 

CO CO 
>J CO 

«« 
CM^ 


4a 

co ca 
%$ 

CO CO 
>s CO 

co^ 


+f CM 

3 CO 

t>3 CO 

CO^ 


co ca 
d^ 

CO CO 
>S CO 

CM^ 

co^ 1 


*." 

co c3 
ca3 
« co 

>s CO 
CO ^ 

co^ 


4™ 

co cS 

?h ra 

CO CO 
>j CO 

CO' - ' 


4*3 

co d 

CO +=> 

P^ CO 

CO 


aco 

* a 

s^ 

CD CO 

>i co 

o^ 

CO 


4" 

CO c3 

ca +=> 

>3 CO 

co^ 


"So* 

41 

co d 

^a 

ca -*=> 
£ co 

>j co 
CO 


^ a 
ca^ 

CO CO 
>s CO 

CO 


CO 

% n 

CO a) 

f>s O 

O n 

«5f O 


15 

52 

17 

6 


13 

32 

13 

2 


15 

45 

15 

5 


12 
63 

18 
6 


2 

49 
2 
2 


8 
50 
11 

2 


12 
32 

9 
4 


7 
27' 
10 

2 


5 

< 27 

11 

4 


10 
20 

7 
1 


10 

14 

5 

8 


11 

17 
3 
2 


1 

17 
5 
1 


23 
45 
23 

4 


90 
52 


60 
71 


80 
76 


99 
66 


55 
72 


71 

54 


57 

44 


46 
42 


47 
37 


38 
29 


37 

29 


33 
23 


24 
21 


95 

79 


38 


ii* 


4 


33 


"ii" 


17 


13 


4 


10 


9 


8 


3 


16 






















.21 




.79 


.53 


.70 


.87 


.48 


.62 


.50 


.40 


.41 


.33 


.32 


.29 


.84 



190 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL 





School Houses 


School Visits 


Rural Schools 


'o 
o 

4=1 

o 
CO 

o 

u 

J8 

B 


o 

cq 


0) 

o 


1 

fl 

O 


B 

u 
ft 





CO 

2 



<o 

p. 

co 

rt 

1— 1 

*\ 


CO 

a> 

90 
CO 

1=5 
U 

CQ 


a 
>> 

CD 

O 

>> 

cq 


CO 

O 
CO 

Fh 
a> 

U 
Hi 



CQ 


3 


H 


1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 


62 

168 

122 

92 

75 

105 

112 

143 

75 

222 

74 

59 

58 

177 

184 

131 

168 

122 

220 

112 
64 

184 

98 

202 
117 
107 

74 
112 

98 

86 


50 

120 

37 

64 

8 

83 

43 

13 

4 

126 

66 

2 

31 

59 

120 

96 

93 

21 

61 

21 
34 

142 

68 

139 
81 
91 
54 
92 
48 

10 


2 

15 
17 

4 

8 

3 

20 

""52 


1 

1 
7 
2 
2 
2 
7 

'"3 
2 


9 
30 
57 
22 
57 
20 
59 
105 
67 
42 

8 
50 

8 
99 
52 
34 
71 
84 
82 

79 
23 
41 
14 

49 
35 
11 
11 
15 
39 

67 


*5 

1 

4 

"5 

"3 

1 
8 


175 
346 
249 
182 
176 
281 
251 
339 
189 
431 
163 
114 
130 
424 
399 
304 
325 
257 
494 

222 

138 
386 
225 

437 
261 
293 
177 
315 
232 

175 


43 

102 

66 

74 

57 

82 

84 

106 

35 

93 

55 

37 

44 

141 

202 

123 

114 

127 

74 

76 
123 
121 

73 

189 
75 

105 
95 

164 
86 

52 


22 
52 
19 
26 
32 

8 
39 
63 
31 
80 

8 
31 
15 
70 
57 
60 
49 
22 
20 

26 
36 
48 
25 

74 
28 
39 
26 
90 
51 

28 


220 

103 

92 

67 

177 

97 

93 

56 

44 

202 

65 

61 

74 

812 

449 

140 

245 

610 

195 

76 
285 
237 
157 

485 

88 
192 

58 
292 

188 

109 


4m 

603 

426 


4 Dufferin 


349 


5 Dundas 


442 


6 Elgin 


468 


7 Essex 


467 


8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 


564 
299 
806 


11 Haldimand 


291 


12 Hali burton 

13 Halton 


2 

13 
14 

8 

"i 
12 
73 

7 

7 

"9 

11 

1 
4 

6 
5 
3 


1 
6 
5 
4 
1 
3 
.... 

4 
.... 

7 

3 
.... 

3 

" # 3 

1 


243 
263 


14 Hastings 


1.447 


15 Huron 


1.107 


16 Kent 


627 


17 Lambton 


733 


18 Lanark 


1.016 


19 Leeds & Grenville. 

20 Lennox and Ad- 

dington 

21 Lincoln 


783 

400 
582 


22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 


792 
480 


24 Northumberland & 

Durham 

25 Ontario 


1,185 

452 


26 Oxford 


629 


27 Peel 


356 


28 Perth 


861 


29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Rus- 

sell 


557 

S64 







1918 



DEPABTMENT OF EDUCATION 



191 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
HOUSES, PRAYERS, ETC. 



Maps and Globes 


Examinations, Lectures 
Prizes lectures 


d 
o 


i 
xi 

be d 


03 


-d 
o 

13 T* 


d 

03 


igious 
lergy- 
tives 


















a3<^_c! 
« fc d 




















£ 


.StI 


d 




03 




















d 


3H 


CO 

d 


d'£ 

"H O 


Pi 


43 -° S 
^ fl K 








co 


CO 03 










A 


coK 


CO 


xl S 


CO 43 


43 4) 03 


































o 


o.~ 


co 






CO 


o 03 


o 




O cS 


"^•H Pi 

> be 03 






X; 


° t> 


° Jt* « 


d 






03 


° b 


o 


£* 


o S 






o 


^•2w 


xt Ph ^ 


o 






03 


^^ 


Xl 


^pu 










or^ d 


o " f-, < w 


CO 








° "£ 


o 


O 03 


o 1 ^ 


r- i'-l >H 




ii 

O 


O 

u 


QO-g.2 


2 la 2 


J-l 
<u 

p. 
u 








03.9 

■8.8 


o 


CO % 

O CO 


OQxl 


g d-S 

xi .2 xi 
o ■+=> ■** 
02 2 u 




03 

x> 


03 


<u d a 


8^ ® | w 

d -^^ ' . ^q 

d co . 


X) 






3S 


J^ 


.M 


^1 


43 T3 

X? 03 


. & o 




a 


B 


d3 ^ 


o 




J 


Sfi 


a -S 


a^ 


3 « 


g s 


. «) 43 





5 


53 


!*« 


!*° ; £ 


pq 




o 

* 1 


IH 




13 CQ 


2* 


1" 


odd 


1 


825 
2,107 


76 
203 


25 3 




3 
3 


16 
64 


28 
80 


52 
142 


17 

49 


60 
156 




2 


73 


37 






3 


14 


3 


1,544 
1,014 


136 
97 


30 
13 


22 
18 










211 

67 


62 
35 


86 
89 


17 

30 


115 
92 


1 


4 






4 


4 




5 


1,128 
1,249 


103 
127 


30 


4 
20 










22 
34 


52 

59 


45 
70 


"i9 


74 
102 




6 






2 


2 


3 


7 


1,399 
1,450 
1,013 
2,754 


123 

164 

90 

242 


9 
25 
25 


19 
34 
11 










72 
56 

82 
99 


52 

48 
28 
71 


82 
112 

23 
190 


81 

35 

9 

62 


99 
141 

71 
222 


4 


8 


1 




1 


2 


q 




3 


10 


57| 27 






2 


2 


3 


ii 


851 
401 


81 
58 


15 7 

6 5 










16 
42 


43 
27 


41 
51 


14 
13 


74 
54 




12 







3 


3 


1 


13 


741 


63 


16: 4| 




1 


1 


35 


22 


47 


15 


58 


1 


14 


2,384 


203 


79| 77 




2 


2 


114 


64 


144 


62 


174 


19 


15 


2,244 


209 


60 27 1 




2 


3 


23 


109 


153 


65 


183 




16 


1,680 


147 


129i 2 




2 


2 


41 


78 


92 


49 


127 


5 


17 


2,053 


173 


421 26 


2 




2 


4 


64 


82 


132 


77 


164 


17 


18 


1,206 


129 


24i 17 


30 




22 


52 


156 


69 


62 


21 


120 


4 


19 


2,719 
1,138 


235 
127 


22| 21 
10; 13 










66 
29 


108 
43 


95 
73 


29 
31 


215 
110 




20 






1 


1 




21 


725 


76 


19 14 






7 


7 


13 


26 


38 


17 


64 


i 


22 


2,480 


232 


86 48 






7 


7 


168 


87 


152 


90 


182 


2 


23 


1,005 


108 


43 21 


1 




3 


4 


16 


52 


71 


21 


98 


1 


24 


2,445 


242 


83 33 






5 


5 


83 


110 


154 


68 


191 


37 


25 


1,513 


121 


21 13 






13 


13 


33 


32 


88 


39 


115 


1 


26 


1,485 


130 


27| 23 


1 




4 


5 


38 


64 


56 


20 


105 


2 


27 


1,028 
1,413 


81 
133 


19! 14 

70! 8 










42 
4 


22 
51 


51 
90 


7 
27 


74 
108 




28 


29 




8 


37 


30 


29 


849 


106 


16 16 






3 


3 


37 


47 


68 


34 


95 


4 


30 


1,063 


92 


14 12 










93 


27 


39 


13 


80 
















1 



192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 



IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL 



Rural Schools — 
Concluded 



School Houses 



School Visits 



pq 





«j 




rt 


PJ 


o 


4) 


Sh 


8 


03 


(30 


^ 


t~i 


a> 


<V 


xi 






O 


o 


t» 


>> 


m 


cq 



31 Prince Edward . . 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming .... 

50 Thunder Bay, etc 



Totals 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 

5 Grand Totals, 1917. 

6 Grand Totals, 1916. 



7 Increases. 

8 Decreases. 



9 Percentages 



76 

153 

207 
75 

104 
82 
78 

142 
79 

164 
77 
20 
47 

106 
53 

117 
44 
54 
64 
55 



5,420 
286 
237 
160 



6,103 
6,091 



12 



37 

49 

145 

3 

74 

63 

49 

94 

57 

128 

8 

1 

2 

25 

5 

11 

1 

4 

4 



2,645 
262 
182 

138 



3,227 
3,202 



390 

18 

18 

9 



435 

444 



25 



118 
"4 

9. 



26 

87 

51 
69 

26 
5 

19 
7 
i) 
33 
61 
15 
31 
69 
39 
90 
31 
50 
54 
40 



10 



152 

6 

33 

11 



124 2,202 
117l 2,208 



52.871 7.12 2.03 



36.08 



115 



115 
120 



1.: 



191 
356 
455 
192 
283 
212 
197 
319 
141 
343 
162 

35 

98 
215 

92 
254 

84 
112 

60 
114 



12,005 

6,086 

2,238 

921 



21,250 
20, ,724 



526 



35.00 



36 
111 
122 

38 
68 

170 
84 

114 
82 

194 
46 
21 
19 
76 
65 
84 
67 
36 
73 

112 



4,436 

2,046 

927 

' 357 



1,879 
370 
616 
212 



7,766 3,077 
7,906 2,705 



140 



12.79 



372 



5.06 



80 

68 

121 

557 

229 

179 

88 

277 

114 

25 

51 

121 

70 

140 

110 

43 

27 

113 



,669 

15,984 

3,598 

370 



28,621 
26,578 



435 
613 
702 
321 
561 
960 
527 
637 
347 
910 
357 
83 
184 
454 
289 
521 
271 
221 
186 
358 



26,989 

24,486 

7,379 

1,860 



60,714 
57,913 



2,043 



47.14 



2,801 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



193 



SCHOOLS— Continued 



HOUSES, PRAYERS, ETC.— Concluded 



Maps and Globes 


Examinations, 
Prizes 


Lectures 


d 
o 


i 

xi 

1 ■ 
« cuo 


co 




XI 

o 


d 

T3 


igious 
lergy- 
tives 


















CO 

d 


bo 5 

.9*3 


.9 

"co 


,d"d 


d 

CO 

Pi 


«£d 








CO 


CO 

co co 








Pi 


j3 CO 

co 1 ^ 


d 

CO 


-US 


CO « 


-d ^ ft 








o 


o-P! 




eg 




CO 


o 2 


o 


o § 


o c3 


£ 'So CO 

§ d'S 
QQ-2 n 




A 

o 


o 
o 


2 o 

Jl-Z CO 


2^ M 

° 3^ 


CO 

o 

CO 
03 

P. 


8 

CO 

u 

03 

P. 




a> 
co 


5S 


o 
o 


o co 

O CO 
. 4> 


2 G 

CCd 




0) 

.a 

B 


co 


co d cj 


CO:S CO 
Xi V.^ 


CO 

d 


rd 

o 


3 


CO Ji 


^> CO 


■2,3 

a. -2 




co t3 

,£5 CO 

a § 


■8^ 2 
° -*-» d 
• 22 « 




d 


523 


!■»« 


|^° 


>> 
eq 




o 


S^ 


d *-< 


S* 


55 


l-s 


5§~ S 


31 


932 
1,563 


80 
186 


19 
22 










8 
139 


50 
51 


56 
66 


56 
19 


76 
153 


11 


32 


31 




2 


2 


4 


33 


2,152 


218 


51 


16 




2 


2 


131 


67 


167 


51 


203 


38 


34 


998 
1,278 
1,030 


83 

110 

99 


23 
12 

46 


5 
3 
7 








87 
28 
54 


32 
25 
51 


43 
81 
41 


10 
13 
27 


75 
99 

82 


2 


35 








6 


36 




4 


4 


1 


37 


819 


86 


20 


12 




6 


6 


64 


23 


60 


22 


78 


1 


38 


1,698 


149 


26 


14 




10 


10 


25 


73 


85 


27j 142 


4 


39 


788 


480 


41 


19 




2 


2 


101 


45 


62 


22| 77 


4 


40 


1,971 


195 


57 


21 


3 


11 


14 


85 


93 


127 


48 160 


3 


41 


772 


79 


19 


9 




2 


2 


50 


30 


74 


9 76 


9 


42 


92 


16 


5 


2 




4 


4 


12 


3 


16 


3 20 




43 


440 


45 


13 


7 


1 


8 


9| 42 


24 


33 


81 47 


4 


44 


1,028 


125 


19 


13 




2 


2 128 


46 


82 


6| 105 


6 


45 


337 
1,321 


49 
124 


24 
25 


5 
10 








18 
106 


1 

94 


26 
108 


2 52 




46 




11 


11 


20 


117 


1 


47 


244 


39 


9 


6 




2 


2 


58 


18 


41 


6 


44 


6 


48 


407 


52 


11 


D 




2 


2 


42 


7 


29 


3 


51 


2 


49 


506 


63 


11 


15 




1 


1 


33 


17 


54 


15 


61 


8 


50 


317 


54 


24 


17 








54 


3 


48 


7 


55 




1 


62,599 


6,439 


1,565 


821 


72 


165 


237 


3,101 


2,431 


3,887 


1,405 


5,296 


• 
265 


2 


6,066 


570 


104 


117 


40 


224 


264 


*7 


47 


253 


149 


277 


3 


3 


3,813 


390 


57 


26 


10 


129 


139 


62 


86 


191 


57 


227 


3 


4 


2,128 


262 


38 


13 


10 


58 


68 


46 


85 


113 


27 


150 


6 


5 


74,606' 


7,661 


1,764 


977 


132 


576 


708 


3,216 


2,649 


4,444 


1,638 


5,950 


277 


6 


67,401 


7,262 


1,859 


925 


256 


376 


632 


3,793 


2,585 


4,392 


1,772 


5,906 


159 


7 


7,205 


399 




52 




200 


76 




64 


52 




44 


118 


8 . 






95 




124 






577 






134 






















9j 


U2.22 


U.25 


28.90 


16.01 


18.64 


81.35 


1 


43.40 


72.81 


26.83 


97.49 


4.53 




1 





*In addition there were set out 544 shrubs and 15,981 plants. 
tTo each school. 



13 E. 



194 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 



Receipts 



4> 
> 

as 



a a 



3 °S 

Mi 3 



sis 

43. 



fee § 



1° 

CJ CO 



gl3 

r-H rt o o, 
£«2<X ft 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland & Durham. 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29» Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay, etc 

Totals 



$ c. 

6,158 78 

15,442 96 

10,582 36 

7,024 31 

8,922 81 

8,396 17 

8,054 60 

20,082 27 

6,283 38 

16,658 78 

5,618 20 

11,385 27 

4,264 62 

26,147 01 

13,578 99 

10,781 50 

11,255 90 

10,543 77 

20,935 40 

12,108 78 

5,931 43 

13,695 62 

7,458 88 

15,207 24 

9,356 39 

9,273 88 

5,461 18 

8,381 73 

14,774 68 

8,520 97 

4,898 67 

20,948 11 

16,717 52 

8,502 38 

13,997 38 

7,051 13 

6,531 56 

10,315 86 

9,308 33 

21,887 34 

16,573 12 

2,877 03 

12,229 67 

23,046 50 

8,644 46 

28,902 22 

11,816 85 

11,311 33 

15,921 44 

12,766 93 



596,535 69 



$ c. 
23,726 03 
53,100 23 
41,668 96 
27,600 00 
25,492 17 
36,587 49 
36,608 18 
36,521 35 
23,232 50 
71,389 79 
23,515 01 
10,925 21 
18,400 26 
50,110 65 
62,448 30 
42,573 30 
53,807 64 
37,051 91 
70,391 95 
32,895 84 
23,503 99 
60,576 14 
32,770 22 
63,938 00 
39,238 30 
38,742 54 
24,359 95 
36,389 13 
26,152 39 
33,657 81 
23,465 44 
45,274 88 
68,840 83 
24,869 10 
31,542 47 
29,314 46 
34,294 20 
45,252 81 
29,919 58 
74,582 72 
6,330 00 
573 60 
5,350 00 
15,070 41 
2,833 23 
12,102 22 
5,923 27 
3,743 40 
5,554 66 
5.340 43 



1,627,552 95 



$ c. 
42,611 74 
67,907 92 
67,440 47 
37,474 85 
34,298 65 
54,177 76 
62,675 04 
31,212 01 
23,802 81 
87,279 61 
29,518 83 
8,946 56 
24,721 83 
65,850 34 
80,901 21 
77,720 50 
75,826 31 
28,290 29 
67,413 05 
27,876 75 
40,923 36 
92,013 21 
42,664 84 

76.773 65 
56,848 08 
67,406 26 
36,743 98 
59,594 26 
32,013 22 
29,518 96 
26,111 80 
42,453 12 
92,787 40 
26,730 60 
40,369 45 
52,926 62 
55,611 31 
65,207 73 
75,000 29 

180,970 73 
30,702 57 
8,029 81 
14,228 81 
20,099 39 
18,053 91 
36,304 61 

16.774 97 
35,579 62 
53,057 95 
39,072 81 



2,460,509 85 



$ c. 

51.851 7 
88,445 78 
54,753 43 
31,968 10 
21,159 81 
74,631 96 
86,966 72 
52,348 69 
13,828 09 
88,277 86 
65,890 20 
10,693 02 
34,232 87 
94,966 20 
94,078 30 

111,099 22 
61,547 61 
33,667 37 
95,313 82 

37.852 17 
48,642 86 
89,184 42 
60,735 36 
65,543 89 
41,522 16 
84,378 73 
42,102 16 
50,862 66 
36,046 00 
36,839 74 
22,625 03 
64,170 72 

138,668 51 
26,685 76 
31,475 65 
71,763 57 
58,484 85 
76,966 62 
85,260 11 

227,563 72 

21,798 82 

3,774 88 

9,470 58 

24,828 56 

16,465 03 

22,873 92 

6,459 90 

20,112 49 

103,880 95 
20,776 70 



2,813,537 33 



$ c. 
124,348 31 
224,896 89 
174,445 22 
104,067 26 

89,873 44 
173,793 38 
194.304 54 
140,164 32 

67,146 78 
263,606 04 
124,542 24 

41,950 06 

81,619 58 
237,074 20 
251,006 80 
242,174 52 
202,437 46 
109,553 34 

254.054 22 
110,733 54 
119,001 64 
255,469 39 
143,629 30 
221,462 78 
146,964 93 
199,801 41 
108,667 27 
155,227 78 
108,986 29 
108,537 48 

77,100 94 
172,846 83 
317,014 26 

86,787 84 
117,384 95 

161.055 78 
154,921 92 
197,743 02 
199,488 31 
505,004 51 

75,404 51 
15,255 32 
41,279 06 
83,044 86 
45,996 63 

100,182 97 
40,974 99 
70,746 84 

178,415 00 
77,956 87 



7,498,135 82 i 



1918 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



195 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT 



Expenditure 


CO 

<u 
'55 

.8 9 








CO 

CO 



CO 

ft 


• 




-4-3 




"to 00 


III 

w^ 2 


2^ o 
.2 ^ f£ 

^ ft MO 

"3 c3 ft co 


*"• • ** M 


i - r— i n. 

£3&H ft 


sag 

<Hd ^ 

331 






$ c. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 


1 


56,481 12 


3,429 93 


1,437 66 


24,779 88 


86,128 59 


310,518 00 


12,306 00 


2 


101,805 36 


9,237 19 


5,384 95 


36,073 57 


152,501 07 


279,800 00 


24,550 00 


3 


90,251 05 


7,076 48 


4,369 50 


35,594 53 


137,291 56 


392,847 00 


16,559 00 


4 


53,182 68 


3,725 20 


1,451 09 


14,056 05 


72,415 02 


124,341 00 


22,194 00 


5 


51,058 57 


3,113 18 


2,958 99 


13,664 42 


70,795 16 


121,938 00 


13,696 00 


6 


71,004 62 


4,576 85 


3,201 67 


31,133 66 


109,916 80 


255,551 00 


23,918 00 


7 


76,656 92 


35,540 02 


3,163 95 


33,370 86 


148,731 75 


298,830 00 


20,800 00 


8 


66,804 39 


3,712 55 


5,274 86 


18,542 72 


94,334 52 


159,685 00 


15,765 00 


9 


43,299 56 


1,738 88 


3,229 22 


7,101 46 


55,369 22 


111,110 00 


7,918 00 


10 


132,074 96 


16,024 95 


2,004 77 


39,458 85 


189,563 53 


400,134 00 


29,362 00 


11 


45,026 63 


28,100 71 


748 29 


10,969 46 


84,845 09 


167,300 00 


12,346 00 


12 


23,162 46 


2,865 75 


539 32 


4,774 22 


31,341 75 


47,450 00 


4,880 00 


13 


36,768 80 


7,326 59 


699 80 


12,667 55 


57,462 74 


134,390 00 


8,410 00 


14 


105,886 28 


10,927 32 


3,042 51 


29,441 56 


149,297 67 


280,342 00 


26,195 00 


15 


119,418 99 


9,583 99 


4,472 07 


46,747 92 


180,222 97 


336,110 00 


24,973 00 


16 


89,369 18 


26,701 55 


3,543 00 


28,269 99 


147,883 72 


416,500 00 


23,042 00 


17 


106,624 60 


6,488 95 


3,101 13 


32,157 12 


148,371 80 


293,225 00 


22,990 00 


18 


61,590 91 


3,371 66 


2,771 49 


13,475 71 


81,209 77 


135,295 00 


12,660 00 


19 


121,377 43 


17,145 42 


4,522 43 


30,024 23 


173,069 51 


335,175 00 


31,460 00 


20 


56,643 74 


2,362 74 


1,228 39 


14,846 55 


75,081 42 


132,199 00 


10,649 00 


21 


47,403 75 


4,619 22 


1,510 95 


19,641 21 


73,175 13 


270,835 00 


16,058 00 


22 


120,010 58 


10,697 87 


4,401 05 


41,774 21 


176,883 71 


420,024 00 


26,568 00 


23 


60,655 58 


5,318 20 


903 00 


15,668 23 


82,545 01 


219,805 00 


12,922 00 


24 


122,692 00 


6,839 49 


4,840 56 


28,717 73 


163,089 98 


352,240 00 


20,005 00 


25 


77,132 35 


7,416 59 


2,433 93 


24,307 34 


111,290 21 


226,308 00 


17,626 00 


26 


81,219 75 


5,415 11 


2,851 88 


35,624 63 


125,111 37 


333,144 00 


18,693 00 


27 


50,005 44 


4,453 13 


1,901 87 


21,018 83 


77,379 27 


182,895 00 


11,717 00 


28 


73,640 55 


5,072 97 


2,067 15 


22,370 42 


103,150 09 


249,900 00 


21,455 00 


29 


56,163 33 


6,028 31 


2,302 66 


12,173 89 


76,668 19 


128,840 00 


6,190 00 


30 


51,503 28 


2,882 53 


2,052 97 


15,527 16 


71,965 94 


242,358 00 


9,442 00 


31 


42,846 78 


1,934 68 


1,384 40 


9,249 69 


55,415 55 


94,800 00 


12,780 00 


32 


82,596 38 


7,664 25 


4,031 70 


21,246 17 


115,538 50 


199,065 00 


19,169 00 


33 


134,452 64 


36,186 26 


5,078 59 


33,547 10 


209,264 59 


394,885 00 


36,197 00 


34 


46,699 12 


4,778 23 


2,052 71 


11,251 45 


64,781 51 


107,339 00 


11,864 00 


35 


65,179 61 


1,745 39 


3,457 37 


20,379 40 


90,761 77 


188,219 00 


13,538 00 


36 


62,365 03 


4,075 16 


1,726 21 


18,155 78 


86,322 18 


207,800 00 


11,275 00 


37 


61,967 12 


13,037 92 


1,302 65 


18,621 53 


94,929 22 


304,375 00 


10,045 00 


38 


92,593,42 


6,462 87 


1,406 14 


28,669 14 


129,131 57 


293,495 00 


24,550 00 


39 


83,673 90 


18,751 41 


1,804 40 


31,425 50 


125,655 21 


441,699 00 


22,619 00 


40 


184,250 50 


64,631 39 


8,779 44 


83,054 02 


340,715 35 


1,393,755 00 


31,175 00 


41 


40,586 56 


8,852 88 


2,079 45 


10,033 83 


61,552 72 


104,908 00 


8,812 00 


42 


8,665 68 


1,061 28 


533 52 


3,294 06 


13,554 54 


13,750 00 


2,225 00 


43 


23,274 20 


1,427 91 


1,756 92 


5,383 86 


31,842 89 


45,790 00 


4,386 00 


44 


44,823 09 


2,416 92 


922 21 


12,773 28 


60,935 50 


106,715 00 


10,206 00 


45 


23,515 50 


10,813 94 


534 61 


5,751 35 


40,615 40 


60,242 00 


3,748 00 


46 


58,731 52 


5,755 34 


2,365 45 


13,515 99 


80,368 30 


128 413 00 


14,557 00 


47 


23,474 07 


2,912 46 


483 43 


7,182 62 


34,052 58 


57,802 00 


4,467 00 


48 


34,546 75 


4,562 69 


1,346 32 


11,092 54 


51,548 30 


76,326 00 


4,583 00 


49 


43,894 19 


84,723 20 


2,614 98 


20,491 36 


151,723 73 


227,081 00 


7,808 00 


50 


35,356 69 


8,623 27 


3,218 12 


21,120 73 


68,318 81 


88,013 00 


8,910 00 


3,432,406 61 


552,210 78 


129,299 73 


1,100,213 3( 


5, 214; 130 48 


11,893,561 00 


788,263 00 



196 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Cities 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William . . . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls . . . 

12 Ottawa 

13 Peterborough 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines. .. 

16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia 

18 Sault Ste. Marie. . 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Welland 

22 Windsor 

23 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell 

14 Bowmanville 

15 Bracebridge 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridge burg 

18 Brockville , 

19 Bruce Mines .... 

20 Burlington 

21 Cache Bay 

22 Campbellford.... 

23 Carleton Place . . ; 

24 Charlton 

25 Chesley 

26 Clinton 

27 Cobalt 

28 Cobourg 

29 Cochrane 

30 Collingwood 

31 Copper Cliff 

32 Cornwall 



Receipts 



Cfl 



p 

■ 8 



IS 



a>.? fl o 

£fe ri co 






2-M 

P<J2 

Mdoa 

* 3 5 O p 
°£oQ p, 



$ C 

1,900 00 
3,623 77 



1,537 00 

5.253 50 

1.254 00 
2,226 55 

14,147 70 

4,050 00 

1,819 00 

15,118 75 

1,201 00 

11,668 33 

,502 98 

014 22 

947 41 

003 20 

969 50 

1,800 80 

2,889 50 

75,082 16 

971 00 

3,700 50 

1,397 49 



162,078 36 



36 00 

160 00 
211 00 
104 00 
315 00 
277 00 
322 00 
298 22 
762 00 

161 00 

423 22 
460 10 
102 00 
394 00 
781 22 
472 00 
221 00 

1,480 00 
418 47 
266 00 
684 12 
441 00 
454 00 

424 22 
235 00 

1,275 00 



41 
88 
65 
88 
48 
53 

574 
64 
66 

317 
38 

358 
68 
56 
90 
62 
96 
68 
88 
2,727 
30 
90 
28 



$ c. 
,589 45 
,545 00 
,865 44 
,136 17 
,500 00 
,969 53 
,752 58 
,100 00 
,819 00 
,031 58 
,666 00 
,980 36 
,800 00 
,700 00 
,299 90 
,602 64 
,990 59 
,601 02 
,597 45 
,092 12 
,000 00 
,255 99 
,000 00 



5,214,894 82 



1,163 72 
443 00 
502 22 

1,338 31 
949 72 

1,403 50 



1,855 54 

3,273 38 

5,610 25 

4,696 00 

8,502 36 

6,600 00 

6,805 84 

5,150 50 

24,674 94 

5,294 86 

3,590 45 

275 85 

1,185 18 

8,300 00 

8,833 99 

12,133 32 

19,277 89 

30,500 00 

19,026 89 

7,490 53 

2,100 00 

13,855 36 

10,988 46 

1,741 57 

5,356 42 

5,500 00 

28,567 77 

10,845 54 

6,549 14 

23,503 39 

8,056 68 

13,374 35 



$ c 
4,110 12 
4,858 87 
3,067 96 

644 30 
1,391 55 

547 32 
16,164 10 
3,505 
6,216 86 
4,534 83 
1,842 42 
28,830 05 
7,813 46 
2,352 88 



160 78 

628 66 

228 75 

697 69 

358 88 

257 18 

18,253 76 

19,246 86 

2,679 51 



6 
1 
3 
3 
2 
421 



564,392 67 



299 87 

1,118 77 

1,027 59 

700 71 

2,526 57 

69 37 

1,718 15 

427 97 

718 58 

497 23 

431 24 

408 21 

37 20 

22 75 

68 04 
2,047 74 

787 00 
117 98 
689 16 
136 95 
113 60 
336 29 
109 42 
111 68 
1,349 05 

69 91 
3,335 98 

169 01 
1,063 64 

812 25 

10,098 06 

1,217 36 



47 
97 
70 
94 
51 
56 

605 
71 
74 

336 
41 

399 
79 
63 
98 
66 

102 
74 
93 

223 
49 

113 
32 



$ c. 
,599 57 
,027 64 
,470 40 
,033 97 
,145 55 
,743 40 
,064 38 
,655 88 
,854 86 
,685 16 
,709 42 
,478 74 
,116 44 
,067 10 
,408 09 
,234 50 
,188 84 
,099 51 
,845 83 
,431 46 
,224 76 
,203 35 
,077 00 



5,941,365 85 



2,191 41 

4,552 15 

6,848 84 

5,500 71 

11,343 93 

6,946 37 

8,845 99 

5,876 69 

26,155 52 

5,953 09 

4,444 91 

1,144 16 

1,324 38 

8,716 75 

9,683 25 

14,653 06 

20,285 89 

32,097 98 

20,134 52 

7,893 48 

2,897 72 

14,632 65 

11,551 88 

2,277 47 

6,940 47 

6,844 91 

33,067 47 

11,457 55 

8,115 00 

25,653 95 

19,104 46 

15,995 21 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



197 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



Expenditure 


Value of school 
sites, build- 
ings and fur- 
niture 




'on to 


'B 

co o ^ 
<u Cud 3 
GO a ^ 


Pi H 

* * 1 aS 
. ~i =j C o 
.2 g 9 1! 

^Q Pi 53 S P O 


i 

U ® ^ r« 

r-1 d « £ 

d 53 w 

8 * d H 

£p,c*S 


d^-d 

8,2.2 3 
3 2? & 

°^ft 


a 
^ d 

d d 
> *> 


1 


$ c. 
24,142 82 
64,639 96 
30,683 66 
65*, 964 94 
31,497 42 
40,696 44 

280,146 89 
48,563 48 
42,291 66 

182,431 63 
25,803 23 

269,327 37 
54,387 19 
42,768 06 
37,241 35 
40,496 11 
26,415 02 
37,740 60 
36,196 19 
,616,233 03 
20,462 55 
67,653 50 
22,721 13 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ C. 

16,479 96 
27,559 59 
9,669 17 
20,977 61 
13,382 90 
14,759 75 

134,696 16 
20,859 01 
13,088 84 

108,075 54 
11,233 59 

115,501 95 
19,824 41 
15,916 13 
13,082 65 
15,862 85 
9,158 51 
24,430 46 
14,184 55 

755,706 26 

10,796 49 

24,388 34 

7,027 02 


$ c. 
40,622 78 
96,206 76 
66,228 21 
92,816 97 
47,543 94 
55,757 15 

573.477 25 
70,371 56 
73,931 67 

333,384 86 
40,892 91 

393.478 76 
79,116 44 
62,328 79 
95,128 02 
57,111 61 
99,470 85 
74,082 38 
92,122 81 

2,860,618 91 
31,560 64 
97,494 82 
31,916 40 


$ c. 
231,000 00 
387,075 00 
240,000 00 
610,980 00 
265,000 00 
181,000 00 

1,795,338 00 
275,000 00 
297,000 00 

1,169,544 00 
174,100 00 

1,391,781 00 
321,405 00 
450,000 00 
361,300 00 
150,000 00 
220,000 00 
312,100 00 
200,000 00 
10,417,410 00 
122,262 00 
422,028 00 
130,000 00 


$ c. 
3,000 00 


2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 

^?, 


1,148 60 

25,293 19 

714 54 

2,187 21 

135 08 

146,203 48 

278 07 

15,386 65 

41,565 09 

3,242 30 

8,649 44 

600 00 

367 94 

44,291 95 

341 95 

63,569 69 

9,110 34 

37,058 50 

425,599 42 


2,858 61 
582 19 

5,159 88 

476 41 

165 88 

12,430 72 

671 00 

3,164 52 

1,312 60 
613 79 


49,549 00 
4,000 00 

22,968 00 
8,000 00 
2,450 00 

44,683 00 
3,900 00 

15,000 00 

55,000 00 

2,300 00 

100,756 00 


13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 1 

21 


4,304 84 

3,276 66 

512 07 

410 70 

327 63 

2,800 98 

4,683 57 

63,080 20 

301 60 

3,936 39 

2,168 2b 


17,000 00 
2,978 00 
2,075 00 
9,500 00 
2,204 00 
4,000 00 
15,000 00 
82,500 00 
1,438 00 


22 

23 


1,516 59 


22,800 00 
6,000 00 








3,108,504 23 


827,260 03 


113,238 49 


1,416,661 74 


5,465,664 49 


20,124,323 00 


477,101 00 


1 
2 


1,230 00 
3,190 36 
4,840 28 
3,527 33 
7,286 00 
5,398 67 
5,831 85 
765 00 

17,635 51 
3,499 92 
2,872 00 
600 00 
1,056 01 
6,355 00 
6,745 00 
8,666 18 
4,275-50 

21,565 44 
2,154 48 
5,016 66 
1,978 50 
7,491 17 
8,175 24 
1,510 00 
4,083 94 
5,604 60 

16,823 09 
8,338 42 
4,273 18 

17,503 42 
9,857 80 

10,292 56 


256 49 


41 16 


381 58 
1,233 03 
1,509 45 
1,446 51 
2,030 59 
1,086 97 
1,571 33 

460 79 
6,910 09 

824 25 

949 35 
32 74 

214 37 
1,852 21 
2,905 61 
4,845 10 
1,831 62 
6,842 10 
1,795 78 
2,439 86 

727 57 
1,841 72 
2,110 02 

156 41 
2,337 92 
1,046 11 
9,525 00, 
2,819 13, 
2,828 09 
6,263 26 ! 
3,875 12 
2,988 19 


1,909 23 

4,423 39 

6,418 34 

4,979 84 

9,414 49 

6,821 99 

8,087 09 

5,399 58 

24,606 85 

5,160 15 

3,894 18 

642 99 

1,270 38 

8,555 66 

9,683 01 

14,343 06 

20,177 76 

29,669 54 

19,677 15 

7,703 28 

2,706 07 

13,997 57 

11,342 35 

1,760 41 

6,470 03 

6,703 66 

30,802 49 

11,457 55 

7,444 53 

25,515 12 

14,819 76 

15,129 45 


4,000 00 
35,000 00 
14,630 00 
23,000 00 
17,300 00 
25,000 00 
19,500 00 

9,000 00 
97,800 00 
19,000 00 
10,000 00 

Rented 
10,500 00 
27,000 00 
25,700 00 
46,500 00 
42,800 00 
79,000 00 
30,000 00 
35,000 00 

4,000 00 
27,000 00 
39,000 00 

4,800 00 
25,000 00 
19,500 00 
71,000 00 
40,000 00 
36,000 00 
91,863 00 
58,500 00 
40,000 00 


500 00 
500 00 


3 




68 61 

6 00 

19 20 

13 45 

35 12 

3 66 

61 25 

116 81 

72 83 

10 25 


596 00 


4 




500 00 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


78 70 

322 90 

648 79 

4,170 13 


400 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

165 00 

3,050 00 


10 
11 


719 17 


100 00 
233 00 


12 




166 00 


13 




100 00 


14 


348 45 
32 40 

831 78 
13,998 41 

998 00 
15,726 89 

140 87 




573 00 


15 




465 00 


16 




185 00 


17 
18 
19 


72 23 
264 00 


1,000 00 

2,000 00 

300 00 


20 
21 


105 89 


1,100 00 
285 00 


22 

23 


4,155 20 
1,057 09 


509 48 


1,200 00 
500 00 


24 


94 00 

45 62 

52 70 

1,656 39 


175 00 


25 
26 
27 

28 


2 55 
25 

2,798 01 
300 00 
282 40 
1,743 07 
1,062 70 
1,839 00 


358 00 

860 00 

10,500 00 

3,000 00 

500 00 

10,300 00 

500 00 

4,000 00 


29 
30 
31 
32 


60 86 

5 371 

24 14| 

9 70i 



198 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



V. 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Towns — Continued 



Receipts 



03 

22 d 
o)CD 



_ Pi 






4> e3 S 
-D-d CO 






r^R e3 to 



ftjQ 

--J OS o ft 

££cc ft 



33 Deseronto 

34 Dresden 

35 Dryden 

36 Dundas 

37 Dunnville 

38 Durham 

39 Eastview 

40 Englehart 

41 Essex 

42 Ford , 

43 Forest 

44 Fort Frances . 

45 Frood Mine 

46 Gananoque . . . 

47 Goderich , 

48 Gore Bay 

49 Gravenhurst ., 

50 Haileybury 

51 Hanover 

52 Harriston 

63 Hawkesbury ., 

54 Hespeler , 

55 Huntsville 

56 Ingersoll 

67 Iroquois Falls, 

Kearney 

Keewatin 

Kenora. ..'.... 
Kincardine . . . 
Kingsville . . . 

63 Latchford 

64 Leamington . . 

65 Lindsay , 

66 Listowel , 

67 Little Current 

68 Massey 

69 Matheson 

70 Mattawa 

71 Meaford , 

72 Midland , 

73 Milton 

74 Mimico 

75 Mitchell , 

76 Mount Forest. 

77 Napanee 

78 New Liskeard 

79 Newmarket . . 

80 Niagara 

81 North Bay . . . 

82 Oakville 

83 Orangeville .. 

84 Orillia 

85 Oshawa 

86 Owen Sound . 

87 Palmerston . . 

88 Paris 

89 Parkhill 

90 Parry Sound . 



58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



$ c. 
247 00 
203 00 
479 47 
523 00 
369 00 
189 00 



430 47 
178 00 
74 00 
191 50 
602 22 
298 72 
398 40 
534 00 
456 22 
581 22 
720 22 
329 00 
156 00 
87 00 
530 47 
690 22 
654 58 
454 72 
566 99 
544 22 
1,181 22 
261 00 
428 54 
309 72 
402 00 
695 00 
319 92 
458 42 
786 02 



306 72 
358 00 
744 00 
249 00 
324 00 
229 00 
189 00 
419 00 
639 22 
375 00 
191 00 
1,519 12 



305 00 

1,880 00 

972 00 

1,588 00 

198 00 

844 10 

124 00 

1,266 22 



$ c. 
5,610 23 
4,010 36 
4,418 92 

12,600 00 
2,000 00 
4,756 49 

10,079 19 
3,139 14 

10,329 54 

19,715 38 
5,136 00 

11,467 35 
120 00 

11,270 94 

13,258 47 
2,808 26 
7,793 39 

15,700 00 
8,178 60 
4,010 56 
2,409 18 

11,232 85 
6,800 00 

15,379 55 
3,250 30 
1,126 13 
5,667 22 

19.207 50 
5,700 00 
7,198 15 
1,100 00 
9,850 00 

21,293 64 

19,936 63 

3,343 78 

2,632 10 

1,997 13 

833 87 

10,900 00 

26,780 00 

5,100 16 

12,153 

5,680 62 

4,700 00 

9,020 00 

7,585 70 

10,000 00 

3,550 32 

39,193 01 

12,473 98 

7,589 60 

28,000 00 

32,756 38 

39,735 00 

5,438 92 

11,160 00 

2,900 00 

14.208 34 



$ c. 

48 07 

178 36 

10 17 

484 58 

5,422 76 
354 69 

3,660 30 

26 63 

741 03 

3,467 86 
259 70 
563 80 
595 59 
515 68 
171 95 
187 72 
529 59 
560 83 

1,071 36 



3,145 47 
50 00 

329 75 
1,193 61 
2,938 12 

545 91 

1,025 76 

378 51 

746 25 

49 73 

154 05 

5 21 

911 85 

261 55 

1,055 61 

26 19 

244 44 

2,427 69 

948 38 

1,740 38 

37 53 

657 15 

183 65 

47 26 

595 09 

908 25 

1,940 50 

330 20 
1,193 79 
2,123 94 

419 98 

22,872 11 

4,904 87 

6,305 05 

33 73 

868 69 

230 51 

30,246 52 



$ c. 
5,905 30 
4,391 72 
4,908 56 

13,607 58 
7,791 76 
5,300 18 

13,739 49 
3,596 24 

11,248 57 

23,257 24 
5,587 20 

12,633 37 
1,014 31 

12,185 02 

13,964 42 
3,452 20 
8,904 20 

16,981 05 
9,578 96 
4,166 56 
5,641 65 

11,813 32 
7,819 97 

17,227 74 
6,643 14 
2,239 03 
7,237 20 

20,767 23 
6,707 25 
7,676 42 
1,563 77 

10,257 21 

22,900 49 

20,518 10 
4,857 81 
3,444 31 
2,241 57 
3,568 28 

12,206 38 

29,264 38 
5,386 69 

13,135 03 
6,093 27 
4,936 26 

10,034 09 
9,133 17 

12,315 50 
4,071 52 

41,905 92 

14,597 92 
8,314 58 

52,752 11 

38,633 25 

47,628 05 
5,670 65 

12,872 79 
3,254 51 

45,721 08 



1918 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



199 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



Expenditure 






ft d 



CO"-H 



3 a ® 



& 



5? ft 



.2 * 

••* c« o y 



O 

o 
^ o 



■aw' 

Jg§S 



J, 6 

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8.8 .2 § 

°£PL, ft 



O I 

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° . 03 g 

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QQ 



©.9 
32 



$ c. 
,587 38 
,053 58 
,148 01 
,960 48 
,928 14 
,477 66 
,928 13 
,188 81 
,712 56 
,114 10 
,847 00 
,869 50 

620 00 
,334 15 
,037 13 
,876 83 
,505 45 
,673 59 
,774 30 
,015 79 
,488 18 
,311 12 
,164 89 
,778 40 
,636 36 
,164 13 
,820 67 
,945 69 
,637 50 
,864 37 

817 50 
,099 73 
,793 32 
,037 45 
,541 38 
,533 00 

987 60 

783 00 
,648 46 
,944 71 
,393 41 
,687 56 
,480 72 
,330 28 
,671 90 
,311 38 
,038 75 
,695 91 
,531 40 
,010 00 
,589 00 
,792 29 
,587 00 
,820 00 
,335 13 
,404 00 
,379 00 
,794 62 



c.i 



62 95 

402 30 

93 00 

18 00 

4,448 01 

101 90 

4 50 

17,538 70 



83 99 
784 66 



1,381 05 
4,271 95 



39 75 

43 75 

495 95 

465 09 



1,709 05 

63 94 

133 88 



200 25 

30 191 

12 60j 

225 93! 

13,007 59J 

1,385 96 

77 87 

1,055 48 



185 13 
522 56 
44 08 
,165 10 
134 30 



5 c. 
29 98 



51 88 
14 84 
69 94 
24 00 
334 93 
46 88 



1,047 07 

17 27 

1,500 00 



57 42 
30 00 



25 91 
24 67 
63 66 
47 33 



61 11 

91 85 
743 24 



3 95 

4 90 



117 70 



118 22 
414 23 
144 47 
337 38 



171 65 
15 00 

47 88 
65 94 
58 99 



191 46 

I 1171 

63 26 

115 02 

71 80 53 10 

3,951 26' 169 33 

j 45 24 

2,490 53! 153 91 

1,197 90 781 35 

2,943 71 290 63 

112 50 161 48 

! 95 41 

! 33 15 

30,767 21 199 78 



$ c. 
901 81 
229 94 
319 27 
879 52 
134 94 
174 78 
3,508 40 
1,174 45 
5,266 90 
2,370 46 

1.211 13 
4,047 74 

217 00 
,724 64 
529 23 
486 88 
,625 98 
793 35 
411 96 
,022 82 
502 12 

2.212 29 
1,629 98 
4,761 38 
1,466 27 

540 51 

2,151 21 

5,340 12 

1,480 99 

969 24 

533 86 

1,822 36 

6,131 07 

1,838 86 

453 85 

800 95 

187 55 

171 45 

2,533 11 

8,550 64 

734 71 

2,331 60 

1,102 77 

1,408 53 

1,929 15 

2,557 85 

1,932 64 

1,222 89 

16,517 77 

1,777 62 

1,313 69 

7,563 70 

10,790 74 

11,573 71 

1,976 25 

3,262 55 

661 95 

2,837 14 



$ c. 
5,519 17 
4,283 52 
4,582 11 

13,257 14 
7,226 02 
4,694 44 

13,219 47 
3,512 04 
9,983 96 

23,070 33 
5,075 40 

11,501 23 
837 00 

11,900 21 

13,596 36 
3,363 71 
8,512 48 

16,764 80 
9,210 93 
4,142 02 
3,081 38 

11,019 36 
7,321 07 

15,631 63 
6,554 92 
1,768 58 
7,109 71 

20,290 71 
6,118 49 
7,151 56 
1,381 55 

10,052 91 

22,564 55 

20,028 37 

4,718 57 

3,411 82 

2,230 63 

954 45 

10,538 35 

28,032 91 
5,220 08 

12,250 20 
5,776 78 
4,738 81 
9,792 51 
8,880 94 

10,034 65 
4,033 82 

39,174 07 

12,908 21 
7,947 93 

30,000 43 

38,356 99 

47,628 05 
5,585 36 

11,761 96 
3,074 10 

45,598 75 



$ c. 
12,225 00 
25,000 00 

rented 
35,000 00 
28,000 00 
12,000 00 
45,200 00 

8,000 00 
15,000 00 
45,000 00 
25,000 00 
75,000 00 

4,000 00 
14,500 00 
45,000 00 

5,000 00 
18,000 00 
38,000 00 
25,500 00 
20,000 00 
10,000 00 
35,850 00 
25,000 00 
100,000 00 

rented 

3,325 00 
18,760 00 
51,000 00 
26,500 00 
25,000 00 

9,000 00 

34,000 00 

105,000 00 

35,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,610 00 

3,850 00 

2,600 00 

12,000 00 

120,000 00 

30,000 00 

55,000 00 

33,000 00 

14,500 00 

21,000 00 

27,000 00 

64,000 00 

10,000 00 

165,000 00 

44,000 00 

12,500 00 

89,200 00 

130,000 00 

123,300 00 

29,000 00 

65,000 00 

7,000 00 
20,000 00 



$ c. 
1,775 00 
4,000 00 



3,490 00 

1,000 00 

235 00 

250 00 

2,000 00 

200 00 

150 00 

330 00 

1,000 00 

60 00 

1,500 00 

1,650 00 

149 00 

510 00 

2,700 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

800 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

104 00 

721 00 

4,000 00 

3,500 00 

700 00 

*150 00 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 

500 00 

305 00 

330 00 

600 00 

163 00 

1,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

2,500 00 

3,000 00 

430 00 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 

12,000 00 

750 00 

2,362 00 

800 00 

5,000 00 

8,500 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

300 00 

3,000 00 



200 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 




Receipts 


Towns — Concluded 


<x> 

TO -fj 

39 

U rH 
r3 


CO 

d <* a 

P CO CO 

2 fl <u 


W^^a co 

. «^> CO 

p^fe c3 co 


CO .2 

ftrC 
£~-<r-< CO 

r-H C3 O P, 

g«2c/2 P 


91 Pembroke , 


f $ c. 
550 0C 
635 00 

260 00 
451 60 
396 00 
543 00 
412 72 

261 00 
502 00 
956 72 

1,529 00 
271 00 
67 00 
443 50 
128 00 
240 00 
463 00 
& 393 97 
751 00 
180 00 
123 00 

1,122 72 
350 00 
459 22 
686 12 
584 72 
91 00 
372 80 
80 00 
415 00 
454 22 
469 00 
386 38 
224 00 
115 00 
217 00 

1,145 00 
337 00 
491 00 
401 96 
257 00 
270 00 
245 00 
311 00 


$ c. 

58,898 96 
14,967 93 

6,568 76 
11,500 00 

9,712 52 

12,371 31 

J 2,400 00 

6,515 46 
15,000 00 

7,625 00 
11,014 98 

4,710 00 

1.499 41 
11,585 13 
11,455 93 

5,071 66 
29,384 63 

3.337 53 
23,186 14 

5,276 01 

2.500 00 
23,950 00 

7,861 87 
3,095 00 
27,172 00 
5,003 77 
2,537 25 

9.338 03 
2,030 06 
9,784 54 

54,262 27 

12.900 00 
1,160 00 
5,000 00 
3,071 95 
5,630 45 

25,500 00 
8,667 75 

18,520 41 
2,256 49 

11,003 28 
8,600 00 
5,924 53 
5,457 04 


$ C. 

4,825 48 

729 27 

1,648 82 

81 44 

955 78 

556 31 

264 99 

128 51 

441 50 

28 54 

1,625 99 

138 05 

127 40 

5 00 

3,625 74 

1,188 78 

293 59 

3,662 50 

9 00 

692 27 

2,204 34 

158 20 

106 18 

4,127 23 

12,255 27 

384 06 

24 14 

760 25 

1,350 03 

224 35 

336 95 

2,826 94 

112 53 

64 09 

3,252 39 

105 64 

1,146 28 

1,801 43 

859 57 

19 31 

1,428 18 

207 92 

51 50 

676 71 


$ c. 
64,274 44 


92 Penetanguishene 


16,332 20 


93 Perth 


8,477 58 


94 Petrolia 


12,033 04 


95 Picton 


11,064 30 


96 Port Hope 


13,470 62 


97 Powassan 


3,077 71 


98 Prescott 


6,904 97 


99 Preston 


15,943 50 


100 Rainy River 


8,610 26 


101 Renfrew 


14,169 97 


102 Ridgetown 


5,119 05 


103 Rockland 


1,693 81 


104 St. Mary's 


12,033 63 


105 Sandwich 


15,209 67 


106 Seaforth 


6,500 44 


107 Simcoe 


30,141 22 


108 Sioux Lookout 


7,394 00 


109 Smith's Falls 


23,946 14 


110 Southampton 


6,148 28 


Ill Stayner 


4,827 34 


112 Steelton 


25,230 92 


113 Strathroy 


8,318 05 


114 Sturgeon Falls 


7,681 45 


115 Sudbury 


40,113 39 


116 Thessalon 


5; 972 55 


117 Thornbury 


2,652 39 


118 Thorold 


10,471 08 


119 Tilbury 


3,460 09 


120 Tillsonburg 


10,423 89 




55,053 44 


122 Trenton 


16,195 94 


123 Trout Creek 


1,658 91 


124 Uxbridge 


5,288 09 


125 Vankleek Hill 


6,439 34 


126 Walkerton 


5,953 09 


127 Walkerville 


27,791 28 


128 Wallaceburg 


10,806 18 


129 Waterloo 


19,870 98 


130 Webbwood 


2,677 76 


131 Weston 


12,688 46- 


132 Whitby 


9,077 92 


133 Wiarton 


6,221 03 


1 34 Wingham 


6,444 75 






Totals 


64,071 55 


1,411,111 26 


199,077 73 


1,674,260 54 


Totals 
1 Rural Schools 




596,535 69 

162,078 36 

64,071 55 

22,033 79 


4,088,062 80 

5,214,894 82! 

1,411,111 26 

413,116 96 


2,813,537 33 
564,392 67 
199,077 73 
220,646 10 


7,498.135 82 


2 Cities 


5,941,365 85 


3 Towns 


1,674,260 54 


4 Villages 


655,796 85 


5 Grand Totals, 1917 


844,719 39 
786,152 04 


11,127,185 84 
10,110,417 89 


3,797,653 83 

3,769,978 64 

27,675 19 


15,769,559 06 


6 Grand Totals, 1916 


14,666,548 57 


7 Increases 


58,567 35 


1,016,767 95 


1,103,010 49 


8 Decrease 




9 Percentages 


5.35' 


70.56 


24.08 





Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance : Rural Schools, $25.46 ; 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



201 



SCHOOLS— Concluded 
STATEMENT— Concluded 



Expenditure 



CD *C 



a 

CO o 
<V em 
CO"" 



a a 

£ a ©a -g 

is ft_3 g^ o 

•^ CO O a C3rO 



I 

W «J ^ r„ 

•3.B S CD 

Jft§2 



*> «o <2 r* 

3§1£ 



o I ;-, 

^^ a 

CD r-H =+H 

<g^ a 

*> M rft 2 



CD 

cd .9 

a 3 



12 

10 

6 

7 
9 
2 
4 

11 
5 
8, 
3, 
1, 
7, 
4, 
4, 
8, 
2, 

16, 
4, 
2, 

15, 
6, 
3, 

13, 
4, 
1, 
6, 
1, 
7, 
5, 

10, 
1, 
4, 
2, 
4, 

18, 
7, 

11, 
1, 
8, 
6, 
5, 
4, 



$ c 
,359 10 
,718 92 
,179 10 
,436 59 
,399 18 
,172 08 
,400 00 
,739 93 
.497 29 
,548 63 
,951 16 
,966 38 
,251 47 
,736 82 
,721 39 
,313 80 
,372 13 
,841 76 
,036 24 
,087 66 
,375 00 
,948 09 
,139 77 
355 00 
253 17 
470 23 
802 88 
112 59 
633 83 
379 47 
837 00 
331 34 
280 62 
134 00 
452 43 
225 01 
350 69 
385 45 
677 52 
760 31 
114 15 
104 00 
192 70 
519 53 



909,509 92 



$ 
42,710 
348 
79 



295 30 



79 

480 

1,131 

72 

26 



23 

198 



60 



18,321 

814 

1,260 

400 

91 

159 

516 

1,162 

13,531 

88 

25 

527 

68 

547 

43,948 



368 99 

364 55 

115 00 

2,125 99 



$ c. 
234 45 

61 66 
225 17 
218 54 
122 91 

14 00 

33 15 
129 73 

21 43 



35 95 



43 48 



$ c. 
5,387 39 
4,469 53 
1,837 84 
2,172 93 
2,860 73 
2,850 01 

322 74 
1,730 63 
3,510 68 
1,791 44 
4,944 59 

893 70 

256 82 
4,053 08 
2,923 59 

799 68 
3,420 70 



51 75 
49 55 
60 99 



58 60 
60 17 
122 82 
93 60 
15 00 
27 95 



418 88 



53 91 



491 15 

277 90 

41 72 



20 54 
46 60 

204 27 
90 40 

863 59 
39 90 
60 00 

117 85 
10 95 
46 70 



275,124 53 14,958 87 j 352,815 69 



6,282 96 
1,333 49 

622 00 
9,078 88 
1,583 03 
1,696 70 
6,769 40 

977 64 

570 89 
3,557 67 

331 01 
1,911 35 
3,887 43 
5,263 46 

178 37 
1,094 52 

580 75 
1,280 27 
8,510 81 
2,932 16 
4,269 92 

666 15 
2,751 51 
2,578 17 

830 16 
1,764 77 



$ c. 

60,691 26 

15,598 83 

8,321 33 

10,828 06 

10,382 82 

12,331 39 

2,755 89 

6,679 79 

15,510 30 

8,471 78 

13,968 35 

4,886 08 

1,544 24 

11,813 50 

7,843 86 

5,156 96 

30,114 66 

3,656 09 

23,631 76| 

5,870 70 

3,149 29 

25,186 90 

8,298 27 

6,274 28 

33,676 81 

5,630 20 

2,413 77 

10,225 48 

2,033 69 

10,257 01 

53,672 43 

15,594 80 

1,512 90 

5,228 52 

3,053 72 

5,920 87 

27,430 32 

10,523 01 

18,937 02 

2,466 36 

11,416 81 

9,077 92 

6,075 53 

6,331 00 



1,552,409 01 



$ c. 
92,700 00 
53,000 00 
34,500 00 
43,000 00 
21,000 00 
61,190 00 

8,500 00 
20,912 00 
120,000 00 
26,000 00 
53,000 00 
30,000 00 

2,450 00 
60,000 00 
75,000 00 
15,000 00 
45,000 00 
16,000 00 
120,000 00 
22,000 00 
14,500 00 
80,400 00 
30,000 00 
25,000 00 
125,850 00 
27,300 00 

2,400 00 
46,000 00 
12,500 00 
45,000 00 
45,000 00 
29,000 00 

3,050 00 
20,000 00 
10,000 00 
20,000 00 
17,500 00 
40,000 00 
47,000 00 

9,300 00 j 
65,000 00 
21,000 00 1 
14,000 00 
25,000 00 



$ c. 

349 00 
725 00 
500 00 

3,000 00 

4,565 00 

800 00 

178 00 

433 00 

5,000 00 

404 00 

500 00 

5,000 00 

127 00 

700 00 

1,500 00 

400 00 

513 00 

600 00 

8,000 00 

2,150 00 

176 00 

750 00 

462 00 

500 00 

650 00 

364 00 

155 00 

7,000 00 

197 00 

5,000 00 

3,500 00 

2,350 00 

261 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

2,750 00 

6,300 00 

410 00 

4,600 00 

300 00 

500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

350 00 



4,780,365 00 221,644 00 



1 3,432,406 61 

2 3,108,504 23 

3 909,509 92 

4 312,940 25 



552,210 78 

827,260 03 

275,124 53 

70,946 05 



129,299 731,100,213 36 5,214,130 4811,893,561 00] 



113,238 491,416,661 74 

14,958 87| 352,815 69 

7.873 98! 174,147 69 



7,763,361 01 
7,393,829 08 



1,725,541 39 
1,836,820 96 



265,371 073,043,838 48 
174,503 04 2,703,422 51 



369,531 93 



90,; 



03 340,415 97 



111,279 57 



60.66 



13.48 



2.07 



23.78 



5,465,664 49 
1,552,409 01 
565,907 97 



12,798,111 95 
12,108,575 59 



20,124,323 00, 
4,780,365 00! 
1,552,265 00! 



788,263 00 

477,101 00 

221,644 00 

68,038 00 



38,350,514 001,555,046 00 



689,536 36 



Cities, $34.08 ; Towns, $22.89 ; Villages, $22.94 ; Province, $27.96 



14 E. 



202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE F— FINANCIAL 







Receipts 




Rural Schools 


On 2 

• i— i CO 

bo K 


Pt «» 


&3T3 o 

co B u 
w_, o 

Vd CO 

i* ® 

%3 o -^ 


49 

g 

d p. 

3'i 


1 Bruce 


$ c. 

1,010 37 
896 20 

3,790 82 

2,985 24 
746 70 

1,329 44 

1,649 40 
666 45 
43 66 
673 79 
494 77 
396 52 
425 60 
116 56 

1,539 21 

116 56 

67 96 

1,484 08 
257 47 


$ c. 
8,956 65 
11,007 49 
23,404 70 
5,589 09 
4,438 44 
3,049 64 
6,579 01 
4,833 89 

660 25 
1,542 28 

485 67 

567 98 
3,154 38 

765 84 
2,560 38 

420 20 

589 32 

6,599 97 

1,638 17 

63,269 71 

9,973 12 

5,946 65 

11,485 41 

1,288 47 

6,533 15 

3,936 21 

23,503 90 


$ c. 

5,351 80 

4,048 76 

16,097 81 

2,534 69 

2,131 66 

2,058 72 

2,414 61 

3,793 93 

560 79 

422 66 

314 38 

581 71 

1,998 96 

468 00 

647 10 

1,258 33 

329 27 

4,479 54 

664 04 

36,796 77 

9,830 46 

2,100 18 

8,684 93 

295 22 

5,327 21 

1,712 56 

11,540 81 


$ c. 
15,318 82 


2 Carleton 


15,952 45 


3 Essex 


43,293 33 


4 Frontenac 


11,109 02 


5 Grey 


7,316 80 


6 Hastings 


6,437 80 


7 Huron 


10,643 02 


8 Kent 


9,294 27 


9 Lamb ton 


1,264 70 


10 Lanark 


2,638 73 


11 Leeds and Grenville 


1,294 82 


12 Lennox and Addington 


1,546 21 


13 Middlesex 


5,578 94 


14 Norfolk 


1,350 40 


15 Northumberland and Durham 

16 Ontario 


4,746 69 
1,795 09 


17 Peel 


986 55 


18 Perth 


12.563 59 


19 Peterborough 


2,559 68 


20 Prescott and Russell 


100,066 48 


21 Renfrew 


5,329 92 
644 06 

3,029 55 
200 72 
651 04 
630 86 

5,504 31 


25,133 50 


22 Simcoe 


8,690 89 


23 Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry 

24 Victoria 


23,199 89 
1,784 41 




12,511 40 


26 Wellington 


6,279 63 


27 Districts 


40,549 02 








34,681 26 


212,779 97 


126,444 90 


373,906 13 






Cities 
1 Belleville 


189 60 


4,155 95 

6,221 24 

7,433 18 

21,385 36 

1,814 92 

11,246 92 

38,972 97 

12,997 73 

13,750 37 

24,014 70 

3,300 17 

202,438 57 

14,887 66 

9,076 98 

7,789 43 

4,456 73 

4,737 51 

13,747 55 

5,927 25 

183,551 58 

25,438 06 

1,747 05 


1,046 90 

23,392 10 

10,173 14 

880 51 

354 68 

949 35 

22,696 96 

221 94 

1,052 50 

1,669 71 

944 27 

5,736 13 

2,375 30 

2,274 47 

321 14 

607 32 

4,839 44 

8,647 80 

3,513 65 

48,096 40 

4,122 43 

29 00 


5,392 45 


2 Brantford 


29,613 34 


3 Chatham 


269 80 

1,359 56 

70 40 

253 00 

1,887 85 

470 80 

533 20 

960 60 

127 80 


17,876 12 


4 Fort William 


23,625 43 




2,240 00 


6 Guelph 


12,449 27 


7 Hamiltou 


63,557 78 


8 Kingston 


13,690 47 


9 Kitchener 


15,336 07 


10 London 


26,645 01 


11 Niagara Falls » 


4,372 24 


12 Ottawa 


208,174 70 


13 Peterborough 


787 60 
845 56 
302 00 
169 60 
215 00 


18,050 56 


14 Port Arthur 


12,197 01 


15 St. Catharines 


8,412 57 


16 St. Thomas 


5,233 65 


17 Sarnia 


9,791 95 


18 Sault Ste. Marie 


22,395 35 




322 95 

5,565 80. 

959 80 

107 20 


9,763 85 


20 Toronto 


237,213 78 




30,520 29 


22 Woodstock 


1,883 25 






Totals 


15,398 12 


619,091 88 


143,945 14 


778,435 14 



1918 



DEPABTMENT OF EDUCATION 



203 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT, ETC. 







Expenditure 






co" 




Or3 


a 

3 w 

£ CO 

£ § 

03 
CO O 


raries, maps, 
paratus, prizes 
d school books 


Is 


d 
3 

2^ 

*^ 


ue of school si 
ildings and 
rniture 


O) 

a 

.» 

o 

2 


o3 c3 


-O ft CJ 
•^ of o3 


=1 ^ 




*^>£ 


o3 
> 



$ c. 
7,220 12 
9,383 35 
17,570 94 
5,855 33 
3,844 77 
3,095 47 
5,759 66 
4,024 56 

523 25 
1,535 55 

574 57 

752 09 
2,782 70 

615 00 
3,062 13 

665 00 

501 50 
6,261 84 
1,224 91 

20 48,392 89 

21 10,225 84 

22 3,673 53 

23 12,678 88 

24 1,213 10 

25 5,605 83 

26 3,567 76 

27 22,417 84 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 



$ c. 
595 19 
878 24 
643 50 
360 68 
197 60 

85 07 
752 51 

71 43 



89 29 

16 90 

10 54 

673 00 



83 20 

30 13 

103 60 

1,035 67 

39 90 

11,817 50 

6,372 00 

582 36 

1,208 37 

11 85 

244 78 

79 30 

5,024 35 



$ c. 
381 98 
377 78 
236 02 
122 34 
245 45 
244 87 
131 17 

27 85 

4 70 

126 89 

87 92 
3 81 

21 31 



398 89 



5 35 
181 53 
201 97 
374 12 
415 00 
102 43 
610 51 
35 38 
162 44 
284 73 
510 36 



$ c. 
2,839 08 
1,441 78 
8,746 99 
2,294 65 

569 98 
1,260 72 
2,139 59 
1,997 03 

113 35 

402 08 
50 92 

511 19 
1,065 22 

186 07 

301 40 

365 82 

56 76 

3,294 74 

486 63 

10,973 29 

2,990 25 

2,189 24 

3,628 41 

192 21 
1,746 52 

789 74 
8,507 22 



$ c. 

11,036 37 

12,081 15 

34,197 45 

8,633 00 

4,857 80 

4,686 13 

8,782 93 

6,120 87 

641 30 

2,153 81 

730 31 

1,277 63 

4,542 23 

801 07 

3,845 62 

1,060 95 

667 21 

10,773 78 

1,953 41 

71,557 80 

20,003 09 

6,547 56 

18,126 17 

1,452 54 

7,759 57 

4,721 53 

36,459 77 



$ c. 

26,800 00 

26,610 00 

53,188 00 

10,975 00 

8,300 00 

4,820 00 

21,100 00 

13,250 00 

900 00 

5,200 00 

1,393 00 

2,900 00 

7,875 00 

4,200 00 

9,275 00 

4,500 00 

2,300 00 

28,850 00 

6,200 00 

164,559 00 

49,374 00 

29,770 00 

48,302 00 

3,450 00 

25,750 00 

11,300 00 

40,205 00 



$ c. 

2,326 00 

2,016 00 

2,332 00 

1,743 00 

887 00 

844 00 

1,997 00 

1,198 00 

333 00 

253 00 

243 00 

219 00 

562 00 

156 00 

696 00 

160 00 

150 00 

1,624 00 

302 00 

5.496 00 
3,476 00 

482 00 

3,718 00 

228 00 

1.497 00 
805 00 

2,319 00 



183,028 41 



38,006 96 



5,294 80 



59,140 88 



285,471 05 



611,346 00 



36,062 00 



2,162 51 
2,794 50 
3,587 90 
10,961 50 
1,615 00 
3,651 25 

7 20,766 81 

8 6,218 55 

9 6,611 25 

10 9,933 35 

11 1,716 84 

12 98,134 66 

13 9,769 39 
5,720 00 
4,075 00 
1,852 50 
2,423 00 
7,446 96 
3,028 50 

87,615 78 

21 11,681 15 

22 924 38 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



23,588 79 


225 96 


819 23 


189 50 


4,103 22 


899 30 


200 00 


25 00 


5,100 00 


356 84 


15,673 62 


2,537 99 


1,057 89 


211 30 


2,488 24 


265 68 


5,694 85 


706 47 


530 45 


61 31 


883 90 


3,638 39 


63 65 


1,910 09 


1,745 50 


98 70 


1,372 32 


95 72 


775 53 


762 96 


4,730 29 


59 39 


3,153 30 




4,489 08 


742 58 


87,891 17 


1,836 90 


1,041 50 


225 54 


522 19 





2,383 24 

2,171 06 

1,429 27 

6,497 78 

400 00 

3,094 49 

11,690 80 

5,748 06 

4,206 72 

6,461 97 

672 94 

105,517 75 

6,307 43 

4,127 60 

2,385 02 

1,526 81 

2,536 47 

6,521 53 

1,503 69 

57,432 43 

17,277 10 

415 50 



4,545 75 
28,780 31 

6,025 90 
22,461 80 

2,240 00 
12,202 58 
50,669 22 
13,235 80 
13,571 89 
22,796 64 

2,981 54 

208,174 70 

18,050 56 

11,691 80 

7,928 06 

4,917 80 

9,749 15 
17,121 79 

9,763 85 

234,776 28 

30,225 29 

1.862 07 



50,000 00 
55,000 00 
20,000 00 

240,000 00 

9,700 00 

44,000 00 

785,000 00 
48,000 00 
80,000 00 

140,000 00 
10,000 00 

461,650 00 

130,000 00 
60,000 00 
40,000 00 
34,000 00 
38,000 00 

100,000 00 
20,000 00 

834,540 00 

210,000 00 
16,500 00 



190 00 

414 00 
1,400 00 
8,000 00 

232 00 
1,050 00 
5,200 00 

400 00 
1,433 00 
6,000 00 

187 00 

17,163 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,500 00 

940 00 
1,270 00 
3,600 00 
1,412 00 
52,165 00 
8,600 00 

720 00 



302,690 78 



165,924 72 ' 14,849 62 



250,307 66 733,772 78 



3,426,390 00 



118,876 00 



204 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F— FINANCIAL 







Receipts 




Towns 


a +? 

39 

CUD M 

3° 


CO 

a * 8 

O. «jg CO 

2 P <u 
H c3 co 
9 M co 

|o<3 


P ""d a 

M 2 ft 

« c3 P 

<dt3 co 
o a> l, 

43 C .p 
Is © +» 


-♦^ 

p 
p 

p^j 

.t 

3 

§2 
EH 


1 Alexandria 


$ c. 
262 56 
105 20 


$ c. 
5,592 47 

930 51 
3,007 12 
4,060 37 
1,941 85 
1,171 08 
3,960 00 
1,233 00 
1,156 73 
1,976 10 
10,022 85 
1,950 00 
2,152 98 
2,310 00 
8,244 85 
1,335 18 
7,700 00 
4,052 59 
2,449 27 

824 06 

984 87 
7,525 00 
6,227 05 
1,350 89 

668 27 

675 00 
2,600 00 
5,158 23 
1,262 09 
3,144 93 

923 87 
1,300 00 

953 14 
15,200 00 

629 11 
3,051 06 
2,124 25 
2,840 74 

707 78 

568 43 
8,545 88 
1,640 00 

755 33 
2,662 88 
3,272 53 

963 94 
8,378 10 
5,358 00 
1,182 48 
4,434 58 1 


1 

$ c. 

655 18 
1,991 57 
1,999 14 
3,547 78 

590 10 

842 95 

"58*07" 
527 98 
203 66 

6,005 20 
555 50 

2,218 06 
299 98 

2,799 00 

218 96 

787 65 

6 15 

2,163 48 
257 52 
214 49 

1,279 92 

1,609 06 
823 69 
259 16 
188 61 

1,810 75 
570 66 
931 41 

3,939 65 
821 46 
609 32 
850 34 
283 51 
536 68 

2,473 66 

1,339 94 
123 12 

6,617 43 
86 96 

1,636 99 
212 90 
648 15 

3,806 62 

1,789 81 
146 54 
857 51 

""634*67" 

697 63 


$ c. 
6,510 21 


2 Almonte 


3,027 28 


3 Amherstburg 


5,006 26 


4 Arnprior 


222 40 
98 20 


7,830 55 


5 Barrie 


2,630 15 


6*Bonfield 


2,014 03 


7 Brockville 


226 40 
142 56 
192 06 


4,186 40 


8 Cache Bay 


1,433 63 


9 Charlton 


1,876 77 


lO*Chelmsford 


2,179 76 


11 Cobalt 




16,028 05 


12 Cobourg 




2,505 50 


13 Cochrane 




4,371 04 


14 Collingwood 


77 20 

434 04 

58 80 


2,687 18 


15 Cornwall 


11,477 89 


16 Dundas 


1,612 94 


17 Eastview 


8,487 65 


18 Ford 


128 00 

225 56 

64 60 

59 60 

268 56 


4,186 74 


19 Fort Frances 


4,838 31 


20 Goderich 


1,146 18 


21 Hanover 


1,258 96 


22 Haileybury 


9,073 48 


23 Hawkesbury 


7,836 11 


24 Ingersoll 


66 60 
189 06 
121 57 
198 56 
268 00 
183 57 
1,086 95 

75 20 
149 07 

43 60 
962 00 

35 60 
113 20 

113 68 

56 60 

41 60 

389 20 

189 40 

35 60 


2,241 18 


25 Kearney 


1,116 49 


26 Keewatin 


985 18 


27 Kenora 


4,609 31 


28 Lindsay 


5,996 89 


30 Mattawa 


2,377 07 
8,171 53 


31 Mount Forest 


1,820 53 


32 New Liskeard 


2,058 39 




1,847 08 


34 North Bay 


16,445 51 


35 Oakville 


1,201 39 


36 Orillia 


5,637 92 




3,628 19 


38 Owen Sound 


3,077 54 


39 Paris 


7,381 81 


40 Parkhill 


696 99 


4 1 Pembroke 

42 Perth 


10,572 07 
2,042 30 


43 Picton 


1,439 08 


44 Prescott 


6,469 50 


45 Preston 


90 80 
121 57 
229 40 


5,153 14 


46 Rainy River 


1,232 05 


47 Renfrew 


9,465 01 


48 Rockland 


5,358 00 


49 St. Mary's 


51 60 
1,388 00 


1,868 75 


50 Sandwich 


6,520 21 



No report for 1916 received ; statistics of previous year. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



205 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT, ETC.— Continued 



Expenditure 



to to 

II 

£02 



d 

m ? s 

<u be g 
CO '^^ 



.8 8 

g p.n 
9 8 o 



o3 £ 



co 



„ P"3 

^ p. d 






d 

d 

c3 p. 
o M 



fi 



o d 
to w <u 

2^"d 

> 



$ c. 


2,979 00 


1,393 20 


2,124 74 


2,800 00 


1,440 00 


984 15 


2,460 00 


824 00 


604 50 


1,430 00 


6,604 69 


1,300 00 


1,065 00 


1,329 25 


7,793 56 


1,117 25 


3,613 00 


2,580 00 


1,485 00 


641 60 


1,020 00 


3,450 00 


4,079 00 


665 00 


555 00 


555 95 


1,540 00 


3,201 55 


977 50 


2,267 00 


622 50 


638 63 


626 05 


9,146 84 


501 01 


1,600 00 


1,230 00 


1,130 00 


627 50 


615 00 


5,224 48 


1,435 00 


607 50 


1,600 04 


1,305 00 


500 00 


2,850 00 


3,900 00 


715 00 


2,237 00 



$ c. 


$ c. 


338 96 


118 87 


340 00 


40 00 


2,586 77 


29 92 


861 98 


90 00 


22 30 


13 35 


300 00 
195 21 




5 20 


953 19 


15 12 


19 30 


10 00 


2,305 73 


13 03 


439 20 


35 00 


1,779 80 




90 11 


52 72 


426 80 


250 00 


24 00 
3,591 58 




215 69 


463 53 


309 80 


1,000 00 


4 55 


172 28 




32 50 | 
14 15 


2,781 25 


722 30 

98 13 




25 80 




25 00 


30 15 


6 43 


1,001 66 
732 17 
242 00 

1,247 05 








67 38 


7 75 


323 57 


134 52 


7 00 


242 88 


41 60 


3,303 40 


64 00 


392 37 


13 17 


492 77 


62 98 


778 64 
144 11 




186 46 


482 69 


13 77 


9 00 


17 95 


2,245 32 


157 10 




36 75 




32 15 

28 00 


181 84 


2,115 32 
390 17 




22 00 


3,440 52 


14 95 


598 00 


210 00 


257 92 
1,514 49 




60 U 



$ c. 


$ c. 


2,998 38 


6,435 21 


350 00 


2,123 20 


200 67 


4,942 10 


1,898 62 


5,650 60 


652 61 


2,128 26 


90 98 


1,075 13 


1,426 40 


4,186 40 


118 75 


1,143 16 


92 10 


1,664 91 


577 31 


2,036 61 


7,104 60 


16,028 05 


720 43 


2,494 63 


513 26 


3,358 06 


890 75 


2,362 83 


2,933 56 


11,403 92 


368 25 


1,509 50 


990 71 


8,410 98 


600 95 


3,954 28 


797 20 


3,286 75 


162 30 


976 18 


105 74 


1,158 24 


2,085 57 


8,330 97 


1,348 08 


6,149 38 


508 12 


1,297 05 


269 32 


849 32 


280 55 


873 08 


967 04 


3,508 70 


1,961 57 


5,895 29 


602 74 


1,822 24 


1,808 18 


5,389 61 


362 65 


1,316 47 


680 53 


1,460 68 


170 06 


1,080 59 


3,331 60 


15,845 84 


281 78 


1,188 33 


2,221 06 


4,376 81 


882 50 


2,891 14 


904 69 


2,365 26 


5,904 53 


7,028 49 


53 05 


695 00 


1,510 12 


9,137 02 


451 00 


1,922 75 


180 33 


819 98 


858 91 


2,668 79 


273 27 


3,693 59 


67 59 


979 76 


1,441 90 


7,747 37 


650 00 


5,358 00 


236 15 


1,209 07 


816 37 i 


4,627 99 



$ c. 


$ c. 


20,000 00 


620 00 


6,000 00 


500 00 


40,000 00 


1,430 00 


15,000 00 


448 00 


10,500 00 


634 00 


1,350 00 


120 00 


40,000 00 


300 00 


2,375 00 


82 00 


1,600 00 


200 00 


1,800- 00 


197 00 


24,000 00 


1,642 00 


1,700 00 


600 00 


7,400 00 


157 00 


22,000 00 


444 00 


40,000 00 


7,750 00 


8,400 00 


200 00 


48,000 00 


136 00 


4,000 00 


200 00 


18,000 00 


800 00 


8,300 00 


267 00 


500 00 


30 00 


15,600 00 


200 00 


55,000 00 


1,238 00 


5,000 00 


535 00 


1,300 00 


200 00 


2,600 00 


200 00 


15,000 00 


2,000 00 


60,000 00 


3,200 00 


2,700 00 


115 00 


16,000 00 


500 00 


4,500 00 


131 00 


3,000 00 


400 00 


5.000 00 


223 00 


75,000 00 


3,000 00 


4,000 00 


150 00 


2,500 00 


1,023 00 


15,000 00 


428 00 


6,000 00 


373 00 


15,000 00 


135 00 


3,000 00 


37 00 


30,000 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


365 00 


2,000 00 


49 00 


20,000 00 


1,500 00 


24,000 00 


422 00 


5,000 00 


500 00 


50,000 00 


1,700 00 


20,000 00 


2,000 00 


2,500 00 


143 00 


17,500 00 


500 00 



206 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Towns— Concluded 


4) 

> 

a-g 

be B 


CO 

— 1 ^ « 

rt ^ a 

Pi « CO 

$%% 


_a co 

co • o 
co'd CO 

o <o . 



g? 

&* . 


51 Seaforth 


$ c. 
44 60 


$ c. 
1,013 63 
2,041 60 
2,000 00 
5,950 00 
17,177 58 
3,308 80 
2,665 76 
6,057 00 
2,092 64 
1,419 31 
1,671 00 

842 63 
3,668 11 
3,475 92 

464 66 

679 39 


$ c. 

699 20 
3,034 18 
3,293 14 
1,196 25 
5,402 07 

433 25 

1,898 45 

8 76 

508 97 

606 25 
1,763 40 

431 95 

3,473 27 

21 44 

386 59 

440 90 


$ c. 

1 757 43 


52 Smith's Falls 


5,075 78 
5,591 82 
7 146 25 


53 Steelton 


298 68 


54 Sturgeon Falls 


55 Sudbury 


716 00 

159 60 

214 00 

381 56 

113 20 

90 60 

97 00 

102 20 

168 80 

118 80 

37 60 

49 60 


23 295 65 


56 Thorold 


3,901 65 


57 Tilbury 


4,778 21 


58 Timmins 


6,447 32 


59 Trenton 


2,714 81 


60 Vankleek Hill 


2,116 16 


61 Walkerton 


3,531 40 


62 Walkerville 


1,376 78 


63 Wallaceburg 


7,310 18 


64 Waterloo 


3,616 16 


65 Weston 


888 85 


66 Whitby 


1,169 89 






Totals 


11,522 41 


215,687 47 


85,126 64 


312,336 52 






Totals 
1 Rural Schools 


34,681 26 

15,398 12 

11,522 41 

1,524 88 


212,779 97 

619,091 88 

215,687 47 

18,694 02 


126,444 90 

143,945 14 

85,126 64 

14,829 81 


373,906 13 


2 Cities 


778,435 14 


3 Towns 


312,336 52 


4 Villages 


35,048 71 






5 Grand Totals, 1917 


63,126 67 
45,836 21 


1,066,253 34 
899,938 22 


370,346 49 
467,758 78 


1,499,726 50 


6 Grand Totals, 1916 


1,413,533 21 






7 Increases 


17,290 46 


166,315 12 




86,193 29 


8 Decreases 


97,412 29 














4.21 


71.09 


24.69 









Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance : Rural Schools, $17.05 ; Cities, $21.87 ; 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



207 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT, ETC.— Concluded 



Expenditure 


Value of school sites, 
buildings and 
furniture 


-*j 


■§49 


• 
'B 

i 5 « 

« M 2 

0) CUD g 

02 


Pi U § 
g P.J§ 

9 a o 

G 3 en 

^^ 
J 0888 


u 8 


d 

S3 

IB 


a 

O 

o 

=3 

"Si 

> 


$ c. 
51 906 00 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

165 43 

1,372 00 

1,372 18 

1,324 26 

8,487 73 

1,924 94 

394 40 

2,752 30 

1,020 32 

250 00 

914 59 

246 60 

1,043 95 

867 00 

104 00 

232 50 


$ c. 

1.071 43 

5.072 00 
5,559 87 
5,618 20 

21,922 15 
3,564 94 
2,766 60 
6,040 06 
2,320 30 
1,414 76 
2,801 09 
1,134 05 
4,326 46 
3,525 92 
779 00 
836 69 


$ c. 

3,000 00 

3,500 00 

2,500 00 

15,000 00 

60,000 00 

15,000 00 

6,000 00 

3,000 00 

8,500 00 

25,000 00 

20,000 00 

4,000 00 

30,000 00 

16,700 00 

2,800 00 

3,000 00 


$ c. 
114 00 


52 1,500 00 

53 4,053 43 

54 3,462 00 

55 9,038 69 

56 1,640 00 


2,100 00 

30 20 

806 94 

3,550 54 


100 00 

104 06 

25 00 

845 19 


450 00 
1,500 00 

450 00 
3,200 00 
1,100 00 


57 1.597 00 

58 3,287 76 


733 29 


41 91 


410 00 
500 00 


59 930 00 

60 1,125 00 

61 1,230 00 

62 300 00 

63 1,750 00 

64 2,050 00 


302 39 
25 45 
606 05 
568 80 
1,478 82 
608 92 


67 59 
14 31 
50 45 
18 65 
53 69 


1,266 00 
171 00 
528 00 
124 00 
917 00 
610 00 


65 625 00 


50 00 
30 00 


500 00 


66 519 62 


54 57 


28 00 


134,005 99 


50,363 13 


4,066 94 


77,175 03 


265,611 09 


1,020,125 00 


53,892 00 


1 183,028 41 

2 302,690 78 

3 134,005 99 

4 15,363 94 


38,006 96 

165,924 72 

50,363 13 

7,808 40 


5,294 80 

14,849 62 

4,066 94 

624 81 


59,140 88 

250,307 66 

77,175 03 

5,071 00 


285,471 05 

733,772 78 

265,611 09 

28,868 15 


611,346 00 

3,426,390 00 

1,020,125 00 

96,200 00 


36,062 00 

118,876 00 

53,892 00 

4,654 00 


5 635,089 12 

6 535,661 15 


262,103 21 
395,289 03 


24,836 17 
17,709 35 


391,694 57 
294,669 63 


1,313,723 07 
1,243,329 16 


5,154,061 00 


213,484 00 








7 99,427 97 




7,126 82 


97,024 94 


70,393 91 






8 


133,185 82 


















9 48.34 


19.95 


1.89 


29.81 

















Towns, $14.54 ; Villages, $19.25 ; Province, $18.75. 



208 



THE REPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 








Teachers 




CO 

to 

%2 

o£ 

-** d 

COHH 
1—1 


to 

CO 

6 

°<™ 
Sfl 




Rural Schools 


co 

o 
o 

o 

CO 

o 

d 


°£ 

U CD 
CD,Jd 

Xi O 
Pi c3 

2 ° 


la 


CO 

'eg 

a 

CO 


co 
Is 
a* 

CO 

< 


CO 

a 

co 
li 

CO 

> 

< 


O) eg 

1^ 


co f-> t* 

> ee-3 
ed — 1 

^B 


£1^ 


I! 

as 


CO 

CO 

O 

-d 
M 

CO 




CO 

s 


1 Bruce 


9 

18 

26 

11 

7 

6 

9 

7 

1 

3 

2 

2 

5 

1 

6 
1 
1 
7 
2 
94 
14 
4 

19 
2 

7 

6 

45 


15 

24 
36 
11 

7 
6 
11 
8 
1 
3 
2 
1 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 

10 

2 

129 

23 
8 

28 
2 

12 
6 

61 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

"i 

"i 

"7 

1 

1 
"i 
"i 


14 
23 
34 

10 
6 
6 

11 
7 
1 
3 
2 
1 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 
9 
2 
122 
22 
8 

27 
2 

11 
6 

60 


$ 

625 
450 
600 
600 
575 

'600 

'600 

*5i9 
700 

475 
*725 
i(325 


$ 

499 
389 
562 
525 
562 
512 
541 
507 
550 
517 
375 


8 

14 

1 
1 
2 
1 
4 

i 

1 


8 
9 
14 
10 
5 
4 

10 
4 
1 
2 


2 





2 


8 
7 

12 
9 
5 
3 
8 
4 
1 
1 






2 Carletou 


8 

15 

2 

1 
2 
3 

4 

"i 

1 


? 


3 Essex 


1 


.... 


1 


1 


4 Frontenac 




5 Grey 


1 


.... 


1 




6 Hastings 




7 Huron 










8 Kent 










9 Lambton 










10 Lanark 






1 




11 Leeds & Grenviile 








12 Lennox &Add'gton 

13 Middlesex 


550| 

555 


1 
5 

1 

4 
1 
1 
7 
2 
6 
17 
4 

10 
2 

7 
6 
4 








1 
5 

1 

4 
1 
1 
7 
2 
6 

16 
4 

8 
2 

7 
6 
4 














14 Norfolk 


600 

512 
700 
500 
645 
625 
392 
506 
450 

464 
625 


2 

"96 
3 
1 

15 












15 Northumberland 
and Durham .... 








2 




16 Ontario 










17 Peel 












18 Perth 


3 


.... 


3 






19 Peterborough .... 






20 Prescott & Russell 

21 Renfrew 


1 


1 


1 
1 


70 

"i 

8 


11 
1 


22 Simcoe 








23 Stormont, Dundas 

and Glengarry.. 

24 Victoria 


2 





3 


4 


25 Waterloo 


455: 

586' 

444 24 












26 Wellington 


"• 










27 Districts 


2 


.... 


1 


16 


5 






Totals 


315 


420 


19 


401 


590 


463 


168 


145 


12 


1 


14 


133 


134 


?4 




| 


Cities 
1 Belleville 


1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
3 

12 
3 
2 
9 
1 

42 
4 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 

28 
5 
1 

131 


7 
10 

8 
20 

3 
11 
57 
15 
17 
31 

4 

200 

27 

10 

10 

6 

8 
14 

8 

178 

30 

3 


"38 
"25 


7 
10 

8 
20 

3 
11 
57 
14 
17 
31 

4 

162 

27 

10 

10 

6 

8 
14 

8 

153 

30 

3 


950 


286 
340 


5 


5 
5 
7 

16 

2 

6 

26 

12 

15 

24 

1 

72 

22 

9 

5 

4 

4 

9 

4 

127 

23 

3 








5 

5 

7 

16 

2 

5 

24 

12 

15 

24 

1 

74 

22 

9 

5 

4 

> 4 

9 

4 

127 

22 

3 






2 Brantf ord 


1 
1 





1 
1 






3 Chatham 


437 

567 ? 






4 Fort William 


2 

1 
1 
2 




5 Gait 


533 
409 
377 
R71 


1 

""27 

15 

i 

3 
89 
8 
2 
3 
2 
3 

"**22 

4 










6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 


1 
3 





1 

3 


.... 


9 Kitchener 


.... 379 












10 London 


'760 

*ei2 


330 
400 
458 
368 
530 
400 
300 
325 
514 
375 
449 
393 
300 


6 


2 


6 






11 Niagara Falls .... 


2 
46 




12 Ottawa 


2 
4 


.... 


7 
4 


7 


13 Peterborough .... 

14 Port Arthur 








15 St. Catharines .... 








1 




16 St. Thomas * 










17 Sarnia 


1 


1 


1 






18 Sault Ste. Marie.. 


2 




19 Stratford 










20 Toronto 


7 
3 


5 


7 
3 


3 
4 




21 Windsor 




22 Woodstock... 
















Totals 


677 


64 


613 


670 


425 


187 


401 


29 


8 


34 


399 


64 


7 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



20!) 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 



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1,677 
254 
214 
154 
320 
351 
36 
88 
15 
35 
103 
57 



98 



48 



17 



114 
53 
24 

415 

78 

5,682 

841 

344 

1,055 

90 

472 

141 

2,444 



16,742 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,628 
716 
918 

1,161 
211 

9,504 

1,330 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



349 

521 

862 

145 

107 

70 

159 

177 

14 

41 

6 

15 

58 

19 

71 
22 

14 
201 

47 

2,842 

427 

161 

510 
46 

244 

68 

1,200 



8,396 



147 
231 
193 
575 
68 
320 

1,313 
400 
481 
591 
106 

4,569 
636 
237 
269 
127 
151 
305 
196 

5,111 

848 

53 



322 

493 

815 

109 

107 

84 

161 

174 

22 

47 

9 

20 

45 

38 

43 

31 

10 

214 

31 

2,840 

414 

183 

545 
44 

228 

73 

1,244 



501 

558 

978 

147 

121 

92 

223 

196 

28 

53 

9 

19 

70 

39 

68 

39 

13 

275 

53 

3,590 

508 

239 

604 
63 

344 

89 

1,241 



346 



10,160 



161 
274 
212 
506 
79 
234 

1,315 
316 
437 
570 
105 

4,935 
694 
267 
258 
120 
160! 
323 
171 

4,557 

857 

72 



214 
401 
301 
742 
108 
395 

2,141 
551 
705 
866 
154 

6,247 
893 
389 
356 
179 
272 
467 
283 

6,540 

1,150 
94 



60.68 



118 

350 

532 

42 

37 

28 

66 

139 

7 

9 

3 

4 

15 

6 

27 

14 

3 

72 

10 

2,124 

242 

107 

256 

10 

83 

35 

1,089 



5,428 



67 
173 
143 
439 

31 
123 
718 
194 
155 
269 

54 

2,560 

279 

172 

108 

70 

73 
158 

54 

2,244 

388 

35 



49 124 33,55016,92716,62323,448 69.8818,5071 6,026 6,951 6,238 4,6711,157 32,667 



97 
199 
258 
27 
23 
22 
36 
38 

5 
13 

2 

2 
21 

8 

12 

3 

3 

51 

11 

1,146 

102 

48 

226 
13 
62 
12 

496 



2,936 



48 

90 

58 

191 

24 

75 

495 

113 

131 

180 

21 

1,771 

214 

137 

85 

35 

52 

148 

77 

1,688 

374 

19 



174 


140 


219 


147 


353 


278 


43 


51 


34 


59 


29 


35 


53 


85 


45 


51 


5 


11 


21 


13 


6 


1 


5 


13 


12 


32 


8 


14 


18 


25 


12 


11 


5 


9 


51 


82 


15 


15 


,043 


853 


137 


162 


74 


69 


177 


176 


19 


19 


122 
31 


134 
29 



446 255 



3,157 2,769 



47 

59 

52 
207 

41 
140 
413 
132 
236 
202 

43 

2,287 

185 

93 
113 

38 

50 
106 

57 

2,084 

348 

18 



68 
119 

85 
118 

36 
104 
579 
177 
207 
245 

51 

1,554 

202 

73 
120 

54 

59 
115 

91 

1,794 

355 

32 



135 
97 

244 
83 
61 
39 
69 
77 
8 

26 
3 
11 
23 
21 

30 

12 

4 

99 

27 

469 

140 

46 

120 
28 
71 
34 

158 



2,135 



78 

64 

67 
126 

15 
112 
345 
100 
189 
179 

'42 

1,097 

258 

29 
101 

50 

77 
101 

88 

1,292 

240 

21 



60 



100 
1 



317 



78 



86 



235 
192 



566 



671 

817 

1,375 

250 

214 

142 

320 

351 

36 

78 

11 

35 

103 

57 

110 
53 
24 

415 

78 

4,834 

780 

344 

1,008 

90 

472 

141 

2,244 



15,053 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,550 
716 
918 

1,127 
211 

8,818 

1,245 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



210 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Rural Schools — 
Concluded 















h 








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2 


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CO 


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>» >• 


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>» 


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a 


5 


£« 


J5? 


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P. 

o 

o 



1 Bruce 

2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds & Grenville 

12 Lennox & Add'tn. 

13 Middlesex 

14 Norfolk 

15 Northumberland 

and Durham . . 

16 Ontario 

17 Peel 

18 Perth 

19 Peterborough.... 

20 Prescott&Russell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 

23 Stormont.Dundas 

and Glengarry 
£4 Victoria 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Districts 



553 

787 

1,235 

212 

177 

117 

254 

276 

36 

61 

11 

31 

99 

57 

103 
53 
24 

334 

66 

3,976 

660 

344 

822 

90 

389 

106 

1,677 



Totals 12,550 



Cities 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantf ord ...... 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William . . . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls. ., 

12 Ottawa , 

13 Peterborough 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines. ., 

16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia , 

18 SaultSte. Marie, 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Windsor , 

22 Woodstock 



241 
332 
405 

1,081 
116 
431 

2,628 
514 
763 

1,161 
211 

7,809 

1,181 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
313 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



671 

692 

1,090 

194 

214 

65 

320 

166 

36 

78 

13 

4 

103 

57 

93 

53 

24 

415 

76 

3,527 

566 

327 

952 

90 

472 

141 

2,233 



12,672 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,628 
716 
918 

1,161 
211 

8,074 

1,330 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



671 

760 

1,287 

210 

214 

128 

320 

311 

36 

65 

11 

31 

103 

57 

105 
43 
24 

415 

66 

3,440 

683 

250 

857 

90 

472 

141 

2,098 



12,888 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,628 
300 
918 

1,161 
211 

8,441 

1,330 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



671 


142 


456 


859 


376 


149 


1,469 


476 


396 


231 


97 


135 


214 


61 


154 


135 


37 


45 


320 


80 


218 


311 


104 


119 


36 


8 


19 


67 


33 


33 


11 


5 


9 


31 


12 


23 


103 


27 


62 


57 


21 


35 


106 


39 


36 


43 


24 


43 


24 


4 


13 


415 


150 


292 


72 


34 


28 


4,630 


2,110 


810 


701 


238 


421 


283 


90 


84 


930 


327 


499 


90 


29 


39 


472 


71 


327 


141 


34 


94 


2,307 


290 


652 



456 

395 

752 

157 

154 

75 

218 

205 

19 

33 

10 

24 

65 

35 



26 

13 
292 

41 

3,779 

479 

94 

575 
48 

327 
94 



14,729' 4,919 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,628 
514 
918 

1,161 
211 

8,688 

1,330 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



146 

64 

67 

126 

15 

112 

345 

100 

189 

231 

42 

3,361 

449 

29 

101 

50 

77 

101 

88 

1,660 

497 

21 



Totals 30,90132,120 32,07132,532! 7,871 9,79913,685 29,67132,039 31,204 424 



5,191 9,581 



78 
242 
204 
244 

92 
356 
424 
100 
632 
500 

93 

1,858 

576 

102 

101 

50 

93 

216 

236 

3,290 

259 

53 



146 
242 
262 
451 
92 
356 

1,415 
514 
632 
702 
136 

2,189 
592 
195 
527 
94 
171 1 
216 
236 

3,997 

430 

90 



671 

785 

1,249 

217 

214 

120 

320 

260 

36 

59 

10 

29 

103 

57 

105 
43 
24 

367 

66 

3,752 

686 

236 

764 

90 

472 

141 

2,021 



12,897 



241 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,550 
100 
918 

1,075 
211 

6,664 

1,138 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



671 

836 

1,255 

239 

214 

116 

320 

221 

36 

78 

11 

35 

103 

57 

110 
53 
24 

367 

71 

3,614 

714 

311 

875 

90 

472 

141 

1,958 



671 

783 

1,351 

254 

214 

136 

320 

282 

36 

78 

15 

35 

103 

57 

111 
53 
24 

415 

78 

4,600 

763 

344 

1,001 

90 

472 

141 

'2,322 



12,99214,749 



241 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,550 
514 
918 

1,075 
211 

8,426 

1,330 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



308 
505 
405 

1,081 
147 
554 

2,628 
716 
918 

1,161 
211 

7,350 

1,138 
504 
527 
247 
311 
628 
367 

9,668 

1,705 
125 



137 
26 



33 
1 



18 



233 



78 
*34 

isi 



125 






1918 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



211 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OP INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 





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214 






195 
154 
216 
131 
86 


37 
147 
93 
65 
11 


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125 

163 

225 

92 

93 

79 

113 

70 

13 

31 

24 

14 

53 

15 

58 
7 

10 
97 
20 
575 
131 
52 

178 
18 

104 
78 

227 


13 

19 

26 

10 

7 

7 

12 
7 
1 
3 
2 
3 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 
7 
2 
90 
15 
5 

19 
2 
9 
7 

36 


5 

7 

12 
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15 


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721 
1,260 








14 


3 12 


12 
6 


6 
6 










7 
2 


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5 


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5 .... 










31 3 


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74 
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10 6 


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20 


35 


35 


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11 .... 












.... 


12 .... 


















31 
52 






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13 .... 
























3 


14 .... 




























15 2 


2 




2 


2 












41 

24 


26 





6 


6 


16 .... 














17 .... 




























18 51 


57 


36 


44 


31 








48 


.... 


125 
71 




... 


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32 
5 
2 

5 


1 


19 .... 












12 


20 71 


38 
58 


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5 

58 


70 

48 
2»2 


5,371 
103 






47 
44 




346 
24 


'..'.!. 


100 


21 34 






.... 


31 

26 

72 
70 
118 
63 
62 


12 


22 .... 






65 


23 68 


90 
1 


90 




569 






64 


"i 


36 


78 


7 


24 1 






l!. 


25 .... 












182 




209 

19 

189 


28 


5 6 


26 .... 


















31. 


27 .... 










2,154 










15 25 






















268 


285 


















1,731 


1,340 


288 


2,665 


316 


117 


283 


1 .... 


























21 
31 
25 
29 
8 
25 

174 

12 

42 

88 

8 

406 
65 
14 
39 
17 
25 
17 
30 

159 
58 
15 


3 
2 
5 
4 
1 
5 

50 
8 
5 

15 
2 

59 
8 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 

30 
9 
3 


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2 .... 


























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3 .... 


























11. 


4 .... 


























4 ! - - 


5 .... 






















55 


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6 .... 


























7 78 
























10 


10 


8 .... 


























9 .... 














736 








40 


59 


........ 


10 86 


76 


52 


52 


52 








34 




81 . 


11 .... 


















12 68 


68 


5C 




68 


4,494 






68 




112 
360 


3,095 
198 


| 383 
46 


'.'.'.'. 12 


13 138 

14 .... 




.... 


1|.... 
is 


15 .... 






















I"' 


1 


16 .... 

























1 


17 .... 
























1 


18 .... 






















31 

184 


28 
95 


1 
1 




19 .... 
























20 313 


435 


35? 


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486 


234 
137 






487 


125 






21 .... 












5 

1 




22 .... 












































I 






68c 


► 771 


56? 


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1 798 


4,865) 1 


736 


693 


237 


472! 3, 603 


629 


1,308 


223 


36 


22 



212 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. IT 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns 



1 Alexandria .. 

2 Almonte .... 

3 Amherstburg 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6*Bonfield 

7 Brockville . . . 

8 Cache Bay . . . 

9 Charlton .... 

10 Chelmsford . . 

11 Cobalt 

12 Cobourg 

13 Cochrane 

14 Collingwood . 

15 Cornwall 

16 Dundas 

17 Eastview 

18 Ford 

19 Fort Frances . 

20 Goderich 

21 Hanover 

22 Haileybury . . 

23 Hawkesbury . 

24 Ingersoll .... 

25 Kearney .... 

26 Keewatin. . . . 

27 Kenora 

28 Lindsay , 

29*Massey 

30 Mattawa 

31 Mount Forest , 

32 New Liskeard 

33 Newmarket. .. 

34 North Bay.... 

35 Oakville 

36 Orillia 

37 Oshawa 

38 Owen Sound . . 

39 Paris 

40 Parkhill 

41 Pembroke 

42 Perth 

43 Picton 

44 Prescott 

45 Preston 

46 Rainy River . . 

47 Renfrew 

48*Rockland 

49 St. Mary's 

50 Sandwich 

51 Seaforth 

52 Smith's Falls. 

53 Steelton 



Teachers 



u 2 



a 
6 

CO CO 



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2 .... 



21 
2 . 

1 . 

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7 . 

7: 

2 . 

6. 
2. 
1!. 
1 . 
17. 
1 . 
4 
3 
4 
2 
1 
12 
4 
1 

4 
4 
1 
8 
15 
2 
7 
2 
5 
9 



575 



12 
3 

8 

8 
4 
1 

8|.... 
2L... 

lL... 

4|.... 
11.... 

4.... 

5.... 

2.... 
13 429 

3.. 
10 750 

6. 

41. 

2- 

2- 

6. 
17| 450 

2.... 

1 .... 

lL.. . 

7L... 

61025 

2 



$ 

250 
450 
300 
350 
375 
450 
300 
500 
600 
369 
561 
325 
400 
675 
410 
363 
310 
396 
375 
325 
525 
550 
218 
300 
550 
550 
236 
375 
. 500 
.1392 
.J350 
.650 
.625 
.476 
.1525 

.... koo 

.... (400 

4L...I300 

2 ....300 

1 ....600 

12 i462 



1350 

. . . . |600 
. . . . 400 

1300 

. . . . |500 
....[331 
...J260 
....350 

357 

....450 
...J300 
....!444 



7 
1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

11 



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1 



*No report received for 1917. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



213 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 















CD 






Reading 










CO 

'S 








el <o 

CD d 
> CO 
COT* 


















u 

CD 

8 


U 








o 

o 




ca- 
ll 

8 

<u 
En 


S3 


d 
o 

M 
CD 
JO 

1 
1 


CO 

>» 
o 

pp 


CO 


>* 

CO o 

eo c3 

co d 

S3 
< * 


«h d 
°3 

CD -^> 

be Co 
cd^H 

d +-> 
So 


3^ 
CO £ 

Mm 

CO M 
U CO 


** o 


M 
o 

o 

PP 

TJ 

d 

o 

8 


M 

o 
o 

pp. 

T* 
u 


M 
o 
o 

PP 

u 

d 


PP 

d 
o 

>> 

CD 

DP 


u 
< 


1 1 


7 


629 


291 


338 


423 


67 


215 


109 


113 


106 


86 


629 


2 


1 


146 


66 


80 


95 


65 


30 


25 


18 


44 


29 


146 


3 


3 


282 


109 


173 


215 


76 


71 


38 


44 


70 


35 


24 


282 


4 1 


2 


435 


222 


213 


294 


68 


138 


59 


103 


67 


68 




435 


5 


3 


165 


78 


87 


121 


73 


32 


21 


31 


32 


49 




165 


6 2 




137 


61 


76 


76 


55 


65 


30 


21 


10 


11 




40 


7 


2 


317 


147 


170 


229 


72 


57 


78 


78 


57 


47 




317 


8 




152 


91 


61 


73 


48 


71 


16 


53 


3 


9 




152 


9 


I 


57 


26 


31 


30 


53 


28 


8 


7 


4 


10 





57 


10 2 


1 


180 


78 


102 


117 


65 


40 


33 


43 


41 


21 


2 


180 


11 6 




633 


334 


299 


366 


58 


217 


104 


169 


78 


65 




633 


12 




139 
311 


68 
156 


71 
155 


103 
167 


74 
54 


28 
89 


9 

74 


34 

99 


32 
45 


36 

4 




139 


13 5 




311 


14 




100 


50 


50 


66 


66 


27 


11 


16 


24 


22 




100 


15 


5 


1,063 


489 


574 


769 


72 


360 


240 


203 


155 


105 




1,063 


16 ..... 


2 


116 


63 


53 


85 


73 


15 


28 


24 


28 


21 




116 


17 2 




592 


253 


339 


416 


70 


330 


144 


50 


39 


29 




592 


18 1 


1 


334 


175 


159 


237 


71 


121 


85 


71 


31 


26 




334 


19 4 




192 


97 


95 


107 


56 


76 


26 


37 


31 


21 


1 


192 


20 


1 


82 


40 


42 


57 


70 


13 


9 


12 


22 


26 




82 


21 


i 


92 


46 


46 


65 


71 


15 


11 


45 


14 


7 




92 


22 3 




365 


221 


144 


211 


58 


94 


63 


120 


48 


40 




365 


23 13 




1,094 


514 


580 


743 


68 


408 


318 


198 


116 


37 


17 


1,094 


24 


1 


108 


53 


55 


77 


71 


31 


12 


18 


26 


21 




108 


25 




37 


19 


18 


26 


70 


8 


11 


6 


7 


5 




37 


26 ... 




30 
261 


12 

138 


18 
123 


16 
177 


53 

68 


4 
100 


12 

34 


11 
62 


3 
26 






30 


27 7 


39 




261 


28 




304 
126 
310j 


149 

49 

149 


155 

77 

161 


223 
56 

206 


73 
44 
66 


39 
75 

98 


59 
12 
49 


64 
26 
45 


61 

3 

51 


81 
10 
61 


...... 


298 


29 




39 


30 


1 


310 


31 


1 


66 


28 


38 


56 


85 


18 


13 


13 


15 


7 




66 


32 




65 


44 


21 


37 


57 


22 


3 


20 


7 


13 




65 


33 




65 


41 


24 


39 


60 


20 


10 


8 


13 


14 




65 


34 




902 


438 


464 


660 


73 


206 


195 


168 


180 


153 




902 


35 




42 


15 


27! 


22 


52 


15 


3 


5 


4 


15 





42 


36 


1 


1831 


101 


82i 


128 


70 


32 


30 


43 


36 


42 




183 


37 


1 


147j 


78 


691 


99 


67 


48 


13 


33 


32 


21 




147 


38 


1 


187 


104 


83! 


132 


71 


32 


29 


47 


43 


36 




187 


39 


1 


70! 


35i 


35 


55 


79 


23 


8 


10 


10 


19 




70 


10 




41! 


23 


18 


26 


63 


6 


9 


11 


4 


11 




41 


11 


4 


620 


329 


291 


448 


72 


227 


106 


102 


89 


96 




620 


12 




229 


108 1 


121 


176 


77 


30 


34 


56 


55 


54 




229 


13 




34 


13 


2l! 


21 


62 


3 


5 


111 


7 


8 




34 


14 


1 


140 


82j 


58| 


105 


75 


31 


16 


30i 


26 


37 




140 


15 


2 


210 


921 


1181 


164 


78 


34 


38 


49 


37 


52 




210 


46 1 




42 


18 1 


24 


25 


60 


22 


10 


1 


7 


2 





42 


47 1 


2 


484 


241 


243! 


333 


69 


172 


64 


61 


102 


85 




484 


48 4 




922 


491 


431 


575 


62 


417 


262 


142 


77 


24 




922 


49 


1 


57 


27 


30 


44 


77 


12 


6 


8 


17 


14 




57 


50 




396 


206 


190 


228 


58! 


136 


65 


132 


40 


23 




260 


51 




76 


44 


32i 


37 


49 


22 


/ 


13 


17 


17 




76 


52 1 


1 


257 


120 


137 


1831 


71 


90 


45 


45 


42 


35 





257 


53 2 




500 


248 


252 


276 


55 


202 


88 


106 


69 


35 


i 


500 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns— Con. 


p 

cS 
f* 

ex 
o 


'co 


03 

d 


d 
o 

"■£ 

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CO 

o 

Pi 

a 


B 

a 

e9 


u 
o 

CO 

3 

-d 

CO 

1m 


& 

o 

CO 

a 

d 
eg 

''B 

ed 

d 


d 

Ms 

"co'Si 


d 

! 


C0 

u 



'd 

o 

o 


d 
"p. 

CO 

ea 

M 
M 




<o ' 






O 


u 


i 


s 


s?H 


j=? 


-d 


o 




O 


S 


J 


O 


O 


w 


° 


Pm 


£ 


PL, 


m 


1 Alexandria .... 


629 


629 


629 


629 


56 


160 


145 


629 


629 


629 




2 AJmonte 


121 


146 


121 


146 


29 


31 


73 


91 


121 


146 




3 Amherstburg . . 


282 


282 


282 


282 


59 


59 


129 


258 


258 


282 




4 Arnprior 


367 


435 


435 


435 


68 


135 


238 


435 


435 


435 




5 Barrie 


133 
70 


165 


165 
137 


165 
137 


49 
42 


112 
21 


[ 112 
42 


165 
137 


165 
137 


165 
137 




6 Bonfield 




7 Brockville 


317 


317 


317 


317 


47 


107 


137 


317 


317 


317 




8 Cache Bay 


143 


152 


143 


152 


9 


143 


143 


143 


143 


152 




9 Charlton 


57 


57 


57 


57 


10 


34 


57 


57 


57 


57 




10 Chelmsford .... 


180 


180 


180 


180 


107 


25 


180 


180 


180 


180 


23 


11 Cobalt 


405 
139 


633 
139 


633 
102 


633 
139 


65 
38 


210 
68 


330 
68 


633 
139 


633 
139 


197 
139 




12 Cobourg 




13 Cochrane 


222 


311 


311 


311 


4 


49 


49 


311 


311 


311 




14 Collingwood 


73 


100 


100 


100 


22 


62 


62 


100 


100 


100 




15 Cornwall 


703 


1,063 


1,063 


1,063 


260 


1,063 


1,063 


1,063 


1,063 


1,063 




16 Dundas 


116 


116 


116 


116 


21 


49 


73 


116 


116 


116 




17 Eastview 


592 


592 


592 


592 


61 




323 


592 


592 


592 




18 Ford 


334 
192 


334 
192 


334 
192 


334 
192 


26 
22 


334 
90 


128 
90 


334 
192 


334 
192 


334 
192 




19 Fort Frances... 


1 


20 Goderich 


69 


82 


82 


82 


26 


60 


60 


82 


82 


82 




21 Hanover 


77 


92 


92 


92 


7 


66 


66 


92 


92 


92 




22 Haileybury .... 


365 


365 


208 


208 


128 


128 


128 


365 


365 


365 




23 Hawkesbury . . . 


1,094 


1,094 


1,094 


1,094 


54 


54 


1,094 


1,094 


1,094 


1,094 


17 


24 Ingersoll 


108 


108 


108 


108 


21 


21 


47 


108 


108 


108 




25 Kearney 


37 


37 


37 


37 


5 


12 


12 


37 


37 


37 




26 Keewatin 


30 


30 


30 


30 




11 


11 


30 


30 


30 




27 Kenora .... 


261 


261 


261 


261 


61 


50 


161 


261 


261 


261 




28 Lindsay . . . 


206 


304 


146 


146 


81 


165 


165 


165 


165 


304 




29 Massey 


39 


39 


39 


39 


10 


10 


41 


41 


41 


41 




3.0 Mattawa . . . 


310 


310 


310 


310 


118 


118 


118 


310 


310 


310 


37 


31 Mount Forest . . 


48 


66 


66 


66 


7 


35 


35 


66 


66 


66 




32 NewLiskeard.. 


65 


65 


65 


65 


13 


20 


20 


65 


65 


65 




33 Newmarket 


45 


65 


65 


65 


14 


35 


35 


65 


65 


65 




34 North Bay 


902 


902 


902 


902 


153 


333 


501 


902 


902 


902 




35 Oakville.... 


42 


42 


42 


42 


15 


19 


42 


42 


42 


42 




36 Orillia 


151 
147 


183 
147 


183 
147 


183 
147 


58 
21 


42 
21 


78 
53 


78 
147 


183 
147 


183 
147 




37 Oshawa 




38 Owen Sound . , 


155 


187 


187 


187 


36 


126 


126 


187 


187 


187 




39 Paris 


70 
35 


70 
41 


70 
41 


70 
41 


19 
11 


29 
26 


29 
26 


70 
41 


70 
41 


70 
41 




40 Parkhill.... 




41 Pembroke . . 


620 


620 


620 


620 


96 


185 


287 


620 


620 


620 




42 Perth 


165 
34 
93 


229 

34 

140 


165 
34 
93 


229 
34 
93 


54 
15 
63 


165 
15 
63 


165 
15 
63 


165 

34 

140 


229 

34 

140 


229 

34 

140 




43 Picton 




44 Prescott... 




45 Preston . . . 


176 


210 


210 


210 


52 


138 


138 


210 


210 


210 




46 Rainy River . . . 


42 


42 


42 


42 


6 


6 


6 


42 


42 


42 




47 Renfrew . . . 


484 


484 


484 


484 


85 


139 


194 


484 


484 


484 




48 Rockland 


922 


922 


8f 


'922 


922 


50 


922 


922 


922 


922 




49 St. Mary's 


45 


57 


57 


57 


14 


39 


39 


57 


57 


57 




50 Sandwich 


260 


396 


396 


396 


63 


63 


195 


195 


396 


396 




51 Seaf orth 


54 


76 


76 


76 


17 


47 


47 


76 


76 


76 




52 Smith's Falls.. 


257 


257 


257 


257 


21 


59 


59 


257 


257 


257 




53 Steelton 


500 


500 


500 


500 


35 


210 


210 


500 


500 


500 





1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



215 



SEPARATEISCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THB VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 





< 


b 

! 


5 


M 
o 
o 

cq 

d 
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43 

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5 

o <u 

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o o 

g« 
fa 


M 
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o 

CQ 
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a 

43 


5 

11 

d^ 

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43 


4> 
C3 

d 
.2 

b 

■p 

d 

43 

a 

4> 

fa 


42 

o 

43 
•i— » 

d 

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M 
43 

O 

O 


43 

H 

S3 

*-> 

13 
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CUD 

<9 


d 

!a 

M 

H 

1 

d 


43 

O 

d 

43 

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CQ 

43 
CO 

d 
o 

a 


Maps.Globes and 
Prizes 




d d 
9 CO 

-d a 

5 s 


CO 

p. 
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M 
8 

d 


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43 
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O 

3 

o 
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43 
rQ 

B 
d 
53 


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o 

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O 43 

CO .2 

43 bfi 

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CO o 

43 X> 

43 M 

43 <V 

fl 
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1 


























18 
12 
22 
20 
35 
10 
13 

8 

6 

12 
12 
14 
10 
21 
50 
10 
30 

7 

14 
12 

5 

1 
62 
15 
10 

6 
36 
22 

4 

22 
15 

5 

10 
20 

4 
21 
12 
15 

3 

9 
32 
12 
11 
12 

8 

2 
16 
32 
10 

9 
13 

9 
22 


3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 

11 

\ 
2 






2 






























3 24 


24 


4 


.... 


10 


223 






24 














4 










176 


.... 






5 




















81 






6 










137 


















7 




















147 


.... 


i 
i 
i 

i 




8 










148 














9 


























10 2 


2 






2 


172 
436 






2 


2 


.... 


180 


.... 


10 


11 












12 


























13 










251 




















14 


















46 


22 


24 


i 




15 






















16 






























17 










592 
300 
















.... 

i 
i 
i 




18 


























19 1 


1 
























20 


























21 




















21 






30 


22 










88 
1,077 
















23 17 


17 






17 






17 














24 






















25 


























i 
i 














261 


















27 




















50 


102 




























29 










90 
170 














.... 
.... 




30 6 


6 


6 


.... 


4 






6 


.... 


67 


310 


.... 


i 
i 




31 




































33 






























34 






























35 




























36 






























37 






























38 






















.... 


48 


i 

i 




39 






















40 




























41 










73 




















42 ........ 
























i 




43 




























44 


























"i 
l 
l 




45 




























46 










32 
















1? 


47 


























48 




























49 




























50 










341 




















51 


















34 

77 










52 




















17 


25 






53 










500 
























, 



216 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I!. TABLE Q -TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



















Teachers 












Towns — 
Continued 


OQ 

o 

o 
CO 

4- 

o 
6 


9 a) 


r<D 


03 

B 


42 

a 

42 
d 

en 

< 


0> 

1 

en 


Number who have 
ever attended a 
Model School in 
Ontario 


Number who have 
ever attended a 
Normal School 
in Ontario 


Number who have 
ever attended the 
Normal Coll. or 
F. of E. in Ontario 


> en 

a 2 

so 


en 
en 

6 

t-i ■** 

en 

tH 

Jl 

^ a 

eni— 1 
1— 1 


ca 
en 

42 


d 

encvj 

42.1 


en 
en 

42 


CO 




'C 
43 
en 

Q 


54 Sturgeon 
Falls 


1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 


10 

16 

4 

5 


.... 


10 
16 
4 
5 
5 
4 

5 
4 


$ 


$ 

375 
550 


6 

7 














6 


55 Sudbury . . 


6 
1 








6 

1 
1 


3 




56 Thorold . . . 


400 


3 


"*" 






57 Tilbury 


310 


• 1 






1 
3 
2 




58 Timmins . . 


5 .... 


840 
300 

250 
300 
275 
292 
400 
625 
575 


4 


::::::::i:::: 




1 


59 Trenton . . . 


4 


.... 


2 

3 


2 
• 1 






2 




60 Vankleek 
Hill 


i 
11 5 
1 4 






?| 


61 Walkerton . 


i ■ 










62 Walkerville 


I 

1 
1 

1 


3 
6 
5 
1 
1 


31... 

6... 
5j... 
1 ... 
1 ... 


"i" 


1 
4 


i 




1 
4 






63 Wallaceb'rg 






1 




64 Waterloo .. 


.. .. 






65 Weston. . . . 


"i" 


1 
1 






1 
1 






66 Whitby .... 




















Totals 


85 354 


14 


340511 


385 


116 130 3 1 


3 


130 


65 


21 


Totals 

1 Rur'l Schools 

2 Cities ...... 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 


315 

131 

85 

17 


420 

677 

354 

37 


19 
64 
14 

1 


40l'590 

613J670 

340511 

36550 


463 
425 
385 
416 


• 

168 

187 

116 

9 


145 
401 
130 

18 


12 

29 
3 
3 


i 

8 

1 


14 

34 

3 

3 


133 

399 

130 

19 


134 

64 

65 

3 


24 
7 

21 
2 


5 Gd. Totals, 

1917 

6 Gd. Totals, 

1916 


548 
539 


1,488 
1,454 


98 
92 


1,390 630 
1,362 654 


426 
407 


480 
427 


694 
668 


47 
44 


10 
13 


54 
49 


681 
666 


266 
254 


54 
45 


7 Increases . . . 

8 Decreases . . . 


9 


34 


6 


28 


24 


19 


53 


26 


3 


**3 


5 


15 


12 


9 





























9 Percentages. 







6.58 


93.4lL. 




32.25 


46.63 


3.15 


.67 


3.63 


45.76 


17.87 


3.63 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



217 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 













c3 CO 


Reading 










CO 

"p. 








<0 


u 

CO 

a 


u 

C3 CO 
CO rH 

« H 
+^> O 
CO . 

Hi— 1 








h 






u 

t 

o 
Pi 

5 

CO 


P 

s 


p 

PL. 

«M 

o 

JB 

B 


CO 


CO 

s 


3} CO 

o3 PI 


O « 

cud ce 

11 

CO O 
O ^ 

fi 5 


d 




cq 

a 



a> 


M 




w 

u 

IB 
EH 


M 



cq 

u 

p 

A 



>» 

CO 

CQ 


u 

< 


54 


4 




529 


250 


279 


348 


66 


187 


149 


87 


52 


50 


4 


529 


55 


5 


2 


937 


454 


483 


548 


58 


307 


279 


166 


95 


90 




937 


56 




3 


230 


113 


117 


173 


75 


86 


26 


46 


46 


26 




230 


57 


3 




268 


122 


146 


175 


65 


86 


55 


77 


20 


30 




268 


58 


1 




285 


125 


160 


193 


68 


144 


57 


40 


42 


2 




285 


59 






217 
230 


132 

100 


85 
130 


139 

128 


64 
56 


67 
57 


44 
32 


22 

43 


48 
43 


36 
55 




217 


60 




3 


230 


61 




4 


185 


111 


74 


150 


81 


24 


29 


43 


43 46 




185 


62 


1 


1 


152 


76 


76 


97 


64 


30 


28 


25 


4l| 28 




152 


63 


1 




314 


131 


183 


211 


67 


119 


45 


59 


51, 40 


314 


64 




5 


255 


121 


134 


204 


80 


46 


44 


60 


561 49 


! 255 


65 






72 

59 


32 
25 


40 
34 


44 
41 


61 
69 


14 
14 


9 
5 


11 
13 


23 
13 


15 
14 


72 


66 






1 59 












71 


64 


18,257 


8,962 


9,295 


12,166 


66.63 


5,896 


3,589 


3,627 


2,776 


2,315 


5417,931 


1 


98 


17 


16,742 


8,396 


8,346 


10,160 


60.68 


5,428 


2,936 


3,157 


2,769 


2,135 


317 


15,053 


2 


49 


124 


33,550 


16,927 


16,623 


23,448 69.88 


8,507 


6,026 


6,951 


6,2384,671 


1,157 


32,667 


3 


71 


64 


18,257 


8,962 


9,295 


12,166 


66.63 


5,896 


3,589 


3,627 


2,776 2,315 


54 


17,931 


4 


2 


8 


1,499 


751 


748 


1,145 


76.38 


442 


222 


224 


283 


302 


26 


1,499 


5 


220 


213 


70,048 


35,036 


35,012 


46,919 


66.98 


20,273 


12,773 


13,959 


12,066 


9,423 


1,554 


67,150 


6 


229 


211 


69,265 


35,410 


33,855 


46,197 


66.69 


20,296 


11,794 


13,799 


12,061 


9,560 


1,755 


65,809 


7 


...... 


2 


783 


"374 


1,157 


722 


.29 


""23 


979 


160 


5 






1,341 


8 




137 


201 
























9 


14.78 


14.31 




50.01 


49.98! 66.98 





28.94 


18.23 


19.92 


17.2213.45 


2.21 


95.86 



218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 

















U 

s 


na 









Towns— 












S 


CO 




t» 


-*j 




Concluded 


P. 
eS 
H 


o 


2 


d 

'55 
o 
P. 


a 


03 

a 

CO 




Is 

.2.2 
'co*5i 


2 

u 


o 

.2 
*5j 


.a 

A 
CO 
CO 




o 
a> 


CO 


$ 

3 


o 

O 


C5 


bo 


a 


b b 


1 




o 
o 


54 Sturgeon Falls 


193 


193 


193 


529 


54 


54 


193; 529 


529 


193 




55 Sudbury 


937 


937 


937 


937 


90 


185 


351 937 


937 


937 




56 Thorold 


230 


230 


230 


230 


26 


26 


72j 230 


230 


230 




57 Tilbury 


127 


268 


127 


127 


50 


30 


50 


50 


127 


268 




58 Timmins 


285 


285 


285 


285 


2 


44 


77 


285 


285 


285 




59 Trenton 


150 


217 


217 


217 


36 


84 


84 


217 


217 


217 




60 VankleekHill. 


230 


230 


141 


230 


55 


98 


230 


230 


230 


230 




61 Walkerton .... 


161 


185 


185 


185 


46 


132 


132 


185 


185 


185 




62 Walkerville... 


152 


152 


152 


152 


28 


26 


43 


152 


152 


152 




63 Wallaceburg .. 


314 


314 


314 


314 


40 


91 


91 


314 


314 


314 




64 Waterloo 


209 


255 


255 


255 


49 


165 


165 


255 


255 


255 




65 Weston 


72 


72 


72 


72 


15 


15 


38 


72 


72 


72 




66 Whitby 


59 


59 


59 


59 


14 


27 


27 


59 


59 


59 




Totals 


16,102 


17,697 


16,271 


17,667 


3,801 


6,289 


10,183 


17,357 


17,834 


17,400 


78 


• Totals 
























1 Rural Schools . . 


12,550 


12,672 


12,888 


14,729 


4,919 


5,191 


9,581 


12,897il2,992 


14,749 


233 


2 Cities 


30,901 


32,120 


32,071 


32,532 


7,871 


9,799 


13,685 


29,67132,039 31,204 


424 


3 Towns 


16,102 


17,697 


16,271 


17,667 


3,801 


6,289 


10,183 


17,35717,834 


17,400 


78 


4 Villages 


1,327 

60,880 


1,076 


1,430 


1,454 


500 


477 


980 


1,368 


1,414 


1,486 


13 


5 Gd. Totals, 1917 


63,565 


62,660 


66,382 


17,091 


21,756 


34,429 


61,293 


64,279 64,839 


748 


6 Gd. Totals, 1916 


63,384 


61,263 


60,010 


64,984 


23,920 


26,350 


35,067 


61,326 


62,328 


63,352 


942 


7 Increases 




2,302 


2,650 


1,398 










1,951 


1,487 




8 Decreases 


2,504 








6,829 


4,594 


638 


33 






194 
















9 Percentages ... 


86.91 


90.74 


89.45 


94.76 


24.39 


31.05 


49.15 


87.50 


91.76 


92.56 


1.06 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OP EDUCATION 



219 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Concluded 

PUPILS IN THB VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Concluded 





M 

_Q 

CO 

cm 
5 


>> 

B 

CD 
O 

o> 




o 
PQ 

d 
o 

>> 

4) 

i 


<D 

11 

.1 

ft, o 

^x O 


? 
o 

CQ 

o 

e 

4) 


* d 

.11 

w o 

S3 

C3 


a 
d 
<o 

*o 
CQ 

>> 
M 

d 
B 

m 


CO 
O 

<x> 
d 

'3 

a 

o 


H 

d 

'd 
o 

<1 


bo 

d 

u 
H 

§ 


to 

i 

*s 

CQ 

-73 
O 

,d 
CO 
CO 

d 
o 

w 


Maps, Globes 
and Prizes 


OS 


CO 

Pi 
03 

a 

M 
O 
JO 

8 

d 


CO 

o 

EB 
•8 

u 


CO 

1—1 

o 
o 

-d co 

^d° 


^ d 
S « 

J* 


54 . 










417 
627 
















11 

32 

8 

8 

7 

12 

13 

17 

11 

10 

11 

5 

10 


2 

5 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

2 

1 
1 




55 




















937 








56 






















57 










237 

200 












127 






58 






















59 .... 






















36 


1 






60 










214 
















61 


























1 
1 

1 
1 






62 










145 


















63 


























64 












69 














65 










' 














66 


























































50 


50 


10 




33 


7,960 




69 


49 


2 


48911,966 


235 


976 


127 31 


52 


1 268 

2 683 

3 50 

4 18 


285 

771 

50 

18 


177 

565 

10 

15 


156 
679 

"ii 


475 

798 

33 

17 


10,433 

4,865 

7,960 

514 


"i 


396 

736 

69 


218 

693 

49 

18 


1 

237 

2 


1,731 

472 
489 


1,340 

3,603 

1,966 

131 


288 
629 
235 


2,665 

1,308 

976 

152 


316 

223 

127 

19 


117 

36 

31 

6 


283 
22 
52 

8 


















5 1,019 

6 1,623 


1,124 
1,594 


767 
1,429 


852 
1,034 


1,323 
1,690 


23,772 
24,208 


l 

213 


1,201 
1,355 


978 
1,331 


240 
403 


2,692 
2,409 


7,040 
8,836 


1,152 
3,325 


5,101 
4,923 


685 
667 


190 
185 


365 
393 


7 .... 


















283 






178 


18 


'5 




8 604 


470 


662 


182 


367 436 


212 


154 


353 


163 


1,796 


2,173 


?8 












9 1.45 


1.6 


1.09 


1.21 


1.88 33.93 

1 


... 


1.71 


1.39,1.34 


3.84 


10.05 


1.64 


*9.3 


*1.25;34.67 ... 


• 



To each School. 



220 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN- 



Continuation 
Schools 



Receipts 



I 

Is 
■is 



.s * 





Ti 


CO 


d 


0) 

0) 


o3 


h 


93 


,__( 


O 


o 


P 


o 
o 


43 

o3 


W. 


W 



Ex- 



1 Acton ...... 

2 Agincourt . . 

3 Alvinston . . . 

4 Arkona 

5 Ayr 

6 Bancroft . . . 

7 Bath 

8 Beaverton . . 

9 Beeton 

10 Belmont.... 

11 Blenheim .. . 

12 Blind River. 

13 Blyth 

14 Bothwell ... 

15 Bowesville.. 

16 Bracebridge 



17 Bridgeburg . 

18 Bruce Mines 

19 Brussels.... 

20 Burk's Falls 

21 Burlington . . 

22 Cannington . 

23 Cardinal. ... 

24 Carp 

25 Chapleau . . . 

26 Claremont . . 

27 Clifford .... 

28 Cochrane . . . 

29 Coldwater . 

30 Comber 

31 Cookstown . . 

32 Creemore . . . 

33 Delaware . . . 

34 Delhi 

35 Drayton 



36 Dresden 



37 Drumbo 

38 Dryden 

39 Eganville 

40 Eganville(R.C.S.S) 

41 Elmira 

42 Elm vale 

43 Ennismore 

44 Erin 



45 Exeter 

46 Fenelon Falls... 

47 Finch 

48 Fingal 

49 Fitzroy Harbour. 

50 Fort Frances 



$ c. 
527 51 
270 70 
546 42 
213 33 
502 40 
635 35 
425 95 
549 75 
423 49 
556 30 
538 78 
915 20 
350 30 
437 95 
229 30 
1,116 40 

512 13 

1,205 97 
573 64 

1,066 60 
542 45 
627 20 
458 70 
498 95 
940 50 
368 30 
495 26 



505 75 
407 64 
517 90 
410 64 
255 11 
265 97 
668 86 

552 21 

338 77 
513 10 
484 70 
456 70 
516 71 



470 00 
369 85 

550 35 
433 00 
529 80 
511 30 
399 00 
1,109 70 



$ c. 
527 51 
270 70 

1,337 61 
341 45 
627 98 
635 35 
600 95 
649 75 
619 49 

1,427 60 
638 78 



615 60 
537 95 
229 30 



612 13 



1,405 17 



542 45 
630 20 
608 70 
498 95 



468 30 
652 76 



880 75 



707 90 
559 64 
255 11 
365 97 
732 24 

538 58 

488 77 



484 20 
456 10 
645 89 
913 51 
470 00 
569 85 

366 05 
433 00 
794 70 
283 13 
499 00 



$ c. 

1,010 00 

703 78 

539 76 



942 90 

1,004 55 

751 60 

1,283 94 

2,478 80 

600 00 

1,155 14 

1,159 55 

798 17 

839 82 

525 00 

2,688 60 

2,075 9? 

12,176 14 

300 00 

1,496 59 

1,919 47 
868 60 

1,132 12 
600 00 

1,450 00 

1,025 32 
978 47 
659 27 
950 00 
400 00 
455 00 

1,134 42 
703 06 
571 53 

1,711 53 



1,158 06 

600 00 
984 08 

1,059 46 
342 68 
978 94 

7,826 73 
500 00 
932 50 

1,237 50 

1,416 04 

650 00 

500 W 

300 00 

2,227 28 



$ c. 
222 50 
121 00 
420 00 
101 00 
221 00 



70 00 



317 
225 
503 
211 
2G4 
223 75 
205 00 
13 50 
342 50 



472 50 
141 00 
368 00 
411 00 
226 00 
519 00 



228 00 
219 50 



150 00 
154 00 
163 50 
240 00 
208 50 

65 00 
563 75 

173 32 

82 75 
11 00 
24 33 
42 00 
466 15 

66 50 
576 00 
262 00 

731 00 
117 00 
373 00 
73 00 
110 50 



$ c. 

228 70 

1,000 06 



314 22 
677 73 



155 00 
24 25 
12 00 
17 69 



376 58 
19 01 
10 20 



5 00 

1 70 

791 49 

17 00 



1,558 02 

573 80 

125 59 

47 15 



60 35 
756 65 
788 98 

13 00 
258 22 



51 44 
586 07 



344 23 
572 76 



42 93 



186 16 

27 00 

2,368 22 

2,238 50 

349 30 

598 17 



$ c. 
2,516 22 
2,366 24 
2,843 79 

970 00 
2,972 01 
2,275 25 
2,003 50 
2,824 69 
3,758 78 
3,104 59 
2,543 70 
2,278 75 
2,364 40 
2,039 73 
1,007 30 
4,147 50 

3,205 23 
13,383 81 
3,542 80 
2,721 19 
3,372 37 
2,537 00 
2,425 52 
3,674 92 
2,964 30 
2,215 51 
2,393 14 
659 27 
546 85 
718 29 
633 28 
357 70 
680 00 
268 47 
676 38 



2,473 61 

2,096 36 
1,508 18 
2,396 92 
1,870 24 
2,607 69 
8,806 74 
2,058 93 
2,134 20 

4,071 06 
2,426 04 
4,715 72 
4,605 93 
1,657 80 
3,935 15 



$ c. 

2,150 68 

1,000 00 

2,255 00 

900 00 

1,873 74 

1,797 25 

600 00 

210 32 

655 00 

044 25 

856 00 

1,700 00 

1,383 95 

1,650 00 

850 00 

3,842 50 



2,073 52 

1,970 00 

2,100 

2,108 

2,500 

1,945 

1,750 



1,900 00 



1,950 00 
1,676 79 
1,700 00 
320 00 
1,890 00 
1,500 00 
1,810 63 
1,700 00 
1,000 00 
1,020 39 
2,875 00 

2,050 00 

1,400 00 
1,200 00 
1,800 00 
1,500 00 
1,910 60 
701 98 
1,790 00 
1,541 25 

3,072 90 
2,035 00 
1,875 00 
1,900 00 
1,420 00 
2,349 20 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



221 



SCHOOLS 

CIAL STATEMENT 



penditure 




Buildings , Sites and all 
permanent improve- 
ments 


J J 

en eg 

gl 


ail 

.2 « g 8 g 

*d to 3 d 
>» d M O* O 

lull 

"3 cJ > c3 ft 


61 

1.1 

tfi (S « 
03 


u 

d 

^3 

d 
3 

ft 
M 



H 


Charges per year for Tuition 


1 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 

40 10 
118 36 


$ c. 
302 80 
947 24 
432 86 

63 95 
226 52 

178 00 
296 00 
532 36 

179 87 
853 32 
543 17 
450 00 
429 95 
185 80 

95 83 
305 00 

488 57 
626 11 
268 60 
209 98 
608 34 
475 00 
177 75 
1,115 03 
228 00 
265 17 
508 29 

"381*68 
28 79 
160 00 
521 30 
201 75 
93 26 
421 42 

400 31 

218 60 
146 04 
392 42 
198 43 
546 19 

'*2i9*88 
417 70 

497 42 
339 06 
1,741 88 
1,980 05 
116 00 
781 01 


$ c. 
2,493 58 
2,088 85 
2,843 78 

970 00 
2,209 51 
2,062 43 
2,003 50 
2,824 69 
3,664 54 
3,104 59 
2,543 07 
2,278 75 
2,086 17 
1,906 35 
1,001 42 
4,147 50 

3,205 23 
13,173 85 
2,398 75 
2,708 25 
3,372 37 
2,537 00 
2,381 77 
3,181 55 
2,902 27 
2,170 63 
2,393 14 
659 27 
2,419 12 
1,528 79 
2,046 11 
2,357 70 
1,317 61 
1,260 59 
3,676 38 

2,459 98 

1,618 60 
1,497 68 
2,370 16 
1,755 51 
2,607 69 
6,280 35 
2,053 69 
2,091 40 

3,645 26 
2,426 04 
4,715 72 
4,429 17 
1,536 00 
3,755 40 


Res. $5 ; non-res. $7. 


2 
3 


14 00 
155 92 


9 25 


$10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 


4 




6 05 
109 25 
87 18 
92 50 
71 91 
175 00 
82 39 
66 40 
75 00 
77 95 
62 59 
55 59 


$10. 


5 






$10. 


6 






Free. 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


i,*654*67 

45 25 
32 50 


15 00 
10 10 

"79*38 
45 00 
53 75 

194 32 

7 96 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 

$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

$7.50. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$5. 


16 






Res. free ; non-res. I $10, II $12.50. 


17 
18 
IP 


l6i44*39 


52 20 


590 94 
433 35 

30 15 

50 00 
148 82 

22 00 
211 62 
166 52 
100 00 

75 75 
162 55 
339 27 
129 44 


Ill $15. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res. F. I $5, II $7.50; all others $10. 
$5. 
$10. 
$10. 
$10. 
Res. $5; Tp. $15; others $20. 


20 
21 
22 
23 
?4 


340 27 
47 63 
20 00 

175 00 


"67*58 
75 00 
67 40 


25 
26 
27 

?8 


551 51 

98 00 


72 76 
54 92 
22 30 


Free. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $15. 

$10. 

Free. 


29 
30 




18 00 


$10. 
$10. 


31 


29 99 

136 40 

13 67 

"i50'67 


45 49 




$7.50. 


3? 




$10. 


33 
34 
35 

36 


65 65 
9 67 


102 19 

81 29 

229 89 


Res. $10 ; non-res. $12. 

Res. free, non-res. $10. 

Res. F.I free, II $10, III $12.50; non- 
res. $15. 

Res. L. Sch. free, M. $5 ; non-res. L. $6, 
M. $10. 

$5. 


37 




38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 


100 00 

71 68 

9 02 

5*134 66 


"32*83 
2 00 


51 64 
106 06 

15 23 
148 90 
444 37 

43 81 

98 20 

42 81 

51 98 

248 30 

49 95 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 
Res. $5; non-res. $10. 
$20. 


44 

45 
46 


34 25 
32 13 




Res. F. I free ; non-res. F. I $4.50 ; all 

others $9. 
Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


47 
48 
49 


837 19 
450 00 


13 35 
49 17 


$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 


50 


3ii 86{ 


200 00 


i07*33 


Free. 



222 



THE BEPORT OP THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN- 



Continuation 
Schools.— Con. 



Receipts 



49 



.9^ 

IS 



9^ 



d 

d 

11 
I 3 



Ex- 



51 Frankford .. 

52 Gore Bay.... 

53 Grand Valley 

54 Hanover 

55 Harrow 

56 Havelock .... 

57 Highgate .... 



58 Huntsville 

59 Jarvis 

60 Jockvale 

61 Kars 

62 Keewatin , 

63 Kenmore , 

64 Kinburn 

65 Lakefield , 

66 Lanark 

67 Lansdowne 

68 Little Current.... 

69 Lucknow 

70 Malakoff 

71 Manitowaning..., 

72*Manotick 

73fMassey 

74 Maxville 

75 Melbourne 

76 Merlin 

77 Merrickville 

78 Metcalfe 

79 Millbrook 

80 Milton 

81 Mount Albert 

82 Navan 

83 New Hamburg . . . 

84 New Liskeard. . . . 
85fNew Toronto 

86 North Augusta . . . 

87 North Gower 

88 Norwich 

89 Odessa 

90 Oil Springs 

91 Orono 

92 Paisley 

93 Pakenham 

94 Palmerston 

95 Plattsville 

96 Port Burwell .... 

97 PortColborne.... 

98 Powassan 

99 Princeton 



$ c. 
467 20 
,032 40 
503 63 
561 06 
443 70 
477 50 
531 99 

,127 30 
271 02 
225 50 
424 30 
,094 00 
453 20 
361 85 
539 60 
469 00 
222 05 
489 20 
525 90 
313 05 
445 20 



$ c. 
638 63 



968 51 



200 00 
477 50 
631 99 



200 00 
525 50 
424 30 



453 20 
400 00 
539 60 
469 00 
522 05 



1,051 80 
313 05 



478 75 
462 80 
417 73 
452 65 
462 90 
472 10 
537 44 
511 95 
349 40 
543 04 
,156 90 



453 15 
457 00 
525 40 
457 00 

487 03 

488 95 
514 55 
519 00 
532 90 
487 17 
497 90 
564 25 
531 60 
352 80 



718 12 
777 42 
517 23 
602 65 
962 90 
822 10 
537 44 
511 95 
490 00 
678 80 



650 00 
457 00 
675 40 
616 20 
737 03 
788 95 

1,029 10 
519 00 
680 40 
592 17 

1,244 75 
564 25 



502 80 



$ c. 

1,008 79 

760 64 

206 97 

1,071 40 

1,342 25 

1,287 52 

1,168 70 

1,700 00 
617 87 
350 00 
974 90 

2,132 78 
807 64 

1,370 57 

1,925 00 
883 33 
670 70 

1.306 22 
1,117 00 

662 32 
475 00 
234 00 
364 40 
900 00 
652 13 
664 00 
772 35 
232 04 
700 00 

1,035 84 
850 59 

1,250 87 

1.307 16 
1,900 00 

640 00 

412 52 

1,301 91 

1,220 56 

800 00 

759 78 

929 28 

573 70 

1,100 00 

1,607 78 

941 48 

500 00 

2,000 00 

500 00 

1,200 00 



$ c. 
220 00 
449 00 
319 00 
341 50 
61 00 
45 00 
272 50 

245 75 
73 50 
26 50 
50 25 



458 75 
219 00 



149 00 
37 20 
10 00 

415 00 
55 50 

194 00 



23 00 
355 50 
202 00 
273 50 

48 00 
245 00 



$ 
584 14 



21 00 
495 07 



37 70 
175 22 
ii6'86 



98 00 
,145 83 

56 16 
,071 74 
481 36 



127 96 

504 84 

30 91 



933 00 
249 00 
10 00 
171 00 
169 50 



201 00 
142 00 
185 35 
83 00 
277 50 



407 00 

423 00 

80 00 

244 25 



200 60 
37 50 



8 00 
18 00 
61 11 
13 00 

300 00 
25 11 

131 92 
37 51 
39 95 

578 56 



422 27 



39 59 
120 15 
109 36 
690 27 



256 31 
'697*43 



55 61 
835 95 
666 34 
209 65 
064 95] 



$ c. 
2,918 76 
2,242 04 
2,019 11 

2.469 03 
2,046 95 
2,287 52 
2,642 88 

3,248 27 

1.162 39 
1,238 36 
1,873 75 
3,226 78 
2,270 79 
3,497 25 
3,060 36 
3,042 07 
1,933 36 
1,805 42 
3,237 66 
1,848 76 
1,145 11 

234 00 
395 40 

2.470 37 
2,155 46 
1,885 46 
2,175 65 
1,927 95 
2,126 12 
3,081 23 

2.163 44 
2,678 83 
2,700 00 
3,648 67 

640 00 
1,756 26 
2,478 06 
2,716 07 
2,646 47 
2,261 34 
3,463 49 
2,524 35 
4,658 43 
2,901 08 
2,320 68 
3,078 60 
3,794 84 
1,441 85 
3,158 05 



$ c. 
1,800 00 
1,889 64 
1,550 00 
1,812 85 
1,610 00 
1,900 00 
2,080 00 

2,415 00 
1,000 00 
820 00 
1,549 30 
2,360 00 
1,650 00 
1,376 31 
2,200 00 
1,650 00 
825 00 
1,025 00 
2,250 00 
1,554 28 
950 00 
186 50 
320 00 
1,800 00 
1,763 75 
1,545 00 
1,700 00 
1,700 00 
1,600 00 
2,500 00 
1,975 00 
1,280 00 
2,250 00 
2,200 00 
640 00 
1,625 00 
1,670 00 
1,900 00 
1,700 00 
1,840 00 
1,750 00 
1,848 50 
2,050 00 
2,125 00 
1,820 00 
1,915 00 
2,180 00 
1,000 00 
1,760 00 



* Opened in October. 



t Opened in September. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



223 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CIAL STATEMENT— Continued 



penditure 



t3 <o 

> 

CO Pi 
IS 

. a 

is 

H d 01 

Hi 





CO 


8 


d 
o 


,d 
o 

CO 




3 


O 

S 


H 


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W 


o 
o 
o 
c3 



1 1 * ^ i 

- p w d d 

>* d ^ o* o 

c9 co+* w 

E p"£^ S? 

•^ ee IS cc3 P« 









>» 






h 






CO 






d 






o 


CO 

p 


CO 

<o 


J 


o 


d 

4) 




<rf 


ft 




d 


* 


| 


a 


CO 


o 


ed 


03 


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X,d 


_, 


CO 


-*J 


8 

02 


"5 
<+-t 


t3 
d 
3 



ft 

M 

3 

o 



Charges per year for Tuition 



51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 

58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 



$ c. 
206 59 



16 60 
68 20 
45 00 



55 00 



27 85 
8 50 



$ c. 
21 09 
14 86 



39 



55 03 



367 45! 



563 15; 
180 00 

25 14 



14 58 
3 82 



15 36 

8 85 

11 25 



20 00 



10 62 



03 



39 10 



75 00 



28 50! 



52 00 
46 00 



169 50 



8 55 



16 00 
200 00 



57 50 



89 | 202 58 



90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 



39 24 

24 20 

100 85| 

"ll 66 



25 00 
13 54 
25 00 
95 00 
243 54 



50 60 



19 05 



$ c. 
82 51 
90 25 
42 62 
54 81 

141 66 
71 80 

130 50 

107 38 
66 14 
16 



81 35 



486 34 
200 00 

11 00 

50 35 
150 00 

60 00 
109 98 

52 41 



45 00 
95 52 
70 32 
31 66 



52 29 



38 88 
126 03 



254 31 



98 42 
93 16 
57 33 
89 79 

106 52 
15 00 
29 17 
53 82 

139 63 
55 60 



15 00 



50 00 
30 27 



$ c 

339 75 

247 29 
408 61 

486 05 
238 53 

248 64 
112 50 

440 75 
87 50 
333 10 
315 95 
708 51 
616 08 
936 55 
628 50 

272 26 
274 12 

60 00 

620 00 

159 36 

85 03 

30 12 

30U0 

517 71 

209 30 

6 26 

273 15 
157 80 
344 58 

487 98 
134 28 
348 27 
450 00 
777 54 
640 00 
119 24 
510 21 
508 64 

340 45 
253 81 
413 44 
535 00 
235 23 
381 72 
347 05 

91 62 
320 90 
110 00 
324 03 



$ 
2,449 
2,242 
2,017 
2,430 
2,035 
2,220 
2,323 

3,073 
1,153 
1,197 
1,873 
3,164 



269 

166 

043 

942 

160 

798 

130 

1,848 

1,098 

216 

395 

2,421 

2,082 

1,657 

1,973 

1,910 

1,996 



062 
148 
923 
700 
240 
640 
744 
352 
701 
300 
247 
307 
524 
409 
875 
306 
112 
519 
160 
2,129 



Res. free; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $8. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. F. I free, others $3 : non-res. $6. 

Res. I free, II and III $7.50; non-res. 

1 $5, II and III $10. 
Res. F. 1 free, II $5 ; all others $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $7.50. 
Res. F. I free ; all others $5. 
Res. free; non-res. $7.50. 
Free. 
$12.50 

Res. free ; non-res. $20. 
Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. and County $5 ; others $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $7.50. 
Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 
Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
$10. 
Free. 

Res. $10 ; non-res. $15. 
$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $15. 
Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
Res. I free ; all others $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. $3 ; non-res. $6. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 
Free. 

F'sI&II$7.50 ; III $12.50. 
$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
Res. $6 ; non-res. $12. 
Free. 
Free. 
$10. 
Res. free; non-res. $4.50. 



224: 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
TABLE H— FINAN- 



Coutinuation 

Schools 
—concluded 







CO 








a 
u 


3 
d 


CJ 


2 


CD 


a 


r3 


.5-1 




'2 !=> 


Leg] 





Receipts 



o 



.2 * 



Ex- 



100 Richmond ; 

101 Ridgeway 

102 Ripley 

103 Rodney 

104 Russell 

105 St. George 

106 Schomberg j 

107 Southampton 

lt)8*South Mountain. 

109 South Porcupine . 

110 Spencerville 

111 Springfield 

112 Stayner 

113 Stella 

114 Stouffville 

115 Sturgeon Falls . 

116 Sutton 

117 Tarn worth .... 

118 Tara 

119 Tavistock .... 

120 Teeswater 

121 Thamesville .... 

122 Thessalon ......! 

123 Thornbury 

124 Thorndale 

125 Tilbury j 

126 Tottenham 

127 Wark worth ; 

128 Webbwood j 

129*Westboro' 

130 West Lome 

131 Westmeath ! 

132 Westport 

133 Westport(R.C.S.S)! 
134tWheatley 

135 Winona 

136 Wolfe Island.. 

1 37 Wroxeter 



$ c. 
241 00 
593 97 
516 46 
519 30 
464 00 
534 50 
241 15 
549 50 



515 70 
421 65 
551 25 
522 35 
210 00 

492 90 
567 50 
360 80 
475 90 
534 35 
534 15 
469 45 
502 80 
835 30 
518 95 
309 20 
413 00 
508 34 

493 45 

536 20 



$ c. 

241 00 

609 80 

1,032 92 

1,298 25 

664 00 

834 50 

241 15 

1,099 00 



571 65 
1,378 12 
728 35 
385 00 
492 90 



1 Totals, 1917 

2 Totals, 1916 



541 09 
269 05 
365 35 
283 20 
435 50 
256 67 
195 15 
464 81 



65,732 84 
64,753 20 



360 80 
650 90 
1,068 70 
684 15 
938 90 
602 80 



778 43 
309 20 
513 00 
690 84 
893 45 



1,352 72 
269 05 
512 64 
421 04 
572 20 
456 67 
195 15 

1,280 07 



3 Increases 

4 Decreases 



5 Percentages. 



979 64 



72,541 21 
69,725 89 



2,815 32 



18.24 



20.12 



$ c. 

429 10 

1,573 59 

500 00 

433 87 

1,166 00 

1,100 00 

300 00 

578 92 

800 00 

1,675 00 

700 00 

236 19 

1,000 00 

300 00 

744 72 

2,000 00 

799 78 

799 74 

446 80 

4,813 76 

700 00 

1,003 06 

2,597 94 

1,153 08 

2,209 04 

1,000 00 

872 20 

1,107 02 

777 53 
1,327 17 
1,363 04 

484 61 
1,185 32 
3,000 00 



604 13 
400 00 



155,173 97 
133,468 87 



21,705 10 



43.05 



$ c. 
142 50 



642 50 
37 00 

'i45'40 

119 50 

250 40 

23 00 



224 50 
67 00 
304 50 
355 00 
519 50 
59 00 
319 00 
271 00 
349 00 
263 00 
266 00 
210 00 
107 50 
292 50 
276 00 
165 00 
254 00 
374 00 



$ c, 



14 00 
116 66 

16 00 
2,594 93 

88 70 

75 93 
452 81 
200 00 

68 93 

640 66 

609 56 

1,168 81 

677 90 



142 20 
585 671 

153 711 



326 48 
725 47 

14 80, 



23 00 1 

724 16 

572 23i 

9 80 

29 00 



651 18 



189 50 
50 00! 
34 00 

246 30 



114 00 
267 25 



35 00 
493 20 



644 44 
29 35 



26,179 55140,803 58 
28,625 22|41,279 10 



2,445 67 475 52 



7.26 



11.32 



$ c. 
1,053 60 
2,791 36 
2,808 54 
2,304 42 
4,888 93 
2,703 10 

977 73 
2,930 63 
1,023 00 
2,259 63 
2,558 46 
2,842 12 
3,724 01 
1,927 90 
2,250 02 
2,768 70 
2,426 05 
2,351 25 
2,398 85 
6,621 54 
3,099 82 
2,333 46 
3,540 74 
2,765 96 
3,827 60 
2,663 23 
2,335 18 
2,896 92 

1,313 73 
1,327 17 
3, £03 03 
1,212 21 
2,148 31 
4,231 44 
1,254 00 
1,317 47 
1,548 74 
2,041 48 



360,431 15 
337,852 28 



22,578 87 



$ c. 

900 00 
2,515 50 
1,957 50 
1,900 00 
1,720 00 
2,010 00 

871 50 
1,900 00 

365 00 
1,050 00 
1,680 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,085 00 
1,850 07) 
1,000 00 
1,400 00 
1,760 00 
1,830 00 
2,120 00 
1,876 57 
1,923 10 
1,940 75 
1,856 55 
2,034 50 
1,500 00 
1,900 00 
1,900 00 

1,025 00 
340 00 
1,945 50 
1,100 00 
1,669 75 
1,085 00 
1,060 62 
1,000 00 
750 00 
1,525 00 



228,361 92 
224,463 58 



3,898 34 



70.35 



Opened in September. 



t Closed in June. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



225 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CIAL STATEMENT— Concluded 



penditure 



51 

« p 

CO 03 

cyj P 

P d co 



— I CO 

o p 

8 2 



M 03 -h 
03 P. 03 

p >>"£ 
P+ 3 2 

03 - S o 
O 03 jyj'n 03 

•§82|g 



rO 



a* o 
^ co 

P-p 



e3 £ d P 









>» 






J-l 






03 






rt 


CO 




o 


d 


03 




o 
d 

n 


co 

P 

03 


CO 


P 






X 


CO 


d 


03 




X 


03 


x> 


03 


rP 








o 






o 

rP 


d 


P 


CO 


d 



p 

13 

XI 

3 

o 



Charges per year for Tuition 



$ c. 



230 05 
37 83 



140 00 



$ c. 
25 57 



1 00 

8*30 



158 80: 
166 001 



40 75 



45 65 

63 80 



581 20 
132 28 



86 00 

2,486 19 

37 25 

27 30 

1,234 45 

220 00 

300 00 



31 12 

19 21 



64 92 



27 56 



487 00 
606 79 



228 20 
90 00 



14 00 
28 25 
13 71 

60 00 



35 40 
12 12 



$ c. 
22 10 
130 86 
6 70 
78 66 
36 70 
43 87 



69 35 

211 99 

399 00 

59 22 

78 03 

29 51 

91 94 

294 78 



5 55 



32,328 15 2,648 69 
25,109 39i3,416 27 



7,218 76 



9.96 



767 58 



.81 



190 21 
29 07 

172 61 
35 82 
93 25 
73 80 
16 15 
22 80 
54 14 
95 00 
14 00 
13 00 

28 75 
267 17 
500 00 

27 36 
380 12 

58 37 



62 08 
107 80 



12,735 26 
10,234 54 



2,500 72 



3.92 



$ c. 
101 53 

80 00 
361 68 
269 07 
214 91 
397 98 
106 23 
824 08 
113 00 
112 11 
223 08 
295 19 
354 51 
149 84 

80 00 
813 58 
314 20 
304 97 
292 64 
570 49 
116 75 
266 61 
325 68 
583 69 
1,404 95 
169 00 
243 41 
983 92 

234 98 

233 00 

313 75 

76 60 

95 34 

185 00 

90 65 

100 68 

298 24 

171 05 



1,049 
2,726 



48,546 90 
42,923 97 



5,622 93 



14.95 



2,556 
2,285 
1,979 
2,591 

977 
2,793 

889 
1,727 
1,962 
2,404 
2,448 
1,390 
2,224 
2,459 
2,036 
2,094 
2,381 
5,212 
2,137 
2,319 
3,530 
2,743 
3,793 
1,799 
2,197 
2,896 

1,288 
1,327 
3,366 
1,203 
2,145 
3,556 
1,246 
1,100 
1,110 
1,803 



e.: 
20 
36 
93 
56! 

91 
85 

73j 

43 

54 

11 
30 

34 

88 

58| 

78! 

70! 

69 

04 

25! 

50! 

82 

06 

74 

04 1 

59 

40 

09 

92 

73 
171 

04! 
96| 

21 
57 
82 
68 

32: 

85 



Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $8 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. and County, free ; others $10. 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $12. 

F. I res. free ; non-r. $5; F. II $10. 



Res. free 

Free. 

$10. 



non-r. $5. 



F: I free; all others $10. 
$5 ; non-res. $10. 



Res 

Res 

$20. 

$15. 

$10. 

$10. 

Res- free ; non-res. $13. 

$10. 

Res- $5; non-res. $10. 

F. I $5 ; others $10. 

Res. free; non-res. $10. 

Res. free; non-res. $10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

$10. 

$10. 

F. I res. $6 , non-res. $7.50 

non-res. $10.50. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10 
Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
Res. free ; non-res. $5. 
$20. 
Free. 
$15. 
F. 1 $5 ; II $7.50 ; III $10. 



II res. $9, 



324,620 92 57 free; 80 not free. 
306,147 75 53 free; 83 not free. 



18,473 17! 4 free. 
3 not free. 



41.60 free; 58.39 not free. 



15 E. 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





H3 

o c$ 

Sec 

1- 

(3 

o ft 

o <u 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 




as 


■l< 

w 




o3 
ta 
eS 

^ as 
as^Q 

o 


as 

u 


as 
u 

as 

P. 

H > 


as 

0. 

II 

OCO 


Equipment for 
Physical Culture 


Gymnasium, not 
including equip- 
ment 




OS 



3 


c3 


1 Acton 




$ 

307 
167 
260 
167 
228 
105 
196 
215 

34 
253 
426 
176 
154 
200 
190 
477 
371 

54 
315 
299 
246 
219 
287 
201 
122 
292 
333 
151 
200 
178 
234 
162 
138 
165 
388 
303 
200 

95 
188 
429 
257 

88 
237 
195 
519 
237 
329 

47 
162 
306 


$ 

235 
153 
369 
147 
359 
161 
238 
276 
241 
531 
528 
202 
261 
426 
153 
634 
527 
283 
256 
349 
311 
322 
295 
273 
226 
310 
284 
122 
366 
229 
346 
196 
134 
148 
497 
364 
225 
157 
343 
305 
339 
325 
307 
242 
547 
313 
551 
164 
212 
364 


$ 

22 

39 
91 
25 

42 
56 
56 
63 
14 
38 
71 
20 
81 
28 
30 
78 
52 
55 
87 
68 
100 
20 
64 

"23* 
61 
74 

6 
32 
63 
31 

9 
28 
67 
88 
30 
54 
41 
41 
65 
36 
42 
49 
37 
85 
38 
31 
10 
24 
61 


$ 
35 
13 
34 
25 
37 
16 
24 
47 
22 
16 
52 
19 
34 
25 
44 
50 
69 
42 
35 
49 
51 
44 
50 
18 
43 
31 
74 
36 
37 
43 
56 
16 
35 
34 
51 
44 
42 
33 
22 
58 
44 
41 
42 
29 
91 
37 
58 
33 
9 
51 


$ 


$ 

26 
33 
42 
11 
25 
6 


$ 
12 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2 Agincourt 








3 Alvinston 










4 Arkona 


1 








5 Ayr 








6 Bancroft ,. . 












7 Bath 










8 Beaverton 




25 


15 








9 Beeton 








10 Belmont 




34 
32 










1 1 Blenheim 


16 








12 Blind River 








13 Blyth 




16 
22 








6 


14 Bothwell 










15 Bowesville 










16 Bracebridge 





20 
48 










17 Bridgeburg 


12 








18 Bruce Mines 








19 Brussels 


'36' 

8 

i25' 


44 
33 
30 
10 
51 
20 
17 
15 
22 
24 
35 
24 
16 










20 Burks Falls . . 










21 Burlington 

22 Cannington 

23 Cardinal 


40 
22 




















24 Carp 










25 Chapleau 


8 






6 


26 Claremont . . 










27 Clifford.. 


7 








28 Cochrane 








29 Coldwater . . 










30 Comber 


10 






5 


31 Cookstown . . 








32 Creemore 










33 Delaware . . 




25 
22 
56 
34 
13 
19 


12 








34 Delhi.. 








35 Drayton . 


5 

17 








36 Dresden 








37 Drumbo 








38 Dryden 


9 

15 

500 

12 








39 Eganville . . 








40 Eganville (R.C.S.S.) 

41 Elmira. . 


i50* 


58 
23 
19 
11 
12 
16 
37 
50 


3,500 




3 


42 Elmvale 










30 








44 Erin 








45 Exeter 


19 




25 




46 Fenelon Falls 




47 Finch . 


10 








48 Fingal 








49 Fitzroy Harbour 

50 Fort Frances 














.... 


31 






25 





1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



227 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
BOARD,^VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


CO 


Pi 

o d 

*& 

,— i d d 
* § § 


a 

ti co 

ill 

CO 2 

r-Jrd OJ 

2 -*f t-< 

2 d d 
-d c«£ 


CD 

-d 

*■ 

.3 

CO 

d 
co a> 

— < i— H 

-gcq 


-d 

O CD 
I 8 * 

* <» £ 

•s bo C 
to ^2 
i — i co d 

ss| 

QQ 


"3 u. 
C7> 


f 

-d 

a> 

CO 

o 

■*§ 

O d 
O J-i 

-dOn 

03 


CD 

d co 

o S3 
do 

CD Sh 

IS 

o 
O 


o 
u 

CD 

a 

B 

o 
O 


a> 

d 

'd 
o 
'C 
be 




.3 8 

-d 3 

£0 
!^ 


1 

be 
d 

,3 


H 


CO 
CO 

g 

Eh 

a> 


cS 

CD 

.5 

CO .2 

co |> 
cu 3 


CO 

d 
.2 

+3 

S3 

P. 
d 
cd 



u 

CD 
-4-3 




d 
.2 a= 

i§ 

.5 



dil 

tf! 

Oil! 
d ?! 
if 

CD 11 

I 

|1 


$ 

1 9 

2 .... 


f $ 
646 
405 
796 
376 
691 
344 
514 
641 
311 
892 

1,165 
430 
557 
701 
417 

1,304 

1,079 
434 
782 
825 
778 
647 
767 
542 
457 
727 
79i 
342 
795 
577 
693 
383 
372 
436 

1,085 
792 
534 
354 
659 

4,947 
811 
515 
691 
515 

1,488 
671 

1,054 
254 
407 
850 J 




1 
1 




1 


1 


1 


1 

3 
2 


5 

6 
4 

1 




1 


3 
2 


— 


3 


5 

3 
2 

4 
5 




3 .... 








5 




3 


2 


4 .... 


1 














2 


5 














1 

4 
1 
2 
4 
6 
3 
3 
2 








1 


6 


1 
1 










1 

"i* 

i 


"2 

"'2 

1 
3 


1 

"i" 
1 


.... 


1 

1 


1 


2 


7 .... 








1 


1 


8 .... 






1 

"i* 

8 
1 
1 
7 
1 
11 
8 
1 
1 
2 
5 
5 






9 


T 

1 
1 

T 
l 


1 








.... 


3 


2 


5 


10 20 


1 


1 


11 40 


1 
1 
1 




"i" 

2 
2 


5 

1 


4 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 

"4" 
5 


9 


12 13 






3 

1 
2 


4 


13 5 






2 




1 


14 .... 


1 


.... 




15 .... 






3 
2 








16 45 










4 

1 

"i* 

l 

3 

1 

I 

5 


1 


10 
2 
2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
4 
4 


5 

1 


1 


2 


17 .... 


"i" 


1 
1 
1 








2 


18 .... 




1 


2 
2 


— 




19 45 


1 


1 


1 


20 27 




,, 


21 .... 




1 








8 

3 
10 


1 
3 




22 10 





1 
1 


8 


23 20 


i 

i 
i 

i 
i 

'T 






1 




1 


24 .... 


1 






2 


1 




25 4 






2 




2 


26 18 


1 








3 
6 


1 


4 




1 
1 






27 .... 






2 






1 


1 


28 3 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


i 
















29 .... 






3 
4 
4 
3 
2 
4 
3 
5 
1 


3 

1 
2 


.... 


1 






3 
1 
1 


2 
2 

"3' 
7 
3 
3 
1 
4 
2 
3 


2 


30 25 








31 10 






.... 


1 
1 






1 


32 .... 






1 




1 


33 .... 


1 




3 
2 

10 
7 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 










34 .... 


l 
l 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


! 

. 1 

! 
















35 .... 


"i* 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


8 
4 










36 .... 

37 .... 


1 
2 
1 


.... 


1 
3 




38 .... 








39 50 

40 29 


i 
i 


1 
1 


2 
2 

6 


1 


6 

11 

3 


2 


1 
1 


.... 


41 100 








1 




4 




42 .... 




1 


i 












43 15 


1 






2 
5 

4 
8 
5 


"2 


3 
1 
5 
5 
2 
5 






2 
2 
3 

'5' 

1 


5 

3 
5 
2 

T 

1 
4 1 




44 .... 


l 


1 
1 







4 
1 
2 


2 
"2 


2 

1 
1 


2 


45 36 

46 9 




1 


6 

1 


47 25 


l 






i 




2 


48 .... 






1 




.... 


1 




49 .... 




1 


i 


I 


3 
2 




50 12 






.... 


1 






















228 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 



Continuation 

Schools 
— Continued 



. "3 

O c* 

3 o 
°^ 

la 

!= 03 

o ft 

o <u 



Value of General 



m 



O 03 

• ^ 03 



CO 



en co 
ft <u 

S3 

^03 

o 





to 


to 


N 






<D 




tJ 


*H 


3 


4) 




ft 


& 


>> 


<t1 


H 



•Sog 
,5 ft 

OCO 

pq 



b 3 

fl 03 

<v o 
S'S 
ft >> 

C3 



o != 

.3-S 

03 S3"** 
So S 

C3 



•p 



51 Frankford 




$ 

207 
166 
226 
378 
170 
189 
306 
352 
260 
127 
170 
303 
180 
207 
214 
388 
510 
134 
339 
107 
111 
140 
272 
154 
281 
224 
208 
252 
372 
277 
315 
136 
310 
348 
153 
233 
231 
297 
218 
207 
176 
209 
242 
327 
143 
235 
298 
136 
264 
168 


$ 

282 
315 
348 
317 
226 
267 
300 
542 
160 
177 
220 
368 
437 
313 
491 
323 
183 
146 
348 
182 
153 
192 
162 
250 
348 
216 
248 
324 
328 
392 
339 
209 
362 
368 
188 
217 
265 
257 
329 
300 
293 
454 
346 
247 
380 
349 
443 
219 
164 
171 


$ 

43 

65 

66 

48 

43 

30 

45 

88 

38 

35 

37 

76 

38 

67 

45 

55 

26 

53 

34 

14 

33 

39 

70 

35 

58 

34 

28 

49 

71 

59 

37 

19 

65 

81 

"hi' 

32 

68 
69 
31 
22 
61 
37 
63 
33 
47 
72 
24 
19 
16 


$ 

36 

12 

41 

40 

32 

36 

39 

58 

42 

22 

25 

42 

15 


$ 


$ 

25 
18 
20 
39 
23 
27 
15 
28 
6 

15 
11 
11 
30 


$ 
14 


$ 


$ 


$ 


52 Gore Bay 








53 Grand Valley 










54 Hanover 


22 






5 


55 Harrow 








56 Havelock 










57 Highgate 










58 Huntsville 


73 


50 






59 Jarvis 






60 Jockvale 










61 Kars 










62 Keewatin 


53 








63 Kenmore 








64 Kinburn 


30 








65 Lakefield 


31 
41 
25 
32 
34 
6 
29 
22 
44 
23 
47 
48 
23 
23 
47 
36 
40 
28 
51 
37 
30 
22 
27 
30 
39 
40 
15 
58 
57 
' 50 
44 
36 
32 
22 
20 
22 


.... 


28 
8 
29 
13 
45 
23 
9 








66 Lanark 


27 








67 Lansdowne 








68 Little Current .... 










69 Lucknow 










70 Malakoff 










71 Manito waning 
















2 


73 Massey 


.... 


25 

26 
24 
17 
23 
18 
43 
50 
6 
52 
70 
54 
35 










74 Maxville . . 












8 
27 

18 








76 Merlin 








77 Merrickville 








78 Metcalfe . . 








79 Millbrook . 










80 Milton . . 










81 Mount Albert . 










82 Navan 










83 New Hamburg .... 

84 New Liskeard . 


10 














85 New Toronto 










86 North Augusta 

87 North Gower 


7 

7 

5 

18 











18 
42 








88 Norwich . . 








89 Odessa 








90 Oil Springs 

91 Orono 




17 
















92 Paisley . . 


.... 


83 
7 

16 
32 
19 
26 


23 








93 Pakenham 
















95 Plattsville 


10 






5 


96 Port Burwell 








97 Port Colborne 


40 




















23 












4 

















1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



229 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC.— Continued 



Equipment 




P, 




•w d 




o a* 




©W 




d^_, 


CO 


^S 


CD 


t> S^ 


u 

d 

O 


otal 
Gen 
men 


Oh 


H 



Religious and other Exercises 



CO o 

""d l-d 
2 ^ 

CO 



J* 

CO 



C$T3 



1 S TJ fe 



§§1 

CO 



p. £ 

CO 



o 

,4 

a 



o cc 
I — I t-t 

. -30 

CO 



£ 8 

a to 
do 

|S 
o 



Destination of Pupils 



H 

3 

+-^ 

o 

-5 









c3 






M 






£ 


CO 


d 

O CO 








CD 


a 


-*-=> o 








pP 


o 


c3 o 


CD 






-*-^ 




d-d 


H^ 









a 


°\?. 


3 8 




CO 




p. 


•^3 CO 


t3 2 

SO 
- o> 


3 

3 




CD |> 

«J p-l 


p 

o 
o 
o 
u 


IS 


o 
a 

CD 


| 


rH CD 

£co 


i 


s ^ 

^o 


J 


H 


H 


o 


O 


o 



$ 

607 
576 
701 
916 
520 
564 
722 
1,211 
506 
376 
477 
853 
703 
634 
809 
847 
773 
384 
806 
347 
335 
410 
573 
508 
776 
566 
548 
682 
867 
814 
737 
444 
868 
888 
426 
530 
584 
707 
680 
595 
506 
893 
689 
733 
647 
716 
933 
401 
490 
381 



10 

2 



3 , 

3 |. 
4 

i 
1 1. 

I! 



12 
1 
2 
5 



530 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 







Value of General 




















, 




Continuation Schools — 


tider Publ 
e School 






i 








2 

1 1 

U 3 


§3 






Concluded 




CO 

S3 


Pi 

c3 




CO 


CO 

a 




a e» 




M 




O P, 

O 03 

-PCO 
o 

w 


b 


O o3 
CO 


^ CO 
CO ^2 

o 


o 

■a 


1 

1 


11 

OCC 


■d -d 

q,I-H 


Gymnasiu 
includin 
ment 


g 

4) 
CO 


3 £ 

3 e3 

< 



101 Ridgeway 




$ 
253 
317 
241 


$ 

239 
291 
307 


$ 

55 
58 
47 
63 
49 
39 
71 
27 
35 
37 
75 
61 
2 
25 
41 


$ 
33 


$ 


$ 

22 

14 


$ 


% 


$ 


$ 


102 Ripley 


26 .--. 










103 Rodney 


50 
34 
50 
23 
53 


....! 25 


6 








104 Russell 


199 304 
263 { 337 
174 165 
342 422 
228 246 








105 St. George 


. . . . ! 54 
.... | 31 
60 i 15 










106 Schomberg 












107 Southampton 


10 








108 South Mountain... 


18 .... 








109 South Porcupine . . 


125 
163 
405 
218 


107 
260 
602 
443 


44 
31 


27 
i 16 










110 Spencerville 










Ill Springfield 


64 .... 115 

39 .... 39 

8 .... 8 
10 .--.! 3 










112 Stayner 


18 






1 


113 Stelia 


90 220 








114 Stouffville 




91 
197 
241 
290 
237 


273 
280 
316 
231 
372 
351 
267 
319 
297 
451 
303 
279 
358 
298 
221 
103 
380 
169 










115 Sturgeon Falls.... 


39 












116 Sutton 


67 ! 23 
33 1 28 
56 58 


9 
.... 18 

.... 12 
. . . . i 10 
.... 2 
...J 16 










117 Tamworth 










118 Tara 










119 Tavistock 


1 276 
1 J 265 
1 ! 358 
1 ! 297 
1 1 96 


32 
56 


16 
46 










120 Teeswater 










121 Thamesville 


14 51 










122 Thessalon 


73 26 .... 12 
59 ; 50 .... 28 
83 ' 44 .... 17 
36 1 37 .... 10 
32 57 1 










123 Thornbury 


29 

4 








124 Thorndale 




BOO 

?4n 








125 Tilbury 










126 Tottenham 


1 274 
1 242 
1 ! 149 
1 | 103 
1 304 
1 182 


10 








127 Warkwortii 

128 Webbwood 


42 ' 50 ! 


22 










37 28 
27 34 
66 62 













129 Westboro' 












130 West Lome 




42 

30 

45 

5 

7 


14 








131 Westmeath 


f 43 i 28 .... 
36 21 1 








132 Westport 


1 263 J 453 
1 300 28Q 


24 








133 Westport (R.C.S.S.) 
134fWheatley 


41 
16 


20 .... 
29 1 




3 


4 


1 I 216 
1 ! 158 
1 90 
1 R82 


302 
214 
117 
411 








135 Winona 


21 35 




10 








136 Wolfe Island 


28 

39 27 




8 
23 








137 Wroxeter 


9 










131 

129 










1 Totals, 1917 

2 Totals, 1916 


32,046 

29,387 


40,601 
38,388 


6,189 4,912 
5,785 4,292 


373 
410 


2,966 
2,313 


1,302 
908 


3,550 
5,500 


53 
25 


37 
39 


3 Increases 


2 


2,659 


2,213 


404 ; 620 


'37* 


653 394 


i,*950* 


28 




4 Decreases 


a 
















5 Percentages 


95.62 


34.37 


43.55 


6.63 5.27 


.40 


3.18 1.39 


3.80 


.05 


.04 



Consolidated School Board 



t Closed in June, 1917 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



231 



SCHOOLS— Contin tied 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC.— Concluded 



Equipment 



O o* 

d^_, 
"3 g 

— i d & 
rt 3 2 



Religious and other Exercises 



Destination of Pupils 



3 w 

2 £ ^ 

d.S oj 
feW 
r d -d aj 
2 3 d 
CO 



101 .. 

102 .. 
103 
104 

105 .. 

106 .. 
107 

108 .. 

109 .. 

110 .. 

111 .. 
112 

113 .. 

114 .. 

115 .. 

116 .. 

117 .. 
118 
119 
120 .. 
121 
122 
123 .. 
124 
125 .. 
126 
127 
128 .. 
129 
130 
131 
132 .. 
133 
134 .. 
135 

136 .. 

137 .. 



15 



1 1,199 

2 854 



345 

1.28 



$ 

602 
706 
686 
628 
753 
432 
988 
530 
338 
507 
1,261 
823 
328 
402 
557 
656 
600 
747 
695 
636 
808 
710 
813 
761 
607 
755 
661 
435 
280 
874 
457 
842 
687 
570 
453 
243 
891 



93,228 
87,901 

5,327 



CO aj 

is 



i n3 

CO Nl 

.2 8 

a 9 



CO 



O <u 

o co O 

CD 'CO 



&£ 



T3 ^ 

4) 0) 



o 
CO 



a « 











o3 








u 






£ 


CO 

d 


o «» 




o 






Xi 


o 


^3 


4> 
U 

d 
■*-» 

"d 
o 


a* 

.2 2 

^ d 

go 


bfi 
d 

1 
03 


CO 

<u 

e 

Eh 


d 

si 

£co 


o3 
A 

g 
o 

o 

u 
<o 

,d 


•J|gq 
2 ^ 

xi o 


bo 


X 


<o 


xi 


>^ 


+J 


-*^» " 


< 


H 


H 


o 


O 


O ' 



39.41 



58.39 



13 
136 



100 



1 



17.51 



238 

283 



45 

22.6212.87 



394 
403 



21.32 



3 

3 
10 I 

5| 

I 

2 



46 315 
42 1 256 



4 59 



2.48 



17.04 



79 



4.27 



1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
16 
1 1 
1 .... 



48 



2.59 



272 
407 



135 



14.71 



315 
322 



17.04 



232 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS AND 



Continuation Schools 



Pupils 



-2 * 

;3 CO 





73 M 






0) OS 




f-l 




O ;_, 


+3 


ber of n 
pils adm 
ring the 


M 03 

o ^ 




a =* 3 

3 ftT3 




O 


o ^ 




S3 


CQ 



«ph«s a 



" 03 
o ^ 



& 



Q § 

03 +_> 



Number of Pupils Number of 
Pupils from— 



3d 

. p o 

TO fl OrH 



C£ 



1 Acton 

2 Agincourt 

3 Alvinston 

4 Arkona 

5 Ayr 

6 Bancroft 

7 Bath 

8 Beaverton 

9 Beeton 

10 Belmont 

11 Blenheim 

12 Blind River 

13 Blyth 

14 Bothwell 

15 Bowesville 

16 Bracebridge 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Bruce Mines 

19 Brussels 

20 Burk's Falls 

21 Burlington 

22 Cannington 

23 Cardinal 

24 Carp 

25 Chapleau 

26 Claremont 

27 Clifford 

28 Coldwater 

29 Cochrane 

30 Comber 

31 Cookstown 

32 Creemore 

33 Delaware 

34 Delhi 

35 Drayton 

36 Dresden 

37 Drumbo 

38 Dryden 

39 Eganville 

40 Eganville (R.C.S.S/* . 

41 Elmira 

42 Elm vale 

43 Ennismore 

44 Erin 

45 Exeter 

46 Fenelon Falls 

47 Finch 

48 Fingal 

49 Fitzroy Harbour 

50 Fort Frances 



42 
9 
50 
10 
26 
42 
24 
38 
35 
66 
71 
24 
37 
46 
7 
110 
28 
21 
62 
40 
73 
45 
35 
56 
35 
25 
30 
27 
8 
19 
37 
35 
15 
24 
65 
57 
17 
11 
30 
57 
56 
26 
29 
44 
102 
44 
56 
19 
16 
28 



10 

4 

16 
10 
12 
25 

7 
18 
17 
24 
37 
15 
21 
14 

5 
47 
19 

9 
21 
15 
37 
18 
19 
21 
15 
10 
12 
10 

8 

6 
20 
20 

7 
13 
27 
17 

5 

5 
11 
22 
23 
13 

8 
20 
46 
18 
22 

3 
10 
15 



19 

5 

18 
5 

9 
8 

11 
11 
12 
29 
:*2 
8 

18 
20 

34 

7 
7 

18 
15 
34 
20 
15 
18 
16 
12 
(5 

10 

2 

6 

15 

12 

8 

7 

23 

27 

9 

6 

10 
28 
26 
10 
15 
20 
28 
22 
28 

8 
li) 

7 



23" 


31 


4 


8 


32 


41 


5 


8 


17 


22 


34 


33 


13 


19 


27 


34 


23 


30 


37 


53 


39 


48 


16 


11 


19 


28 


26 


37 


7 


4 


76 


91 


21 


21 


14 


17 


44 


48 


25 


27 


39 


56 


25 


31 


20 


28 


38 


41 


19 


23 


13 


19 


24 


24 


17 


22 


6 


5 


13 


13 


22 


29 


23 


20 


7 


12 


17 


21 


42 


48 


30 


43 


8 


12 


5 


8 


20 


21 


29 


35 


30 


40 


16 


20 


14 


22 


24 


30 


74 


83 


22 


35 


28 


39 


11 


11 


6 


10 


21 


20 



30 
9 
36 
10 
20 
38 
17 
24 
24 
48 
55 
22 
29 
32 
7 
93 
25 
18 
46 
29 
57 
32 
26 
37 
30 
17 
18 
22 
8 

12 
31 
26 
15 
24 
49 
42 
14 
11 
26 
34 
39 
22 
19 
30 
73 
33 
41 
15 
16 
24 



12 



14 



6 

4 
7 

14 
11 
18 
16 
2 
8 
14 



17 
3 
3 

16 

11 

16 

13 

9 

19 

5 

8 

12 

5 



16 

15 

3 



4 
23 

17 
4 
10 
14 
29 
1! 
L5 
4 



31 

3 
12 

4 
20 
20 
15 
26 
14 
33 
37 
24 
20 
19 

5 
77 
13 

8 

19 
30 
46 
26 
27 
25 
35 
11 
14 
22 

8 

13 
20 
10 

6 
15 
21 
32 
15 
11 
23 
42 
25 
11 
13 
23 
54 
32 
21 
12 

6 
28 



11 
6 
38 
6 
6 
22 
9 

12 
21 
33 
34 



17 
27 
2 
33 
15 
13 
43 
10 
27 
19 



31 


9 


14 


7 


16 


10 


5 


3 



17 

25 

9 

9 

44 

25 

2 



7 

15 
31 
15 
16 
21 
48 
12 
35 

7 
10 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



233 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 



o 

B 

a 

o 
O 


CO 

H 


a 

M 
-5 




T3 d 
<o,d 
§^ 

. CO 


be 

a 

co 


CO 
4> 

e 

Eh 

■v 
-a 

H 


CO 

d 


d c« 

IS 

Jo 
3° 


CO 

a 


"-+3 

a 





|h 

CO 






P< 
d 
O 
O 
O 

d 
O 


English Grammar 

English Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric 


co 
t-t 

d 

g 

& 

CO 


O 

co 

M 

i 

9 




>> 


co 

a 

CO 

'£ 


>> 

F-i 

3 

CO 

O 

d 


■a 
g 


43 

C5 


be 

d 

03 

4> 

M 


Is 


U 

be 
< 


1 


5 


10 


2 


3 


9 


11 


2 




30 


42 


42 


4 


2 42 


12 


30 


30 


31 


42 


2 


"'6 

"i 

7 


8 
27 

7 

14 
21 








1 
4 
1 
3 

4 






9 

36 
10 
20 
38 


9 
50 
10 
26 
42 


9 
50 
10 
26 
42 


5 
1 
2 
4 


9 4 
50 
5 
8 
2 17 


"ii 

"6 
4 


9 
36 

10 
20 
38 


9 
36 
10 
20 
38 


9 

36 
10 
20 
38 


9 


3 






'*6 
1 
8 
2 


"7 




50 


4 


3 


"3 


10 


5 






26 


6 


"3 


.... 


42 


7 


5 


9 


3 




4 


1 


2 


.... 


17 


22 


22 


2 


2 1 


5 


17 


17 


17 


22 


8 


12 


15 


1 




3 


5 




2 


24 


38 


38 


3 


8 25 


14 


38 


24 


24 


38 


9 


3 


24 


1 




2 


2 


"*2 


1 


24 


35 


35 


3 


5 18 


11 


24 


24 


24 


35 


10 


3 


55 


1 




3 


2 




2 


48 


66 


66 


6 


6 66 


18 


48 


48 


48 


66 


11 


6 


39 


3 




11 


4 


'"7 


1 


55 


71 


71 


5 


5 71 


16 


55 


55 


55 


71 


12 


2 
3 


1 
17 






2 
6 


6 

7 


11 
3 


2 


22 

29 


24 
36 


24 
36 


2 
2 


4 24 
9 15 


2 

7 


22 

29 


22 

29 


22 
29 


24 


13 


"i 




36 


14 


4 


26 


1 




5 


4 


6 




32 


46 


46 


2 


6 27 


14 


32 


32 


32 


46 


15 


'is 


7 
27 














7 
93 


7 
110 


7 
110 


11 


7 7 
56 


"l7 


7 
93 


7 
93 


7 
93 


7 


16 


"3 


"3 


"20 


• • • . 

15 


22 


"5 


110 


17 


2 


5 


2 




16 




3 




25 


28 


28 


2 


8 9 


3 


25 


25 


25 


28 


18 


1 


17 

34 






2 

7 


"*8 


1 

4 


2 


18 
46 


18 
61 


21 
61 


1 
6 


2 12 
1 61 


3 

16 


18 
46 


18 
46 


18 
46 


21 


19 


"e 




61 


20 


"i 


16 


4 




4 


2 


13 


• . . • 


30 


39 


39 


3 


9 39 


10 


29 


29 


29 


39 


21 


9 


33 


6 




4 


10 


5 


6 


57 


73 


73 


7 


3 73 


16 


57 


57 


57 


73 


22 


8 


19 


2 




3 


4 


3 


5 


32 


45 


45 


4 


5 26 


13 


32 


32 


32 


45 


23 


3 

2 


13 
43 






6 
2 


11 


2 

5 


.... 


26 
37 


35 
37 


35 
56 


3 
5 


5 35 

6 35 


9 
19 


26 
37 


26 
37 


26 
37 


35 


24 


"3 




56 


25 


5 
1 


1 
15 


1 
2 




27 
4 


1 

1 






30 
17 


35 
25 


35 
25 


3 
1 


5 22 
8 15 


5 

8 


30 
17 


30 
17 


30 
17 


35 


26 


*2 




25 


27 


4 


13 


2 




5 




5 


"i 


18 


29 


29 


2 


9 20 


11 


18 


18 


18 


29 


28 


7 


7 


1 




4 


"*3 


3 


2 


22 


27 


27 


2 


7 18 


5 


22 


22 


22 


27 


29 


1 
3 


1 

9 


2 

1 




4 

1 








8 
12 


8 
19 


8 
19 


1 


8 2 

9 14 


"7 


8 
12 


8 
12 


8 
12 


8 


30 


"2 


"*3 




19 


31 


4 


27 


2 




2 


1 


1 




31 


37 


37 


3 


7 16 


6 


31 


31 


31 


37 


32 


7 


22 






3 


2 




"i 


26 


35 


35 


3 


5 23 


9 


26 


26 


26 


35 


33 


1 
5 
8 


14 

5 

46 














15 
24 

49 


15 
24 

65 


15 
24 
65 


1 
1 
6 


5 9 

4 10 

5 33 


"i6 


15 
24 

49 


15 

24 

49 


15 

24 

49 


15 


34 


"5 

3 


.... 


"7 

1 


"2 






24 


35 


"7 




65 


36 


11 


32 


1 




5 


'"4 


3 




42 


57 


57 


2 


1 21 


15 


42 


42 


42 


57 


37 


5 
2 


3 

2 


3 




3 
2 


3 
4 






14 
11 


17 
11 


17 
11 


1 
1 


7 11 
1 6 


3 


14 
11 


14 
11 


14 
11 


17 


38 


"i 




11 


39 


11 


8 






5 


1 




'5 


26 


30 


30 


3 


30 


"4 


26 


26 


26 


30 


40 


13 


22 


"4 




3 


5 


**8 


2 


34 


57 


57 


5 


7 57 


23 


34 


34 


34 


57 


41 


3 


27 




"i 


16 


2 


6 


1 


39 


56 


56 


3 


9 37 


17 


39 


39 


39 


39 


42 


4 


15 


1 




5 


• • • • 


1 


.... 


22 


26 


26 


2 


6 9 


4 


22 


17 


22 


26 


43 


"*4 


28 
31 






1 
2 








19 
30 


29 
44 


29 
44 


2 
4 


9 29 
4 44 


10 
14 


19 
30 


19 

30 


19 
30 


29 


44 


"i 




"i 


**4 


"i 


44 


45 


8 


51 


2 




23 


6 


10 


2 


64 


93 


93 


9 


3 93 


29 


64 


64 


73 


93 


46 


5 


12 


1 




16 


3 


4 


3 


33 


44 


44 


4 


4 26 


11 


33 


33 


33 


44 


47 


3 


37 


3 




6 


2 


5 


.... 


41 


56 


56 


5 


6 32 


15 


41 


41 


41 


56 


48 




14 


1 




3 




1 




15 


19 


19 


1 


9 15 


4 


15 


15 


15 


19 


49 


'*6 


12 

7 


1 
3 






"i 

8 


1 
2 


"i 
1 


15 
24 


15 

28 


15 

28 


1 

2 


1 4 

7 11 


"4 


15 
24 


15 

24 


15 

24 


16 


50 




"i 


28 



16 E. 



234 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 







Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 




Continuation Schools 


>^ 

a 

o 




a 
B 

4> 

C3 


'•+3 


1 
1 

S3 I 


a 

J 

o 


en 

s 

A 

Q 


1 Acton 


30 

4 
36 

5 

14 
17 
14 
25 
18 
42 
38 

9 
15 
34 

2 
56 
11 
12 
39 
25 
57 
26 
12 
35 
22 
15 
20 
18 

2 
14 
16 
23 

9 

10 
33 
36 
11 

6 

19 
39 
37 

9 
20 
24 
52 
26 
32 
15 

5 
11 


37 

9 

26 
10 
24 
20 
15 
30 
32 
61 
58 
24 
32 
34 

7 
90 
28 
10 
51 
36 
72 
43 
28 
50 
32 
25 
20 
26 

7 

19 
37 
32 
12 
10 
60 
56 
15 

6 
10 
33 
52 
25 
15 
33 
78 
39 
48 
15 
14 
26 




39 

9 
30 

9 
24 
20 
15 
29 
33 
61 
56 
24 
32 
42 

7 
73 
28 
10 
46 
36 
71 
42 
30 
50 
32 
24 
27 
24 

7 

18 
37 
35 
13 
24 
63 
54 
17 
11 

8 
28 
56 
22 
17 
44 
78 
40 
50 
15 
14 
26 


30 
9 
36 
10 
20 
38 
17 
24 
24 
48 
55 
22 
29 

93 
25 

""46" 

29 
57 
26 
26 
37 
30 
17 
18 
22 
8 
12 
31 
26 
15 
24 
49 
42 


30 
9 

36 
10 
20 
38 
17 
24 
24 
48 
55 
22 
29 
32 
7 

93 
25 
18 
46 
29 
57 
26 
26 
37 
30 
17 
18 
22 
8 

12 
31 
26 
15 
24 
49 
42 


30 


2 Agincourt 


4 


3 Alvinston 


36 


4 Arkona 


5 


5 Ayr 


14 


6 Bancroft 


17 


7 Bath 


14 


8 Beaverton • • 




9 Beeton 


18 


10 Belmont 


42 


11 Blenheim 


55 


12 Blind River 


9 


13 Blyth 


15 


14 Both well 


34 


15 Bowesville 


2 


16 Bracebridge 


56 


17 Bridgeburg 


11 


18 Bruce Mines 


12 


19 Brussels 


15 


20 Burk's Falls 


25 


21 Burlington 


38 


22 Cannington 


26 


23 Cardinal 


12 


24 Carp 


56 


25 Chapleau 


5 


26 Claremont 


15 


27 Clifford 


11 


28 Coldwater 


27 


29 Cochrane 


2 


30 Comber 


14 


31 Cookstown 


16 


32 Creemore 


35 


33 Delaware 


9 


34 Delhi 


10 


35 Drayton 


33 


36 Dresden 


36 


37 Drumbo 


11 


38 Dryden 


11 
26 
20 
39 
22 
19 
30 
64 
33 
41 
15 
15 
23 


11 
26 
20 
39 
22 
- 19 
30 
64 
33 
41 
15 
15 
23 


6 


39 Eganville 


19 


40 Eganville (R.C.S.S.) ; 

41 Elmira 


23 

37 


42 Elmvale 


9 


43 Ennismore T. . 


10 


44 Erin 


14 


45 Exeter 


52 


46 Fenelon Falls 


11 


47 Finch 


32 


48 Fingal 


15 


49 Fitzroy Harbour 


4 


50 Fort Frances 


11 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



235 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued 


Special Courses 


.2 

'to 

>> 

& 


cut 

.2 


I 

A 




CQ 


>* 

d 

1 

GO 


3 

I 

>> 


H 


1?° 


"1 

a 

B 





U 



"u 

< 


1 


42 
9 
50 
10 
26 
42 
22 

35" 

66 

55 

24 

36 

46 

7 
110 
28 
12 
61 
40 
73 
45 
35 
56 
35 
25 
29 
27 

8 
19 
37 
35 
15 
24 
65 
57 
17 
11 
30 
57 
37 
22 
29 
14 
93 
44 
56 
19 
15 
11 


30 
9 
36 
10 
20 
36 
17 
24 
24 
48 
33 
22 
29 
32 
7 

56 
25 
18 
46 
29 
57 
32 
26 
37 
30 
17 
18 
22 
8 
12 
31 
26 
15 
24 
49 
42 
14 
U 
26 
34 
39 
17 
29 
30 
73 
33 
41 
15 
16 
24 








30 
9 
36 
10 
20 
36 
17 
24 
24 
48 
55 
22 
29 
32 
7 
93 
25 
18 
48 
29 
52 
26 
26 
37 
30 
17 
18 
22 
8 
12 
31 
26 
15 
24 
49 
42 
14 
11 
26 
20 
35 
22 
19 
30 
64 
33 
41 
15 
15 
23 


41 
9 
50 
10 
26 
42 
24 
38 
35 
66 
66 
24 
36 
46 
7 

110 
28 
21 
60 
40 
73 
45 
25 
56 
35 
25 
30 
27 
8 

19 
37 
35 
15 
24 
65 
57 
17 
11 
30 
56 
56 
26 
29 
44 

102 
44 
56 
19 
16 
28 






2 













3 












4 












5 













6 












7 












8 













q 












10 












11 












1? 













13 




j 






14 




1 






15 










16 










17 






1 






18 




:::::::::::::::::::::::: 






19 








20 











21 










22 










23 










24 




1 






25 










26 












27 












28 


5 




27 






29 








80 












31 












32 












33 












34 












35 










49 


36 












37 












38 


5 










39 










40 












41 












42 












43 












44 












45 
46 


67 


23 


23 


23 


29 


47 












48 












49 












50 











236 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


dumber of Pupils 
in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




Continuation Schools — 
Continued 


o 

* «. 

-3 ft u 


CO 

ft 2? 

*? & 
525 


£ 

U 

<o 

■3 b 

g* 

CO « 

o ^ 

cq 


.o 

1 — 1 

u 

CD 

o f*» 

CO ® 


So 

Q § 

r 


'o 
o 

-a 
o 
CO 
u 

1 

h5 


o 
o 

o 

CO 

S3 

a 


1* 

toCn.g-43 

all* 
lll-i 

§<8Qco 
2 


CO 

a 


CO 

CO 
Eh 

O 


CO 

■4348 

co S 

CO co 

CD 

Vl f-, 

2 ft 
■H S 


51 Frankf ord 


37 
59 
53 
61 
30 
33 
50 
60 
22 

9 
20 
13 
48 
35 
53 
53 
15 
18 
78 
17 
16 

8 
59 

5 
34 
37 
39 
35 
69 
76 
42 
20 
19 
34 
41 
28 
35 
57 
11 
31 
34 
46 
69 
44 
55 
28 
24 
59 
25 
18 
22 
34 
78 


9 

13 

22 

29 

3 

12 

19 

20 

13 

6 

7 

9 

13 

17 

19 

19 

5 

8 

35 

4 

5 

4 

25 

5 

13 

16 

15 

11 

31 

26 

15 

20 

6 

10 

19 

9 

15 

23 

11 

8 

14 

13 

34 

17 

25 

8 

8 

30 

16 

8 

12 

14 

30 


18 
25 
19 
27 
12 
8 

22 

20 

12 

2 

11 

5 

25 

14 

22 

20 

5 

3 

35 

4 

7 

3 

22 

1 

13 

15 

10 

11 

27 

16 

21 

4 

5 

16 
13 
11 
18 
25 
3 
12 
14 
18 
28 
15 
18 
10 
9 

29 
14 
6 
6 
18 
30 


19 

34 

34 

34 

18 

25 

28 

40 

10 

7 

9 

8 

23 

21 

31 

33 

10 

15 

43 

13 

9 

5 

37 
4 
21 
22 
29 
24 
42 
60 
21 
16 
14 
18 
28 
17 
17 
32 
8 

19 
20 
28 
41 
29 
37 
18 
15 
30 
11 
12 
16 
16 
48 


26 
24 
40 
50 
23 
26 
30 
47 
16 

6 

13 
12 
35 
25 
40 
36 
11 
11 
56 
11 
13 

6 
46 

4 
27 

5 

30 
25 
41 
57 
30 
15 
16 
25 
48 
20 
26 
34 

7 

23 
29 
41 
58 
28 
36 
25 
19 
26 
23 
14 
15 
31 
62 


21 

47 

39 

52 

23 

20 

38 - 

45 

22 

9 
15 
11 
32 
25 
41 
28 
15 
18 
41 
13 
16 

8 
50 

5 
20 
28 
29 
24 
57 
53 
30 
20 
16 
26 
35 
18 
21 
45 
11 
22 
27 
27 
53 
33 
45 
18 
19 
49 
25 
13 
22 
22 
49 


16 
12 
14 

9 

7 
13 
12 
15 

"k" 

2 

16 
10 
12 
25 

""37" 

4 

9" 

""il" 
9 

10 
11 
12 
23 
12 

3" 

8 

6 

10 

14 

12 

"9" 

7 

19 
16 
11 
10 
10 
-5 
10 

"5" 

""12" 
29 


19 
40 
21 
51 
15 
28 
17 
49 

9 

8 
10 
13 
23 
17 
38 
30 

7 

15 
32 
11 

4 

6 
17 

1 

13 
33 
22 
21 
21 
34 
16 

7 

17 
20 
30 
15 
12 
24 

6 
12 
22 
26 
38 
20 
36 
17 
20 
51 
21 
13 
11 
21 
\ 42 


18 
19 
32 
10 
15 

5 

33 
11 
13 

1 
10 


6 


52 Gore Bay 


7 


53 Grand Valley 

54 Hanover 


7 
8 


55 Harrow 


8 


56 Havelock 


5 


57 Highgate 


9 


58 Huntsville 


7 


59 Jarvis 


7 


60 Jockvale 


1 


61 Kars 


3 


62 Keewatin 




63 Kenmore 


25 
18 
15 
23 
8 
3 

46 
6 

12 

2 

42 

4 

21 

4 

17 

14 

48 

42 

26 

13 

2 

14 

11 

13 

23 

33 

5 

19 

12 

20 

31 

24 

19 

11 

4 

8 

4 

5 

11 

13 

36 


4 


64 Kinburn 


9 


65 Lakefield 


8 


66 Lanark 


9 


67 Lansdowne 


6 


68 Little Current 

69 Lucknow 


2 
13 


70 Malakoff 


1 


71 Manitowaning 

72 Manotick 


8 
2 


73 Maxville 


17 


74 Massey 


2 


75 Melbourne 


9 


76 Merlin 

77 Merrickville 

78 Metcalfe 


2 

9 

8 


79 Millbrook . . . 


18 


80 Milton 


17 


81 Mount Albert 

82 Mount Brydges 

83 Navan 


8 
7 
2 


84 New Hamburg 

85 New Liskeard 

86 North Augusta 

87 North Gower 

88 Norwich 


6 
9 
8 
8 
11 


89 New Toronto 

90 Odessa 


2 

15 


91 Oil Springs 


6 


92 Orono 


9 


93 Paisley 


16 


94 Pakenham 

95 Palmerston 


7 

7 


96 Plattsville 


6 


97 Port Burwell 

98 Port Colbome 

99 Powassan 


3 
3 
3 


100 Princeton 


2 


101 Richmond 


2 


1 02 Ridgeway 


7 


103 Ripley 


12 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



2:37 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 




Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 




















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53 


53 


53 


35 


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41 


41 


66 


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27 


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28 


53 


53 


53 


34 


25 


28 


28 


28 


53 


67 


4 


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15 


15 


15 

18 


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7 
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15 

18 


15 

18 


15 

18 


15 
18 


68 


2 


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'*6 


.... 


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18 


18 


18 




69 


11 


50 


**4 


.... 


3 


8 


2 


.... 


41 


78 


78 


78 


52 


"37 


41 


41 


41 


78 


70 




17 














13 


17 


17 
16 


13 
16 


13 
9 
2 


4 


13 
16 

8 


13 

8 


13 
16 

8 


47 
16 

8 


71 


"2 


11 


"i 




"i 


"i 






16 


16 


72 


2 


3 


2 








"i 




8 


8 


8 


8 




73 


4 


42 


6 




"2 


"i 


3 


"i 


50 


58 


58 


59 


30 


"9 


50 


50 


50 


59 


74 


.... 


1 


1 




3 








5 


5 


5 


4 


1 




5 
20 


5 
20 


5 
20 


5 
34 


75 


*4 


25 


1 


"i 




"i 


**2 




20 


34 


34 


34 


34 


"ii 


76 


10 


20 










6 


i 


37 


37 


37 

39 


24 


22 

39 


9 
10 


28 
29 


28 
29 


28 
29 


37 
39 


77 


2 


17 


"2 




"*4 




14 




29 


39 


39 


78 


2 


23 


3 


.... 


3 


"i 


1 


"2 


24 


35 


35 


35 


19 


11 


24 


24 


24 


35 


79 


7 


47 


6 




5 


2 




2 


57 


69 


69 


69 


38 


12 


57 


57 


57 


69 


80 


12 


43 


3 


"i 


6 


5 


"5 


1 


53 


76 


76 


24 


52 


23 


53 


53 


53 


76 


81 


4 


32 






4 


1 




1 


30 


42 


42 


42 


27 


12 


30 


30 


30 


42 


82 


1 


16 


"i 








2 




20 


20 


20 


20 


5 




20 


20 


20 
16 
26 


20 
19 
34 


83 




17 






2 








16 


19 


19 


19 
26 


12 

24 


"3 

8 


16 
26 


16 
26 


84 


*7 


12 


"i 


"i 


5 


"5 


"3 




26 


34 


34 


85 


7 


8 


5 


. . . . 


12 


1 


8 




35 


41 


41 


41 


16 


6 


35 


35 


35 


41 


86 


4 


20 


1 




2 




1 




18 


28 


28 


28 


20 


10 


18 


18 


18 


28 


87 


3 


25 


1 




3 




2 


"i 


21 


35 


35 


27 


22 


14 


21 


21 


21 


35 


8ft 


7 


39 


3 




3 


"2 




3 


45 


57 


57 


34 


35 


12 


45 


45 


45 


55 


89 


1 
2 








10 
2 








11 
22 


11 
31 


11 
31 


11 
20 






11 

22 


11 
22 


11 
22 


11 
31 


90 


"23 


"2 




"2 






"26 


*9 


91 


5 


12 






7 


2 


"*8 




27 


34 


34 


20 


21 
33 


7 
19 


27 
27 


27 
27 


27 
27 


34 
46 


92 


8 


25 


"i 




5 


3 


4 




27 


46 


46 


46 


93 


5 


49 


4 




5 


2 


4 


. . . . 


53 


69 


69 


69 


35 


16 


53 


53 


53 


69 


94 


2 


32 


4 




5 




1 




33 


44 


44 


44 


28 


11 


33 


33 


33 


44 


95 


4 


22 


2 




12 


"ii 


4 


. . . . 


45 


55 


55 


55 


29 


10 


45 


45 


45 


55 


96 


6 


15 


1 


. . . . 


4 


1 


1 




18 


28 


28 


28 


20 


10 


18 


18 


19 


28 


97 


6 


5 










11 


2 


19 


24 


24 


24 


13 


5 


19 


19 


19 
49 


24 
5§ 


98 


15 


8 






"20 


"io 


2 


2 


49 


59 


59 


59 


59 


10 


49 


49 


99 


4 


8 


1 




3 


4 


5 





25 


25 


25 


25 


9 




25 


25 


25 


25 


100 




14 


2 






1 


1 




13 


18 


18 


18 


10 


"5 


13 


13 


13 


18 


101 


**8 


14 
18 


3 

1 




'"4 
1 


1 
5 






22 
22 


22 

34 


22 

34 


22 
34 


13 . 
26 


'ii 


22 
22 


22 
22 


22 
22 


13V 
34 


102 


"i 




103 


18 


44 


5 


"" 3 


5 


2 1) 


49 


781 


78 


78 


48 


29 


49 


49 


49 


78 



238 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Continuation Schools — Con. 



51 Frankford 

52 Gore Bay , 

53 Grand Valley . . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harrow 

56 Havelock 

57 Highgate 

58 Huntsville 

59 Jarvis 

60 Jockvale 

61 Kars 

62 Keewatin 

63 Kenmore 

64 Kinburn 

65 Lakefield 

66 Lanark 

67 Lansdowne 

68 Little Current . , 

69 Lucknow 

70 Malakoff ...... 

71 Manitowaning . , 

72 Manotick 

73 Maxville 

74 Massey 

75 Melbourne 

76 Merlin 

77 Merrickville . . , 

78 Metcalfe , 

79 Mill brook , 

80 Milton 

81 Mount Albert . , 

82 Mount Brydges , 

83 Navan 

84 New Hamburg . , 

85 New Liskeard . 

86 North Augusta . 

87 North Gower... 

88 Norwich 

89 New Toronto . 

90 Odessa 

91 Oil Springs 

92 Orono 

93 Paisley , 

94 Pakenham 

95 Palmerston 

96 Plattsville 

97 Port Burwell . , 

98 Port Colborne., 

99 Powassan 

100 Princeton 

101 Richmond 

102 Ridgeway .... 

103 Ripley , 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued. 



■a 

I fa 




1 


3 


& 

a 

o 
o 


a 

3 

o 



30 
31 
53 
32 
13 
22 
29 
32 
10 

3 
10 

4 
31 
17 
35 
34 

7 

10 
52 
17 

9 

2 
30 

1 
21 
37 
24 
19 
38 
52 
27 

5 
12 
24 
16 
20 
22 
55 



20 
21 
33 
35 
28 
29 
20 
13 
27 
9 
10 
13 
20 
48 



22 

40 
51 
50 
28 
16 
40 
49 
20 



20 
9 
43 
30 
53 
43 
15 



57 
14 



8 
29 

5 
28 
35 
24 
24 
67 
53 
39 
20 
19 



41 
22 
31 
33 
11 
25 
23 
42 
58 
43 
45 
21 
21 
50 
23 
4 
7 
27 
65 



24 



21 
42 
52 
61 
27 
21 
43 
47 
20 
6 

20 
10 
47 
30 
53 
51 
15 



64 
15 



28 
5 
31 
32 
24 
26 
66 
57 
40 
20 
19 
33 
41 
22 
32 

:\2 
11 

25 
18 
46 
69 

44 
4<S 
28 
24 
50 
23 
5 
10 
26 
69 



21 
47 
39 
52 
23 
19 
38 
45 
22 

9 
15 
11 
32 
25 
41 
28 
15 
18 
41 
13 
16 

8 
50 

5 

20 
28 
29 
24 
57 
53 
30 
20 
16 
26 
35 
18 
21 
44 
11 
22 
27 
27 
53 
33 
45 
18 
19 
49 
25 
13 
22 
22 
49 



21 
47 
39 
52 
23 
19 
38 
45 
22 

9 
15 
11 
32 
25 
41 
28 
15 
18 
41 
13 
16 

8 
50 

5 
20 
28 
29 
24 
57 
53 
30 
20 
16 
26 
35 
18 
21 
44 
11 
22 
27 
27 
53 
33 
45 
18 
19 
49 
25 
13 
22 
22 
49 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



239 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued 





t>J5 




.1 




ft 


ba 


<u 


a 


M 


■+* 


M 


M 


o 
o 

pq 



Jq 
Pi 



O 

d 

CO 






Special Courses 






51 37 


21 
47 
39 
52 
23 
20 
21 
45 
22 

9 
15 

9 
32 
25 
41 
28 
15 
18 
41 
13 
16 

8 
50 

5 
'20 
28 
29 
24 
57 
53 
30* 
20 
16 
26 
35 
18 
21 
44 
11 
22 
27 
27 
53 
33 
45 
18 
19 
32 








21 
47 
39 
52 
23 
22 
50 
45 
22 

9 
16 
11 
32 
25 
41 
28 
15 
18 
41 
14 
16 

8 
50 

5 
20 
28 
29 
24 
57 
53 
30 
20 
16 
26 
35 
18 
21 
44 
11 
22 
27 
28 
53 
33 
45 
18 
19 
49 
25 
13 
22 


37 
, 57 
53 
61 
30 
33 
50 
60 
22 

9 
20 
13 
48 
35 
53 
53 
15 
18 
78 
17 
16 

8 
59 

5 
33 
35 
39 
35 
69 
76 
42 
20 






52 57 












53 53 












54 61 












55 30 












56 33 












57 50 












58 60 


28 










59 22 










60 9 












61 20 












62 13 












63 48 












64 35 












65 53 












66 53 












67 15 












68 18 












69 78 












70 17 












71 16 












72 8 












73 59 












74 5 












75 34 












76 37 












77 39 












78 35 












79 69 












80 76 












81 42 












82 20 












83 12 












84 34 








34 
41 
28 
35 
57 
11 
31 
34 
46 
69 
44 
55 
28 
24 
59 
25 
18 
22 
34 
78 






85 41 










35 


86 28 












87 35 








. 




88 35 












89 11 












90 31 












91 34 












92 33 












93 69 












94 44 












95 55 












96 28 












97 24 












98 59 












99 25 


25 
13 

22 
22 

78 















100 5 












101 22 












102 34 










22 


103 78 








49 







240 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


Number of 
Pupils in— 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




Continuation Schools — 
Continued 


Total number of 
pupils on the roll 
for the year 


Numberof new-pupils- 
admitted during 
the year 


o 

'o 

03 

-d U 

o ^ 




O 

u 



rd U 

^ S3 

d £ 

CO 2 

T^'rd 

b 


So 

£ d 

n 




xi 


u 

<v 







xi 

w 

CO 


Municipalities 
forming C. S. 
District or from 
School Section 


CO 

1 


CC 
u 

-d 

O 


CO 

§^ 

d 
% § 

UJ CO 

««_, CO 

d 

XI 

** 

sz; 


104 Rodney 

105 Russell 


55 
29 
37 
27 
42 
51 
9 
27 
18 
57 
23 
41 
11 
43 
42 
35 
46 
39 
51 
45 
54 
42 
27 
39 
45 
14 
38 
30 
37 
37 
26 
30 
14 
38 


16 
16 
13 
15 
20 
51 

6 
10 

6 
22 

7 
15 

8 
22 
12 
10 
13 
13 
19 
15 
20 
23 
21 
16 
17 

5 

13 
11 
12 
14 
26 
19 

9 
11 


24 

7 

14 
13 
25 
26 

2 
11 

5 
21 

9 


31 
22 
23 
14 
17 
25 
7 
16 
13 
36 


40 
23 
27 
18 
26 
46 
4 
23 
15 
40 


40 
22 
27 
27 
29 
37 
9 

18 
14 
44 
17 
22 
11 
3fi 


15 

7 
10 

'•"is 

I 4 
9 

4 
13 

6 
19 

"l 

12 

12 

16 

11 

11 

8 

15 

11 

2 

9 

8 

*7 

17 

8 

10 

i3 


30 
23 
24 
27 
36 
19 

8 

13 
13 
28 

8 
25 
10 
25 
19 
35 
33 
18 
32 
25 
18 
42 
18 

9 
25 
14 
36 
12 
26 
31 
23 
17 
14 
14 


25 

6 

13 


6 
3 


106 St. George 

107 Schomberg 


4 


108 Southampton 

109 South Mountain... 

110 South Porcupine . . 

111 Spencerville 

112 Springfield 

113 Stayner 


•r 6 

32 
1 

14 
5 
29 
15 
16 
1 
18 
23 


6 
18 
1 
6 
3 
11 


114 Stella 


14! 16 


6 


115 Stouffville 

116 Sturgeon Falls .... 

117 Sutton 


17 i 24 

4 7 
22 21 
17! 25 
11 24 


23 

8 
30 


8 
1 
9 


118 Tamworth 

119 Tara 


28 30 
28 23 


9 


120 Tavistock 

121 Teeswater 

122 Thamesviile 

123 Thessalon 

124 Thornbury 

125 Thorndale 


19 
12 
12 

9 
22 
13 

8 
.13 
19 

3 
17 
12 
19 
13 
12 

8 

9 
20 


27 
27 
39 
36 
32 
29 
19 
26 
26 
11 
21 
18 
18 
24 
14 
22 
5 
18 


35 
32 
41 
21 
40 
26 


30 
28 
40 
37 
39 
31 


13 
21 
19 
20 
36 


4 
11 

8 

7 

14 


126 Tilbury 

127 Tottenham 

128 Warkworth 

129 Webbwood 


19 25 

26! 30 

35; 37 

8 14 


9 
30 
20 


7 
8 
8 


130 West Lome 

131 Westmeath 

132 Westport 

133 Westport (R.C.S.S.) 

134 Westboro 

135 Winona 

136 Wolfe Island 


28 
18 
23 
27 
22 
19 
12 
32 


31 
13 
29 
27 

26 
30 
14 
25 


2 

18 

11 

6 

3 

13 


1 
3 
4 
6 
3 
5 


137 Wroxeter 


24 


10 








Totals, 1917-1918.. 


5,104 


2,151 


1,989 


3,115 


3,734 3,858 


1,246 


2,949 


2,155 


900 


Totals 1916-1917.. 


5,082 




1,979 


3,103 


3,729 3,977 


1,105 


2,906 


2,176 


902 


Increases 


22 




10 


12 


5 


141 


43 






Decrease s 




119 


21 


2 




















Percentages 




42.14 


38.96 


61.03 


73.15 75.58 


24.41 


57.77 


42.22 















1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



241 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from Families whose Head is occupied 
as below — 


Number of Pupils in 


the Various Subjects 




43 


o 

43 

d.CJ 
O g 




co 


CO 

d 
o 


co 

d 

ft 


a 


ft 

d 

43 


o3 

o3 
u 


C3 

■A "6 

CO -*-a 

O 43 

ft-a 

aw 


43 

H 

d 

1 

2 


b 

s 

CO 

3 


b 



co 


b 


CO 


03 

u 

43 


B 


03-d 


bo 

d 


43 
1 


1 &€'-£ 


d 





O 

d 





3-3 

-d c3 


rd 


d 

o3 


w 

,d 


3 

d 
43 

'0 
5 


B 

B 

o 
O 




« 33 


,d 

43 

43 

H 


4) 

-a 
H 


13° 


43 
O 


O 


1 


.2 d 

■3.3 


1 


13 
e3 

1 


4 co 


104 14 


22 

16 






3 
2 


12 
3 


4 
5 




40 
22 


53 
29 


53 

29 


53 

29 


37 
29 


13 


105 2 


1 




7 


106 5 


22 
15 


1 

2 




4 

1 


5 
5 






27 

27 


37 

27 


37 
27 


37 

27 


24 
10 


10 


107 .. 


2 


2 




108 10 


5 


1 




15 


5 


5 


1 


29 


42 


4*2 


42 


23 


i3 


109 4 


45 
1 

15 
9 

37 






1 
2 

4 
1 
1 


"2 


1 

2 




37 
9 
18 
14 
41 


51 
9 
27 
18 
54 


51 
9 
27 
18 
54 


51 
9 
27 
18 
54 


36 
4 

27 
8 

31 


14 


110 2 








111 5 


3 




13 


112 4 


3 

1 


1 
5 




4 


113 11 


1 


1 


13 


114 6 


12 
22 






4 

4 




1 
5 


3 


17 
22 


23 
41 


23 

41 


23 
41 


16 

27 


6 


115 .. 


7 




19 


116 3 


5 
20 






3 
2 








11 
36 


11 

43 


11 

43 


8 
43 


3 
22 




117 8 


6 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


118 7 


26 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 




30 


42 


42 


42 


30 


12 


119 2 


16 


5 




6 


5 


1 




23 


34 


34 


34 


23 


11 


120 .. 


19 

25 






9 
3 


3 
2 


15 
2 




30 

28 


46 

39 


46 
39 


46 
39 


46 
25 


16 


121 3 


4 




11 


122 10 


21 


1 




3 


1 


14 


1 


40 


51 


51 


51 


27 


11 


123 10 


17 




1 


6 


4 


4 


3 


37 


45 


45 


45 


29 


8 


124 3 


29 
33 


9 
3 




7 
3 


6 






39 
31 


54 
42 


54 
42 


54 
42 


34 
42 


15 


125 1 


2 




11 


126 1 


12 

26 


1 
3 






3 
2 


10 
2 




25 
30 


27 

39 


27 
39 


27 

39 


27J 
25 


2 


127 4 




2 


9 


128 5 


28 






4 


4 


4 




37 


45 


45 


45 


23 


8 


129 .. 


3 
18 
23 
25 










11 




14 
31 

30 
29 


14 

38 
30 
37 


14 
38 
30 
37 


14 
12 
30 
29 


6 
19 
17 
23 




130 16 


2 




2 
2 
1 




7 


131 5 










132 6 


1 






4 




8 


133 7 


21 
2 
25 
10 
28 






4 
2 


2 


3 




37 
26 
30 
14 
25 


37 
26 
30 
14 
38 


37 
26 
30 
14 

38 


37 
21 

30 

8 

38 


37 

5 

8 

6 

27 


8 


134 22 








135 2 




1 




2 






136 .. 


4 
5 






137 2 






2 


1 




13 










642 


2,693 


233 


22 


602 


359 


457 


96 


3,877 


5,057 


5,079 


4,726 


3,421 


1,220 


599 


2,675 


223 


26 


609 


39i 


464 


95 


3,979 


5,039 


5,030 


4,639 


3,562 


1,107 


43 


18 


10 










1 


'"io2 


18 


49 


87 


"iii 


113 




4 


7 


32 


7 


















12.57 


52.76 


4.56 


.43 


11.79 


7.03 


8.95 


1.88 


75.96 


99.07 


99.51 


92.59 


67.02 


>3.90 



242 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Concluded 


Continuation Schools — Con. 


1 


I 

•s 

W 


"2 S 

< 


c3 
U 

< 


3 

o 


© 


B 

G5 


•♦a 
$ 


>> 
cm 
o 

'o 
o 
S3 


104 Rodnev 


40 
22 
27 
27 
29 
37 
9 
18 
14 
41 
17 
22 
11 
36 
30 
23 
30 
28 
40 
37 
54 
31 
25 
30 
37 
14 
31 
30 
29 
29 
26 
30 

14 
25 


40 
22 
27 
27 
29 
37 
9 
18 
14 
41 
17 
22 
11 
36 
30 
23 
30 
28 
40 
37 
54 
31 
25 
30 
37 
14 
31 
• 30 
29 
37 
26 
30 
14 
25 


40 
22 
27 
27 
29 
37 
9 
18 
15 
42 
17 
22 
11 
36 
31 
24 
30 
28 
40 
37 
39 
31 
25 
30 
37 
14 
31 
30 
29 
29 
26 
30 
14 
25 


53 
29 
37 
27 
42 
51 
4 
27 
18 
54 
23 
41 
11 
43 
42 
34 
46 
39 
51 
45 
54 
42 
27 
39 
45 
14 
38 
30 
37 
37 
26 
30 
14 
38 


37 
13 
24 
10 
23 
36 

4 
13 

8 

31 
16 
27 

3 

22 
30 
23 
31 
25 
27 
29 
34 
19 

6 
25 
23 
14 
26 
17 
23 
23 
26 

8 

6 
27 


37 
29 
34 
14 
42 
48 

9 
25 
11 
32 
19 
23 

5 

35 
25 
35 

"3i' 

31 
29 
44 
32 
27 
37 
44 
8 

21 
30 
34 
36 
25 
23 
14 
21 


"ii" 


37 
22 
33 
18 
42 
48 

9 
26 
17 
35 
21 
36 

7 
34 
37 
31 
43 
39 
43 
33 
52 
33 
22 
37 
44 

6 

27 
30 
34 
36 
26 
23 
14 
25 


40 


105 Russell 


22 


106 St. George 


27 


107 Schomberg 


23 


108 Southampton 


29 


109 South Mountain 

110 South Porcupine 

111 Spencerville 


37 

9 

18 


112 Springfield 


14 


113 Stayner 


41 


114 Stella 


17 


115 Stouffville 


22 


116 Sturgeon Fails 

117 Sutton 


11 
36 


118 Tamworth 


30 


119 Tara 


23 


120 Tavistock 


30 


121 Teeswater 


28 


122 Thamesvilie 


40 


123 Thessalon 


37 


124 Thornburv 


39 


125 Thorndale 


31 


126 Tilbury 




127 Tottenham 


30 


128 Warkworth 


37 


129 Webbwood 


14 


130 West Lome 


31 


131 Westmeath 


30 


132 Westport 


29 


133 Westport (R.C.S.S.). .. 

134 Westboro' 


2 

26 


135 Winona 


30 


136 Wolfe Island 


14 


137 Wroxeter 


25 






Totals, 1917-1918 


3,906 


3,865 


3,877 


5,036 


3,021 


4,025 


73 


4,277 


3,721 


Total, 1916-1917 


3,956 


3,958 


4,001 


5,016 


3,158 


3,627 


81 


3,958 


3,753 


Increases 








20 


"i37* 


398 


8*" 


319 




Decreases 


50 


93 


124 


32 






Percentages 


76.52 


75.72 


75.97 


98.66 


59.18 


78.85 


1.43 


83.79 


72.90 







1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



243 



SCHOOLS— Concluded 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Concluded 





Number of Pupils in the Various 


Subjects — Concluded 




Special Courses 


1 

o 


5 

CO 

a 

CD 

o 


CO 

'co 

& 


bo 

a 

'u 


bo 

a 

p. 

o 

o 
M 


>> 

■a 

s 

o 

d 

3 

QQ 


bo 

•| 
1 

ft 
1 




CD 

ea rj 
53*3 


3 

o 
u 

CO 

a 

S 

o 
O 


2 

■+* 

bo 
< 


101 


40 
22 
27 
23 
29 
37 
9 
18 
14 
41 
17 
22 
11 
36 
30 
23 
30 
28 
40 
37 
39 
31 

3<)" 

37 

14 

31 

30 

29 

27 

26 

30 

14 

25 


37 
13 
24 
10 
23 
36 

4 
13 

8 
13 
16 
27 

3 
22 
30 
23 
31 
11 
27 
29 
34 
19 

2 
39 
23 
14 
26 
30 

8 

18 
26 

8 
14 
27 


53 
29 
37 
27 
42 
51 

9 
27 

8 
54 
23 
27 
11 
22 
42 
34 
46 
25 
51 
45 
54 
42 

2 

39 
45 
14 

7 
30 
37 
37 
26 
30 
14 
38 


40 
22 
27 
27 
29 
37 
9 

18 
14 
41 
17 
22 
11 
36 
31 
23 
30 
28 
40 
37 
34 
31 
25 
30 
37 
14 
31 
30 
29 
37 
26 
30 
14 
25 








40 
22 
27 
24 
29 
37 
9 

18 
14 
41 
17 
22 
11 
36 
30 
24 
30 
28 
40 
37 
34 
31 
21 
30 
37 
14 
31 
30 
29 
27 
26 
30 
14 
27 


55 
29 
37 
27 
42 
57 
9 

27 
18 
55 
23 
41 
11 
43 
41 
34 
46 
39 
51 
45 
54 
42 
27 
39 
45 
14 
38 
30 
37 
37 
26 
30 
14 
38 






105 












106 












107 












108 












109 












110 












111 












112 












113 










114 










115 










116 












117 












118 












119 












1?0 






1?1 












1?? 










T23 












1?4 












1?5 












1?6 












127 


30 










1?8 










1?9 












130 












131 












13? 












133 












134 


21 


4 


4 






135 






136 










137 




i 



















3,796 


2,935 


4,778 


3,814 


156 


27 


54 


3,817 


5,062 


23 


135 




3,892 


3,017 


4,866 


3,788 


273 


16 


16 


3,995 


4,992 


16 


166 










26 


"in" 


11 


38 


"i78* 


70 


7 






96 


82 


88 


31 
















74.37 


57.50 


93.61 


74.72 


3.05 


.52 


1.05 


74.78 


99.17 


.45 


2.64 



2U 



THE BEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
1. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



Collegiate Institutes 



Re- 



Legislative 


Municipal 


Municipal 


Grants 


Grants (county) 


Grants (local) 


$ c. 


$ c. 


| $ c. 


1,218 41 


3,983 38 


7,071 89 


3,452 64 


6,423 98 


23,730 00 


2,703 62 


4,608 36 


13,000 00 


3,226 48 


3,946 79 


20,917 00 


1,018 73 


5,347 71 


2,000 00 


1,338 62 


4,365 81 


8,300 00 


1,705 12 


3,324 13 


11,609 26 


2,705 32 




21,827 04 


2,385 81 


10,408 68 


11,900 00 


1,934 06 




6,500 00 


2,640 53 




18,108 19 


2,350 03 




51,558 59 


1,489 05 


3,444 12 


6,986 79 


1,213 52 




22,200 00 


2,695 80 


4,314 17 


18,994 80 


1,218 39 


7,244 49 


8,363 39 


2,780 65 




58,187 94 


839 76 


3,965 39 


3,305 51 


1,097 04 


4,747 71 


5,338 00 


2,017 29 


2,886 45 


17,500 00 


2,300 28 




18,144 00 


1,305 25 


2,438 22 


9,500 00 


1,329 60 




96,286 87 


2,485 63 


6.093 91 


14,280 00 


1,059 05 


4,216 47 


4,026 S9 


1,773 62 
1,347 39 




24,600 00 


6,706 40 


5,500 00 


3,307 51 




15,000 00 


1,212 50 


9,251 38 


8,000 00 


1,160 76 


4,701 54 


15,197 60 


1,054 28 


2,528 07 


6,500 00 


1,716 41 


5,234 62 


• 22,719 04 


1,131 10 


2,582 25 


15,660 80 


1,001 75 


4,174 39 


3,006 91 


2,019 69 


888 51 


13,251 84 


2,795 79 


3,653 66 


23,348 31 


929 12 


3,529 07 


4,400 00 


1,416 25 




127,659 89 


1,217 50 
1,481 11 
1,216 00 




40,347 02 




39,969 22 




21,377 16 


2,688 36 




41,312 90 


1,125 50 




38,574 05 


2,961 48 




37,471 87 


1,048 48 


5,431 55 


2,750 00 


1,169 00 


7,000 87 


29,865 99 


2,734 29 


6,167 73 


11,350 00 


85,018 57 


143,609 81 


1,027,498 26 


741 38 


741 38 


5,680 65 


553 12 


1,465 58 


2,000 00 


601 03 


1,000 00 


3,744 01 


517 89 


1,032 98 


2,400 00 


1,076 03 


3,403 86 


4,883 65 


646 39 


1,841 33 


2,094 50 


742 32 


3,999 24 


2,000 00 



Barrie 

Brantf ord 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Fort William 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Ingersoll 

Kingston 

Kitchener- Water loo 

Lindsay 

London 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Orillia 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Seaf orth 

Smith's Falls 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Toronto, Harbord 

Toronto, Humberside 

Toronto, Jar vis 

Toronto, Malvern Avenue 

Toronto, Oakwood 

Toronto, Parkdale 

Toronto, Riverdale 

Vankleek Hill 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

Tota's 

High Schools 

Alexandria 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



2 ±5 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT 



ceipts 



School Fees 



$ c. 
199 00 
782 30 
818 00 
985 94 
229 50 



534 00 



267 50 
455 10 
641 80 
417 25 
705 75 
689 75 
907 70 
803 50 
258 00 



2, 

16, 
1, 



593 50 
092 50 
953 25 
814 23 
577 94 



10 00 
,688 50 
,573 00 
753 00 



482 80 
414 00 
079 71 
318 00 
218 00 
340 00 
996 35 
714 00 
746 00 
913 00 
864 00 



Balances and 
other sources 



46 


47 


2,307 95 


107,144 82 


1 


2 
3 
4 
5 . 


490 00 

554 00 

64 00 



724 45 
310 00 



$ c. 

4,756 93 

266 24 

1,074 15 

2,778 52 

314 51 

5,107 20 

449 04 

229 98 

4,759 13 

2,257 24 

345 82 

710 58 

1,866 47 

3,241 17 

3,567 87 

2,091 97 

11,272 39 

2,856 37 

5,773 24 

931 90 

296 93 

1,469 93 

17,773 20 

1,654 24 

5,453 86 

4,417 46 

6,753 53 

2,589 52 

1,926 31 

1,773 68 

243 71 

958 15 

3,502 37 

3,995 64 

2,229 63 

951 72 

735 57 

132,878 72 

43 30 

136,589 95 

36 32 

106 84 

58,618 30 

2,386 25 

5,249 52 

140,881 19 

596 98 



588,763 54 



Total 
Receipts 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Buildings, 

Sites and all 

permanent 

improvements 



Repairs to 
school accom- 
modations 



1,307 24 
545 13 
694 60 
545 32 

2,119 91 
106 81 

3,823 68 



• $ 
19,229 
37,655 
22,204 
32,854 
9,910 
19,111 
17,621 
24,762 
32,721 
12,146 
24,736 
63,036 
14,492 
30,344 
32,480 
21,721 
77,498 
10,967 
16,955 
23,335 
20,741 
17,306 

131,482 
26,467 
15,570 
33,369 
20,307 
20,897 
20,400 
24,522 
11,899 
31,381 
22,876 
13,661 
18,803 
34,829 
10,911 

267,172 
45,947 

182,036 
25,343 
48,854 

102,230 
44,683 
14,479 

178,917 
23,156 



c. 
61 
16 
13 
73 
45 
63 
55 
34 
12 
40 
34 
45 
18 
44 
34 
74 
98 
03 
99 
64 
21 
90 
17 
03 
00 
02 
32 
03 
19 
08 
06 
22 
52 
49 
67 
19 
76 
86 
82 
63 
48 
10 
85 
60 
55 
05 
95 



1,952,035 00 



8,470 65 
5,053 83 
6,593 64 
4,560 19 

11,483 45 
5,413 48 

10,875 24 



$ c. 
10,729 54 
26,388 63 
13,720 00 
18,091 50 
7,853 75 

11.280 39 
12,040 00 
17,683 35 
20,133 28 

9,433 15 
17,200 00 
50,891 00 

7,795 05 
24,580 00 
18,403 36 
17,283 50 
48,780 00 

7,400 00 

9,286 15 
15,530 00 
11,057 20 
12,390 00 
71,724 10 
19,170 50 

8,540 00 

23.281 50 
9,502 20 

13,461 75 
13,719 11 
18,802 23 

8,900 00 
25,866 34 
14,126 99 

7,534 40 
13,140 00 
23,800 00 

7,842 75 
40,330 50 
34,275 00 
34,503 11 
17,208 50 
37,672 25 
33,675 37 
29,162 50 

7,500 00 
29,408 43 
15,005 75 



946,103 13 



5,500 00 
3,500 00 
4,600 00 
3,220 00 
7,200 00 
4,310 00 
5,660 00 



$ c. 
2,922 05 



71 21 
171 15 
511 14 

163 88 
610 00 



72 77 



2,284 43 



214 00 
299 97 



252 79 



12,823 81 

796 32 

730 80 

1,865 90 

55 25 

220 78 



17 30 



91 15 
954 49 



1,286 60 



739 77 
87 58 
84 30 

117 66 

801 62 
22,000 00 

390 55 



130,748 40 
420 97 



183,806 64 



433 55 



650 00 

631 66 

25 00 

99 49 

50 00 



$ c. 

40 43 
,797 93 
150 63 
,554 43 

43 77 
339 53 

86 60 

74 12 
232 62 
236 32 
303 33 
550 50 
641 54 
640 06 
307 51 
410 04 
717 27 
170 31 

47 57 
234 65 
312 29 
228 17 
,502 63 
570 35 

26 04 
,390 89 
124 25 
607 98 
268 37 
198 46 

43 23 
428 04 



744 81 
177 80 
456 90 



3,868 88 
2,105 22 
1,639 48 
1,607 44 

718 49 
2,250 82 
1,936 49 

126 64 
5,794 51 
1,017 87 



40,725 21 



19 90 



193 41 
*58*20 



246 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 







I. TABLE 


K— FINANCIAL 




Expenditure — 


Collegiate Institutes — Continued 


Library, scientific 
apparatus, 
maps, etc., type- 
writers /drawing 
models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science 
and agricultural 
department 
equipment 


School books, 
stationery, 
prizes, fuel, 
examinations 
and all other 
expenses 


1 Barrie „ 


$ c. 

1,474 66 

162 85 

125 15 
830 79 
223 58 

43 50 

91 45 

23 56 

219 47 

31 80 

339 30 

250 00 

234 85 

126 40 
149 57 

57 21 
146 12 


$ c, 


$ c. 
2,143 46 


2 Brantford 


118 00 

128 98 

34 00 


8,117 52 


3 Brockville 


5,755 80 


4 Chatham 


12,344 01 


5 Clinton 


1,257 80 


6 Cobourg 


647 82 
32 32 


2,930 89 


7 Collingwood 


4,598 21 


8 Fort William 


4,817 43 


9 Gait 


23 37 


7,647 06 


10 Goderich 


1,209 41 


11 Guelph 




6,721 70 


12 Hamilton 


333 35 


9,672 44 


13 Ingersoll 


5,688 48 


14 Kingston 


40 80 
21 07 


4,957 18 


15 Kitchener- Waterloo 


8,457 86 


16 Lindsay 


3,057 83 


17 London 


92 86 


25,862 33 


18 Morrisburg 


1,792 43 


19 Napanee 






1,672 88 


20 Niagara Falls 


1,454 92 
107 94 
170 00 
279 39 
105 38 


44 37 


5,290 69 


21 North Bay 


3,564 83 






3,098 73 


23 Ottawa 


820 70 
395 95 


40,331 54 




4,949 16 


25 Perth 


2,130 91 




200 00 

74 02 

140 05 

296 89 

38 52 




6,489 86 


27 Picton 


57 58 
347 57 


2,736 68 




5,139 66 


29 Renfrew 


2,617 77 






5,195 28 


31 St. Mary's 




2,155 51 




209 72 
584 35 


165 35 


3,974 10 


33 Sarnia 


1,781 41 


34 Seaforth 




2,333 14 


35 Smith's Falls 




18 00 


4,084 03 


36 Stratford 


458 45 


8,519 76 


37 Strathroy 


23 81 

20 00 

50 00 

123 00 

98 70 

483 22 

1 92 

1,108 91 


2,669 72 


39 Toronto, Humberside ' 


103 82 
192 13 
126 48 

89 66 
117 72 

22 25 
153 07 

94 35 
4,593 57 


14,821 77 

8,380 39 
9,885 69 


41 Toronto, Malvern Avenue 


5,825 27 


43 Toronto, Parkdale 


8,130 80 
6,915 49 


45 Vankleek Hill 


6,335 71 

1,088 34 




2,064 31 


6,140 33 


47 Woodstock 


5,760 55 










Totals 


14,142 94 


7,295 96 


299,049 84 


High Schools 
1 Alexandria . . 




105 45 




1,660 73 






861 81 


3 Almonte 


31 30 
14 10 
75 17 

109 15 




562 43 






261 31 


5 Arnprior 




1,673 99 




62 78 


816 81 


7 Athens 


1,188 66 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



247 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



Continued 



Total Expendi- 
ture 



Charges per year for Tuition 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 



$ 
17,310 
36,584 
19,880 
32,854 
9,450 
15,413 
17,357 
24,762 
28,865 
10,910 
24,637 
61,697 
14,359 
30,344 
29,623 
20,808 
75,598 
9,576 
11,306 
22,554 
15,295 
15,886 

131,482 
25,987 
11,427 
33,228 
12,549 
19,917 
16,902 
24,251 
11,098 
30,734 
17,447 
10,612 
18,706 
33,235 
10,536 
59,884 
45,090 
46,362 
24,947 
47,924 
64,865 
39,087 
8,809 

178,749 
22,205 



c. 

14 
93 
56 
73 
11 
28 
72 
34 
80 
68 
10 
29 
92 
44 
80 
58 
58 
74 
57 
63 
05 
90 
17 
66 
75 
15 
98 
79 
14 
79 
74 
70 
24 
35 
43 
11 
28 
74 
32 
06 
23 
10 
85 
23 
33 
55 
14 



$10. 

Res. F. I free, others $10. Co. $10; non-res. $30. 

$5. 

Res. 1st yr. free, other yrs. $6 ; non-res. $10. 

Lower school $6 ; all others $10. 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Co. $10 ; res. and other Cos. $14. 

F. I $6, II and Com. $8, III and IV $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. 1st yr. $2.50, thereafter $10 ; Don-res. $55. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $7.50. - [V $35. 

Res. I free, II, III, IV $15, V $30; Co. $5 ; others, I & II $25, III & IV $30, 

Res. $10 ; non-res. $15. 

Res. $7.50 to $10 ; non-res. $7.50 to $20. 

Res. F. I free, other F's $10 ; Co. $10; others $30. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$10. 

Res. I and II $10, ill $20, IV and V $25; non-res. I, II, III $45, IV and V $50 

Res. I free, II $8, III & IV $12 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; Co. $10 ; other Co's. $16. 

Res. I free, II $5, III $8, IV $10 ; non-res. $25. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. and Co. free ; others $25. 

$5. 

Res. F. I $5 ; all others $10. 

Res. free; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Lower Sch. $6 ; M. Sch. $8 ; U. Sch. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 

Res. I free ; all others $10. 



Res. I, free, II $9, III, $15, IV, $21, V, $27 
I, $30, II, $24, III, $30, IV. $36, V, $42. 



Free. 

Res. and Co. free. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $7.50. 



1 , 491 , 123 72 17 free ; 30 not free. 



1 7,719 63 Province free, others $20. 

2 4,361 81 Res. $5; non-res. $10. 

3 5,843 73 Res. $2.50 ; non-res. $12.50. 

4 4,127 07 Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

5 9,167 57 Res. Carle ton and Lanark Cos. free ; others $25. 

6 5,368 93 $10. 

7 7,128 79 Res. free; Co. $5 ; others $10. 



248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Continued 



Re- 



Legislative 
Grants 



Municipal 
Grants (county) 



Municipal 
Grants (local) 



8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville 

12 Belleville 

13 Bowmanville 

14 Bradford 

15 Brampton 

16 Brighton 

17 Caledonia 

18 Campbellford 

19 Carleton Place 

20 Cayuga 

21 Chatsworth 

22 Chesley 

23 Chesterville 

24 Colborne 

25 Cornwall 

26 Deseronto 

27 Dundalk 

28 Dundas 

29 Dunnville 

30 Durham 

31 Dutton 

32 Elora 

33 Essex 

34 Fergus 

35 Flesherton 

36 Forest 

37 Gananoque 

38 Georgetown 

39 Glencoe 

40 Gravenburst 

41 Grimsby 

42 Hagersville 

43 Haileybury 

44 Harriston 

45 Hawkesbury 

46 Iroquois 

47 Kemptville 

48 Kenora 

49 Kincardine 

50 Leamington 

51 Listowel 

52 Lucan 

53 Madoc 

54 Markdale 

55 Markham 

56 Meaford 

57 Midland 

58 Mitchell 

59 Morewood 

60 Mount Forest , 

61 Newburgh 

62 Newcastle 

63 Newmarket 

64 Niagara 

65 Niagara Falls South 

66 Norwood 

67 Oakville 



$ c. 
709 69 
500 60 
754 02 
516 07 
1,357 88 
674 46 
588 10 
896 63 
515 93 
601 08 
623 65 
614 90 
638 94 

434 71 
680 56 
532 20 
500 41 

1,770 81 

647 83 
437 50 

1,777 06 
888 79 
601 28 
581 77 
511 38 
939 81 
580 43 
563 86 

631 66 
770 62 
806 92 
530 45 

1,144 88 
594 61 

648 88 
1,491 18 

688 83 
586 90 

632 12 
679 63 

1,423 68 
959 91 
791 31 
734 17 
642 21 
661 57 
477 36 
676 63 
990 54 
694 55 
683 77 
472 75 
611 08 

1,001 18 

435 67 
1,516 75 

536 22 

1,110 47 

572 24 

729 63 



$ c. 

2,409 30 

669 15 

3,505 75 

1,911 70 

4.230 12 
2,350 17 
1,738 26 
3,365 12 
2,009 45 
2,875 28 
2,059 55 
1,402 97 
2,746 38 

434 71 
1,908 53 
1,575 08 
1,460 33 
6,527 52 

990 06 
1,068 43 

2.231 09 
3,575 45 

601 28 
3,717 73 
1,206 75 
3,951 14 
1,934 73 

563 86 
2,115 77 
1,671 29 
2,984 02 
1,775 71 



1,832 04 

2,427 88 



2,330 82 
2,003 92 
3,458 05 
2,760 67 



3,694 73 
3,587 41 
3,352 29 
2,574 46 
3,391 20 

477 36 
3,361 49 
2,999 86 

923 31 
1,789 96 

472 75 
1,452 35 
2,671 00 

635 67 
3,540 53 
1,000 00 
84 85 
1,565 31 
2,801 91 



$ c. 
2,400 00 
3,750 89 
1,950 00 
2,504 07 
16,089 30 
4,000 00 
2,000 00 
4,000 00 
1,600 CO 
1,000 00 
6,413 66 



.604 34 
,400 00 
,015 46 
,000 00 
,176 60 
,560 00 
13,000 00 
2,993 00 
1,500 00 
5,100 00 
2,000 00 
2,839 90 
750 00 
1,800 00 
2,500 00 
2,000 00 
2,626 75 
1,950 00 
3,529 06 
2,803 61 
300 00 
2,825 00 
1,620 22 
1,850 00 



2,892 00 
1,752 03 



2,300 00 
7,350 00 
3,265 60 
5,000 00 
2,550 00 
1,200 00 
1,300 00 
1,709 71 

650 00 
3,500 00 
4,750 00 
2,800 00 
3,216 45 
2,300 00 

420 00 
1,109 54 
2,500 00 
1,025 00 
9,162 13 
2,077 20 
2,526 02 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



249 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



ceipts 










Expenditure 




School Fees 


Balances and 
other sources 


Total 
Keceipts 


Teachers' 

Salaries 


Buildings, 

Sites and all 

permanent 

improvements 


Eepairs to 
school ac- 
commodations 


8 


$ c. 
846 00 


$ c. 

1,121 88 

429 64 

613 94 

1,352 05 

188 47 

213 00 

30 11 

804 25 

446 58 

2,820 45 

1,307 52 

129 16 

3,793 36 

1,428 66 

1,215 29 

61 43 

2,890 74 

3,426 48 

44 25 

577 84 

239 97 

5,147 49 

906 59 

1,326 86 

194 71 

1,346 10 

2,248 02 

724 18 

1,237 81 

9 70 

82 00 

683 78 

24 17 

387 88 

90 26 

10,389 45 

101 98 


$ c. 

7.486 87 
5,350 28 
7,626 71 
6,283 89 

21,865 77 

7.487 70 
4,762 47 

10,356 04 
4,571 96 
7,971 59 

10,404 38 
6,116 37 
8,578 68 
4,592 54 
6,922 88 
4,345 31 
6,411 48 

24,724 81 
4,675 14 
4,108 77 

10,128 42 

11.611 73 
• 5,625 07 

7,259 36 
4,025 59 
8,737 05 
7,293 18 
4,817 65 
5,935 24 
6,127 67 
7,811 25 
3,878 94 
4,306 05 
4,434 75 
5,017 02 
13,325 13 
6,590 63 
4,342 85 
6,631 19 
7,439 71 
8,974 05 
10,332 73 
12,799 85 
9,562 98 
5,578 13 
6,739 45 
4,899 82 
6,429 04 
9,525 34 
8,721 98 
7,016 73 
6,414 89 
5,816 69 
6,711 41 
2,180 88 

11.612 47 
3,467 53 

16,782 35 
4,673 75 
6,758 31 


$ c. 
5,240 00 
3,380 00 
5,000 00 
2,918 62 

17,600 00 
3,165 00 
3,200 00 
8,350 00 
3,127 72 
4,830 00 
5,626 00 
4,950 00 
4,210 00 
2,230 13 
5,040 13 
3,095 00 
2,500 00 

14,120 00 
3,316 40 
3,075 00 
6,700 00 
6,465 00 
3,340 00 
4,611 77 

3.130 00 
6,125 00 
4,190 00 
2,840 00 
3,950 00 
4,731 29 
6,175 00 
2,750 00 
3,050 00 
3,500 00 
3,670 00 
5,400 00 
4,960 00 
3,230 00 
4,620 00 
5,819 00 
5,133 20 
6,930 00 
6,440 00 
6,845 00 
4,200 00 
4,500 00 
2,150 00 
4,690 00 
7,264 56 
5,723 00 
4,638 00 
2,600 00 
4,255 00 
3,000 00 
1,862 50 
7,908 64 

2.131 50 
6,410 00 
3,200 00 

1 4,440 00 


$ c. 

469 50 

21 00 


$ c. 


9 ... 


235 45 


10 


803 00 


370 96 


11 . 




28 29 


12 . 




406 75 


13 

14 


250 07 

406 00 

1,290 04 


23 72 


261 22 

7 00 


15 

16 . 


317 00 


225 81 
15 25 


17 


674 78 


664 33 

2,017 00 

60 00 




18 ... 


275 47 


19 365 00 

20 - 


269 15 
21 25 


21 


279 00 
1,118 50 






22 


825 00 




23 ... 


8 40 


24 


87 75 


28 91 


25 . 


9 40 


26 




35 79 


27 


525 00 

780 30 


97 28 




28 


14 09 


29 ... 




69 48 


30 
31 
32 


676 02 
883 00 
312 75 


48 15 
15 00 


2 00 

217 32 

75 06 


33 ... 


"*23'65" 


255 92 


34 
35 


530 00 
339 00 


107 03 
61 87 


36 ... 




264 19 


37 
38 
39 
40 


147 00 

1,134 70 

589 00 

312 00 


36 89 

71 40 

361 36 


62 39 

202 60 

4 00 

65 75 


41 ... 




54 83 


42 


75 00 
60 00 


31 84 


43 
44 


1,444 50 
577 00 


498 90 
15 33 


45 ... 


87 50 




46 


2,541 02 
1,296 06 

200 37 
1,170 99 
3.421 13 
1,398 52 
1,161 46 
1,386 68 
1,848 39 

831 92 
1,185 94 
1,674 82 

967 50 
2,252 94 

390 51 
2,599 23 




47 403 35 

48 


8 50 
450 00 


127 11 


49 


1,241 50 


76 00 


50 ... 




554 30 


51 
52 ... 


1,528 00 


1,115 95 


155 84 
145 30 


53 


240 84 


36 73 


54 


387 00 
909 00 
849 00 
679 30 
775 50 




55 

56 


14 93 

233 66 

72 59 

1,032 87 


195 00 


57 
58 
59 ... 


264 20 
21 43 
17 00 


60 
61 


1,062 75 
20 00 


56 50 


30 75 
86 44 


62 ... 




28 03 


63 

64 ... 


1,634 35 


2,420 84 

906 31 

6,424 90 


899 28 


179 42 
24 00 


65 


1,303 72 


289 65 


66 


459 00 
629 75 


56 89 


67 


ii 66 


232 16 


1 66 05 



250 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 





Expenditure- 


High Schools — Continued 


library, scien- 
tific apparatus, 
maps, etc., type- 
writers, draw- 
ing models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science 
and agricultural 
department 
equipment 


School books, 
stationery, 
prizes, fuel, 
examinations 
and all other 
expenses 


8 Aurora '. 


$ c. 

30 18 

202 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
885 45 


9 Avonmore 




812 38 


10 Aylmer , 




1,219 32 


11 Beamsville 


19 30 

142 09 

91 36 


15 00 
104 35 


3,182 35 


12 Belleville 


3,496 13 


13 Bowmanville 


1,759 62 


14 Bradford 




1,177 09 


15 Brampton 






882 07 


16 Brighton 


154 89 
231 10 
431 54 

71 25 
208 90 

26 79 




1,253 21 


17 Caledonia 




721 26 


18 Campbellford 




1,490 99 


19 Carle ton Place 




742 97 


20 Cayuga /. 




2,966 13 


21 Chatsworth 




2,023 47 


22 Chesley 




565 40 


23 Chesterville 


66 72 




717 16 


24 Colborne 




907 78 


25 Cornwall 




49 65 


3,218 80 


26 Deseronto 


51 67 

21 72 

5 76 

188 85 

26 35 

190 84 

136 91 


1,271 28 


27 Dundalk 


887 64 






3,205 59 


29 Dunnville 




1,344 59 






1,161 31 


31 Dutton 




575 C3 






518 96 


33 Essex 


345 04 


890 06 




44 30 

38 08 


1,011 95 


35 Flesherton 




943 83 






929 36 


37 Gananoque 


64 45 

78 28 




1,232 65 


38 Georgetown 


78 29 


1,168 28 


39 Glencoe 


477 81 




35 86 




1,044 93 


41 Grimsby 




865 04 




81 34 


19 71 


860 10 


43 Haileybury . . 


1,813 28 








831 45 


45 Hawkesbury.. 






1,004 26 




3 75 

144 50 

280 00 

135 41 

22 33 

53 10 

57 47 

53 09 

65 50 

83 56 




1,037 86 


47 Kemptville . . . 




1,074 79 


48 Kenora 




2,999 97 


49 Kincardine. . . 




1,056 38 


50 Leamington . 




1.276 46 






1,351 33 







1,146 98 


53 Madoc ... 




839 77 




5 25 


757 23 


55 Markham 


690 61 




1,983 71 


57 Midland 

58 Mitchell 


884 21 




730 00 


10 00 


1,285 43 




52 66 


971 88 






1,130 06 


61 Newburgh 


7 66 

400 40 
160 73 
212 50 
101 15 
176 86 


15 70 


698 03 




284 81 




2,178 21 






311 84 


65 Niagara Falls South 


211 94 


1,769 35 




921 98 


67 Oakville 


457 06 


1,386 18 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



251 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATE WENT— Continued 



Continued 



Total 
Expenditure 



Charges per year for Tuition 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 



$ c. 
6,625 13 
4,650 83 
6,590 28 
6,163 56 

21,749 32 
5,300 92 
4,384 09 
9,774 88 
4,551 07 
6,446 69 
9,841 00 
6,093 37 
7,406 28 
4,280 39 
6,430 53 
3,887 28 
3,524 44 

17,397 85 
4,675 14 
4,081 64 
9,925 44 
8,067 92 
4,577 81 
5,609 96 
3,860 93 
7,616 02 
5,376 93 
3,883 78 
5,143 55 
6,127 67 
7,773 85 
3,593 17 

4.196 54 
4,419 87 
4,737 99 
7,772 18 

5.806 78 
4,321 76 
5,661 61 
7,173 90 
8,863 17 

8.197 79 
8,293 09 
9,521 22 
5,549 75 
5,670 43 
2,977 98 
5,674 10 
9,481 93 
7,674 00 
6,987 73 
3,641 54 
5,472 31 

3.807 83 
2,180 88 

11,565 95 
2,628 07 

10,197 16 
4,280 62 
6,758 31 



$10. 

Free. 

Res. F. I $5 ; all others $10. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. F. I free, II $6 ; others $7.50 ; non-res. free. 

Form I free ; all others $10. 

$10. 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $4.50. 

Free. 

Free ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Res. 1st year free ; all others $10. 

F. 1 $10, II $15, III $20, IV $30. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$10. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $10. 

Free. 

Res. $7.50 ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. and adjacent Cos. free; others $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. I free, II $5, III $7.50 ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5 . 

$10. 

$10. 

F. I $5 ; others $10. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $30. 

Res. 1st year free ; all others $10. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. free ; Co. & adjoining Cos. $5 ; others $2>. 

Free. 

Res. $8 ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Res. 1st year $7 ; all others $10. 

$10. 

Free. 

$10. 

$10. 

Res. I. $5 ; others $8 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $5; non-res. $10. 

Res. $6 ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

F. I free ; all others $10. 

Res. and Co. free ; others $10. 

Free. 

$10. 

Free. 

Free. 

$6. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. 8. 



252 



THE BEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Continued 



Re- 



Legislative 
Grants. 



Municipal 
Grants (county) 



Municipal 
Grants (local) 



68 Omeniee 


$ c. 
424 24 
863 30 

1,029 65 
657 57 
626 47 

1,837 99 

1,996 24 
690 35 
651 31 
501 41 
457 00 
507 34 
899 29 
611 77 
427 31 
726 16 
555 14 
738 91 
579 24 

4,041 22 
530 12 
877 39 
515 05 
646 12 
512 45 

7,982 36 
689 64 
893 18 
837 50 

2,873 76 

1,098 21 
600 84 
527 65 
583 24 
419 38 
718 54 
523 51 
406 95 
485 77 
552 93 
684 50 

1,211 15 
728 51 

2,372 73 
569 71 
728 26 
689 18 
742 42 


$ c. 

584 92 
1,889 58 
2,582 88 
1,902 39 
1,885 52 


$ c. 
1,238 32 


69 Orange ville 


3,950 00 


70 Oshawa 


9,017 80 


71 Paris 


3,950 00 


72 Parkhill 


1,500 00 


73 Parry Sound 


4,500 00 


74 Pembroke 


2,273 51 

690 35 

2,093 11 

1,213 19 

561 85 

1,680 67 

3,973 37 

2,995 00 

1,079 98 

835 33 

2,365 90 

2,341 26 

2,146 64 


10,728 90 


75 Penetanguishene 


3,900 00 


76 Petrol ia 


2,800 00 


77 Plantagenet 


2,091 39 


78 Port Dover 


1,785 79 


79 Port Elgin 


1,250 00 


80 Port Hope 


8,110 56 


81 Port Perry 


2,100 00 


82 Port Rowan 


.1, 341 99 


83 Prescott 


5,145 47 


84 Richmond Hill 


800 00 


85 Ridgetown 


2,800 00 


86 Rockland 


1,210 30 


87 Sault Ste. Marie 


15,500 00 






2,800 00 


89 Simcoe 


4,249 99 
1,813 91 
2,962 93 
2,062 97 


4,584 22 


90 Smithville 


1,500 00 


91 Stirling 


1,588 73 




650 00 


93 Sudbury 


11,251 20 


94 Sydenham 


5,000 00 

264 41 

2,300 47 




95 Thorold 


3,700 00 




3,500 00 


97 Toronto, Commerce 


127,250 96 


98 Toronto, North 




20,656 92 


99 Trenton 


1,560 04 


2,500 00 




38,672 35 


101 Uxbridge 


2,507 60 

823 57 

1,776 03 

1,312 86 

784 22 

885 77 

1,960 00 

3,087 80 


2,896 05 


102 Vienna 


1,004 15 


103 Walkerton 


2,900 00 




6,300 00 


105 Wards7ille 


868 27 


106 Waterdown 


3,170 00 


107 Waterford 


1,500 00 


108 Watford 


2,000 00 


109 Welland 


7,000 00 




2,531 86 
3,188 96 
1,801 58 
728 26 
1,734 97 
3,767 74 


5,355 95 


Ill Whitby 


5,700 00 


112 Wiarton 


1,500 00 


113 Williamstown 


4,800 00 


114 Winchester 


5,896 48 


115 Wingham 


2,753 84 






1 Totals, High Schools 


99,069 84 
85,018 57 


220,442 26 
143,609 81 


554,629 99 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 


1,027,498 26 


3 Grand Totals, 1917 


184,088 41 
185,245 16 


364,052 07 
382,542 00 


1,582,128 25 


4 Grand Totals, 1916 


1,845,705 45 
















1,156 75 


18,489 93 


263,577 20 






7 Percentages 


6.03 


11.93 


51.84 



1918 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



253 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Cantinuei 
STATEMENT— Continued 



ceipts 



School Fees 



Balances and 
other sources 



Total 
Receipts 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Buildings, 
Sites and all 

permanent 
improvements 



Repairs to 
school ac- 
commodation 



$ c. 
238 07 
,217 50 
136 75 

35 66 
737 00 

49 00 

51 00 



398 88 
600 00 
263 25 



108 00 
656 00 
950 85 



2,186 00 
423 50 



328 00 
159 00 
642 00 



657 00 
3,607 00 
1,610 00 



743 50 



806 24 
191 00 
219 75 
544 00 



405 50 
170 00 
736 50 
352 25 
462 00 



991 20 



47,680 01 
107,144 82 



& c. 
242 50 
237 94 
804 67 
990 49 
288 48 
494 12 



600 71 
600 00 

3,227 56 
249 00 

1,002 71 
113 00 
103 42 



80 06 

45 75 

486 65 

1,401 18 

3,326 77 

21 56 

157 22 

3,842 57 

1,670 79 

952 39 

6,007 03 

448 85 

575 63 

527 69 

160 93 

10,580 03 

3,103 74 



24 



309 94 

1,310 32 

1,268 02 

105 00 

142 55 

246 37 

1,253 10 

3,154 83 

6,643 69 

838 23 

264 52 

980 45 

793 35 

215 57 

1,628 45 



177,827 10 
588,763 54 



$ c. 
2,728 05 
9,158 32 

13,571 75 
7,536 11 
5,037 47 
6,881 11 

15,049 65 
5,881 41 
6,144 42 
7,033 55 
3,053 64 
4,839 60 

13,696 22 
6,073 44 
2,849 28 
6,895 02 
4,422 79 
7,317 67 
5,337 36 

25,053 99 
3,775 18 
9,868 82 
7,671 53 
6,868 57 
4,505 81 

25,399 59 

6,780 49 

5,433 22 

7,822 66 

157,892 65 

33,945 16 
7,764 62 

39,200 00 
7,040 33 
3,557 42 
7,468 83 
8,432 37 
2,421 74 

5.331 91 
5,266 03 

9.332 63 
15,024 84 
10,191 05 
11,878 46 

5,313 74 
7,049 87 
8,536 20 
9,883 65 



1,099,649 20 
1,952,035 00 



$ c. 
2,090 00 
6,010 00 
8,580 00 
5,070 00 
4,000 00 
3,880 00 

10,554 63 
3,900 00 
4,960 00 
2,892 00 
2,200 00 
3,030 00 
8,218 96 
4,750 00 
1,880 00 
5,025 00 
3,350 00 
5,830 00 
2,933 25 

13,970 00 
2,875 00 
7,922 00 
3,166 64 
3,523 37 
3,020 00 

13,542 75 
4,850 00 
4,123 65 
5,770 00 

40,456 15 

14,133 50 
4,660 00 
3,100 00 
5,150 00 
1,880 00 
5,069 85 
4,340 00 
1,940 00 
3,500 00 
3,185 80 
4,750 00 
8,178 00 
6,110 00 
6,215 00 
3,450 00 
5,442 38 
5,265 62 
6,660 00 



607,946 01 
946,103 13 



$ c. 

5 00 

275 00 

243 68 



1,795 32 
105 67 



240 00 



3,500 00 
98 51 
96 00 



85 68 
3,184 68 



119 15 
403*66' 



32,591 00 
302 94 



35,000 00 
"*i3135 



1,140 47 

65 51 

121 18 



160 50 
803'27" 



349 91 
7 25 



93,737 30 
183,806 64 



100 55 
439 94 
51 37 
99 24 
]66 25 
208 34 



186 85 



289 52 



329 60 

40 60 

23 55 
288 75 

47 69 
344 83 

31 99 
561 28 
131 92 

54 95 
384 24 

63 25 
165 00 

71 08 



5,375 47 

2,380 93 

47 25 



7 00 
50 00 
71 04 



16 05 
107 37 

38 43 

99 91 
403 31 

10 70 
199 20 

68 12 



85 53 
107 18 



19,975 63 
40,725 21 



3 154,824 83 

4 160,755 26 



766,590 64 
468,827 40 



3,051,684 20 
3,043,075 27 



1,554,049 14 
1,509,226 66 



277,543 94 
398,790 68 



60,700 84 
38,078 23 



5,930 43 
5.07 



297,763 24 



25.12 



8,608 93 



44,822 48 



64.24 



121,246 74 
11.47 



22,622 61 



2.51 



254: 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 





Expenditure — 


High Schools— Concluded 


Library, scien- 
tific apparatus, 
maps, etc., type- 
writers, draw- 
ing models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science 
and agricultural 
department 
equipment 


School books, sta- 
tionery, prizes, 
fuel, examina- 
tions and all 
other expenses 


68 Omemee 


$ c. 
23 64 


$ c. 


$ c. 
511 69 


69 Orangeville 




1,539 84 

2,542 47 

1,254 23 

577 21 


70 Oshawa 


508 34 

116 51 

54 30 

5 25 

145 09 




71 Paris 




72 Parkhill 




73 Parry Sound 


27 80 


2,230 32 
2,287 52 
1,426 63 


74 Pembroke 


75 Penetanguishene 




76 Petrolia 






3 82 


77 Plantagenet 






2,631 29 


78 Port Dover 


100 31 
31 61 

208 85 




496 83 


79 Port Elgin 




1,632 45 


80 Port Hope 


109 85 


1,028 67 
819 26 


81 Port Perry 


82 Port Rowan 


124 66 
29 23 

123 29 

107 22 
17 23 

266 27 
9 13 




404 27 


83 Prescott 




1,721 81 


84 Richmond Hill 




673 31 


85 Ridge town 




1,005 98 
465 49 


86 Rockland 




87 Sault Ste. Marie 


466 86 


4 824 15 




739 83 


89 Simcoe 




1,385 54 


90 Smithville 






479 56 


91 Stirling 




1,208 88 




48 71 
242 17 




438 88 


93 Sudbury 




S 3,886 53 






1,464 24 


95 Thorold 


18 94 

20 25 

230 53 

121 94 




1,198 78 






1,863 44 


97 Toronto, Commerce 


32 76 

58 50 


28,908 17 

15,215 56 

1,389 50 


98 Toronto, North 


99 Trenton 


100 Tweed 


1,100 00 
238 78 

46 49 

41 14 

53 42 






101 Uxbridge 


81 00 


1,512 30 


102 Vienna 


115 00 


103 Walkerton 




795 80 






1,071 07 


105 Wardsville 




345 79 


106 Waterdown 




1,509 00 


107 Waterford 




616 57 


108 Watford 




785 06 


109 Welland 


120 39 




3,699 53 


110 Weston 


180 71 
615 91 


2,272 87 


Ill Whitby 


91 01 

48 55 


4,581 92 


112 Wiarton 


882 03 


113 Williamstown 


100 75 
124 54 


714 73 


114 Winchester 


• 72 71 


2,231 23 


1 15 Wingham 


1,503 39 






1 Totals, High Schools 


10,928 04 
14,142 94 


3,404 20 
7,295 96 


191,860 02 




299,049 84 


3 Grand Totals, 1917 

4 Grand Totals, 1916 


25,070 98 
27,677 14 


10,700 16 
5,345 60 


490,909 86 
509,135 81 


5 Increases 




5,354 56 




6 Decreases 


2,606 16 


18,225 95 








7 Percentages 


1.03 


.44 


20.29 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Zoi) 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Concluded 



Concluded 


Charges per year for Tuition 






Total Expendi- 






ture 










$ c. 








*68 


2,630 33 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 






69 


7,925 39 


$10. 






70 


12,314 43 


Res. free; non-res. $7.50. 






71 


6,492 11 


Res. Brant, Waterloo & Oxford Cos. free ; others $20. 






72 


4,730 75 


Res. Lower School $6, others $7 ; non-res. $10. 






73 


6,309 62 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 






74 


14,990 90 


Free. 






75 


5,432 30 


Free. 






76 


5,150 67 


Free. 






77 


5,523 29 


Free. 






78 


3,037 14 


Free. 






79 


4,694 06 


$6.50 






80 


13,355 85 


Co. free ; res. and others $9. 






81 


5,667 77 


Res. F. I, and Durham Co. free ; all others $7.50. 






82 


2,834 53 


Free. 






83 


6,816 64 


Res free ; non-res. $5. 






84 


4,170 15 


$10. 






85 


7,231 95 


Res. F. I free, others $6 ; non-res. $10. 






86 


3,549 34 


Free. 






87 


23,056 79 


$10. 






88 


3,655 95 


Res. I free ; all others $10. 






89 


9,868 82 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 






90 


3,792 12 


Free. 






91 


4,906 35 


Free. 






92 


3,891 83 


$10. 






93 


18,137 70 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 






94 


6,479 24 


L. and M. Schools $5 ; U. School $12 






95 


5,412 45 


Free. 






96 


7,653 69 


L. & M. Schools $7.50 ; U. School $10. 






97 


107,594 08 


Res. 1st & 2nd yrs. free ; 3rd & 4th yrs. $15 ; non-res. 


2nd yr. $15 ; all 




98 


32,213 37 


(See Toronto Collegiate Institutes.) 


[other yrs. $30. 




99 


6,096 75 


Free. 






100 


39,200 00 


Free. 






101 


6,989 08 


Res. $5 i non-res. $7.50. 






102 


2,276 35 


Free. 






103 


5,983 18 


Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 






104 


6,921 17 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 






105 


2,408 49 


$7.50. 






106 


5,312 16 


$10. 






107 


3,894 22 


Free. 






108 


5,634 97 


Res. $10 ; non-res. free. 






109 


12,401 23 


Free. 






no 


8,734 78 


1st yr. free ; 2nd yr. $10 ; other yrs. $10 to $15. 






111 


11,703 04 


Res. $6; Co. $7.50; others $10. 




• 



,251 97 
,257 86 
,147 53 
,475 07 



1 927,851 20 

2 1,491,123 72 



2,418,974 92 
2,488,254 12 



$6. 

Free. 

Free. 

L. Sch. $6 ; M. Sch. $8 ; U. Sch. $10. 

60 free ; 55 not free. 
17 free; 30 not free. 



77 free ; 85 not free. 
76 free ; 84 not free. 



1 free. 1 not free 



69,279 20 



7 47.53 free; 52.46 not free. 



Approximate cost per pupil, enrolled attendance, $83.00; average attendance, $106.00. 



256 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE L— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED 







a 
en 

e 

o 

of 

£ fcfi 
-2 >» 

a * 




3 

cq 
m 

1.1 

§| 


l 


Value of 


Collegiate Institutes 


b 

3 


03 

c3 
U 
c3 
P. 
Pi 
< 


'0 


d 

P. 

C3 

- CO 

Sil 

TO 1— 1 

O 


1 Barrie 


B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

S 
S&B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 
B&S 

B 
B&S 

B 

B 

B 


"a" 

3 

n 

3 

1 

11 
11 

8 
h 

11 
2 
2 

4f 
1 
3 
12 
3| 
51 
2 
2 

24 

4 

H 

n 

3 

2J 

1 

2 
2 

2h 

2| 

10 
10 

2* 

6 

11 

3 
5 

1* 

4J 
2 
3 
1 


1 

1 

..... 

....... 

1 




$ 

132 

859 
1,002 
1,154 

884 
1,835 

792 
1,154 
1,276 
1,065 
1,089 
1,905 

981 
1,180 
1,867 
1,818 
1,209 

773 
1,068 
1,097 

631 

818 
2,979 
1,614 
1,002 
1,262 

980 
1,044 

799 
1,015 
1,047 
1,284 
1,102 

876 

692 
1,316 
1,107 
2,512 
2,326 
2,251 
1,425 
2,267 
2,178 
1,659 

776 
1,728 
1,470 


$ 

444 
1,150 
1,279 
2,546 

710 
1,469 

836 

911 
1,680 

796 
1,986 
2,437 

935 
1,244 
1,547 
1,556 
3,263 
1,293 

904 
1,137 
1,125 

907 
4,513 
1,568 

994 
1,169 
1,150 
1,784 

606 
1,551 
1,409 
2,083 
1,453 

785 
1,406 
1,609 
1,071 
5,723 
3,750 
4,510 
2,580 
4,503 
3,352 
2,530 

942 
1,508 
1,723 


$ 

36 


2 Brantford 


i'" 


419 


3 Brockville 


192 


4 Chatham 


271 


5 Clinton 


11 
11 


135 


6 Cobourg 


219 


7 Collingwood 


165 


8 Fort William 


11 


194 


9 Gait 


265 


10 Goderich 






103 


11 Guelph 


1 
1 
1 
1 




282 


12 Hamilton 




407 


13 Ingersol 1 


11 


109 


14 Kingston 


239 


15 Kitchener-Waterloo 




266 


16 Lindsay 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


11 


87 


17 London 


321 


18 Morrisburg 




143 


19 Napanee 




125 


20 Niagara Falls 


1 
1 
1 

11 

1 

11 


114 


21 North Bay 


164 


32 Orillia 


163 


23 Ottawa 


431 




139 


25 Perth 


140 


26 Peterborough 


86 


27 Picton 


1 
1 


247 


28 Port Arthur 


303 


29 Renfrew 


95 


30 St. Catharines 




169 


31 St. Mary's 


"i" 

1 
1 
1 


11 


120 




74 


33 Sarnia 




133 


34 Seaforth 


11 

1 


78 


35 Smith's Falls 


88 


36 Stratford 


171 


37 Strathroy 


"i" 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


11 

11 


95 


38 Toronto, Harbord 


219 


39 Toronto, Humberside 


153 






228 


41 Toronto, Malvern Avenue 

42 Toronto, Oakwood 


11 


133 
250 


43 Toronto, Parkdale 




160 






127 


45 Vankleek Hill 




64 


46 Windsor 


1 
1 


11 
11 


228 


47 Woodstock 


238 






Totals 






31 


81, 14 II 


61,300 


84,427 


8,588 











High Schools 
1 Alexandria 


B 
B 

S 
B 
B 
B 


3 

4 

ii 
2 
1 
si 




II 


634 
378 
644 
242 

674 
487! 


584 
654 
472 
402 
551 
813 


64 


2 Alliston 


54 


3 Almonte 


1 




47 


4 Amherstburg 




82 


5 Arnprior 


1 


I 


97 




58 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDTCATION 



257 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

SCHOOLS, EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. 



General Equipment 





CO 




d 




<v 




B 








o 




co 




5 


CO 
U 


QQ 


S 


o3 


u 


o 


I 


bo 
o 


a 


o 


>> 




En 


DQ 



$ 

39 
158 
146 
101 

75 
109 
102 
155 
121 

77 

52 
100 
101 
100 
173 

98 
142 
101 
101 
103 
151 
102 
238 
125 
101 
164 
102 
104 
101 
114 
106 
155 
103 
100 
107 
170 

76 
109 
132 
149 
158 
125 
149 
100 
103 
116 
121 



5,535 

85 
35 
71 
33 
75 
47 

17 E. 



$ 
350 

1,117 
658 

1,500 
225 

1,050 
400 

1,195 

1,100 
400 
960 
125 
200 
720 

1,433 
400 

1,500 
150 
420 
850 
800 
450 

1,695 
395 
200 
723 
740 
800 
225 
535 
160 

1,215 
500 
375 
610 
850 
150 



90 
115 



130 
25 
90 
260 
803 
566 



28,255 



150 



63 1 
161! 

103; 

119 
98 ! 
162 
76 
274 ! 
305l 
107 1 
216 
219 
100' 
114 
201; 
268! 
172 
100 
101 

no! 

1021 
105! 
470 
121 
111 
182 
125 
59 
101 
190 
194 
155 
111 
115 
103 
500 
89! 

1 , 320 
369 
656 
239 

1,211 
372; 
672 ! 
108 
130 
94 



11,073 



105 
54 
97 
30 

104 
56 



03 



S 'to 
P. >» 



% 



446 
413 
288 
97 
511 
217 
332 
168 
279 
972 
966 
304 
415 
613 
506 
714 
279! 
389! 
3551 
417! 
288 

1,138 
275 
344 
81 
271 
444 
302 
409 
520 
470 
270 
157 
64 
282 
377 

1,110 
578 
426 
581 
686 
320! 
575 1 
59 
444 
529 



o a 

a 0* 

ii 

.2 

'co tuo 

i| 

S" 3 









B 




0) 




-a 




B.B 


a 


•2£ 


3 


C3 1- 


CO 


d 0> 




^w 



10,000 
2,500 
2,500 
884 
3,000 
1,200 

16,000 



2,500 
2,800 
8,000 
800 
7,000 
1,000 
4,000 

10,500 
980 
922 

10,000 

10,000 
1,800 

10,000 
3,000 
7,000 



160 
50 



25 



31 



662 



5,000 
15,000 
5,000 
8,000 
6,000 
1,532 



1,380 

600 

7,688 

2,000 

3,500 

10,000 

10,000 

7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

15,000 

3,200 

40,000 

5,000 



100 
125 



196 
250 
100 



25 



75 



15 



100 
500 
150 



143 



500 



180i 



692 



19,6811 287,286 



26 



108 

100 

94 



4,151 



75 



50 



552 



22 

13; 

44 



415 
222 
177 
160 
350 
100 

40 
1,025 
189 
625 
774 
164 
200 
412 
152 
500 
200 
217 
150 

15 
150 
620 

65 
127 
644 
779 
233 



437 
100 
550 
250 



84 
350 



500 
565 

1.464 



652 
340 
-553 
51 
200 
227 



15,028 



126 



25 

182 
39 



d 

a 

o d 

ii 



1,064 
14,885 
6,590 
8,656 
3,268 
8,736 
3,888 
20,255 
6,627 
5,516 
9,157 
15,058 
3,709 
11,212 
7,713 
9,135 
18,421 
4,019 
4,247 
13,916 
13,405 
4,783 
22,084 
7,402 
10,519 
4,511 
9,434 
.19,920 
7,229 
12,476 
9,696 
7,518 
5,302 
3,086 
10,842 
7,748 
6,465 
21,673 
17,963 
17,566 
10,116 
19,824 
16,896 
21,356 
5,671 
46,257 
10,062 



525,876 

1,624 
1,175 
1,384 
952 
1,727 
1,500 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE L— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED 





Value of Manual Training 
Equipment 


Value of Household 

Science Department 

Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


B 
p. 


Collegiate Institutes 


o 

o 
o 


fee 
g 

"e 

s 

o 

o 


a 


o 

xi 

CO g 


coW 
° 2 

O 


be 

a 
a > 

o a 
£^ 


o 

>> 

1 


3^ 

> 


1 Barrie 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ $ 


$ 


2 Brantford 


754 


285 


502 


467 


675 


98 






158 


3 Brockville 




89 


120 


4 Chatham 


768 








1,392 








5 Clinton 












244 
81 


32 


6 Cobourg 


j 






1,011 

843 
1,376 
1,310 


203 






7 Collingwood 


1,014 










8 Fort William 


1,422 
1,099 








105 
103 








9 Gait 


299 






22 




11 


10 Goderich 










11 Guelph 








1 










12 Hamilton 


466 
391 














25 


13 Ingersoll 


179 


83 


399 


504 


65 


! 




14 Kingston 






15 Kitchener-Waterloo 


771 


257 


700 


829 


1,647 




1 


1?5 


16 Lindsay 






228 
73 


98 


17 London 


913 








1,007 


154 




75 


18 Morrisburg 










19 Napanee 


















20 Niagara Falls 










746 


296 






21 North Bay 






! 


I 




22 Orillia 












i 




23 Ottawa 



















24 Owen Sound 




350 






731 










25 Perth 












26 Peterborough 


















27 Picton 
















212 




28 Port Arthur 


571 


240 






1,591 


483 


52 




29 Renfrew 










30 St. Catharines 


















17 


31 St. Mary's 


















106 


32 St. Thomas 










872 










33 Sarnia 
















34 Seaforth 




















35 Smith's Falls 


1.360 

600 


364 
400 






582 
1,000 


35 

50 




210 




36 Stratford 


143 


390 


100 


37 Strathroy 






100 


38 Toronto, Harbord 






.... 












39 Toronto, Humberside 




" 












53 


40 Toronto, Jarvis 
















12 


41 Toronto, Malvern Avenue . . 


















42 Toronto, Oakwood 










355 










43 Toronto, Parkdale 








44 Toronto, Riverdale 




















45 Vankleek Hill . . 









46 Windsor 


686 
762 




: 




1,379 
914 






........ 


47 Woodstock 


420 


835 


2,104 


67 






60 








Totals 


15.592 


4,734 


2,263 


4,189 


18,169 


1,677 


1,744 


1,137 


1186 






High Schools 
1 Alexandria .. 












1 




1 
















































5 Arnprior . , 




i 














6 Arthur 


::::::::: 










1 1321.... 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



259 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

SCHOOLS, EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC.— Continued 





i 

c3 q, co 

'o . 5 


to" 


Religious and other 
Exercises 




Destination of Pupils 






III 


OTJ 

«3 p 














A, 

H ]} Q 

3 N 0) 

* 'CM 

2 2 <d 

J 2 


0) 

'00 

S3 

CO 


t3 

§ £ 
g 
wP-t 
2-^ 

-§? 

02 ^ 


"3 * 

coP-t 

1— 1 

05 


+3 

P 
<» 

§ s 

a. 2 

<U 


O 
O) 

b 





2 
3 

1— 1 

P 

.2 

*H 
1 


u 


0) 

a 

-^ 

S*a 


I 
1 

c3 
0} 


CO 

H 


0) <_, 

03 03 

(Art 

> s 




CO 

a 
.2 
ce 

Pi 

p 



Jh 

O 


,-. b M 
be -t? 

M». 3 

3 -' r o ttc 
,p 


k 

p 



P 
O 


1 


$ 


$ 








.... 




10 
54 


19 
19 


10 

1 


15 8 


6 
16 


6 
11 


20 
12 


18 


2 


2,939 


120,000 




1 


26 


11 


16 


3 


209 
2,160 


50,137 
60,000 












34 
53 


19 

24 


2 

6 


16 
13 


3 
4 


10 
2 


10 
22 


1 
21 


6 


4 


1 


1 


1 


5 


276 


12,000 


1 


1 








11 


22 


1 


14 


5 


1 


3 


6 


1 


6 


1,295 


27,100 


1 


1 








7 


4 




2 




1 


6 


5 


9 


7 


1,857 
2,903 


23,200 
65,746 












17 
32 


8 
8 


6 


12 
9 


6 
6 


3 
3 


12 
17 


4 
10 


3 


8 


1 


1 




9 


2,844 


90,000 




1 








55 


20 




11 


21 


6 


32 


9 


2 


10 




40,000 


1 










19 


15 


3 


7 


2 


2 


15 


6 


10 


11 


" *49i 


50,000 
164,863 












21 
103 


12 
15 


2 
17 


19 
25 


5 
11 


3 
25 


12 
24 


23 
15 


19 


12 


1 


1 


51 


13 


1,621 


25,000 


1 










10 


8 


1 


10 




1 


2 


7 


1 


14 




106,900 


1 


1 






, , 


55 


17 


12 


9 


10 


3 


22 


10 


10 


15 


4,329 


50,000 


1 


1 








60 


5 


4 


10 




4 




7 


8 


Ifl 


326 
2,222 


55,000 
206,000 












56 
161 


45 
19 


4 
11 


50 
25 


13 
10 


16 

8 


19 
4 


11 
32 


17 


17 


1 




97 


18 




15,000 


1 










2 


18 


1 


6 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 


19 




26,000 


1 


1 








21 


13 


1 


5 


1 


4 


7 


5 


4 


20 


i,042 


50,000 




•1 








38 


1 


5 


2 


13 


1 


2 


3 


6 


21 




105,000 












2 


2 




18 


16 


2 


36 


6 


10 


22 




65,000 




1 








31 


17 


1 


10 


10 


3 


9 


13 


11 


23 




633,416 


1 


.... 








58 


21 


18 


22 


14 


30 


173 


16 


40 


24 


1,608 


100,000 
46,811 












28 
14 


22 

7 


2 
3 


23 
8 


10 

5 


5 

1 


11 

7 


8 
2 


7 


25 


1 




16 


26 


2,937 


83,992 

65,000 

115,000 

27,500 












30 
13 
46 
12 


13 
30 


3 

1 


16 
5 
3 

38 


19 
4 
4 
2 


3 
9 
2 
2 


29 
8 
4 
3 


9 
6 

10 
4 


7 


27 






3 


28 


1 


"i 


8 


29 


25 


4 


6 


30 


17 


44,000 




1 








44 


15 


4 


14 


3 


3 


31 


11 


16 


31 


106 


32,000 


1 


1 








12 


5 


5 


18 


3 




5 


15 


8 


32 


1,473 


75,000 
50,000 












59 
40 


11 

9 


8 
2 


30 
6 


15 
12 


2 

4 


5 
6 






33 






8| io 


34 


**2*55i 

2,683 
100 


12,000 
100,000 
100,000 

50,000 










.... 


4 
18 

"i9 


2 

35 
14 

8 


3 
3 


6 

22 
15 
17 


"*8 
"*2 


2 

5 

7 
3 


"io 

38 
23 


35 










36 






14 
2 


28 


37 


1 




2 


38 


150,000 




1 








50 


7 


12 


15 




25 


50 


25 


21 


39 


53 176,000 


i 










30 


5 


11 


11 


5 


8 


26 


20 


25 


40 


12 135,500 


1 


.... 








96 


27 


29 


19 


118 


10 


82 


40 


63 


41 




120,000 


1 


1 








42 


6 


3 


6 


5 


3 


7 


10 


12 


42 


2,953 


265,670 


1 


1 








40 


5 


12 


12 


7 


12 


11 


25 


30 


43 




75,000 




1 








56 


9 


10 


10 


13 


6 


70 


32 


17 


44 


4,245 


257,600 




1 




i 




120 


2 


6 


22 


3 


8 


3 


18 


13 


45 




20,000 


1 


1 








14 


12 


9 


10 




1 


5 


5 


2 


46 


2,065 
5,162 


255,500 
50,000 












61 
26 


4 
12 


3 
2 


8 
13 


10 
5 


9 

3 


34 
10 


4 
3 


23 


47 






16 










50,691 


4,446,935 


22 


21 


47 


3 


41 


1,784 


636 


241 


683 


423 


286 


924 


517 


674 


1 




20,000 












5 


23 




7 




2 


16 


6 


3 


2 




35,000 
3,225 


1 


.... 








3 
10 


2 
6 


2 

1 


4 
12 


3 
2 


"2 


2 
5 


4 
6 


8 


3 








4 


381 


688 


1 










4 


4 


2 




7 




2 


8 


6 


5 


"i32 


20,000 
15,000 












12 
1 


9 
11 


"*2 


7 

12 


5 
4 


2 


6 
1 


1 
3 


10 


6 








1 





!60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. TABLE 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
L— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED SCHOOLS, 




§8 

S 00 


d 
co 

<-% 

° § 

u u 
<o be 

a! 


§ i 

? ! 
II 

& c3 
^ o 

CO 

GO 


1 4> 

1 T3 

^ ■ ■ 

» 


Value of General 


High Schools 


3 


CO 

d 

CCS W 

.2 ft 


CO CO 

p. <o 

J* 


CO 

1— ( 
CD 

o 

•> 

* 


7 Athens 


s 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B&S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 

i 
§ 

B&S 
B 
B 
S 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 


11 

1 
a 

I 
I 

3 

6 

It 

9 2 

2 

i 

4 
1 

tt 
1 

7 
3 

1 
2 
3 
2 

h 

2 
1 

n 

31 

2 f 

I 

4i 

1 

5 

4 

31 

5 

3 

Li 

2 

3 

7.i 

2~ 

2 

3* 

1 
2 

n 

41 

ej 

•l 

3 

n 

2 
2 

£ 

2 


.... 




$ 

692 
498 
361 
924 
420 
967 
672 
374 
48 
327 
610 
712 
905 
400 
287 
452 
322 
546 
855 
534 
.239 
749 
569 
443 
397 
331 
453 
718 
321 
519 
784 
494 
486 
398 
334 
573 
751 
455 
523 
870 
535 
428 
727 
495 


$ 

740 
582 
337 
943 
525 

1.590 
642 
428 
76 
395 
835 
879 
636 
345 
318 
531 
474 
625 
811 
623 
244 

1.044 
844 
484 
665 
451 
758 
569 
362 
512 
640 
536 
627 
392 
340 
650 

2,167 
507 
358 

1.111 
730 
743 
901 
726 
637 
609 
958 
311 
674 

1,300 
850 
586 
385 
631 
437 
352 
658 
298 
885 


$ 

83 

109 
70 

268 
93 
80 
52 
76 
23 

152 

100 
86 
58 
51 
51 

179 
72 
60 

150 
64 
70 
85 
47 
75 
56 
50 
73 
75 
54 
50 
85 

106 
65 
79 

104 
82 
77 
62 
62 
82 
75 
73 
85 

120 
81 
93 
68 
53 
99 

110 
69 

165 
72 
74 
75 
52 

186 
72 
90 


$ 

80 


8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore 


76 
57 


10 Aylmer 


.... 




85 


11 Beams ville 


43 


12 Belleville 


95 


13 Bowmanyille 


103 


14 Bradford 






70 


15 Brampton 


28 


16 Brighton 






52 


17 Caledonia 


62 


18 Campbellford 


95 


19 Carleton Place 


91 


20 Cayuga 


73 


21 Chatsworth 


51 


22 Chesley 






74 


23 Chesterville 






50 


24 Colborne 


.... 




55 


25 Cornwall 


84 


26 Deseronto 


51 


27 Dundalk " 


57 


28 Dundas 






76 


29 Dunnville 


66 


30 Durham 


52 


31 Dutton 


77 


32 Elora 






49 


33 Essex 

34 Fergus 

35 Flesherton 


50 
75 
52 


36 Forest 


52 


37 Gananoque 






119 


38 Georgetown 


67 


39 Glencoe 


51 


40 Gravenhurst 


.... 




50 


41 Grimsby 


65 


42 Hagers ville 


77 


43 Haileybury 


87 


44 Harriston 






81 


45 Hawkesbury 


70 


46 Iroquois 


76 


47 Kemptville , 


.... 




70 


48 Kenora 


50 


49 Kincardine 


99 


50 Leamington 


85 


51 Listowel 




462 


81 


52 Lucan 




457 
524 
324 
477 
748 
598 


79 


53 Madoc 


88 


54 Markdale 

55 Markham 


53 

77 


56 Meaford 


77 


57 Midland 


85 


58 Mitchell 






477 
366 


71 


59 More wood 


50 


60 Mount Forest 






537 
599 
391 
532 
300 
535 


131 


61 Newburgh 


56 


62 Newcastle 


49 


63 Newmarket 


90 


64 Niagara 






37 


65 Niagara Falls South 






75 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



2G1 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, Etc, 



Continued 



Equipment 










Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 




CO 

U 

11 

oc72 

m 


U 


i 
.2-2 

"w t3 t? 
c3 d*f 

Sou 

1.9 s 

C3 




CO 

«-■ 

O 


1 
0, 

0* 

4>W 


g 

S 


a 

B 

d 


L 

.Hi 


u 

% 




d 

'3 

u 

d 

"8 




bo 

d 

'So 
u 


p. 



$ 

7 


$ 

123 

) 95 

53 

) 220 

12 

) 129 

) 130 

) 52 

50 

75 

102 

96 

81 

118 

47 

97 

30 

) 54 

) 105 

58 

33 

) 61 

) 122 

50 

78 

> 1,005 

91 
101 

52 
) 49 
5 130 

> 151 

68 

) 51 

48 

102 

I 90 

99 

52 

) 101 

) 97 

) 63 

) 95 

102 

114 

) 100 

105 

50 

102 

) 133 

) 109 

! 102 

53 

102 

10 

42 

) 122 

) 38 

) 108 


$ 

36 
66 
18 

105 
20 
50 
47 
44 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 

112 

125 

5 

90 

3 

185 

309 

25 


$ 

1,866 
1,621 

972 
3,455 
1,116 
3,711 
2,090 
1,109 

225 
1,012 
1,744 
2,056 


$ 


$ 
1 


$ 


8 71 
















9 


69 
680 


— : 


2 










10 14( 










11 










12 611 
















13 5( 




85 
20 


.... 










14 2( 










15 










16 ... 


11 
35 

24 


















17 














. 




18 ... 








164 
35 

105 
15 

100 
22 
60 

140 
84 
25 

160 

250 
90 










19 ... 








1,806 
1,108 

785 
1,454 

988 
1,488 
3,300 
1,624 

678 
3,021 
2,ld8 
1,218 
1,277 
2,091 
1,628 
1,632 

893 
1,290 
2,599 
1,661 
1,335 










20 ... 


16 
16 
21 
18 
28 
60 
210 
10 
48 
80 
24 
4 
















21 ... 
















22 ... 
















23 ... 
















24 6( 
















25 1,07( 






25 










26 ... 














27 ... 
















28 79; 






3 










29 16( 














30 ... 
















31 ... 
















32 20£ 


















33 ... 


53 

34 
L7 
38 
22 
39 
38 
10 
55 
167 
38 
11 
17 
31 
33 
53 
80 
62 
47 
21 
35 




50 


.... 


100 
60 
25 
20 

453 
79 


500 








34 








35 ... 














36 5( 
















37 36( 
















38 13? 




50 


4 










39 










40 12( 






500 


30 

73 


1,630 
1,019 
1,651 
3,678 
1,215 
1,160 
2,471 
1,690 
4,390 
3,262 
1,590 
1,422 
1,479 
1,852 

791 
1,520 
5,143 
2,122 
2,239 

982 
1 , 610 
1 , 233 










41 ... 














42 ... 
















43 15 








317 










44 ... 
















45 ... 








78 
100 










46 10( 
















47 15( 
















48 33( 


2,500 
800 






150 

100 










49 37; 














50 ... 










51 ... 


















52 9( 






5 


25 

74 










53 ... 












. 


54 ... 

















55 ... 


16 
324 

62 
196 

18 

10 








75 

435 
200 
92 
37 
125 
56 
30 
80 










56 59( 


1,404 
"550 


22 
50 


"*4 










57 9; 










58 ... 










59 ... 


1 












60 ... 










61 ... 
















62 ... 










916 

2,472 

2,547 

10,124 


+ 








63 26( 


184 
237 

466 


350 

1 . 475 




10 










64 9( 










35 44( 


7,500 






25 











262 



THE EEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



II TABLE 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
L— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED SCHOOLS, 




Value of Household Science 
Department Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


o 

ft,d 

SI 


Total value of Special 
Equipment as per 
preceding nine 
columns 


on 


High Schools 


Cookery, Sanita- 
tion and 
Hygiene 


Handwork and 
Machine Sew- 
ing 


Laundry Work 


Value of School 
Buildings and 
Furniture 


7 Athens 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 
21,000 


8 Aurora 














1,800 


9 Avonmore 














12,900 


10 Aylmer 














18,000 


11 Beamsville 














6,500 


12 Belleville 


904 


66 


57 




40 


1.067 


76,000 


13 Bowmanville 


j ' 


25,000 


14 Bradford 














12,000 


15 Brampton 
















16 Brighton 














50,000 


17 Caledonia 














9,000 


18 Campbellford 














10,000 


19 Carleton Place 














12,000 


20 Cayuga 














8,000 


21 Chatsworth 














9,000 


22 Chesley 














20,000 


23 Chesterville 














8,100 


24 Colborne 














8,500 


25 Cornwall 


607 


164 








771 


47,500 


26 Deseronto 








25,000 


27 Dundalk 














6,500 


28 Dundas 














22,000 


29 Dunnville 














42,175 


30 Durham 















16,000 


31 Dutton 














8,000 


32 Elora 















4,500 


33 Essex 








255 




755 


13,000 


34 Fergus 








8,000 


35 Flesherton 










! 


25,000 


36 Forest 












2,500 


37 Gananoque 














32,000 


38 Georgetown 








71 




71 


30,000 


39 Glencoe 








14,000 


40 Gravenhurst 














15.000 


41 Grimsby 












25,000 


42 Hagersville 








97 




97 


14,000 


43 Haileybury 








50,000 


44 Harriston 














22,000 


45 Hawkesbury 














25,000 


46 Iroquois 














8,000 


47 Kemptville 














15,000 


48 Kenora 














40,000 


49 Kincardine 








200 


99 299 
1 


38,000 


50 Leamington 








16,000 


51 Listowel , 












15,000 


52 Lucan 












20,250 


53 Madoc 














11,300 


54 Markdale 














9,000 


55 Markham 














15,000 


56 Meaf ord 














25,000 


57 Midland .... 














30,000 


58 Mitchell 














10,000 


59 More wood 














11,300 


60 Mount Forest 












16,000 


61 Newburgh , 












5,500 


62 Newcastle 










i 


15,000 














32,000 


64 Niagara 












4,150 


65 Niagara Falls South , 


499 


L35 


io 


372 




1,016 


35,000 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



263 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, 



ETC — Continued 



Religious and other Exercises 



bo 




^ H 


d 


£ *> 


CC *> 


"55 4) 
23 






w^Z 


wQh 


en 0h 


— ' CQ 






o^ 


2-a 


o^a 


•^ Jd 


O +3 


o^3 




■a? 


CO 


GO 


QQ 



d 

fl.2 
d (u 



Destination of Pupils 



03 

d 

:§^ 
.° 

> 0) 

I 5 



CO ee 



§ 

-d w 
o 03 



Lj ° 

So 



1 


l 
l 


i 


l 
l 
l 
l 

l 


"i 

l 


l 
l 








l 
l 


l 
l 












l 
l 
l 

i 
l 


"i 










l 


l 


l 


l 
l 


i 










i 


"i 


l 
l 
l 
















l 










l 

l 
l 

l 

"i 


"i 

i 

i 
i 
i 



fel 



19 



14 



12 



10 
1 

27 
1 
2 



7 

16 
7 
6 
4 

14 
4 
9 

22 
5 
5 
6 
5 
8 

10 
2 
4 

10 

10 
7 
1 

12 
2 
4 
2 
4 
9 

12 
1 
4 
6 
4 

25 

14 
6 
4 

15 
9 
4 
8 
1 
8 
6 
9 

13 



"3 


"2 




2 




"3 


1 


.... 


8 


3 


2 


1 


"i 


'*6 


5 


.... 




4 




1 


"3 


"0 


1 


• • • • 




1 



12 



12 



10 
3 

1 
6 
4 
1 
6 
5 
8 
2 
11 
10 
5 

15 
1 
1 
1 
2 



5 
2 

4 
6! 

3 

30j 

5 

4 

2 

10 

2 

6 

1 

4 

5 

2 

7 

2 

22 

2 

2 

4 

1 

4 

1 

?i 

6 



3 
1 

10 
4 
2 



264 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 





II. TABLE L— 


BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED 




3 

«>§ 
o 

-* 2 


.2 

CO 

2 


12 
I* 


Approved Schools- 
Grade I and Grade II 


Value of General 


High Schools 


1 
3 


CO 

rr-t TO 

o 


T3 

fl 

03 
CO 

Pi 
m 

. CO 

go 


CO 

-a 

o 
< 


66 Norwood 


B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 

I 

B&S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 


8 

31 
11 
4 

3| 

4 

5 

h 
s 

10* 
2 

1 
4 
1 

n 
u 

3J 

f 
it 

2J 

6 

1* 

7| 

2 

2 

h 
5 

21 
21 
2h 
3 
4 
3 
3J 

3 

4 
n 
u 

5 

3 

3 

3| 

3 

4 
± 

2 
3 
3 
2 


1 
1 
1 


II 
II 


$ 

410 
619 
342 
747 
940 
641 
535 
485 
737 
432 
571 
287 
494 
331 
758 
482 
408 
455 
461 
806 
393 
655 
401 
658 
359 
428 
288 
627 
477 
311 
477 
1,897 
559 
652 
300 
524 
564 
471 
451 
305 
278 
519 
568 
521 
499 
703 
559 
471 
506 
512 


$ 

522 

722 

343 
1,041 
1,317 
777 
815 
581 
961 
793 
759 
356 
410 
440 
938 
773 
529 
655 
561 
1,316 
382 
883 
568 
894 
529 
462 
462 
1,634 
690 
639 
949 
3,025 
825 
627 
800 
621 
319 
618 
451 
333 
364 
644 
969 
992 
955 
1,417 
511 
569 
585 
765 
79,834 
84,427 


$ 

81 

247 

58 

111 

217 

122 

51 

91 

112 

72 

66 

56 

99 

110 

56 

60 

54 

111 

203 

132 

. 77 

71 

110 

161 

53 

67 

69 

69 

82 

125 

230 

217 

68 

203 

16 

120 

85 

84 

63 

63 

52 

79 

123 

65 

252 

112 

63 

83 

65 

176 

10,642 

8,588 


$ 

57 


67 Oakville 


58 


68 Omemee 


67 


69 Orangeville 


75 


70 Oshawa 


1 
1 
1 

"i 
..... 


I 
II 
........ 

II 

I 


83 


71 Paris 


75 


72 Parkhill 


78 


73 Parry Sound 


65 


74 Pembroke 


79 


75 Penetanguishene 


60 


76 Petrolia 


57 


77 Plantagenet 






50 


78 Port Dover 


l 




52 


79 Port Elgin 


59 


80 Port Hope 


""i 

l 
l 
l 

"i 
l 


II 

""{[" 
........ 

II 
II 

""ii" 


76 


81 Port Perry 


66 


82 Port Rowan 


71 


83 Prescott 


76 


84 Richmond Hill 


67 


85 Ridgetown 


60 


86 Rockland 


53 


87 Sault Ste. Marie 


75 


88 Sheiburne 


54 


89 Simcoe 


97 


90 Smithville 


50 


91 Stirling 


l 


ii 


75 


92 Streetsville 


51 


93 Sudbury 




ii 


89 


94 Sydenham 


76 


95 Thorold 






48 


96 Tillsonburg 


"i 
l 

l 

"i 

l 

..... 


ii 

'""ii" 
........ 

ii 


79 


97 Toronto, Commerce 


102 




70 


99 Trenton 


80 


100 Tweed 


34 


101 Uxbridge 


83 


102 Vienna 


57 


103 Walkerton 


90 


104 Wallaceburg 


100 


105 Wardsville 


51 


106 Waterdown 


50 


107 Waterford 






70 


108 Watford 


i 


ii 
ii 

ii 
ii 


155 


109 Welland 


99 


110 Weston 


79 


Ill Whitby 


92 


112 Wiarton 


59 


113 Williamstown . 






78 


1 1 4 Winchester 




ii 
ii 

61,4911 
81,1411 


44 


115 Wingham 


78 


1 Totals, High Schools 






50 
31 


60,758 
61,300 


8,022 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes. 






5,535 


3 Grand Totals, 1917 






81 
79 


141,6311 
181,6611 


122,058 
119,659 

2,399 


164,261 
162,650 


19,230 
19,157 


13,557 


4 Grand Totals, 1916 






12,524 


5 Increases 






2 


i'i'.b'ii 


1,611 


73 


1,033 


6 Decreases 








7 Percentages 




....1 


50.00 


* * 


16.15 


21.74 


2.54 


1.79 



8.64 i) i cent., Grade I ; 38.88 Grade II ; 52.46 not approved. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OK EDUCATION 



205 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

SCHOOLS, EQUIPMENT, DESTINATI ON OF PUP ILS, ETC. — Continued 



Equipment 


Value of Manual Training 
Equipment 




CO 

.2 B 
go 
o ft 


0> 

u 

u & 

fl-H 

ft CO 

•a >* 


*» ft 

CM) 

■§! 

**? 

3h n 

HOCJ 

>> 3 B 




CO 

B 
■+* 
o 


ft 

r 1 ,__, 

*** 

ooa 


CO 

t-t 

<V 

p. 


CO 




1 a 


o 

o 




'5 
s 



-a 

o 

o 




"5i 
u 
o 


ft 

o 
A 

».2 

"A ° 
o g 


$ 

66 

67 165 

68 

69 

70 1,162 

71 150 

72 350 
73 

74 510 

75 180 

76 

77 

78 

79 100 

80 515 

81 

82 
83***i50 

84 

85 300 

86 

87 385 


$ 

63 
76 
50 
99 

195 

111 
54 
44 

116 

157 
39 
53 
51 
42 
88 
56 
51 

101 
84 
98 
48 
90 
60 

141 
20 

100 
43 

118 

127 
32 

104 


$ 

32 
28 
30 

292 
93 
30 

6 

77 
40 
31 
16 
20 
7 

20 
39 
90 
42 
44 
19 

256 
10 
12 
26 
25 
17 
17 
12 

416 
30 
5 
63 
71 
61 
46 


$ " 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 

1,165 
1,983 
910 
4,865 
4,214 
1,993 
2,108 
1,437 


$ 


$ ) $ 

1 








68 
20 
























2,500 


















207 
87 

200 
94 

188 

111 

25 

4 


























19 




























2,743 
1,886 
1,533 

826 
1,113 
1,163 
2,670 
1,569 
1,160 
1.666 
1,456 
3,955 

963 
2,336 
1 343 












'"25 


25 
























































61 

200 
42 
5 
74 
61 
80 
















































































900 




7 




















15 
2 




150 
22 
25 


539 


270 


238 


2,991 


88 100 

89 150 

90 

91 

92 150 

93 690 
94 








2,151 
1,028 
1,157 
1,075 
6,183 
1,524 




























8 




.... 
























2,500 








40 
42 






















95 180 

96 150 
97 








1,340 
2,424 
5,821 
















372 

100 

93 

70 

10 












409 












98. 


142 
94 
54 
98 
59 

103 
28 
52 
26 
53 
83 

111 

104 

114 
35 

104 
33 

116 
10,274 
11,073 




1,818 

1,772 

1,218 

1,476 

1,092 

1,493 

1,318 

825 

806 

1,446 

2,125 

10,180 

1,965 

4,397 

1,459 

1,794 

1,265 

1,825 

229,595 

525,876 










99 
















100 






4 










101 


30 

8 
7 
































103 








120 
25 
16 
15 
38 

133 










104 200 
















105 


5 
21 
43 
39 

192 
43 
92 
25 

117 
32 
86 

6,283 
19,681 
















106 
















107 
















108 45 






10 










109 200 


8,000 










no 




3 

5 


30 
227 
157 
122 








Ill 435 


1,200 




l 






112 50 


1 






113 50 


200 






;;;;;; 






114 












115 




44 




48 


i 






1 13,044 

2 28,255 


30,628 
287,286 


792 

4,151 

4,943 

10,197 


621 

552 

1,173 

1,462 


8,697 
15,028 


1,420 270 
15,592 4,734 


238 
2,263 


2,991 
4,189 


3 41,299 

4 39,393 


21,347 

•20,087 

1,260 


25,964 

24,767 

1,197 


317,914 
283,374 


23,725 

21 , 185 

2,540 


755,471 
714,455 


17,012 
15,234 


5,004 
4,958 


2,501 

2,747 


7,180 
7,091 


5 1,906 

6 


34,540 




41,016 


1,778 


46 


"*246 


89 


5,254 


289 




7 5.46 2.82 


3.43 


42.08 .65 


.15 


3.14 




27.30 8.03 


4.01 i 11.52 



18 E. 



'66 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



II TABLE L 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
BOARDS OF EDUCATION, APPROVED 





Value of Household Science 
Department Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


Value of Art Equip- 
ment (Middle 
School) 


Total value of Special 
Equipment as per 
preceding nine 
columns 




High Schools 


Cookery, Sani- 
tation and 
Hygiene 


Handwork and 
Machine 
Sewing 


d ** 
3 ° 


Value of Schoc 
Sites, Buildii 
and Furnitur 


66 Norwood 


$ 


$ j $ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 
7,000 


67 Oakville 








303 




303 


37,000 


68 Omemee 








9,000 


69 Orangeville 














20,200 


70 Oshawa 










83 


83 


30,000 


71 Paris 










15,000 


72 Parkhill 










78 


78 


10,000 


73 Parry Sound 











25,000 


74 Pembroke 














20,000 


75 Penetanguishene 














25,000 


76 Petrolia 














6,000 


77 Plantagenet 















6,000 


78 Port Dover 















35,500 


79 Port Elgin 














5,300 


80 Port Hope 








110 




no 


30,000 


81 Port Perry 








10,000 


82 Port Rowan 














5,000 


83 Prescott 














19,900 


84 Richmond Hill 














12,000 


85 Ridgetown 














16,900 


86 Rockland 














20,000 


87 Sault Ste. Marie.... 














65,000 


88 SheJburne 








20,000 


89 Simcoe 










58 


58 


20,000 


90 Smithville 










7,500 


91 Stirling 














20, 000 


92 Streetsville 














6,000 


93 Sudbury 














46,700 


94 Sydenham 














25,000 


95 Thorold 














7,000 


96 Tillsonburg 










12 


12 


3,500 


97 Toronto, Commerce 










425,000 


98 Toronto, North 














148,000 


99 Trenton 














9,500 


100 Tweed 














35,000 


101 Uxbridge 














9,500 


102 Vienna 














6,500 


103 Walkerton 














10,000 


104 Wallaceburg 














25,000 


105 WardsYille 














5,000 


106 Waterdown 














2,000 


107 Waterford 














9,000 


108 Watford 














16,000 


109 Welland 














83,000 


110 Weston 










59 r 000 


Ill Whitby 












20,000 


112 Wiarton 






9,000 


113 Williamstown 














12,000 


114 Winchester . > 








273 

125 


27 

77 
505 

1,691 


300 
202 


18,500 


115 Wingham 








18,000 


1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 


3,005 
18,169 


469 
1,677 


67 


2,657 


11,622 


2,725,888 
4,446,935 


3 Grand Totals, 1917 

4 Grand Totals, 1916 


21,174 
19,752 


2,146 
1,539 


1,811 


3,794 


62,313 


7,172,823 


5 Increases 




607 












6 Decreases 




7 Percentages 


133.98 J 3.44 











1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



267 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

SCHOOLS, EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC.— Concluded 



Religious and other Exercises 






Destination of Pupils 






Schools using 
authorized 
Scripture 
Readings 


bo 
.2 


Is 

§& 


"3 n 

£* 


a 

CO 

§ CO 
O CD 

a .a 

CO o 
9 CD 

B x 


CD 

s 

CD 

B 
B 

o 


CD 
M 



r— 1 

B 

< 


Is 


bo 

a 


cd 

CD 

H 


CO 
CD 

EH 

CD 

A 

EH 


u 

1 °3 

CD 
CO CD 

CO +3 


CO 

O 
"•£ 

It 


bo °^> 

^^ bo 

gfflO 


g 


66 1 

67 








1 
1 
1 
1 


4 

12 

2 

7 
28 
2 
3 
3 
4 
8 

u 


1 1 

11 1 
4 3 


3 
9 
9 
16 
9 
3 
1 
4 
9 

"e 

2 


J 
"2 


1 
3 


2 
«-> 


1 

4 

6 

13 

2 

13 

10 

12 

23 

2 

8 

4 

1 


1 

8 
2 
4 
3 

3 

6 
9 

1 
5 
7 
4 

3 

5 
2 
3 
2 
2 
8 
1 
4 
7 
6 
8 
4 
1 
4 
2 
3 
3 
9 


2 
3 


68 




1 


69 




3 1 

7i 1 

41.... 

44 1 






5 


70 




5 
3 
1 
2 
5 
1 
6 


"ii 
2 


8 


71 1 

72 1 


l 
l 


1 


1 


3 
3 


73 1 




1 

1 


7 


74 


13 2 


12 


75 




3 
2 
1 


1 
1 




76 1 


i 






1 


77 






1 


78 


i 
l 






1 

4 
9 

8 
1 

14 
5 
4 
3 

15 
1 
8 




3 


.... 




79 








1 
24 


**3 


4 

10 
6 
3 
7 
4 

10 
4 
8 

10 
5 
2 
5 
3 
2 

10 
2 

12 


2 


80 




1 
1 


8 


6 


7 


81 




2 


82 1 


i 






4 
5 
1 

4 
2 

7 

2 
5 

2 




83 




1 


5 .... 

L 1 . 

3 1 

M 2 
4 


1 


1 


1 


84 


i 
i 




85 1 

86 




1 


1 
**6 
"4 


3 
1 

7 
2 
5 


"i 


87 

88 






1 


12 


89 1 

90 




"i 


1 


8 

10 
22 


2 


6 
1 


91 


l 
l 




4 

"20 

' 5 

3 

9 

202 

21 

8 


1 

1 
5 

"io 
2 


3 


2 


92 1 




1 
1 
1 


71.... 


3 


93 


1 
5 


5 
2 
2 


6 


94 1 

95 


l 

l 
l 


11 

4 


"3 


4 
1 


96 






9 


97 




1 


2 




3 
2 
2 


10 
4 
6 
3 
2 
2 
8 
4 

4 


15 


98 


l 


1 
5 


3 


2 
4 


"7 




99 1 






7 


100 1 








101 






5 


.... 
16 

5 

10 
5 
6 


2 


6 






4 
2 

7 

2 
2 
1 
2 
12 
8 
2 

3 

4 
6 


2 


102 












3 


103 


i 
l 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


10 

12 

4 

2 

3 

44 
9 

10 
3 
1 

13 
8 


1 


8 
2 
3 


1 
1 
1 


1 
4 
3 
2 


1 


104 

105 






1 
2 


106 


"i 

i 

l 




107 1 

108 


3 
20 




2 

10 
6 

10 
9 
4 
7 
6 

12 


2 


2 


109 

110 


cv • . • . 

17 1 1 

5 3 
5 ^ 


1 

3 
3 
2 


7 
3 

"2 


6 
11 
4 
3 
7 
4 


11 

4 


Ill 




1 
1 

1 


1 


112 1 

113 


l 


4 
9 




2 
2 


114 


12.... 

Hi.... 


3 


4 
3 




115 1 


l 




1 


18 


1 37 

2 22 


48 
21 


114 

47 


2 

3 


69 
41 


958 
1,784 
2,742 
2,725 


9211 98 
636 241 


724 
683 


244 
423 


213 

286 


476 
924 


459 
517 


356 
674 


3 59 

4 60 


69 
71 


161 
160 


5 

7 


110 
109 


1,557! 339 
1,335| 413 


1,407 
1,205 


667 
775 


499 


1,400 
2,327 


976 
958 


1,030 
1,530 


5 




1 


2 


1 


17 


222 .... 

I 74 


202 








18 




6 1 


2 


108 


.... 


927 
.13.18 


500 


7 36.41 


42.59 


99.38 


3.08 


67.90 


25.82 


|14. 66! 3. 19 


113.25 


6.28J4.70 


9.19 


9.70 



268 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 





III. 


TABLE M 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
—ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 








Pupils 




Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of Pupils 
from — 


Collegiate Institutes 


CO tf 

£3 <d 

M 

o u 

So 

=3 ?H 

p » 
— i-^ 


co cu 

^-P 

Pi"** 

5 be 
a P 

11 

PT3 

■v - 3 

si ** 


o 
p 

(D 

-P U 

+* e3 

5 >> 

CO £ 


o 
I? 2 


^ <" 
Q P 
o °9 

bn^ 


o 
o 

-a 
o 

ai 
u 

o 


o 
o 
pd 
o 

W 

«D 


o 

o 

o 
CQ 

Fh 

<D 
P 

P 

D 


5?.^ 

a -^ 

• P o 

S'fi 

co^ 

.So 

"tf o 

a,p 

o3 o 

ftcY> 

"OrTi 

"3 Sf 

P^ 


p.i, 
IB 

;3+f co 
P M o 


u 
a 

CO 

p 

3.3 
x£ 
2 <» 


1 Barrie 


242 
541) 
278 
332 
180 
178 
218 
253 
306 
182 
403 
760 
145 
514 
264 
315 

1,198 
118 
191 
219 
226 
300 

1,131 
365 
158 
359 
221 
179 
241 
359 
181 
469 
297 
189 
210 
402 
162 
596 
506 
449 
247 
654 
476 
406 
168 
508 
393 


94 

229 

82 

140 

62 

63 

79 

107 

130 

63 

71 

315 

50 

202 

123 

108 

527 

47 

78 

72 

101 

129 

460 

160 

41 

127 

83 

75 

84 

130 

71 

159 

100 

51 

61 

156 

45 

212 

206 

178 

101 

263 

180 

185 

60 

224 

164 


115 

246 

119 

129 

72 

75 

85 

91 

140 

64 

173 

361 

82 

238 

118 

132 

504 

4ff 

63 

92 

60 

117 

650 

152 

58 

156 

85 

69 

104 

152 

74 

216 

122 

91 

78 

158 

74 

314 

221 

269 

104 

282 

236 

207 

56 

236 

L59 


127 
303 
159 
203 
108 
103 
133 
162 
166 
118 
230 
399 

63 
276 
146 
183 
694 

70 
128 
127 
166 
183 
481 
213 
100 
203 
136 
110 
137 
207 
107 
253 
175 

98 
132 
244 

88 
282 
285 
180 
143 
372 
240 
199 
112 
272 
234 


192 
429 
206 
230 
125 
150 
150 
213 
256 
149 
297 
600 
113 
411 
182 
260 
825 
87 
145 
174 
187 
224 
904 
295 
112 
317 
178 
158 
201 
282 
151 
290 
247 
131 
164 
329 
138 
497 
384 
366 
200 
546 
385 
348 
130 
469 
315 


156 
320 
177 
243 

86 
121 
151 
202 
226 
119 
286 
488 

88 
322 
182 
212 
882 

84 
130 
139 
184 
219 
769 
271 
102 
249 
174 
150 
164 
293 
128 
360 
198 
101 
137 
293 

97 
345 
330 
275 
169 
409 
296 
279 
124 
421 
272 


68 
211 

86 

61 

67 

40 

45 

48 

62 

54 

86 

212 

47 

179 

63 

77 

237 

26 

44 

67 

35 

65 

331 

73 

48 

85 

38 

28 

60 

50 

46 

95 

79 

59 

63 

72 

54 

214 

156 

157 

67 

210 

160 

111 

36 

72 

102 


! 18 

18 
15 
28 
27 
17 
22 

3 
18 

9 
31 
60 
10 
13 
19 
26 
79 

8 

17 
13 

7 

16 
31 
21 

8 
25 

9 

i? 

16 
7 

14 
20 
29 
10 
37 
11 
37 
20 
17 
11 
35 
20 
16 
8 
15 
19 


122 

368 
195 
213 

79 
113 
152 
246 
152 
114 
326 
676 

81 
409 
214 
171 
978 

54 

94 
174 
195 
195 
1 , 031 
246 

77 
297 

91 
179 

87 
262 
103 
397 
245 

99 
170 
286 

77 
571 
437 
428 
224 
609 
461 
400 

61 
383 
173 


114 

161 
82 

112 

99 

65 

42 

6 

130 
68 
71 
68 
43 
96 
50 

107 

213 
63 
95 
24 
5 
64 
61 

103 
77 
44 

128 


() 


2 Brantford 


20 


3 Brockville 


1 


4 Chatham 


7 


5 Clinton 

6 Cobourg 


2 


7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William 

9 Gait 


24 

1 

24 


10 Goderich 




11 Guelph 


(5 


12 Hamilton 


16 


13 Ingersoll 


21 


14 Kingston 

15 Kitchener-Waterloo 

16 Lindsay 


9 
37 


17 London 


7 


18 Morrisburg 


1 


19 Napanee 


2 


20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 


21 
26 


22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound 


41 
39 
16 


25 Perth 

26 Peterborough 

27 Picton 


4 

18 
2 


28 Port Arthur 




29 Renfrew 


147 

83 
52 
70 
52 
78 
13 
82 
80 

"*53 

2 
23 
36 

8 

2 

90 

124 

181 


7 


30 St. Catharines 

31 St. Mary's 


14 
26 


32 St. Thomas 


2 


33 Sarnia 




34 Seaforth 


12 


35 Smith's Falls 

36 Stratford 


27 
34 


37 Strathroy 


5 


38 Toronto, Harbord . . . 

39 Toronto.Humberside 

40 Toronto, Jarvis 

41 Tjronto, Malvern Ave 

42 Toronto, Oakwood. . . 

43 Toronto, Parkdale. . . 

44 Toronto, Riverdale.. 

45 Vankleek Hill 

46 Windsor 


25 
16 
19 

*9 

7 
4 

17 
1 


47 Woodstock 


39 






Totals 


16,697 


6,448 


7.447 


9,250 


13,142 


11,423 


4,346 


928 


12,715 


3,367 


615 


High Schools 
1 Alexandria 




87 
85 
87 
50 
166 
81 


31 
32 
33 
30 
59 
26 


28 
41 
41 
31 
57 
27 


59 
44 
46 
1!) 
L09 
54 


68 
66 

70 

38 

130 

62 


71 
58 
57 
41 
96 
57 


16 

27 

24 

9 

57 
16 


**6 

"l3 

8 


74 
33 

50 

30 

109 

38 


8 
45 
34 
20 
36 
43 


5 


2 Alliston 




3 Almonte 

4 Ambers tburg 

5 Arnprior 


3 
"21 


6 Arthur 





1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



209 



AND HIGH 


SCHOOLS— Continued 
















AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 








- 






Number of Pupils from Families whose Head 
is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 








CO 




CO 

d 









d 




j 




1 






CO 

o 

B 


u 

d 


o 

CO 

a 
'3 


; «> 

co 

d £ 
3 ! H 


H 

A 

d 




tJD 

.2 

d 


co 
d 


P. 
d 





d 

'-£3 
os 

ft 

d 

CJ 



d 



u 
e3 

B 
B 

U 




+3 

*CO 

0,3 


U 

d 

U 

<o 

CO 


>> 

u 

s 

CO 

3 

d 


>> 

a 

CO 


b 



CO 

s 

d 


>> 
S 

CO 

a 

>■ 




B 


"C 




o 

C3 | 3> 





co 


a 


U 


11 


be 





'■£& 




''B 




o 


1 


co ■ -d 

H : H 

1 


c3 


+3 
O 


S 


d 


d 







d 
< 




1 


54 


99 


10 


(5 


34 


5 


ig 


1* 


156 


r 233 


i 235 


II 224 


1 121 


68 8 


2 


134 


127 


31 


12 


173 


12 


58 


i 2 


; 899 


537 


537 


399! 345 


13C 


5 


3 


18 


78 


19 


1 


72 


27 


50 


12 


185 


270 


271 


245 


180 


76 


6 


4 


72 


122 


22 


6 


57 


43 


1( 





214 


323 


322 


304 


304 


61 


11 


5 


38 


94 


8 


5 


25 


- 10 


• 




86 


170 


17C 

171 


153 


109 


67 


17 


6 


21 


54 


9 


3 


37 


8 


"29 


..... 


123 


171 


137 


147 


40 


9 


7 


41 


67 


8 


4 


61 


18 


7 


12 


151 


208 


208 


146 


119 


76 


8 


8 


102 


6 


6 


3 


56 


4 


76 





182 


247 


247 


172 


217 


48 


2 


9 


92 


55 


16 


6 


87 


6 


44 




174 


297 


297 


294 


287 


63 


13 


10 


39 


71 


11 


2 


36 


8 


8 


7 


I 119 


182 


182 


173 


173 


54 


9 


11 


95 


67 


21 


15 


77 


23 


74 


31 


217 


369 


374 


303 


1(53 


8(5 


16 


12 


358 


73 


35 


17 


165 


30 


(59 


13 


488 


744 


745 


700 


700 


212 


29 


13 


24 


60 


3 




24 


6 


1(5 


12 


101 


141 


140 


94 


82 


44 


6 


14 


117 


72 


40 


"l8 


136 


27 


88 


16! 406 


501 


501 


495 


179 


154 


2 


15 


124 


33 


27 


11 


30 




17 


22 


182 


254 


254 


213 


148 


61 


10 


16 


37 


161 


12 


6 


12 


"*47 


27 


13 


170 


310 


310 


287 


292; 


71 


13 


17 


378 


149 


87 


20 


313 


48 


100 


103 


871 


1,142 


1,142 


835 


679! 


230 


27 


18 


9 


75 


5 




6 


18 


4 


1 


80 


117 


117 


110 


110 


2(5 


7 


19 


42 


87 


12 


7 


17 


12 


11 


3 


122 


180 


180 


174 


189 


44 


8 


20 


57 


32 


8 


3 


45 


42 


31 


1 


111 


218 


218 


204; 


204 


52 


2 


21 


42 


20 


6 


4 


50 


45 


44 


15 


184 


226 


225 


149 


219 


35 


2 


22 


65 


103 


12 


5 


74 


25 


15 


1 


200 


289 


287 


2(55 


161 


65 


4 


23 


305 


(58 


82 


37 


228 


67 


303 


41 


764 


1,124 


1 , 123 


639 


655 


111 


20 


24 


71 


113 


13 


2 87 


32 


28 


19 


271 


355i 


355 


344 


344 


73 


7 


25 


16 


89 


6 


1 1(5 


14 


16 




127 


155 


155 


150 


150 


23 


5 


26 


80 


50 


19 


6 125 


25 


49 


5 


179 


848i 


348 


222 


165! 


85 


12 


27 


20 


126 


8 


41 21 


22 


20 





162 


217 


217 


212 


104 


38 


5 


28 


59 


7 


5 


3 55 


7 


35 


8 


152 


178 


178 


113 


49 


28 




29 


29 


163 


8 


3 10 


14 


8 


6 


1(54 


241! 


233 


224| 


224 


60 


'io 


30 


111 


47 


9 


5 


107 


52 


15 


13 


293 


351 


351 


2501 


127, 


50 


7 


31 


20 


94 


5 


3 


26 


24 


8 


1 


128 


179 


179 


127; 


173 


46 


1 


32 


136 


90 


12 


5 92 


89 


45 


. . . . 


360 


460 


4(50 


292 


296 ! 


95 


5 


33 


100 


i 1 


15 


3! 93 


12 


20 


13 


198 


295 


295 


277 


277 


79 


17 


34 


19 


89 


8 


51 40 


14 


11 


3 


101 


175 


17(5 


1(50 


104i 


59 


1(5 


35 


45 


37 


5 


4| 62 


23 


22 


12 


169 


207 


207 


200 


200 


30 


5 


36 


90 


96 


25 


4 86 


16 


(5(5 


19 


237 


353 


36(5 


2(55 


232 


44 


22 


37 


22 


79 


10 


2 19! 


9 


5 


16 


97 


158 


158 


152 


152 ! 


55 


8 


38 


300 


20 


40 


20! 100 




. 66 


50 


345 


589 J 


592 


325 


367 


217 


19 


39 


128 


32 


35 


18 131 


"41 


(51 


60 


330| 


500 


500 


276; 


276 


156 


7 


40 


102 


J 5 


32 


10 93 


39 


10(5 


49 


273 


443 1 


442 


317 


286 


76 


8 


41 


78 


14 


16 


6 91 


6 


13 


23 


170! 


243! 


244 


23(5 


236! 


67 


4 


42 


253 


16 


44 


30 117 


28; 


134] 


32! 


417 


649, 


649! 


381 


303 1 


203 


18 


43 


180 


17 


23 


12 134 


22 i 


83 





29(5 


4701 


470! 


273 


456 


78 


3 


44 


119 


4 


12 


8 125 


4 


122 


12 


279 : 


405 


4051 


390 


390 


111 


4 


45 


17 


1H| 


8 


2 7 


2' 


17 


4 


132 


123 


163 


1(50 


1(50 


36 


3 


46 


122 


28 


15 


6 152 


56 


92 


42 


340 


490 


462; 


382 


221 


71 


3 


47 


64 


163 


16 


21 89 


20 


3l! 

■ 


8 


315 


382 


382 


271 


1(58 


100 


6 


H 


.445 


3,312 


879 


355J3,693 


1,102 


2,170 


741 


11,210 


1(5.219 


145,241 


12,714 1 


1,2433 


.754 429 


1 


15 


47 


4 


3 8 


5 


5 





71 


87: 


87 


87 


87 


1(5 ... 


2 


15 


43 


6 


3 




(5 


"l2 


58 


85 


85 


58 


85! 


27 , -- 


3 


13 


38! 


5 


l! 18| 


"4 


7 


1 


h't 


82 


82 


81 


81 


24 


1 


4 


4 


17 


5 


1 10 


6 


7 




37 


49 


50 


50 


50 


9 




5 


34 


36 


9 


28 


21 


36 


2 


96 


16(5 


1(5(5 


9(5 


92 


57 


i2 


6 


J 6 


46 


1 


10 




8 




57 


80 


80! 


73 


45 


14 





270 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
III. TABLE M— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Collegiate Institutes 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Continued 



1 Barrie 

2 Brantford 

3 Brockville 

4 Chatham 

5 Clinton 

6 Cobourg 

7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William 

9 Gait 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Kitchener-Waterloo. 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 

22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth 

26 Peterborough 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur 

29 Renfrew 

30 St. Catharines 

31 St. Mary's 

32 St. Thomas 

33 Sarnia 

34 Seaforth 

35 Smith's Falls 

36 Stratford 

37 Strathroy 

38 Toronto, Harbord . . . 

39 Toronto, Humberside 

40 Toronto, Jarvis .... 

41 Toronto, Malvern Av 

42 Toronto, Oakwood . . 

43 Toronto, Parkdale . . 

44 Toronto, Kiverdale.. 

45 Vankleek Hill 

46 Windsor 

47 Woodstock 



m 



Totals 

High Schools 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte I 2 

4 Amherstburg . . . 

5 Arnprior | 2 

6 Arthur 



156 
399 
176 
243 

86 
124 
151 
196 
225 
119 
266 
488 

88 
320 
182 
220 
789 

80 
175 
126 
184 
219 
548 
271 
102 
249 
174 
150 
164 
293 
128 
360 
198 
101 
147 
280 

97 
345 
330 
276 
169 
414 
296 
279 
121 
426 
245 



11,175 



bo 

d 

h8 

a 

W 



1 

d 




oi 




d 




<u 




s 




T3 




id 




c3 




o 








-(J 






g 


Ja.2 






bo 


4 



156 
342 
143 
143 

86 

97 
119 
196 
174 
119 
217 
488 

88 
322 
180 
220 
838 

80 
130 

83 
101 
122 
505 
150 

58 
148 
162 
101 
164 
293 
128 
159 
168 
101 
147 
160 

97 
345 
250 
151 
133 
284 
165 
247 
124 
311 
229 



9,224 



>* 




u 




«*J 




a> 




B 




o 


A 


o 


o 


bo 


d 






u 


u 


H 


fe 



157 
365 
182 
243 

87 
137 
151 
197 
199 
124 
266 
488 
111 
421 
182 
202 
862 

80 
122 
154 
184 
219 
684 
235 
102 
249 
174 
164 
164 
293 
128 
360 
198 
101 
167 
273 

99 
345 
334 
275 
169 
447 
296 
279 
121 
422 
239 



11,451 



234 
514 
235 
323 
170 
169 
211 
174 
265 
182 
370 
747 
143 
417 
205 
307 
768 
80 
182 
203 
226 
292 
1,092 
339 
150 
345 
217 
179 
234 
276 
178 
465 
296 
175 
207 
368 
157 
590 
501 
442 
245 
647 
467 
403 
163 
447 
307 



15,307 



87 
85 
85 
49 
166 
80 



124 
404 
234 
154 
126 

76 
190 
144 
153 
103 
181 
456 

93 
287 
205 
189 
411 

67 

93 
130 

89 
150 
592 
187 

52 
169 
113 

66 
202 
141 
103 
218 
151 

74 
122 
186 
113 
400 
288 
301 
147 
649 
303 
222 
116 
195 
184 



9,353 



644 



40 

53 

51 4 
24 

104 12 

52 7 



198 
431 
249 
160 

97 
114 
152 
176 
245 
110 
280 
741 
106 
498 
160 
179 
612 

71 
141 
170 
130 
220 
1,041 
219 
105 
233 
127 
146 
154 
262 
146 
295 
208 
160 
101 
193 
128 
578 
402 
420 
132 
523 
434 
394 
109 
318 
286 



12,354 



22 
17 
31 

186 
12 
43 
45 
5 
38 
2 

21 
13 
17 
19 

107 
11 
19 
32 
10 
16 
22 
32 
11 
10 
13 
14 
13 
34 



165 
87 

135 
32 

152 

105 

68 

5 

12 

25 



J 



198 
370 
190 
203 
117 
115 
147 
172 
209 
115 
278 
742 
112 
397 
175 
181 
679 
87 
180 
129 
112 
234 
858 
253 
138 
232 
131 
146 
146 
238 
131 
265 
206 
163 
177 
220 
144 
570 
445 
415 
213 
579 
421 
380 
102 
299 
288 



1,72212,302 



80 
75 
61 
42 
155 
60 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



2?1 



AND HIGH 


SCHOOLS— Continued 




















AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 










Number of Pupils iu the Various Subjects 


— Continued 




Special Courses 




o 


I 


u 

CO 

1 


CO 

o 
°co 

>» 


>> 
o 

d 


a 
^3 


too 

a 
'& 

| 
3 



ft 



O 

d 


bo 


Pi 


>j 


u 

s 

"a 


'ce 
.2 

"co 

>> 


u 

| 

8 


u 


d 
'd 

"08 
u 
Eh 

1— 1 

§ 

d 



d 
£ 
'0 
w 

'0 

<o 

CO 

d 







CQ 

s 






o , 


,d 


A 




•7" 1 





>> 


H 


rd 




&b 







U 




S3 


cq 


Q 


PU 


S 


£ 


pq 


w 


E-» 


< 


Ph 





< 


^ 


w 


< 


1 


140 
200 


140 

208 


121 

249 


216 
380 


2 

3 


156 
105 


153 
105 


20 
105 


21 
45 


137 

200 


( 242 
547 


14 
105 






ll 


2 


...J 68 


96 


3 


120 
188 


120 

188 


160 
140 


226 
256 


2 

4 


115 
172 


82 
65 


38 
65 


43 
65 


111 

125 


277 
332 


"65 


38 






7 


4 


60 


93 


6 


5 


96 
72 


96 
72 


163 
69 


168 
116 


10 
3 


86 
94 


86 
50 


3 
54 


1 
54 


86 
64 


180 
173 










21 
6 


6 




41 




54 


7 


111 
126 


111 

126 


104 
48 


104 
174 


9 


137 
146 


38 
76 


38 
76 


38 
76 


126 
196 


218 
253 






53 
71 


85 7 


8 


76 




105 . . . 


9 


95 


95 


65 


229 


2 


196 


65 


65 


66 


93 


299 


65 




98 


124 


7 


10 


73 
203 
526 

72 


73 

203 

526 

72 


92 
179 
440 

78 


94 
294 
739 
119 


9 
9 
3 
2 


79 
195 
291 
111 


74 
125 


32 

94 


13 

95 


74 
181 
488 

69 


180 
400 
751 
145 


32 

95 

"22 










11 










12 




228 
51 


260 
37 


fi 


13 


22 


22 


22 


1... 


14 


78 

90 

109 

23 


78 

90 

109 

23 


145 
105 
173 
266 


311 
195 
261 
269 


3 

6 

5 

13 


123 
142 
181 
512 


89 

47 

50 

148 


89 

47 

50 

161 


98 

49 

50 

160 


74 
59 

106 
678 


489 

262 

308 

1,181 


89 










15 




90 


122 


9 


16 


50 
180 




12 


17 


19 


253 


217 


16 


18 


77 
85 
82 
55 
149 
181 


77 
85 
82 
55 
149 
181 


54 
61 
89 
62 
151 
506 


106 
92 
134 
147 
243 
862 


"i 

3 

4 
6 


83 
122 
117 
137 
141 
518 


"89 

76 

64 

200 

137 


18 
30 
83 
68 
45 
109 


20 
30 
83 
68 
45 
56 


66 
62 
43 
55 
144 
674 


115 
191 
219 
226 
297 
1,128 













19 


30 
76 
71 
45 
121 








10 


20 






75 


1 


21 








22 










23 




12 


23 


97 


24 


150 


150 


175 


175 


4 


127 


50 


50 


50 


173 


355 


50 




82 


132 


17 


25 


91 

86 


91 

86 


68 
138 


141 
198 


1 
3 


102 

184 


58 
81 


14 

78 


14 
36 


88 
74 


158 
354 


14 
81 










26 




51 


63 


11 


27 


116 


116 


83 


142 


5 


160 


54 


54 


65 


102 


221 


54 


28 








28 


31 


31 


46 


110 


• • • • 


40 


33 


33 


33 


102 


179 


33 




55 


95 




29 


112 

101 

3 

214 


112 

101 

3 

214 


141 

131 

44 

90 


201 

251 

44 

90 


6 
1 

"5 


164 
340 
128 
251 


79 

28 

83 

251 


38 


12 


135 

106 

75 

210 


233 

359 
180 
460 


44 

99 

22 

160 


42 






13 


30 






q 


31 


22 

160 


22 

92 








7 


32 




70 


51 


11 


33 


96 
115 
112 


96 
115 
112 


103 

73 

120 


206 

75 

172 


2 
9 
3 


143 

101 

85 


69 

101 

64 


71 


71 


90 
111 
117 


295 
187 
210 


69 








5 


34 








7 


35 


30 


30 


30 


39 


44 


93 




36 


203 


171 


164 


250 


11 


83 


81 


81 


81 


173 


382 


81 




99 


140 


19 


37 


99 
316 
120 
212 
167 
238 
198 
284 
126 
139 
131 


99 
316 
120 
212 
167 
238 
198 
284 
126 
139 
131 


110 
357 
127 
263 
139 
338 
261 
206 
160 
123 
171 


160 
512 
366 
260 
227 
340 
428 
383 
160 
242 
283 


1 

"3 

7 
5 

"7 

6 
2 

4 
6 


97 
192 
220 


55 

34 
10 


8 


8 


91 
228 
118 
195 
133 
352 
193 
265 
136 

101 

133 


162 
571 
497 
427 
247 
650 
473 
403 
167 
507 
386 










8 


38 












39 














?8 


40 














11 


41 


98 
238 

'"isi 

121 

201 
196 


30 
183 
160 

66 

48 
171 

73 














4 


42 










174 


234 


49 


43 










18 


44 










130 


149 


27 


45 










15 


46 


171 
73 


174 
73 


170 

73 






173 
190 


6 


47 




119 


10 


6,411 


6,387 


7,151 


11,151 


190 


7,411 


3,703 


2,195 


1,959 


7,412 


16,476, 


2,116 


207 


1,808 


2,611)496 

• 


1 


71 
58 
59 
37 
96 
58 


47 
85 
26 
24 
92 
16 


87 
85 
25 
49 
164 
53 


"i 
. . . . 


71 
32 
57 
41 

96 

28 








71 
1 58 

57 
35 
96 
57 


87 
85 
87 
50 
165 
80 












2 


58 
59 
37 
96 

58 
















8 


3 


11 


3 














4 












5 


















6 


8 








65 









272 



THE REPORT OF THE 



III 


. TABLE M 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
—ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS AND 




Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in — 


Number of Pupils 
from — 


High Schools — Continuec 


«*H i — 1 

£ « % 

, a o <u 
_, as _q 

o 3 rj 


£ V % 

§"S"C 


P ^ 

03 


03 03 

xi > 

-h 03 

03 


TA 03 

■ t£ 

03 +j 


"o 

o 

xi 

o 
CO 
u 

03 

3 


o 
o 
xi 

C3 
CO 
03 

t5 

S 


r— 1 

o 
o 

xi 
o 
CO 

Sh 
03 
ft 
ft 


03 xi 
03 bc+J 

.§'3 ° 


>> 
-♦■=> 

CO§_ 

.2 e8 

St** £"£ 


CO 
O) 

•j3 co 

s -a 


7 Athens 


152 
111 

49 
113 
62 
328 
129 
76 
136 
65 
80 
162 
139 
89 
36 
81 
90 
64 
255 
71 
66 
134 
120 
84 
105 
47 
121 
125 
74 
112 
113 
142 
72 
40 
89 
77 
123 
82 
70 
130 
139 
98 
158 
142 
188 
84 
104 
51 
107 
138 
113 
103 
49 
104 
72 
26 
207 
20 
74 


47 
40 
15 
35 
23 

137 
41 
31 
56 
25 
30 
66 
63 
31 
14 
25 
32 
28 
88 
24 
19 
53 
42 
34 
36 
21 
52 
44 
30 
48 
40 
58 
26 
9 
41 
30 
60 
37 
21 
30 
42 

50 

45 

69 

56 

31 

40 

25 

38 

60 

52 

36 

13 

33 

23 

16 

91 

10 

27 


65 
48 
19 
45 
3G 

136 
50 
34 
52 
20 
37 
62 
49 
40 
14 
28 
32 
29 
93 
24 
30 
53 
54 
32 
48 
18 
51 
48 
32 
45 
43 
68 
16 
14 
29 
33 
58 
36 
29 

51 

36 

30 

38 

62 

89 

42 

34 

18 

48 

45 

46 

48 

22 

34 

24 

13 

93 
3 

27 


87 
63 
30 
68 
26 
192 
79 
42 
84 
45 
43 
100 
90 
49 
22 
53 
58 
35 
162 
47 
36 
81 
66 
52 
57 
29 
70 
77 
42 
67 
70 
74 
56 
26 
60 
44 
65 
46 
41 
79 
103 
68 
120 
80 
99 
42 
70 
33 
59 
93 
67 
55 
27 
70 
48 
13 
114 
17 
471 


100 
91 
35 
80 
44 
260 
107 
54 
128 
46 
63 
115 
119 
66 
26 
64 
66 
48 
197 
54 
52 
109 
94 
70 
80 
29 
86 
102 
53 
83 
84 
103 
61 
33 
52 
62 
95 
65 
54 
110 
90 
83 
131 
119 
131 
66 
92 
37 
79 
115 
95 
73 
35 
76 
57! 
18 
161 

11 


85 
72 
33 
80 
45 
212 
80 
54 
84 
42 
54 
102 
94 
70 
32 
54 
70 
49 
179 
56 
42 
104 
70 
51 
67 
36 
87 
86 
51 
77 
85 
96 
51 
28 
66 
56 
107 
53 
52 
107 
77 
75 
120 
104 
111 
54 
79 
38 
73 
108 
85 
64 
35 
66 
55 
16 
158 
15 
44 


59 
26 
16 
23 
17 
91 
31 
22 
44 
23 
17 
39 
45 
10 
4 
16 
20 
15 
53 
15 
24 
20 
40 
33 
29 
8 
28 
30 
23 
26 
28 
29 
15 
12 
23 
21 
16 
19 
18 
18 
50 
23 
27 
29 
63 
25 
22 
13 
27 
22 
22 
39 
14 
29 
17 
10 
26 

271 


8 
13 

"io 

""25 

18 

8 

'*9 

21 

"9 

"ii 

""23 

"io 
10 

'"9 
3 

6 
9 

*9 

"l7 

6 

"io 

"5 
12 

"ii 
9 

14 

5 
3 

7 

8 
6 

"9 

"23 
"3 


77 

62 

42 

3C 

31 

23S 

8C 

3C 

67 

47 

37 

84 

84 

34 

33 

48 

27 

29 

130 

52 

27 

94 

72 

39 

33 

15 

27 

49 

62 

50 

82 

37 

18 

31 

58 

24 

62 

34 

41 

45 

41 

85 

72 

62 

76 

84 

87 

39 

25 

78 

88 

47 

35 

61 

12 

12 

87 

14 

41 


•75 
48 

6 
74 
30 
74 
49 
45 
62 
18 
31 
70 
36 
55 

2 

25 

63 

35 

109 

9 
24 
38 
43 
44 
71 
32 
94 
69 
10 
62 
23 
61 
49 

8 

6 
51 
58 
21 
19 
84 
59 
13 
86 
58 
95 




8 Aurora 




9 Avonmore 


1 


10 Aylmer 


3 


11 Beamsville 


1 


12 Belleville 


15 


13 Bowmanville 

14 Bradford 


i 


15 Brampton 


7 


16 Brighton 




17 Caledonia 


1? 


18 Campbellford 

19 Carleton Place 

20 Cayuga 


8 
19 


21 Chatsworth 


1 


22 Chesley 


8 


23 Chesterville 

24 Colborne 




25 Cornwall 


16 


26 Deseronto 


10 


27 Dundalk 


15 


28 Dundas 


?, 


29 Dunnville 


5 


30 Durham 


1 


31 Dutton 

32 Elora 


1 


33 Essex 




34 Fergus 


7 


35 Flesherton 


2 


36 Forest 




37 Gananoque 

38 Georgetown 


8 
44 


39 Glencoe 


5 


40 Gravenhurst 

41 Grimsby 


1 
25 


42 Hagersville 


2 


43 Haileybury 

44 Harriston 


3 

27 


45 Hawkesbury 

46 Iroquois 


10 

1 


47 Kemptville 

48 Kenora 

49 Kincardine A 

50 Leamington 


39 

"22 
17 


51 Listowel 


52 Lucan 


53 Madoc 


16 
11 
76 
57 
25 
55 

1 
16 
60 
14 . 
96 

6 . 
33 . 


1 
1 
6 
3 

"i 

L3 

27 

'24 


54 Markdale 


55 Markham 


56 Meaford 


57 Midland 


58 Mitchell 


59'Morewood 


60 Mount Forest 

61 Newburgh 


62 Newcastle 


63 Newmarket 


64 Niagara 


65 Niagara Falls South . 





1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



273 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Papils from Families whose Head 
is occupied as below — 


Num 


Lber of Pupils 


in the Various Subjects 




CO 
O 

>H 
O) 

a 


j 

<v 
S 

S3 

'd 
o 


.2 n 

O S3 

1^ 


9 


1 


CO 

II 

§3 1 


CO 

a 
.2 

"-3 

1 

U S3 


=1 



2 3 
-a 




as 
n 9 2 

.333 § 

1 — I "£ -** 


S3 

.3 g 




CO 

a 

a 

eg 
c3 


u 


-^> 

CO 

a 

CO 


>> 

N 
O 

CO 

a 

a 

a> 


1- 
.2 w 




a 

o 


u 
< 




0) 

xi 


J° 1 




t2 ° 






d 
c3 
O 


2z 

U 

cq 



1 


'&ja 


7 


11 


105 


9 


4 


13 


3 


4 


3 


97 


152 


152 


144 


144 


59 


8 


8 


13 


39 


8 


3 


12 


13 


13 


10 


72 


111 


111 


98 


98 


26 


12 


9 


2 


30 


2 




6 


1 




8 


33 


49 


49 


49 


i 321 16 




10 


11 


75 


4 


2 


14 


5 


i 


1 


80 


104 


105 


103i 103 


23 


1 


11 


1 


31 


7 


4 


8 




11 





45 


62 


62 


62 


1 41 


17 




12 


66 


64 


18 


4 


99 


7 


50 


20 


212 


201 


306 


276 


181 


66 


14 


13 


19 


41 


12 


1 


34 


10 


7 


5 


80 


123 


123 


80 80 


28 


6 


14 


10 


47 


5 





4 


3 


7 




54 


76 


76 


76 


45 


22 




15 


25 


57 


6 


3 


22 


6 


8 


9 


84 


136 


136 


128 


128 


44 


8 


16 


7 


28 


4 


3 


5 




18 




27 


65 


65 


48 


40 


23 




17 


25 


40 


1 




6 


8 






54 


73 


73 


45 


43 


17 


2 


18 


38 


66 


11 


3 


11 


26 


6 


1 


102 


102 


102 


102 


35 


39 


6 


19 


35 


56 


4 




33 


5 


6 


1 . . . . 


94 


139 


139 


121 


73 


45 




20 


9 


56 


6 




9 


3 


4 


2 


70 


80 


80 


80 89 


10 




21 


3 


29 


2 




1 




1 




32 


36 


36 


36 


36 


4 




22 


12 


33 


4 


1 


20 


2 


6 


3 


54 


81 


81 


70! 43 


16 


11 


23 


17 


62 


2 




3 


4 




2 


70 


90 


90 


90 


54 


20 




24 


4 


28 


6 


2 


3 


3 


12 


6 


49 


64 


64 


64 


64 


15 




25 


54 


90 


14 


7 


66 


17 


6 


1 


181 


248 


248 


232 


232 


50 


18 


26 


15 


25 


2 




18 


8 


3 




56 


71 


71 


42 


44 


15 




27 


7 


39 


6 


i 


2 


5 


6 




42 


66 


66 


66 


66 


24 




28 


17 


33 


4 




56 


2 


8 


14 


87 


134 


134 


109 


113 


20 


9 


29 


21 


50 


4 


2 


29 


11 


1 


2 


70 


117 


117 


111 


111 


37 


2 


30 


5 


43 


1 


1 


10 


21 


3 


... 


51 


84 


84 


84 


51 


25 




31 


2 


74 


5 




14 


-6 


1 


•J 


67 


96 


96 


94 


58 


27 


2 


32 


5 


26 




2 


5 


5 


4 





36 


47 


45 


45 


47 


7 




33 


19 


72 


5 


3 


2 


8 


10 


2 


87 


114 


114 


114 


77 


27 




34 


13 


54 


2 


2 


40 


8 


4 


2 


125 


125 


125 


116 


125 


30 


6 


35 


8 


54 


5 




4 


2 


1 




51 


74 


74 


74 


46 


23 




36 


12 


53 


7 


4 


14 





6 


11 


77 


103 


103 


103 


59 


26 




37 


15 


34 


6 


2 


29 


6 


18 


3 


85 


110 


110 


110 


1H> 


25 




38 


23 


64 


10 


1 


30 


5 


8 


1 


84 


125 


125 


125 


125 


29 




39 


11 


52 


1 




3 


3 


2 




51 


66 


66 


66 


40 


15 




40 


10 
13 


8 
49 







6 

8 


12 
5 


4 
7 




3 


28 
66 


40 
89 


40 
89 


40 
89 


29 
47 


12 
23 




41 


4 






42 


12 


43 


' 




8 


6 





1 


56 


77 


77 


77 


77 


18 




43 


20 


12 


13 


3 


15 


2 


53 


5 


97 


120 


116 


113 


113 


11 




44 


10 


37 


10 


2 


D 


2 


14 


2 


53 


77 


77 


72 


42 


19 


5 


45 


17 


21 


4 




13 


3 1 


8 


4 


52 


67 


68 


56 


41 


15 




46 


4 


100 





i 


10 


10 


3 


2 


107 


130 


130 


57 


68 


18 


5 


47 


9 


78 


7 


2 


8 


8 


21 


6 


77 


132 


132 


127 


127 


50 


5 


48 


17 


13 


1 


1 


22 


23 


21 




75 


97 


97 


97 


97 


23 




49 


34 


86 


4 




21 


8 ( 





5 


120 


158 


158 


147 


147 


27 


7 


50 


29 


72 


3 




28 





8 


2 


104 


138 


138 


132 


80 


28 


4 


51 


35 


86 


17 


2 


12 


12 


19 


5 


111 


188 


188 


174 


120 


63 


14 


52 


13 


47 


10 




4 


5 I 


4 


1 


54 


79 


79 


79 


79 


25 




53 


13 


73 


4 


i 


' 4 


3 


5 


1 


79 


104 


104! 


101 


59 


22 


3 


54 


7 


23 




l 


2 


1 


13 


4 


38 


51 


511 


51 


30 


12 




55 


20 


62 


7 


l 


3 


5 





4 


73 


100 


101 


100 


100 


28 




56 


26 


55 


7 




27 


13 


10 




107 


136 


136 


126 


63 


22 


6 


57 


18 


24 


71 




15 


18 


31 




<S7 


107 


107 


107 


107 


23 




58 


• 2b 


52 


2 I 


2 


14 


3 


2 


3 


70 


103 


103 


103 


67 


39 




59 


3 


29 


3 


5 


2 


4 


3 




35 


49 


49 


49 


34 


14 




60 


18 


52 


9 


1 


14 


3 


3 


4 


66 


95 


95 


95 


95 


29 




61 


4 


56 


4 




5 


1 


2! 




55 


72 


72 


72 


72 


17 




62 


2 


17 


1 




3 


2 


1 


. 


22 


26 


26 


26 


10 


6 




63 


22 


86 


15 


2 


19 


39 


13 


11 


129 


197 


197 


182 


182 


24 


11 


U. 




8 






5 




7 




15 


20 


20 


20 


11 

71 


5 
27 




65 


15 


22 


1 


2! 


14l 


41 


151 


1 


40i 


74 


74 


71 


3 



274 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
III. TABLE M— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools — Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued 



3* 



& 



^ 



7 Athens ^ 

8 Aurora 

9 Ayonmore 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville 

12 Belleville 

13 Bowmanville 

14 Bradford 

15 Brampton 

16 Brighton 

17 Caledonia I 6 

18 Campbellf ord | 12 

19 Carle ton Place 



20 Cayuga 

21 Chatsworth 

22 Chesley 

23 Chesterville 

24 Colborne 

25 Cornwall 

26 Deseronto 

27 Dundalk 

28 Dundas 

29 Dummlle 

30 Durham 

31 Dutton 

32 Elora 

33 Essex 

34 Fergus 

35 Flesherton 

36 Forest...: 

37 Gananoque 

38 Georgetown 

39 Glencoe 

40 Gravenhurst 

41 Grimsby 

42 Hagersville 

43 Haileybury 

44 Harriston !.. 

45 Hawkesbury 

46 Iroquois 

47 Kemptville 

48 Kenora 

49 Kincardine 

50 Leamington 

51 Listowel 

52 Lucan 

53 Madoc 

54 Markdale 

55 Markham 

56 Meaford 

57 Midland 

58 Mitchell 

59 Morewood 

60 Mount Forest 

61 Newburgh 

62 Newcastle 

63 Newmarket 

64 Niagara 

65 Niagara Falls South 



97 


97 


97 


152 


105 


72 


72 


73 


111 


69 


33 


33 


33 


49 


32 


80 


80 


80 


106 


64 


45 


45 


46 


62 


41 


221 


131 


258 


297 


168 


80 


80 


80 


117 


117 


54 


54 


54 


76 


45 


84 


54 


84 


136 


136 


42 


42 


42 


65 


48 


54 


54 


54 


74 


48 


102 


102 


102 


156 


89 


94 


94 


93 


138 


72 


70 


70 


70 


80 


43 


32 


32 


32 


36 


23 


54 


54 


54 


81 


46 


70 


70 


70 


90 


54 


49 


49 


49 


64 


36 


198 


81 


181 


250 


169 


56 


56 


56 


71 


44 


42 


42 


42 


66 


47 


104 


56 


104 


97 


60 


70 


70 


70 


117 


73 


59 


59 


62 


84 


51 


67 


67 


68 


96 


60 


36 


36 


36 


45 


21 


87 


62 


91 


115 


78 


125 


125 


86 


122 


122 


51 


51 


51 


74 


46 


77 


77 


77 


103 


59 


79 


85 


85 


110 


76 


96 


57 


82 


128 


71 


51 


51 


51 


66 


40 


28 


28 


28 


40 


29 


66 


66 


66 


89 


47 


56 


56 


56 


74 


49 


112 


97 


112 


87 


87 


53 


53 


53 


77 


46 


52 


52 


52 


69 


42 


107 


107 


107 


107 


68 


77 


77 


77 


132 


90 


75 


75 


75 


67 


67 


120 


120 


120 


154 


100 


105 


104 


106 


138 


86 


111 


111 


111 


188 


188 


54 


54 


54 


79 


45 


79 


79 


79 


104 


62 


38 


38 


38 


51 


30 


73 


73 


78 


102 


70 


130 


108 


105 


133 


57 


87 


87 


87 


110 


110 


70 


70 


70 


103 


67 


35 


35 


35 


49 


34 


66 


66 


66 


95 


95 


55 


55 


55 


72 


39 


22 


22 


22 


26 


10 


158 


158 


139 


200 


151 


15 


9 


15 


20 


10 


44 


40 


44 


74 


40 



IB 



17 



87 
90 
32 
76 
62 

245 
82 
73 

120 
42 
74 

126 

109 
71 
16 
65 
61 
58 

164 
65 
34 
88 
89 
60 
62 
33 

103 

117 
28 
90 
86 
90 
56 
26 
84 
67 

100 
52 
68 
37 
98 
49 

135 

125 

140 
67 
79 
28 

102 
74 

113 
38 
28 
79 
37 
20 

140 
18 
41 



15 



12 



21 



13 



141 
93 
32 
83 
62 

294 
97 
74 

129 
52 
76 

124 

113 
79 
36 
64 
61 
59 

177 
61 
55 
88 

101 
60 
70 
45 

106 

119 
30 

101 
81 

109 
52 
28 
88 
65 
56 
70 
65 

110 

107 
62 

133 

125 

150 
78 
80 
32 

102 
94 

113 
65 
28 
80 
43 
19 

124 
18 
39 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



275 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued 





>» 


1 


ft 






h* 










CO 

s 

a> 


CO 

"co 


H 

CO 

1=1 


bo 


o 

pq 


O 




§ 



be 

5 

o 
o 



6C 
o 

d 
& 

w 



CD 



.2 * 



Special Courses 



I 



CO £ 
5^ 



*5 




60 

114 

94 

9 

32 

57 

67 

40 

175 

56 



84 
27 
54 
106 
111 
59 
79 
38 
79 
68 
90 
65 
35 
75 
55 
22 
97 
15 
27 



60 
114 
94 
79 
32 
57 
67 
40 
175 
56 
42 
68 
69 
59 
72 
38 
84 
95 
51 
86 
52 
99 
56 
28 
66 
56 
23 
57 
52 



84 
27 
54 
106 
111 
59 
79 
38 
79 
68 
90 
65 
35 
75 
55 
22j 

vi 

15i 

27| 



109 
59 
16 
71 
41 

177 
35 
45 
44 
40 
45 
96 

139 
52 
4 
46 
90 
36 

144 
44 
47 
51 
71 
51 
63 
25 
53 

119 
46 
68 
70 
82 
15 
29 
47 
50 
49 
42 
17 
68 
92 
38 
90 
83 

120 
48 
59 
29 
75 
50 
59 
70 
34 
62 
39 
10 
77 
10 
37 



12 



152 

68 

16 
105 

62 
307 
115 

76 
136 

65 

47 
150 
139 

80 

36 

81 

90 

64 
238 

71 

66 

61 
107 

51 

97 

22 
107 
122 

51 
103 
106 
126 

15 

40 

89 

75 

49 

76 

69 

68 
133 1 

64 ... . 
154 -1 
137 2 
188 .... 

80i S 
104 .... 

51 .... 

69 5 

93| 'I 
108! 4 
103; 

49! ... . 

95 ... . 

72 ... . 

26 ... . 
198 \ 

20.... 

40 



14 



85 
72 
33 
80 
45 

159 
80 
54 
84 
42 
28 

102 



69 



70 
32 
54 

70 
49 
81 
56 
42 
73 
70 
51 
36 
22 
37 
125 
51 
77 
70 
96 
51 



5:5 



67 



42 
56 
57 
32 
42 
57 
42 
75 
120 
104 
54 
54 
79 



37 



54 



37 



73 
107 
52 
36 
35 
66 
33 
22 
139 



34 



54 



104 



38 



39 



13 



32 



30 



40 



13 



40 



39 39j 

8 
22i 22 



97 
78 
33 
80 
45 

130 
80 
54 
84 
42 
54 

105 
94 
70 
32 
54 
63 
40 
90 
56 
42 

104 
60 
51 
67 
25 
91 
86 
51 
77 
54 
57 
51 
28 
66 
56 
31 
52 
51 

107 
92 
34 

120 
95 

108 
54 
95 
37 
73 
67 
87 
78 
35 
66 
55 
22 
92 
6 
27 



150 
111 

49 
113 

61 
321 
129 

76 



65 

80 

160 

135 

89 

36 

81 

89 

64 

252 

71 

66 

134 

120 

84 

105 

47 

120 

125 

74 

112 

107 

140 

72 

40 

89 

77 

123 

82f 

69 

128 

139 

98 

154 

142 

188 

83 

104 

51 

107 

138 

113 

101 

49 

104 

72 

26 

204 

20 

74 



39 



38 



13 



30 



32 



94 



83 



80 



61 



39 



2n 



15 



10 
6 



O IV P 



THE EKPOKT OF THE 



X.i. 17 



III. TABLE M 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


Number of Pupils in 


High Schools— Continued 


Total number of 
pupiJson the roll 
for the year 


Number of new 
pupils admitted 
during the year 


p 
2 IS 

>> 
>> U 


Girls oo the roll 
for the year 


^ ca 

4>p2 

<< 


o 

o 
GO 

u 


-a ' 

o 

o 

Ul 

-■a 


o 
o 

o 
W 
u 
a> 
P. 
ft 
E3 


66 Norwood 


911 41 

126 52 

38 19 


29 
51 
14 
59 
75 
37 
32 
28 
102 
24 
38 
17 
12 
17 
63 
34 
14 
46 
35 
49 
8 
114 
32 
60 
24 
30 
14 
62 
60 
31 
42 
180 
93 
54 
16 
56 
7 
46 
41 
16 
35 
18 
47 
87 
50 
49 
29 
42 
52 
57 
4 , 906 
7.447 


62 
75 
24 
98 
95 
49 
61 
48 
91 
29 
92 
38 
23 
57 
71 
58 
29 
61 
61 
94 
21 

133 
40 
86 
37 
53 
23 
88 
74 
27 
54 

456 

116 
72 
39 
86 
17 
55 
63 
22 
43 
28 
65 

120 

60 

76 

50 

61 

57 

87 

7.494 

9.250 

16.744 

16,494 

250 


72 

110 
31 

103 

149 
68 
69 
59 

160 
40 
98 
43 
26 
6) 

114 
70 
27 
86 
73 
96 
23 

195 
53 

110 
46 
65 
22 

116 

105 

48 

71 

■ 540 

168 

104 
41 

106 
16 
82 
83 
24 
57 
36 
82 

140 
77 
90 
60 
86 
76 

118 

9,598 

13.142 

22.740 
22,781 

"x\ 

78.15 


75 

94 
27 

104 

125 
57 
60 
61 

147 
42 

103 
45 
28 
53 

100 
71 
34 
72 
69 
93 
22 

188 
47 
84 
44 
59 
23 

107 

97 

40 

70 

*564 

123 
93 
47 
93 
18 
71 
71 
25 
55 
32 
65 

163 
71 
89 
55 
55 
78 
82 

8.767 

11.423 

20.190 

20,185 

5 


16 

32 
11 
44 
32 
21 
27 
15 
40 
11 
27 
10 

7 

18 
22 
17 

9 
21 
24 
44 

7 
53 
25 
51 
17 
24 
14 
36 
30 
18 
24 
172 
65 
33 

8 
41 

6 

22 
25 
13 
16 
14 
37 
25 
28 
28 
16 
45 
23 
41 




67 Oakville 




68 Omeuiee 




69 Orangeville 


157 

170 
86 
93 
76 

193 
53 

130 
55 
35 
74 

134 
92 
43 

107 
96 

143 
29 

247 
72 

146 
61 
83 
37 

150 

134 
58 
96 

636 

209 

126 
55 

142 
24 

101 

104 
38 
78 
46 

112 

207 

no 

125 

79 

103 

109 

144 

12,400 

16.697 

29,097 

28.833 
264 


66 
60 
31 
29 
36 
87 
15 
58 
26 
12 
25 

134 
42 
15 
38 
42 
38 
18 

112 
23 
59 
18 
25 
12 
55 
45 
29 
44 

344 
88 
62 
27 
40 
6 
36 
32 
13 
36 
21 
32 
82 
55 
60 
21 
27 
38 
54 
4.904 
6,448 
11,352 


9 
13 

8 
6 

"6 


70 Oshawa 

71 Paris 

72 Parkhill 


73 Parry Sound 

74 Pembroke 


75 Penetanguishene 

76 Petrolia 

77 Plantagenet 


78 Port Dover 




79 Port Elgin 


3 
12 


80 Port Hope 


81 Port Perry 

82 Port Kowan 


4 


83 Prescott 


14 
3 


84 Richmond Hill 


85 Ridgetown 


6 






87 SaultSte. Marie 

88 Shelburne 


6 


89 Simcoe 

90 Smithville 

91 Stirling 


11 


92 Streetsville 




93 Sudbury 


7 


95 Thorold 






2 


97 Toronto, Commerce 




98 Toronto, North 

99 Trenton 

100 Tweed 


21 


1 01 Uxbridge 


8 


1 02 Vienna 




103 Walkerton 


8 


104 Wallaceburg 


8 


105 Wardsville 




107 Waterford 




108 Watford 

109 Welland 

110 Weston 


10 
19 

n 


Ill Whitby 


( s 


112 Wiarton 


8 


113 Williamstowo 

1 1 5 Wingham 


3 

8 

21 


1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 


2.990 
4,346 

7.336 
7.105 

231 


643 

928 


3 Grand Totals, 1917-1918 

4 Grand Totals, 1916-1917 

5 I ncreases 

6 Decreases 


12,353 

12.339 

14 


1,571 
1,543 

28 


7 Percentages 




39.01 


42.45 


57.54 


69.38 


25.21' 


5739 



1st and 2nd years. 



t 3rd and 4th years. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



-Continued 



Number of Pupils 


from — 


Numberof Pupils from Families whose Head is occupied as below — 


Municipalities 
forming 
High School 
District 


i 

Cft j- 1 +J 

.2 «2 

w ,H -*-= ^-i 
"S-Jd d ce 


CO 
CD 

an 

CD« 


CD 

a 

a> 

8 

8 




CD 
M 

S3 

cm 
< 


u 


a -d 
u 

s 


be 
d 




CO 

CD 

u 

EH 

CD 

EH 


co 

d 

1% 

u ft 
d =3 


1 

ft 
d 




I_ CO 
CD d 

"^ 2 


d 


1! 


66 46 29 


16 


10 


46 


2 





9 


10 


11 


3 


67 . 57 69 




15 


57 


4 


2 


25 


8 


10 


5 


68 14 22 


2 

50 


""io 


30 

88 


2 
5 


2 

2 






2 

14 


2 


69 61 


46 


30 


8 




70 132 


30 


8 


40 


39 


11 


2 


60 


6 


12 




71 44 36 


6 


11 


39 


2 




16 


3 


15 




72 36 49 


8 


19 


50 


6 


1 


5 


2 


6 


4 


73 68 7 


1 


8 


8 


6 


1 


20 


21 


1C 


2 


74 144 


46 


3 


31 


48 


8 


1 


53 


8 


44 




75 46 


7 




11 


9 


4 




12 


5 


12 




76 72 


58 




15 


46 


5 




20 


18 


22 


4 


77 53 


1 
13 


1 
3 


3 

1 


39 
16 








8 
4 


3 

5 


2 


78 19 


2 


1 


5 


1 


79 40 


34 




10 


33 


8 




8 


4 


4 


7 


80 77 


57 




29 


52 


3 


1 


36 


8 


4 


1 


81 34 


46 


12 


.10 


54 


11 


1 


8 


5 


1 


2 


82 18 


25 




6 


27 


4 




3 


1 


2 




83 82 


24 


1 


39 


26 


1 


3 


20 


7 


4 


7 


84 21 72 


3 


14 


57 


7 




6 


6 





1 


85 70 


71 


? 


22 


74 


2 


1 


9 


4 


16 


15 


86 13 


15 


6 


13 


1 




3 


5 


1 




87 221 


26 




60 


18 


12 


7 


112 


8 


25 


5 


88 27 


. 44 


1 


11 


44 


3 




3 


4 




7 


89 58 


88 




33 


57 


12 


4 


20 


. 8 


10 


2 


90 17 


29 


15 




37 


5 


1 


5 


2 


10 


1 


91 24 


59 




4 


54 


4 




6 


9 


4 


2 


92 21 


10 


6 


6 


16 


4 


1 


3 


1 


3 


3 


93 102 


48 




21 


6 


19 


1 


22 


33 


34 


14 


94 134 






17 
10 


93 
7 


7 

6 


"i 


4 
25 


5 
4 


2 
5 


6 


95 42 


9 


7 




96 55 


15 


26 


24 


42 


7 


2 


11 


4 


4 


2 


97 619 


15 


2 


197 


6 


19 


7 


204 


30 


101 


72 


98 172 


37 




65 


20 


15 


7 


49 


11 


29 


13 


99 72 


16 


38 


20 


47 


6 


2 


27 


11 


4 


9 


100 19 


36 




7 


22 


2 


3 


11 


5 


5 




101 53 


78 


11 


25 


84 


7 


3 


8 


4 


9 


2 


102 21 


"39 


3 

3 


5 

26 


17 

36 






2 
23 








103 59 


4 


4 


7 




1 


104 70 


28 


6 


21 


37 


6 


1 


20 


14 


5 




105 15 


14 


9 


7 


21 


5 




3 




1 


1 


106 70 3 


5 


9 


49 


2 




12 




6 




107 46 






10 
12 

50 


24 
84 
68 


5 

2 

11 


"3 


2 

10 

63 


2 

4 
3 


3 




108 47 


52 

112 


13 




109 95 


5 


4 


110 66 


32 


12 


23 


24 


5 


2 


20 


5 


7 


24 


111 72 


52 


1 


10 


48 


10 


3 


9 


18 


24 


3 


112 37 


21 


21 


18 


30 


3 




5 


2 


19 


2 


113 100 


3 




13 


55 


9 




9 


7 


6 


4 


114 50 


57 


2 


13 


84 


5 




6 




1 




115 130 




14 
763 


16 


68 


10 
652 




10 


16 

797 


10 
1,111 


14 


1 7,211 


4,426 


2,071 


5,137 


156 


2,041 


435 


2 12,715 


3,367 
7.793 


615 


4,445 


3,312 

8,449 


879 
1.531 


355 


3,693 


1,102 

^ 1,899 


2,170 

3.281 


741 


3 19,926 


1,378 


6,516 


511 


5,734 


1,176 


4 19,570 


7.823 


1,440 


6,300 


8,492 
""43 


1,498 


471 


5,610 


2,257 


2.978 


1,227 


5 356 




216 


33 


40 


124 


"358 


303 




6 ... 


30 

26.78 


62 
4.73 


51 


7 68.48 


22.39 


29.03 


5.26 


1.75 


19.70 


6.52 


11.27 


4.04 



278 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. TABLE M 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
-ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 











Number of Pupils 


in the 


High Schools—Continued 


.2 S 

US 




U 

zi 

^3 CD 


g CO 

8* 


>> 
u 
o 

co 

a 

A 

CO 

m 


b 

o 

CO 

a 

a 

'o 

3 


jfjffl 


66 Norwood 


75 
94 
27 

104 

113 
58 
60 
61 

147 
42 

103 
45 
28 
53 
86 
71 
34 
72 
69 
93 
22 

188 
47 
84 
44 
59 
23 
45 
97 
41 
70 

349 

123 
93 
47 
93 
20 
71 
71 
25 
55 
32 
65 

163 

71 

89 

55 

76 

78 

82 

8,464 

11,210 

19,674 

19,358 

316 


91 

126 

38 

152 

166 

86 

87 

76 

193 

53 

129 

55 

35 

74 

122 

90 

43 

105 

95 

140 

29 

244 

72 

140 

61 

83 

37 

143 

134 

58 

94 

636 

204 

126 

55 

136 

23 

101 

96 

38 

71 

46 

107 

199 

99 

117 

71 

100 

101 

134 

11,910 

16,219 

" 28,129 

27,848 

~ 281 


91 

126 

38 

152 

166 

86 

87 

76 

193 

53 

129 

55 

35 

74 

122 

90 

43 

105 

95 

140 

29 

244 

70 

140 

61 

83 

37 

143 

134 

58 

94 

636 

204 

126 

55 

136 

23 

101 

96 

38 

71 

46 

107 

199 

97 

117 

71 

100 

101 

134 

12,009 
16,241 

28,250 
27,964 


91 

126 

38 

148 

145 

75 

87 

61 

186 

53 

130 

55 

35 

71 

107 

87 

43 

91 

72 

137 

29 

188 

57 

121 

37 

83 

21 

77 

97 

58 

94 

349 

188 

126 

55 

134 

23 

93 

96 

38 

71 

46 

112 

187 

100 

115 

69 

100 

101 

123 


91 

70 

38 

148 

79 

75 

93 

76 

97 

53 

64 

31 

35 

71 

104 

43 

25 

48 

54 

94 

28 

128 

57 

121 

41 

54 

16 

79 

80 

34 

94 

223 

129 

126 

32 

83 

17 

93 

62 

38 

78 

26 

80 

137 

100 

115 

69 

100 

109 

87 


16 
32 
10 
44 
32 
21 
27 
15 
40 
11 
27 
10 

7 

18 
22 
16 

9 

19 
24 
44 

7 

53 
18 
51 
17 
24 
14 
36 
30 
18 
24 
64 
65 
33 

8 
41 

4 
22 
25 
13 
16 
14 
37 
25 
28 
26 
16 
24 
31 
41 
2,886 
3,754 

6,640 
6,496 




67 Oakville 




68 Omemee 




69 Orangeville 


4 


70 Oshawa 


5 


71 Paris 


7 


72 Parkhill 




73 Parry Sound 




74 Pembroke 


4 


75 Penetanguishene 




76 Petrolia , 




77 Plantagenet 




78 Port Dover 




79 Port Elgin 


3 


80 Port Hope 




81 Port Perry 


3 


82 Port Rowan 




83 Prescott 


14 


84 Richmond Hill 


2 


85 Ridgetown 


5 


86 Rockland 




87 Sault Ste. Marie 




88 Shelburne 




89 Simcoe 


9 


90 Smithville 




91 Stirling 




92 Streetsville 




93 Sudbury 




94 Sydenham 


7 


95 Thorold 




96 Tillsonburg 




97 Toronto, Commerce 


64 


98 Toronto, North 


7 


99 Trenton 




100 Tweed 




101 Uxbridge 


1 


102 Vienna 




103 Walkerton 


7 


104 Wallaceburg 




105 Wardsville 




106 Waterdown 


/. . 


107 Waterford 




108 Watford 


5 


109 Welland 


6 


110 Weston 




Ill Whitby 




112 Wiarton 




113 Williamstown 




114 Winchester 




115 Wingham 


10 


1 Totals, High Schools 


10,797 
12,714 


8,916 
11,243 


344 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes.. 


429 


3 Grand Totals, 1917-1918 

4 Grand Totals, 1916-1917 


23,511 
23,966 


20,159 
20,579 


773 

807 


5 Increases 


286 




144 
22782 




6 Decreases 


455 


420 


34 


7 Percentages 


67.61 


96.67 


97.08 


80.80 


69.28 


2.65 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



279 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



-Continued 



Various Subjects — Continued 





u 

o 
■+=> 
09 

a 



u 
<o 

o 


Pi 
g 

o 

a> 


e3 


c3 o 


e3 
U 

a> 
< 


Geometry 


Trigonometry 


A 

3 

2 
s 


a 

o3 

S 
u 


66 


75 
94 
27 

104 

125 
54 
60 
61 

146 
42 

104 
45 
28 
53 

100 
71 
34 
72 
69 
93 
22 

188 
47 
84 
44 
59 
23 
95 
97 
40 
70 

564 
96 
93 
47 
91 
19 
71 
71 
25 
55 
32 
65 

162 
74 
88 
55 
79 
78 
82 


' 75 
94 
27 

104 

113 
54 
60 
61 

111 
42 

103 
45 
28 
53 
85 
71 
34 
43 
39 
90 
22 

188 
47 
84 
44 
59 
23 
65 
97 
40 
70 

315 

123 
93 
47 
93 
19 
71 
71 
25 
55 
32 
65 

163 
51 
88 
55 
76 
78 
82 


75 
94 
27 

104 

127 
57 
62 
61 

146 
42 

103 
45 
28 
56 

100 
69 
36 
72 
69 
93 
22 

188 
47 
84 
44 
* 59 
23 

107 
97 
40 
70 

590 

123 
93 
47 
93 
19 
70 
71 
25 
55 
33 
65 

162 
74 
88 
55 
78 
78 
82 


91 

115 

37 

154 

143 

83 

87 

76 

152 

53 

130 

55 

35 

74 

124 

71 

43 

106 

96 

140 

29 

247 

72 

100 

61 

83 

37 

149 

134 

58 

94 

453 

209 

126 

55 

135 

22 

100 

96 

38 

71 

46 

107 

162 

104 

95 

71 

100 

103 

133 


45 
70 
37 
51 
70 
56 
87 
39 
80 
32 
64 
31 
18 
45 
52 
49 
25 
63 
57 
97 
17 

144 
49 
70 
37 
58 
23 

114 
87 
40 
94 




77 

110 

20 

129 

145 

29 

52 

63 

150 

48 

98 

50 

6 

62 

61 

90 

34 

90 

72 

108 

28 

94 

40 

25 

19 

58 

32 

106 

112 

50 

71 

591 

205 

109 

46 

119 

8 

43 

26 

14 

77 

42 

37 

176 

93 

48 

43 

90 

70 

113 

8,942 

12,354 




67 




3 


68 






69 
70 
71 . 


5 
5 


4 
9 
8 


16 

7 
4 


72 


6 


2 


73 . 






74 
75 . 


2 


5 


9 
4 


76 




14 


77 






78 . 








79 . 


3 
2 
3 




80 
81 
82 . 


10 
2 


16 
6 


83 


14 
3 

6 


2 


84 


15 


85 


3 


86 




87 


6 
*6 




88 




89 
90 . 


7 


10 


91 






92 






93 


10 

7 


5 


94 




95 


4 


96 


2 




1 


97 . 






98 
99 . 


2 


208 
65 
32 
84 
17 
61 
62 
25 
71 
26 
75 
91 
53 
95 
44 
70 
61 
97 
7,334 
9,353 


19 


70 


100 






101 
102 . 


8 


1 


9 


103 
104 


1 

8 


7 


7 
4 


105 . 






106 
107 . 


7 




3 
7 


108 
109 
110 
111 
112 


10 
11 

3 
3 
7 
3 
8 

10 
282 
399 


5 

11 
4 
3 


"i.3 

12 
4 


113 






114 




2 


115 


10 

378 
644 


10 


1 
2 


8,866 
11,175 


8,081 
9,224 


8,882 
11,451 


11,581 
15,307 


475 
1,722 


3 

4 


681 
651 


20,041 
19,690 


17,305 
17,481 


20,333 
20,141 


26,888 
26,655 


16,687 
16,463 


1,022 
998 


21,296 
20,524 


2,197 
2,297 


5 


30 


351 




192 


233 


224 


24 


772 




6 . 


76 


100 


7 


2.34 


68.87 


59.47 


69.88 


92.40 


57.34 


3.51 


73.18 


7.55 



280 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
III. TABLE M— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools— Concluded 



66 Norwood 

67 Oakville 

68 Omemee 

69 Orangeville 

70 Oshawa 

71 Paris 

72 Parkhill 

73 Parry Sound 

74 Pembroke 

75 Penetanguishene 

76 Petrolia 

77 Plantagenet 

78 Port Dover 

79 Port Elgin 

80 Port Hope 

81 Port Perry 

82 Port Rowan 

83 Prescott 

84 Richmond Hill 

85 Ridgetown 

86 Rockland 

87 Sault Ste. Marie 

88 Shelburne 

89 Simcoe 

90 Smithville 

91 Stirling 

92 Streetsville 

93 Sudbury 

94 Sydenham 

95 Thorold 

96 Tillsonburg 

97 Toronto, Commerce 

98 Toronto, North 

99 Trenton 

100 Tweed 

101 Uxbridge 

102 Vienna 

103 Walkerton 

104 Wallaceburg 

105 Wardsville 

106 Waterdown 

107 Waterford 

108 Watford 

109 Welland 

110 Weston 

111 Whitby 

112 Wiarton 

113 Williamstown 

114 Winchester 

1 1 5 Wingham 

1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes .. 

3 Grand Totals, 1917-1918 

4 Grand Totals, 1916-1917 



5 Increases 

Decreases . . . 
7 Percentages. 



107 
27 

125 

124 
42 
63 
63 

136 
45 
79 
25 
28 
69 
76 
91 
40 
85 
84 
96 
29 

142 
49 
56 
28 
44 
35 
72 

118 
54 
73 



189 

109 
44 

120 
10 
60 
76 
16 
77 
42 
62 

128 
96 
86 
66 
93 
80 

101 



025 
302 
327 
H8 
209 



Number of Pupils in the 



C23 



15 



59 
328 



387 

495 



108 
88 
54 
66 
25 

107 
42 

103 
45 
28 



70 

74 
34 
72 
55 
94 
22 
66 
47 
40 
44 
59 
23 
36 
97 
17 
72 
564 
97 
50 
47 
97 
18 
57 
79 



62 
20 
75 
131 
75 
67 
59 
79 
86 
77 



7,406 
6.411 



13,817 
15,422 



108 



73.29 



1.33 



1 . 605 



47.4S 



74 
44 
27 
108 
88 
54 
66 
25 
107 
42 
103 
45 
28 
53 
70 
74 
34 
72 
55 
94 
22 
66 
47 
40 
44 
59 
23 
36 
97 
17 
72 
564 
97 
50 
47 
97 
18 
57 
79 
25 
62 
32 
75 
131 
75 
67 
59 
79 
86 
_77 
831 
387 



14,218 
15,613 



1,395 



48.86 



45 

6 

22 

92 

62 

18 

72 

39 

74 

31 

64 

31 

18 

40 

64 

45 

25 

50 

51 

91 

17 

110 
48 
56 
37 
58 
14 
73 
80 
39 
49 
26 

115 
65 
8 
83 
16 
48 
66 
25 
19 
26 
77 
31 
49 
55 
52 
73 
67 
94 



6,345 

7,151 

13,496 

14,286 



790 



Oh 



91 


•• 


108 




37 




153 


4 


118 


4 


80 




87 


4 


76 




147 




53 




130 




55 




35 




43 




78 


2 


91 


1 


43 




106 




54 




140 




17 




184 




72 




130 


4 


61 




83 




14 




141 


21 


134 




58 




94 


1 


590 




187 


1 


126 




55 




135 




16 




85 


1 


96 


4 


38 




71 


3 


26 




107 


5 


35 


4 


99 





72 

71 
100 
101 
133 
10.701 
11,151 



21,852 
22,544 



692 

46.38 75,10 



1.42 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



281 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Concluded 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Concluded 



Various Subjects — Concluded 


Special Courses 


d 


em 

d . 
'p. 

4> 
4) 

M 

o 
o 

w 


,d 
ft 

o 

d 

S 


CUD 

d 
"■♦3 

i 

4> 
A 

>. 
Eh 


M. 
< 


o d 

>» d 
-do 

Oh 


'eg 

4> 

B 
B 

o 
o 


d 

cm 
< 


CX 

d 

P 


% d 
d'3 

K* 5 




66 


75 
,94 
27 

104 
96 
32 
29 
37 

111 
42 
66 
24 
17 
53 

100 
69 
34 
43 
39 
93 
12 

113 
23 
84 
20 
59 
23 
35 
97 
24 
70 

622 
69 
93 
23 
93 
18 
71 
71 
13 
55 
32 
65 

139 
50 
82 
55 
76 
78 
52 

7,315 

7,411 

14,726 

14,801 






44 
36 
27 

86 
88 
54 
60 
27 
34 
42 

103 
45 
28 
54 
49 
68 
34 
59 
55 
90 
22 
53 
43 
94 
44 
59 
23 
21 
97 
27 
70 
45 
96 
50 
47 

104 
18 
58 
71 
25 
55 
32 
65 

131 
75 
52 
50 
77 
90 
67 


91 

126 

38 

157 

164 

83 

92 

76 

192 

53 

130 

55 

35 

74 

134 

91 

43 

107 

96 

139 

29 

247 

72 

146 

61 

83 

37 

150 

131 

58 

96 

636 

209 

126 

55 

141 

23 

100 

104 

38 

78 

46 

112 

204 

106 

118 

79 

100 

109 

144 










67 


10 


10 


10 





38 








68 








69 


55 
41 
57 














10 


70 


41 
19 


41 
19 


41 








4 


71 










7? 












78 


















74 


55 
42 


41 
6 


41 
11 


41 

6 










75 










76 










77 


24 
















78 
















70 


















80 
81 


65 


43 


50 


43 


24 








8? 


















88 


36 


7 


16 












84 












85 


50 
12 
31 


11 


11 


11 










86 










87 


31 


31 






104 


113 


19 


88 








89 


70 


11 


11 










6 


90 












91 


25 
21 
40 
47 
13 
65 
636 
59 
















92 


4 
40 


4 
40 


4 

40 










98 










94 










95 




7 












96 












97 


636 


287 


636 








9 


98 










99 
















100 


















101 










51 






11 


102 














108 


15 
10 
















104 


10 


10 




... 

! 






10ft 




1 






106 










1 






107 














108 
















109 


49 
50 
20 


37 


37 


37 






7 


110 








111 


25 


25 


25 


13 






4 


112 






3 


118 











30 
78 
36 








114 












12 


115 














1 
2 


2,655 
3,703 


1,266 
2,195 


972 
1,959 


7,049 
7,412 


12,181 
16,476 
28,657 
27,674 

983 



~l7065 

2,116 


568 
207 


104 

1,808 


280 
2,611 


177 

496 


8 

4 


6,358 
7,218 


3,461 
3,216 


2,931 

2,645 


14.461 
15,318 


3.181 
2,852 


775 

828 


1,912 

1,806 


2,891 
2,651 


673 
745 


5 




245 


286 


329 


"*53 


106 


240 




6 


75 
50.61 


860 


857 
49.69 


72 


7 


21.85 


11.89 


10.07 


98.481 


10.93 


2.66! 


6.57 


9.93 


2.31 



282 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE N— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 





p 

-** 

"IS 


N bo 


No. 1 

Tilbury, 
North 


L'Orig- 
nal 
Village 


Penetan- 
guishene 
Town 


CO 






Number of Schools 


i 

$ c. 

782 69 
37 09 
12 09 

736 94 


1 

$ c. 

227 08 
147 66 
12 66 
500 00 
223 00 


1 

$ c. 

23 67 
216 10 

10 35 
702 84 
176 71 


1 

$ c. 

34 61 
31 38 


2 

$ c. 

116 37 
349 00 


| 6 


Receipts : 

Balances from 1916 

Government grants 

Municipal grants 


$ c. 

1,184 42 

781 23 

35 10 


Municipal assessments 

Other sources 


659 58 
2 99 


8,150 00 
253 75 


10,749 36 
656 45 








Totals 


1,568 81 


1,110 40 


1,129 67 


728 56 


8,869 12 


13,406 56 






Expenditure: 
Teachers' salaries 


506 55 


500 00 
9 00 

31 50 
283 43 


491 25 
5 05 

29 05 
264 74 


552 23 

48 17 
69 89 


5,328 25 
348 72 

61 66 
2,666 32 


7,378 28 


School sites and buildings . . . 


362 77 


Libraries, maps, apparatus, 
etc 


35 59 
87 26 


205 97 


Other expenses 


3,371 64 






Totals 


629 40 


823 93 


790 09 


670 29 


8,404 95 


11,318 66 






Balances on hand 


939 41 


286 47 


339 58 


58 27 


464 17 


2,087 90 






Teachers : 

Male 










1 

7 
11; 7 II 
Male, $1,150 
Av.Fem.$629 


1 


Female 


1 

II 

$525 


1 
III 

$500 


1 
III 

$500 


1 

II 

$550 


11 


Certificates 


11; 911; 2111 


Salaries 


1 male,$l,150 




Av. Female, 

$589 


Pupils : 

Total number attending 

Boys 


23 
9 

14 

13 

8 

3 

2 

6 

4 

23 

23 

23 

23 

23 

4 

12 

12 

23 

23 

23 


40 
14 
26 
24 
12 

9 

5 
11 

3 

40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

3 
19 
19 
40 
40 
40 


13 

5 

8 

8 

1 

3 

4 

3 

2 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

5 

5 

5 

13 

13 

13 


19 
13 

6 
12 

3 

1 

4 

3 

8 

17 • 
17 

"ll" 
17 

9 

6 

13 
17 
17 
17 


352 

170 

182 

242 

67 

49 

70 

90 

76 

352 

292 

299 

352 

352 

76 

95 

131 

196 

352 

352 


447 
211 


Girls 


236 


Average attendance 

No. in Primer 


299 
91 


" 1st Book 


65 


2nd " 


85 


3rd " 


113 


4th " 


93 


" in Art 


445 


" Geography 


385 


" Music 


375 


" Literature 

" Composition 


445 
445 


" Grammar 


97 


English History 

" Canadian History.... 
" Physiology & Hygiene 

Nature ^tudy 

" Physical Culture 


137 

280 
289 
445 

445 


Brick or frame school house . . . 


Frame 


Frame 


Brick 


Brick 


1 Br.; 1 Fr! 


3 Br.; 3 Fr. 


Number of maps 


11 


9 


18 


18 


25 


81 






Number of globes 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


6 







1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



283 



TABLE O— REPORT ON NIGHT SCHOOLS 
I. Night Public and Separate Schools 



Municipality 


Number of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupils 
Enrolled 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Hamilton 


1 

1 
9 
1 
1 


2 

1 

21 

1 

1 


65 
23 

635 
62 
35 


33 


St. Catharines 


10 


Toronto 


369 


Hamilton R.C. Sep. Sen ' 


47 


Oshawa R.C. Sep. Sch 


12 






Totals , 1917-1918 


13 


26 


820 


471 







II. Night High Schools 



Municipality 



Number of 
Schools 



Teachers 



Pupils 
Enrolled 



Average 
Daily 

Attendance 



Brantf ord 




5 
3 
3 
2 
5 
1 
3 
9 

12 
1 
8 

10 
1 
2 
1 

76 
7 
1 
1 


155 
32 

33 
22 
60 

93 
115 
158 

23 
215 
458 

12 

58 

2,298 

146 

17 

32 


70 


Cobourg 


13 


Collingwood 

Dundas 

Fort William 


1 

1 
■* 
j 


15 
13 

35 


Gananoque 

Guelph 




42'"" 


Hamilton 


40 


London 




64 


Newmarket 


10 


Niagara Falls 


100 


Ottawa 


71 


Parry Sound 


8 


Port Arthur 




Stratford 


17 


Toronto 


1,185 


Whitby 


58 


Windsor 


10 


Woodstock 


10 






Totals , 1917-1918 


23 


151 


3,927 


1,761 







*Not reported. 



284 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE P— REPORT ON TRUANCY 



Cities 


No. of 

children 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of. cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 

Magistrates 
or J. P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by. Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Belleville 




5 

25 
33 
10 
10 

5 

225 

25 

4 
15 

2 

388 

79 


320 
50 
51 
76 
30 
46 
1,029 

399 
64 
75 
24 

131 

79 

7 

48 

95 

9 

652 
20 

398 
71 
25 
62 

6 

5 

4 
20 
30 

3 






430 


Brantf ord 

Chatham 


35 
8 
(5 
5 
6 


10 
4 


5 


20 
140 


Fort William .... 




60 


Gait 

Guelph 


7 

1 

52 

2 


6 


30 
116 


Hamilton 


15 

1 


1,269 


Kingston 

Kitchener 


12 
1 

35 
2 

10 
3 


18 
104 


London 

Niagara Falls .... 


17 

1 


17 


• 150 
932 


Ottawa 




4,731 


Peterborough .... 
Port Arthur 


8 
5 
1 
6 
2 
4 
6 
220 
5 
6 
24 


8 
5 
1 
6 
2 
4 
6 
238 
2 
5 


• 3 

907 


St. Catharines 


48 

95 

18 

652 

12 

8,259 

378 

23 

3 

1 
5 
8 
20 
10 
2 
5 

16 
2 


48 


St. Thomas 

Sarnia 


5 


88 
52 


SaultSte. Marie.. 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Welland 


12 
45 

285 

1 

26 


9 

s 187 

25 


Windsor 

Woodstock 


1,200 
130 


Towns 
Alliston 


2 
2 




2 


Amherstburg .... 






5 


Arnprior 








Aylmer 








Barrie 

Blenheim 


3 

1 


6 


6 


10 
5 


Blind River 






5 


Bowmanville . 


16 






16 


Bracebridge 


2 






2 


Brampton 


3 
24 
20 

5 
26 

! 

8 

12 
26 
62 
14 

8 
37 

3 

1 

5 

4 


2 


2 


25 


Bridgeburg 




1 


Brockville 


20 

4 

26 






20 


Bruce Mines 


3 
3 






5 


Burlington 








Cache Bay 








Carleton Place 


31 








Charlton 






3 


Chesley 


* 






17 


Cobalt 


3 




5 


4 


6 


Cobourg 




65 


Collingwood 


62 
14 

8 






62 


Copper Cliff 






14 


Cornwall , 








Deseronto 






37 


Dresden . 


4 
11 

1 
20 

1 






15 


Dundas 


1 
8 


1 


11 


Dunnville . 




Englehart. . 




20 


Essex 






2 


Ford ! 






10 


Fort Frances . . 


2 

4 

23 


2 
3 
3 

40 






5 


Forest . 








Hai ley bury 






12 


Hanover 






40 


Hespeler . 


20 

10 

4 






24 


Ingersoll 


10 
2 


1 







Kearney 




6 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



285 



TABLE P— REPORT ON TRUANCY— Continued 



Towns. — Con- 
tinued 


No. of 

children 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 

Magistrates 
or J. P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Keewatin 




1 
25 








Kenora 




4 


4 


25 


Kincardine I 




2 


Kingsville 


1 


1 
33 


33 
5 

10 
10 
18 
55 






1 


Lindsay 


9 
2 


6 

2 




Listowel 


12 


Little Current ... 


10 


10 


Massey 






10 


Midlaud 


10 
55 

1 






18 


Mimico 


1 


1 


1 


45 


Mitchell 


1 


Mount Forest 


3 


3 
16 

24 






6 


Napanee 


21 
19 






16 


Newmarket 


2 
3 

1 


2 

1 


4 


Niagara 


3 

7 


13 


North Bay 


46 


21 

8 
27 
18 
27 

8 


659 


Orangeville 




9 




27 
22 
27 


3 
2 

2 


3 
2 


27 


Oshawa 


22 


Owen Sound 


3 


2 


Palmers ton 




8 


Paris 


1 


1 
5 

10 
5 
2 

83 







5 


Parkhill 




3 


3 




Parry Sound 


160 
5 


67 


Penetanguishene 


3 


2 


48 




10 


Picton 


1 


12 
14 
11 

4 
15 

4 
10 

176 
2 
5 

223 


1 




83 


Port Hope 




15 


Prescott 








11 


Preston 


3 






i 3 


Renfrew . 


1 


1 


25 


Ridgetown 


• 


18 

30 


2 


St. Mary's 






10 


Sandwich 


3 
4 


3 

4 


30 


Simcoe 


176 


Smith's Falls .... 


2 




152 


Southampton 


5 

3 






5 


Steelton 


4 


3 


3 


200 


Sturgeon Falls.. . 


1 


Thessalon 


5 
2 
5 

10 

500 

3 

12 


5 

10 

5 

12 

500 

. 3 

12 

5 








Thorold 


6 






21 


Tilbury 






5 


Tillsonburg 


2 
5 




12 


Trenton 

Trout Creek 


20 


5 


300 


Uxbridge 








Walkerton 








8 


Walkerville 










22 


Wallaceburg 




4 
10 

3 
34 
10 

1 
1 


2 
10 

3 

34 
82 

4 
1 

34 
2 






4 


Waterloo 


..... 

1 



;;;;....;.;. 




40 


Webbwood 


i 


1 




Whitby 


34 


Wiarton 






65 


Villages 
Acton 


i 






Athens. .- 






1 


Ayr 








84 


Bancroft 




4 






4 










3 


Bayfield 






2 

10 








Beamsville 




10 


2 




7 



286 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE P— REPORT ON TRUANCY— Continued 



Villages— Con- 
cluded 


No. of 

children 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 
Magistrates 
or J. Ps 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Bobcaygeon ..... 




3 

10 


2 

10 

25 

8 

1 

32 

14 

5 

4 

3 

1 

2 

5 

20 

2 

15 

1 

25 

6 

1 

18 

25 

2 

5 

1 


1 




3 


Bolton 








Bradford 






25 


Brighton 




8 
2 




8 


Brussels 


2 
1 




2 


Burk's Falls 




88 


Caledonia 


9 
5 
3 
3 




7 


Cannington 






5 


Cayuga 


1 


. 




Chesterville .... 






Chippawa 






7 


Clifford 


1 

4 


1 
4 
6 




2 


Colborne 


i 


4 


Coldwater . . 




7 


Courtright 




l 


2 


Delhi 


2 








3 


Drayton 


1 

8 
6 






1 


Elmira 










Elo ra 


1 






9 


Exeter 






2 


Fort Erie 




30 








Georgetown .... 








30 


Glencoe 








5 


Grimsby 










5 


Hensall. 




1 






1 


Hepworth 








1 


Holland Landing 


14 








15 


Iroquois 


3 


"3 








Jarvis 


1 






1 


Lakefield 


2 
2 


2 






2 


Markdale 








2 


Markham 




6 

14 

150 

5 

16 

5 

2 

1 






6 


Marmora 




14 
150 




1 


14 


Maxville 




1 


150 


Merrickville .... 








Merritton . ... 


3 


7 






9 


Millbrook . . 






5 


Milverton 








2 


Neustadt 


1 


1 






1 


Newburgh 






2 


Newbury. . . , 

Newcastle . . 


2 
2 


2 

4 


2 

3 
127 






5 






7 


New Toronto . . . 






136 


Norwich 


1 








10 


Norwood 


2 

1 

7 

15 

10 

1 


1 
2 
2 
7 
15 
10 
1 
2 
7 

i 

1 

16 
1 

7 
5 






2 


Paisley 








1 






1 


1 




Port Co] borne. . . 




7 






2 




15 


Port Elgin 






10 


Port Perry 

Port Rowan 


1 






1 






2 


Richmond Hill . . 




7 






7 


Shelburne 








1 


South River. . 










23 


Streetsville .... 




1 
12 

1 
12 

7 

3 
11 






1 


Sutton West . . 








4 


Tara 








1 




7 






45 


Thedford . 






7 












Waterford . , 




7 
4 






4 


Winchester 








4 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



287 



TABLE P— REPORT ON TRUANCY— Concluded 



Townships 


No. of 
children 
otherwise 
employed 

during 
school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 
Magistrates 
or J.P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Brantf ord 




92 

151 

4 


92 

42 

15 

21 

8 

58 

6 

137 

106 

149 

34 








Burford 


52 
15 








Morrison 






15 


Oakland 






17 


Paipoonge 




1 
2 

6 

1 
99 

1 
1 






9 


Scott 


3 
2 

54 
57 


1 




258 


Sydney 






Thurlow 






117 


Tyendinaga 








Uxbridge 






706 


Waterloo 


1 


1 


1 


134 


Totals 1917.. 


798 


12,459 


7,217 


469 


380 


15,405 



NOTE — Out of 305 urban municipalities in the Province, 56 reported no truants, while 67 
did not report at all ; the remaining 182 are reported above. 



288 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE Q— GENERAL 

A General Statistical Abstract, exhibiting the comparative state and progress of 
Schools (including Collegiate institutes), from the year 1867 



No. 



Subjects compared 



1867 



1872 



1877 



1882 



between the ages 
years up to 1882, 



of five 
five to 



Population 

School population 

and sixteen 

twenty-one subsequently 
High Schools (including Collegiate Institutes) 

Continuation Schools 

Public Schools in operation 



447,726 
102 



6 i Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 



7 

S 

9 
10 

11 

12 



13 

14 



15 



16 
17 
18 
L9 



20 

21 

22 
28 

24 

25 
26 
27 



4,261 
161 
4,524 



1,620,851 



495,756 
104 



Grand total of above schools in operation. . . . 
Pupils attending High Schools (including Col 

legiate Institutes and Night High Schools) . | 5 , 696 

Pupils attending Continuation Schools J j 

Pupils attending Public Schools (including 

Kindergarten and Night Public Schools) . . 382 , 719 
Pupils attending Roman Catholic Separate! 

Schools 18,924: 

Grand total of students and pupils attending; 

High, Continuation, Public, and Separate 

Schools 407 ,339 

Amount paid for the salaries of Public and 

Separate School teachers $1 ,093 ,517 

Amount paid for the erection and repairs of 

Public and Separate School houses, and| 

for libraries, apparatus, books, fuel, sta-; 

tionery, etc ! $379,672 

Total amount paid for Public and Separate! 

School purposes '$1,473,189 

Amount paid for Continuation School teachers' 

salaries j$ ! 

Total amount paid for Continuation School 

purposes i$ 

Amount paid for High School (and Collegiate 

Institute) teachers' salaries 

Amount paid for erection and repair of High 

School (and Collegiate Institute) houses,! 

maps, apparatus, prizes, fuel, books, etc.. , $29,361 
Total amount paid for High School and Col-j 

legiate Institute purposes i $124 ,181 

Grand total paid for educational purposes as: 

above I$l , 597 , 370; 

Total Public and Separate School Teachers . . 4 ,890i 

Male Teachers in Public and Separate Schools \ 2,849 

Female Teachers in Public and Separate 



4,490 

171 

4,765 

7,968 



433,256 
21,406 

462,630 
1,371,594 

835,770 
2,207,364 



494,804 
1041 



1,926,922 



483,817 
104 



4,955 

185 

5,244 

9,229 



$94,820 141,812 211,607 



465,908 
24,952 

500,089 
2,038,099 

1,035,390 
3,073,489 



5,013 

190 

5,307 

12,348 



445,364 
26,148 

483,860 
2,144,449 

882,526 
3,026,975 



Schools 

Continuation School Teachers 

High School and Collegiate Institute Teachers. 
Number of all teachers, as specified above. .. 



,041 



159 
5,049 



68,193 

210,005 

2,417,369 
5,476 
2,626 

2,850 



239 
5,715 



132,103 

343,710 

3,417,199 
6,468 
3,020 

3,448, 



253,864 

89,856 

343,720 

3,370,695 
6,857 
3,062 

3,795 



280 
6,748' 



332 

7 ,189 



Included in Public and Separate School attendances, f Included with 

year ended six months after 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



289 



STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 

Education in Ontario, as connected with Public, Separate, Continuation and High 
to 1917, compiled from Returns to the Department of Education 



No. 


1887 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1907 


1912 


1916 


1917 


1 




2,114,321 




2,167.938 




12,523,358 

609,127 
148 
138 

5,939 
513 

6,738 






2 

3 

4 


611,212 
112 


595,238 
128 


590,055 

130 

44 

5,574 

340 

6,088 


584,512 

134 

65 

5,671 

391 

6,261 


590,285 
143 
107 

5,819 
449 

6,518 


632,527 
160 
132 

6,091 
539 

6,922 


628,996 
162 
137 


5 

6 

7 


5,277 

229 

5,618 


5,577 

312 

6,017 


6,103 

548 

6,950 


8 

q 


17,459 


22,837 


24,390 
*1,618 

453,256 


24,472 
*2,190 

420,094 


30,331 
*4,744 

413,510 


32,608 
6,094 

429,030 


§ 32,300 
§ 5,082 

458,345 


§33,024 
§5,104 

458,436 


10 


462,839 


458,553 


n 


30,373 


37,466 


41,620 


45,964 


51,502 


61,297 


69,265 


70,048 


12 


510,671 


518,856 


519,266 


490,530 


495,343 


529,029 


564,992 


566,612 


13 


2,458,540 


2,752,629 


2,886,061 


3,198,132 


4,389,524 


6,109,547 


7,929,490 


8,398,450 


14 


1,283,564 


1,301,289 


1,329,609 


1,627,028 


3,166,655 


5,164,413 


5,422,415 


5,713,385 


15 
16 


3,742,104 


4,053,918 


4,215.670 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


4,825,160 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


7,556,179 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


11,273,960 

202,875 

265,087 

1,232,537 


13,351,905 
224,464 
306,148 

1,509,227 


14,111,835 
228,362 
324,621 

1,554,049 


17 






18 


327,452 


472,029 


532,837 


547,402 


783,782 


19 


168,160 


224,085 


183,139 


222,278 


429,915 


720,524 


979,027 


864,926 


20 


495,612 


696,114 


715,976 


769,680 


1,213,697 


1,953,061 


2,488,254 


2,418,975 


21 
22 
23 


4,237,716 
7,594 
2,718 


4,750,032 
8,480 
2,770 


4,931,646 
9,128 
2,784 


5,594,840 
9,631 
2,311 


8,769,876 

10,200 

1,813 


13,492,108 

11,128 

1,511 


16,146,307 

12,465 

1,386 


16,855,431 

12,762 

1,317 


24 
?5 


4,876 


5,710 


6,344 
|44 
579 

9,707 


7,320 

t86 

593 

10,224 


8,387 

tl40 

750 

10,950 


9,617 

226 

917 

12,271 


11,079 

234 

1,038 

13,737 


11,445 
241 


26 
27 


398 
7,992 


522 
9,002 


1,051 
14,054 



Public and Separate School teachers. I Census of 1911. § Figures for the school 
the calendar year specified. 



19 E. 



290 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN= 



TEACHERS* 
FINANCIAL 





Total Registered 
Attendance of 
Members 


Receipts 


Name of Institute 


d 
1 


1 2 


CO 

<u 
"to 

u 

B 

0) 


1 Algoma, East 


148 

34 

126 

100 

105 

143 

129 

109 

102 

102 

104 

64 

152 

47 

103 

101 

90 

116 

122 

38 

94 

101 

102 

54 

126 

124 

122 

54 

104 

136 

118 

147 

116 

113 

88 

85 

106 

125 

26 

34 

122 

106 

130 

90 

109 

100 

77 

89 

71 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c, 
35 25 


2 Algoma (Eastern Division) 


50 00 






3 Brant 


39 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
15 31 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 




4 Bruce, East 






5 Bruce, West 


"50*66" 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 


24 00 


6 Carleton, East 


71 50 


7 Carleton, West, and Lanark, East 


60 00 


8 Dufferin 




9 Dundas 


51 00 


10 Elgin, East 


53 00 


11 Elgin, West 


82 75 


12 Essex, North 




13 Essex, South 


33 50 


14 Frontenac, North, and Addington 


25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


11 75 


15 Frontenac, South 


25 25 


16 Glengarry 


20 00 


17 Grey, East 




18 Grey, South 


25 25 


19 Grey, West 


50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 


61 00 


20 Haliburton 




21 Haldimand 


50 00 
50 00 

50 00 




22 Halton 


26 00 


23 Hastings, Centre 


24 00 


24 Hastings, North 


12 75 


25 Hastings, South, and Belleville 


72 31 


33 25 


26 Huron, East 


62 00 


27 Huron, West 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
25 00 


50 00 


28 25 


28 Kenora 


11 50 


29 Kent, East 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 


25 00 


30 Kent, West, and City of Chatham 


33 75 




28 25 


32 Lambton, West 


71 50 


33 Lanark, West, and Smith's Falis 


39 55 


34 Leeds, East, and Brockville (No. 2) 


60 00 




21 50 


36 Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) 






21 75 


38 Lincoln 


25 50 




5 75 


40 Manitoulin, West 




27 00 




50 00 
50 00 


31 00 


42 Middlesex, West 


154 50 


43 Muskoka 


52 00 


44 Nipissing, North 




22 50 




50 00 
50 00 


49 50 


46 Northumberland and Durham No. 1 


19 25 




18 50 


48 Northumberland and Durham No. 3 . 


25 00 
25 00 






17 25 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



291 



DIX J 



INSTITUTES 
STATEMENT 



Receipts— 1 


Continued 


Expenditure 




co 

11 

TO [Tj 

CO o 

cu co 

ll 


CO 

.2 1 
"3 
o 
a> 
M 

3 


i 

CO 

o 

$3 


1*2 

!«, 

■g-s a 

ej a h 


CO 

S3 



V 

a 
1 

CO 


2 
| 

d 

38 


CO 

I 


^ 


o 


PL. 


~ m hS 


§ 


o& 


a 

pq 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 203 85 


239 10 


17 35 


48 00 


48 00 


113 35 


125 75 


2 39 60 


89 60 


5 00 




26 50 


31 50 


58 10 


3 160 71 

4 208 06 


199 71 


21 75 




115 97 


137 72 


61 99 


258 06 


16 19 


"ii*66 


57 35 


90 54 


167 52 


5 209 82 


283 82 


9 00 




31 30 


40 30 


243 52 


6 196 67 


368 17 


11 27 


"9*47" 


71 00 


91 74 


276 43- 


7 326 16 


486 16 


68 26 


59 26 


195 63 


323 15 


163 01 


8 84 28 


184 28 


14 00 


36 50 


84 05 


134 55 


49 73 


9 175 03 


326 03 


22 53 


50 00 


116 50 


189 03 


137 00 


10 275 48 


428 48 


16 61 


139 20 


75 37 


231 18 


197 30 


11 24 01 


206*76 


3 85 


156 70 


16 84 


177 39 


29 37 


12 135 89 


210 89 


7 41 


48 00 


55 00 


110 41 


100 48 


13 80 32 


163 82 
129 26 


93 32 

7 48 




70 50 
52 32 


163 82 
63 55 




14 77 20 


"3*75*' 


"65*7i" 


15 113 42 


238 67 


5 49 


3 50 


45 75 


54 74 


183 93 


16 200 34 


320 34 
333 49 


7 52 
5 50 




83 15 
42 87 


90 67 
87 62 


229 67 


17 233 49 


"39'25*' 


245 87 


18 319 24 


394 49 


10 42 


129 25 


50 00 


189 67 


204 82 


19 60 70 


221 70 


8 50 


57 00 


84 00 


149 50 


72 20 


20 104 18 


129 18 


5 05 


13 00 


37 70 


55 75 


73 43 


21 511 07 


611 07 


8 70 


5 75 


33 80 


48 25 


562 82 


22 226 62 


352 62 


22 70 


76 25 


62 32 


161 27 


191 35 


23 105 35 


« 229 35 


15 48 


62 50 


39 55 


117 53 


111 82 


24 234 11 


271 86 


7 60 


35 00 


39 47 


82 07 


189 79 


25 4 23 


159 79 


8 07 


42 00 


38 50 


88 57 


71 22 


26 392 38 


454 38 


19 75 


110 25 


235 35 


365 35 


89 03 


27 58 33 


186 58 


34 35 


18 75 


68 35 


121 45 


65 13 


28 86 68 


148 18 
460 33 
438 07 


6 75 
9 75 

7 40 




17 05 

111 20 

81 30 


23 80 
120 95 
104 45 


124 38 


29 335 33 




339 38 


30 304 32 


"i5*75" 


333 62 


31 5 76 


134 01 
285 34 


13 50 
11 50 




105 45 
65 50 


118 95 
132 00 


15 06 


32 113 84 


"55*66" 


153 34 


33 172 41 


311 96 


16 00 


30 50 


74 00 


120 50 


191 46 


34 80 68 


240 68 


6 25 


72 00 


51 25 


129 50 


111 18 


35 116 90 


238 40 


15 23 


39 50 


56 60 


111 33 


127 07 


36 28 59 


128 59 


11 80 


50 00 


54 00 


115 80 


12 79 


37 51 86 


148 61 

211 89 

72 53 


15 04 
8 20 
6 36 




80 45 
91 75 
33 20 


95 49 
99 95 
56 66 


53 12 


38 86 39 




111 94 


39 16 78 


"ii'io" 


15 87 


10 9 95 


86 95 
266 45 


3 27 
64 45 




59 26 
43 53 


62 53 
170 05 


24 42 


41 135 45 


"62*07" 


96 40 


42 51 73 


306 23 
217 74 


38 41 
9 35 




155 44 
56 32 


193 85 
100 17 


112 38 


43 115 74 


"34*56" 


117 57 


44 73 31 


145 81 


9 85 




57 25 


67 10 


78 71 


45 4 27 


153 77 


9 75 


"56*66" 


20 50 


80 25 


73 52 


46 184 34 


303 59 
150 88 


13 85 
7 35 




97 90 
36 30 


111 75 
96 40 


191 84 


47 107 38 


"52*75" 


54 48 


48 135 76 


210 76 
81 66 


11 50 

8 80 




47 55 
64 50 


59 05 
73 30 


151 71 


49 14 41 




8 36 



292 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TEACHERS' 
FINANCIAL 



Name of Institute — Concluded 



.2 d w 

Ei o8 Jg 

511 



Receipts 



£0 



o 



e8 



50 Ontario, South 

51 Oxford 

52 Parry Sound, East 

53 Parry Sound, West 

54 Peel 

55 Perth and Stratford 

56 Peterborough 

57 Prescott and Russell 

58 Prince Edward 

59 Rainy River 

60 Renfrew, North 

61 Renfrew, South 

62 Simcoe, East 

63 Simcoe, North 

64 Simcoe, South- West 

65 Stormont 

66 Sudbury 

67 Thunder Bay 

68 Timiskaming 

69 Victoria 

70 Waterloo 

71 Welland 

72 Wellington, North 

73 Wellington, South 

74 Wentworth 

75 York, East 

76 York, North 

77 York, West 

78 Ontario Educational Association* 



Cities 



79 Brantf ord 

80 Guelph 

81 Hamilton 

82 Kingston 

83 London 

84 Ottawa 

85 Peterborough 

86 St. Catharines and Niagara Falls , 

87 Toronto, District No. 1 

88 ' ' " "2 

89 " " "3 

90 " ' ' "4 

91 " " "5 

92 " " "6 

93 " " "7 ,.. 

94 Windsor and Walkerville 



Totals, 1917. 
Totals, 1916. 

Increases . . 
Decreases . . , 



116 
217 

49 

44 
104 
210 
109 
129 
101 

45 
101 
139 
133 
132 
122 
137 

90 
210 
127 
144 
290 
142 
101 
133 
128 
121 

91 
130 
900 



84 

50 

390 

65 

244 

377 

93 

83 

232 

226 

213 

222 

241 

230 

209 

102 



12,460 
12,729 



269 



$ c. 
50 00 
75 00 



50 00 



75 00 
50 00 
75 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



100 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

1,400 00 



25 00 
25 00 

100 00 
25 00 
75 00 
75 00 
25 00 
50 00 
57 00 

126 00 
53 25 



58 50 
55 25 
50 00 



5,475 00 
5,875 00 



400 00 



$ c. 
50 00 
75 00 



75 00 
50 00 
75 00 
50 00 



50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
100 00 
50 00 
50 00 

iso'oo' 



100 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
100 00 
100 00 



50 00 
25 00 

100 00 
25 00 
75 00 

100 00 
25 00 
50 00 



50 00 



3,701 62 
3,596 31 



105 31 



$ c. 
27 75 
37 50 



11 00 

104 00 

105 00 
48 50 
20 75 
19 75 
22 50 
24 50 
26 25 
30 50 



28 00 
13 50 



61 00 
67 50 
73 75 
33 00 
24 25 

62*66* 

133 75 
23 00 
32 00 

450 8b 



179 50 
18 00 
67 50 

138 00 
46 50 
20 75 



56 75 

52 75 

147 58 



54 75 
56 50 
26 00 



3,821 23 
3,107 97 



713 26 



* Statement for 1917-1918 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



293 



INSTITUTES— Concluded 
STATEMENT— Concluded 



Receipts— Continued 


Expenditure 




(A 

11 

C* ja 

CO o 
CO CO 

Ji 


CO 

Pi 

"3 

o 

s 
« 

o 


J. 

CO 


Libraries, 
Educational 
Journals, etc. 


CO 

o 

1 

1 

CO 

§ 


2 

S3 

d 

38 


CO 

I 



$ C. 

50 205 30 

51 220 77 

52 90 15 


$ c 
333 05 
408 27 

90 15 
102 04 
310 36 
509 09 
243 17 
387 40 
300 06 
183 40 
282 34 
169 20 
303 73 
218 78 
209 44 
226 57 

90 87 
272 70 
214 04 
180 79 
472 16 
411 71 
339 85 
276 47 
214 04 
361 39 
320 84 
442 55 
2,986 35 

118 52 
106 80 
763 09 
120 01 
371 07 
1,071 62 
164 20 
204 38 
201 97 
266 27 
242 36 
147 58 
149 90 
263 48 
253 22 
186 64 


$ c. 
9 23 

12 35 
9 25 
2 64 

6 72 
15 03 
28 32 

17 17 

18 96 

15 50 

16 84 
8 40 

13 12 
16 55 

7 35 
24 87 
12 75 

18 75 
23 39 

5 18 
37 71 
20 35 

14 14 

7 30 
43 60 

52 79 

53 80 
86 82 

1,254 10 

85 
25 

15 10 

8 90 

19 33 
108 50 

7 75 
7 03 

20 68 
12 74 
15 84 
18 89 
31 30 
18 39 
39 45 
11 00 


$ c. 
34 50 
40 00 


$ c. 
63 42 
79 73 
21 12 
15 00 
127 89 
236 30 

46 55 
39 60 
51 00 

82 00 
91 30 
28 85 

70 90 
76 35 

39 15 
97 43 
26 70 

110 05 
103 65 

40 00 
219 70 
118 95 

47 05 
42 70 

103 75 
55 46 
45 52 
51 50 

753 35 

49 33 
20 95 

247 30 
40 75 
126 00 
583 25 
45 00 
31 00 
55 10 

71 45 
70 00 

50 35 
50 00 
25 00 
65 85 

83 85 


$ c. 
107 15 
132 08 

30 37 

42 64 
134 61 
251 33 

89 87 

76 77 
122 23 

97 50 
134 14 
117 25 
117 52 

92 90 
167 50 
199 80 

39 45 
128 80 
127 04 

45 18 
267 91 
193 78 
175 60 

50 00 
214 04 

220 95 
153 44 

221 42 
2,007 45 

79 48 
69 20 

471 90 
73 80 

145 33 

736 75 
99 95 
69 83 
75 68 

132 04 
85 84 
99 24 
81 30 

43 39 
105 30 

94 85 


$ c. 

225 90 

276 19 

59 78 


53 41 04 

54 206 36 


25 00 


59 40 
175 75 


55 254 09 




257 76 


56 94 67 

57 216 65 

58 180 31 

59 110 90 


15 00 
20 00 
52 27 


153 30 

310 63 

177 83 

85 90 


60 157 84 

61 42 95 

62 173 23 

63 68 78 


26 00 
80 00 
33 50 


148 20 

51 95 

186 21 

125 88 


64 81 44 

65 113 07 

66 40 87 


121 00 
77 50 


41 94 
26 77 
51 42 


67 72 70 




143 90 


68 103 04 




87 00 


69 113 29 




135 61 


70 198 41 

71 278 71 

72 215 60 

73 176 47 


10 50 

54 48 

114 41 


204 25 
217 93 
164 25 
226 47 


74 102 04 


66 69 

112 70 

54 12 

83 10 




75 152 64 

76 147 84 

77 260 55 

78 1,135 50 


140 44 
167 40 
221 13 

978 90 


79 43 52 

80 56 80 

81 383 59 

82 52 01 

83 153 57 


29 30 

48 00 

209 50 

24 15 


39 04 
37 60 

291 19 
46 21 

225 74 


84 758 62 

85 67 70 

86 83 63 

87 144 97 


45 00 
47 20 
31 80 


334 87 

64 25 

134 55 

126 19 


88 83 52 

89 136 36 


47 85 


134 23 
156 52 


90 


30 00 


48 34 


91 149 90 


68 60 


92 150 23 




220 09 


93 141 47 




147 92 


94 60 64 




91 79 








14,714 16 
19,268 45 


27,712 01 
31,847 73 


2,966 49 
2,353 74 


3,173 12 
3,314 52 


7,837 59 
14,801 18 


13,977 20 
20,469 44 


13,734 81 
11,378 29 






612 75 








2,356 52 


4,554 29 


4J35 72 


141 40 


6,963 59 


6,492 24 





294 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN- 

FIFTH CLASSES, 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 



(In the case of rural schools the 
section number and the name of 
the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Algoma 



Brant and Norfolk (in part) 5 

Bruce, East 

Bruce, West 

Dundas 

9 
10 

Elgin, East 11 

12 

Elgin, West 13 

14 



Essex 



15 



Grey, East 16 

17 

Haliburton 18 

Hal ton and Wentworth (in part) 19 

Hastings. N. and Parry Sound, E 20 

21 
22 

Hastings Centre 23 

Huron East 24 

25 

Huron, West 26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 

Kent, East 35 

Kent, West 36 



1 McDonald. 
1 St. Joseph 
1 Aberdeen. 
1 Laird 



8 Burford.. 
Mildmay 
Tiverton 



6 Mountain . . 

22 Mountain . . 

4 Winchester 



1 Southwold 
8 Southwold 



10 Dunwich. 
10 Aldboro' , 



Kingsville , 



U12Artemesia & Glenelg — 
3 Euphrasia 



1 Anson 



U9 W. Flamboro & Beverly 



South River, 
Trout Creek. 
Sund ridge . . 



Marmora 



7 Howick 
17 Howick, 



Hensall , 

7 Hay 

5 Stephen 

U16 Stephen 

8 Ashfield 

6 Usborne 

Bayfield 

4 West Wawanosh 
3 Ashfield 



Echo Bay 

Richard's Landing 

Ophir 

Laird 



Burford. 
Mildmay 
Tiverton 



Inkerman , 

Mountain Station, 
Ormond 



Fingal 

Shedden, R.R No. 3, 



Campbell ton 
Clachan 



Kingsville 

Priceville . 
Kimberley 



Minden 

Dundas, R.R. No. 4. 



South River 
Trout Creek, 
Sundridge. . 



Marmora, 



Gorrie . . . 
Fordwich , 



Hensall 

Zurich 

Crediton 

Dashwood 

Dungannon 

Woodham, R.R. No. 1 

Bayfield 

Lucknow, R.R. No. 2. 
Lacknow, R.R. No. 7. 



3 and 4 Orford 
Wheatley 



Duart . . . 
Wheatley, 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



295 



DIX K 

1917-1918 



Teachers 


Pupils 


Grade of Fifth 
Class 


Total Value of 
Approved 
Equipment 




Name of Principal and Degree 


e3 V 
§ d 
coca 

CD -+=» 
O 4) 


OO 

1—1 
o> 

3>™ 


CO 

Pu, 

o 
d 


>> 

la 


A 


B 


C 


be ^ 


1 H. R. Ponting 


ii 

ii 
ii 

ii 

n 

ii 
ii 

ii 
ii 
ii 

ii 
ii 
ii 


% 

750 
900 
615 
600 

1,000 

1,025 

750 

700 
750 
750 

725 
615 

650 
650 

1,400 

750 
725 

750 

750 

950 
800 
800 

975 

800 
825 

1,000 
900 
850 

1,000 
875 
675 
700 
700 
650 

700 

725 


6 
8 
3 
3 

5 

8 

4 

5 
5 

6 

4 
5 

5 

4 

9 

10 
6 

4 

13 

6 

4 

13 

6 

8 
3 

8 
15 

8 

7*' 

7 
14 

8 

8 

4 

5 
11 


4 
6 
2 
3 

2 

4 

2 

4 
4 
5 

3 
3 

4 
3 

4 

6 
3 

3 

9 

5 
2 

8 

5 

7 
3 

5 
13 
5 
3 
3 

11 
5 
3 
3 

4 

7 


"l 


1 


— 


$ c. 
221 74 
336 00 
138 03 

190 01 

489 00 

293 25 

225 68 

242 91 
509 14 
347 13 

202 05 
200 41 

170 45 
571 12 

365 49 

210 00 
218 75 

256 36 

217 35 

284 33 
202 37 

251 99 

94 17 

210 33 
209 32 

262 55 

278 24 
387 67 
352 50 
220 20 

191 73 

252 71 
213 07 
175 00 

273 45 

568 03 


$ C. 

174 34 


2 Pearl Wa]sb 


287 20 


3 Nina McLeod 




1 
1 


81 34 


4 Mona Hollingsworth 






88 00 


5 John Henry 


1 
1 

.... 

1 




152 70 


6 John Thos. Kidd 






139 32 


7 Maud Alexander 


1 
1 




122 56 


8 J. C. Fetterlv 


89 29 


9 Pearl MacPherson 


155 92 


10 Lena D. MacLean 






118 63 


11 Libbie MacLennan 




1 
1 

1 


73 32 


12 Mary MacNish 






65 66 


13 Winnifred Poole 






48 29 


14 Maria McLean 


1 
1 


1 


91 25 


15 Wm. J. Elliott 

16 Eleanor Smith 


201 54 

105 37 


17 Marjorie Cook 


1 


1 


84 99 


18 Wilmur Macarthur 


79 63 


19 Percy W. Hoag 


1 

"i* 

l 

l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
l 


1 


86 73 


20 S. G. Gilleland 


386 88 


21 Robert Ingram 


1 




240 46 


22 J. H. Stabbs 


306 64 


23 Charles S. Haig 


• • • • 

1 
1 


.... 


149 47 


24 Viola Isard 


111 03 


25 Geo. H. Jefferson 


85 93 


26 Wm. Mackay 


166 25 


27 Nelson E. Dahms 






137 82 


28 Lulu 0. Gaiser, B.A 






173 76 


29 Geo. S. Howard 






145 25 


30 Fred Ross 






132 02 


31 Nellie Medd 






87 92 


32 Murdena Geddes 


1 
1 


"i* 


145 27 


33 Norman Garrett 


81 30 


34 Edna Kentland 


*107 50 


35 Annie M. Blue 


l 


1 


85 72 


36 Jean McLean 


156 21 











Two years' grants. 



296 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES, 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools, the 
section numberand the name of 
the township are given) 



Post Office 



Lambton, East 37 

'38 
39 

Lambton, West 40 

41 

Lincoln and Pelham Tp 42 

43 
44 
45 

Middlesex, West 46 

Northumberland and Durham No. 1 . . 47 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 3 . . 48 



1 Euphemia.. 
5 Euphemia.. 
8 Enniskillen 

Courtright. 
11 Moore 



Ontario, N. and Parry Sound, N.E. 



Ontario, South 55 

Oxford, North 56 

Oxford, South 57 



Parry Sound, South 



Peel 

Perth, North 



*2 Louth.. 

4 Louth' . 
U4 Louth . 

9 Pelham 



fl5 Caradoc . . , 
18 Darlington 



U16 and 18 Murray and 
Brighton 



13 Brock 

U4 Brock 

5 Scott 

1 Nipissing 

U 4 N. Himsworth & Ferris. 
1 McConkey & Wilson 



Florence, R.R. No. 2 

Florence 

Oil City 



Courtright 
Brigden . . 



Jordan Station 

Jordan 

Jordan 

Fenwick 



Mount Brydges 
Tyrone 



Wooler. 



4 Pickering (West) 

10 E. Zorra 

12 Dereham 



Prescott and Russell 67 

68 
69 
70 

Rainy River and Thunder Bay East. . .71 

72 
73 

Renfrew, North 74 

75 



Simcoe, East 76 



U 1 Chapman and Croft 

7 Humphrey 

Kearney 

1 McKellar 

U 1 McMurrich and Ryerson 



Bolton 

Port Credit 



Milverton 
U6 Logan ... 



2 Cumberland 

5 Cumberland 

L'Orignal 

1 Plantagenet South 



Sunderland 
Manilla. ... 

Zephyr 

Nipissing . . 
Callander . 
Loring 



Pickering , . 

Innerkip 

Brownsville 



Magnetawan. 

Rosseau 

Kearney 

McKellar 

Sprucedale ., 



Bolton 

Port Credit 



Milverton, 
Monkton. , 



Vars 

Cumberland 
L'Orignal . . 
Riceville ... 



Rainy River 

5 Lash 

1 Schreiber.. . 



6 Ross 

7 Westmeath 



Victoria Harbour 



77 J 12 Tay 



Rainy River 
Emo 

Schreiber . . . 



Forester's Falls , 
Beachburg 



Victoria Harbour 
Waubaushene . . . . 



'Opened January, 1918. f Continuation School from January, 1918. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



297 



1917-1918— Continued 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and Degree 



c6 OJ 

O 4> 



^42 



QQ 



Pupils 






2.3 



Grade of Fifth 
Class 



211 



be M 



37 Evelyn Long 

38 A. Archibald 

39 Vera Thompson 

40 John H. Young 

41 Wm. E. Jarrott 

42 Nora McLean 

43 Annie Card 

44 Annie R. Fry 

45 Edward W. Farr 

46 Abbie Bole, B.A 

47 Margaret R. Squair 

48 Harold E. Welsh 

49 Edith M. Harvey 

50 Belle Shannon 

51 Julius Rynard 

52 Harold M. Jackson 

53 Mary B. Searson 

54 Clarence M. Ross 

55 Eli Wilson, B.A 

56 Donta P. Ashworth 

57 Miss M. V. Hopkins 

58 Godfrey Grunig 

59 Mary Jane Graham 

60 Mrs. Mary Dipsam 

61 Mary Vallentyne 

62 Mary V. McDougall, B.A. .. 

63 Jessie Kelso 

64 G. R. Thompson 

55 Wm. R. Burnett 

56 Wm. G. Hammond 

67 Bella J. G owan 

68 Florence M. Bowland 

69 Rosa Perras 

70 Bessie C. Aylesworth 

71 Persie C. Meadows, B.A. . . . 

72 Ruby H. Strachan 

73 Geo. A. Evans 

74 Mrs. Roy Pounder 

75 J. W. Whittington 

76 John A. Gillespie 

77 Alex. Firth 

20 E. 



II 

I 

II 

II 
II 

I 

I 

II 
II 

H. S. 

As't 

I 



II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 



II 
II 
II 
II 
I 

I 
II 

II 

I 

I 
I 

II 
I 

1 

II 

III 

II 
II 

II 
II 



675 
800 
625 

775 

1,000 

800 

700 

625 

1,000 

750 

650 

900 

700 
700 
900 
700 
750 
700 

750 

750 

750 

965 
800 
715 
700 
800 

900 
1,150 

975 
775 

750 
850 
500 
700 

1,200 
900 
1,400 

900 
1,000 

1,075 
1,200 



5 

17 
3 

6 
23 

3 
7 
5 
6 

19 



10 

3 
3 
4 
5 
7 
3 

11 

5 

8 

4 
7 
7 
2 
3 

24 
12 

12 
10 

10 

16 

6 

4 

13 

7 
16 

5 
15 

16 
10 



4 

14 

2 

5 
13 

2 
4 
2 
3 

17 

3 



3 

5 

2 
5 
4 
2 
2 

19 
10 

9 
5 

7 

12 
3 
2 

9 

5 

11 

3 
11 

13 

4 



$ c. 
149 90 
224 11 
102 10 

224 01 
365 77 

208 00 
168 77 

229 89 

230 08 

244 23 
137 00 



271 99 

206 58 
190 53 
211 03 

223 05 
129 85 
188 01 

292 61 

360 61 

345 68 

273 43 
204 91 
235 05 
251 25 
143 50 

294 65 
277 98 

373 70 

224 80 

214 93 
204 25 
129 42 
206 12 

247 55 

225 94 
258 52 

258 31 
326 33 

226 98 
209 25 



$ c. 

57 49 

116 17 

35 21 

122 40 
145 06 

75 80 
91 77 
54 23 
78 00 

48 52 

61 20 



92 19 

80 65 

79 05 

86 11 
164 60 
225 84 
157 60 

141 76 

101 06 

125 18 

184 68 
170 98 
240 74 
200 24 
208 70 

169 46 
163 67 

174 02 

87 48 

133 99 

151 67 

62 94 

80 61 

379 50 
265 18 
271 70 

90 83 
97 37 

162 69 
130 92 



298 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 
section number and the name of 
the township are given) 



Post Office 



Sirocoe, North 78 

79 

Sudbury, etc 80 

81 

82 

Victoria, East 83 

Victoria, West 84 

Waterloo, South 85 

Waterloo, North 86 

Welland 87 



Wellington, South 



Wentworth 90 

91 

92 



York, North 



York, West 96 

97 



R. C. Separate Schools — 
Inspector Finn 



, 98 

99 

100 



Inspector Jones 101 

Inspector Lee 102 

103 



104 

Inspector Bennett 105 

Inspector Sullivan 106 



3 Nottawasaga 

6 Flos 

Cache Bay 

2 Denison & Drury 

1 Wallbridge 

3 Somerville and Galway 

8 Eldon 

Hespeler 

16 Wellesley 

9 Bertie 

Consolidated School . . . 

6 Erin 

5 Ancaster 

3 Barton 

3 Saltfleet 

12 Whitchurch 

11 King 

23 King 

Mimico 

Woodbridge 

7 Bromley 

Killaloe 

Mattawa 

16 Cornwall 

6 Ell ice and Logan 

U2 Hibbert, McKillop and 

Logan 

2 Ashfield 

1 Brougham 

7 Sandwich, S 



Duntroon . 
Phelpston 



Cache Bay . . 
Worthing ten, 
Byng Inlet . , 



Kinmount . . 
Kirkfield . . . 
Hespeler . . . 
Wellesley . . 
Stevensville 



O.A.C., Guelph 
Hillsburg 



Ancaster 

Upper Hamilton, 
Stony Creek 



Bethesda 
Kettleby. 
King .... 



Mimico 

Woodbridge , 



Douglas . . 
Killaloe . . 
Mattawa 



St. Andrews, West 

Sebringville, R.R. No. 1 , 

Dublin 

Goderich, R.R. No. 3.... 

Ashdad, R.R. No. 1 

Maidstone, R.R. No. 1 . . . 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



299 



1917-1918— Concluded 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and Degree 







Pupils 


Grade of Fifth 
Class 








►» 








,_, 


i-i 












c£ <U 


05 












** 


fH 




Q § 








Profess i 
Certific 


r-l >> 

art 


o 
d 


«43 

5^ 


A 


B 


C 



p p, 

ton 



33 

i— I 



78 Emma Williams 

79 John Hall, 



80 Adam L. Hartimer 

81 James E. Bevens . . . 

82 Angus W. Cameron 



83 Fred. McEwan 

84 Margaret Urquhart. 

85 James D. Ramsay . . 

86 Helen MacGregor . . 
87, Irene F. Foster 



88 J. A. Macdonald 

89 R. R. MacKay... 



90 Robert A. Riddell 

91 Archibald Mc Vicar, B.A.. 

92 Robert Lloyd Hyslop 



93 Isaac Pike 

94 Frances L. Clunas 

95 Walter Rolling.... 



96 Jno. W. English, B.A 

97 Geo. W. Shore 



98 Sr. M. Margaret 

99 Sr. M. Nativity 

100 Sr. St. Andre Corsini. 



101 Sr. St. Agnes of Poitiers. . . 

102 Sr. M. Madeleine (Stella 

McDonald) 

103 Sr. M. Dolores (Elizabeth 

Mclntyre) 

104 Sr. M. Eugenia 



105 Sr. Rachel (Rachel Whelan) 

106 Miss N. L. Moynihan 



Totals. 1917-1918. 
Totals, 1916-1917, 



Increases , 
Decrease 



II 
II 

II 
II 
II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

I 

I 
II 

II 
II 
II 

II 
II 
II 

I 
II 



700 
750 


3 
3 


1,000 
1,200 
1,100 


10 
3 
4 


900 


8 


700 


3 


1,500 


7 


775 


6 


900 


13 



1,250 
850 



,000 
200 
950 

770 
725 
750 

2,300 
1,000 



700 
400 
650 

500 



630 

1,000 
600 

600 

700 



^841 
^800 

41 



866 
833 



33 



3 
3 

7 

2 

3 

4 

12 

2 

3 

5 
2 

4 

3. 
2 
2 

18 

7 



33 

12 
2 



31 

2 

13 
2 



611 47 
597 45 



14 



$ c. 
142 00 

208 00 

152 00 
105 00 
259 00 

80 94 

241 12 

862 13 

227 .00 

239 58 

352 00 

219 00 

239 83 
323 40 
256 00 

229 85 
202 95 

220 84 

233 33 
261 10 



497 60 
149 31 
399 51 

516 08 



367 74 

509 17 
545 70 

223 89 

226 45 



19 27,313 92 
9 24,689 70 



10 



2,624 22 



$ c. 

74 20 

75 84 

230 40 
131 00 
181 80 

122 61 

80 43 

165 06 
73 32 

113 95 

144 00 
86 90 

133 98 

95 19 

135 60 

77 98 
73 61 

77 08 

188 33 

166 11 



352 82 

96 06 

720 77 

208 89 



191 65 

482 01 
214 44 

199 04 

173 96 



fl5,579 80 
13,992 16 



1,587 64 



* Average salary. 

tin addition there was paid on equipment, the sum of $293.55 to schools that did not 
qualify as Fifth Classes in 1917-1918. 



300 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX L 

RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1917, TO OCT. 1st, 1918 



Inspectorate 


No. of schools 
purchasing 
books to the 
amount of 
$10.00 dur- 
ing the year 


Total amount 
expended by 
such schools 
during the 
yearforbooks 
recommended 


Total Govern- 
ment grant 


No. of rural 
public school 
libraries in 
inspectorate 


No. of libraries 
established 
during year 


A.lgoma 


4 

7 

4 

36 

11 

7 

13 

19 

13 


$ c. 

77 78 
142 37 

43 14 
527 4p 
130 78 

91 91 
140 47 
274 75 
153 59 


$ c. 

40 00 

70 00 

40 00 

360 00 

110 00 

70 00 

130 00 

190 00 

130 00 


50 
78 
85 
83 
83 
79 
92 
74 
75 
29 
94 
75 
95 
76 
81 
66 
72 
73 
66 
68 
73 

87 
50 
84 
99 
36 
70 
63 
85 
81 
67 
75 
84 
64 
82 
77 
62 
102 
81 
83 
82 
63 
72 
65 
72 
64 
58 
48 
74 
74 
68 
44 
71 
59 
84 


2 


Brant, and Norfolk in part 




Bruce, East 




Bruce, West 




Carleton East 




Carleton West and Lanark East 

Duff erin 




Dundas 




Elgin, East 




Elgin, West 




Essex 


17 

20 

3 

2 

3 

2 

2 

19 

1 

12 

15 

22 

7 
8 
4 


224 61 

228 98 

39 50 

23 17 

34 05 

29 58 

20 11 

276 60 

11 10 

152 83 

177 22 

308 62 
94 60 

106 76 
44 57 


170 00 

200 00 

30 00 

20 00 

30 00 

20 00 

20 00 

190 00 

10 00 

120 00 

150 00 

220 00 
70 00 
80 00 
40 00 


1 


Frontenac, North, and Addington . . . 
Frontenac, South 


1 


Glengarry 




Grey, East 




Grey, South 




Grey, West 




Haldimand 


2 


Haliburton 




Halton, and Wentworth in part .... 
Hastings, Centre 




Hastings, North, South Nipissing and 
N. W. Parry Sound 








Huron, East 




Huron, West 




Kenora and Thunder Bay West 




Kent, East 


23 
12 
14 
13 
11 
3 
48 


345 19 
140 94 
151 62 
156 77 
130 57 
33 00 
516 64 


230 00 
120 00 
140 00 
130 00 
110 00 
30 00 
480 00 


1 


Kent, West 




Lambton, East 




Lambton, West 




Lanark, West 




Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 




Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 


1 


Leeds and Grenville, No . 3 














Lincoln and Pelham Tp 


33 
9 

13 
2 
9 

18 
5 
5 
6 
6 

10 
5 
2 
2 
3 
2 
7 

12 
7 


541 62 

98 98 

142 84 

23 54 
100 38 

193 97 

51 73 

73 65 

107 34 

103 73 

129 14 

56 25 

35 70 

20 10 

32 11 

24 45 
73 00 

154 92 
93 02 


330 00 
90 00 

130 00 
20 00 
90 00 

180 00 
50 00 
50 00 
60 00 
60 00 

100 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
70 00 

130 00 
70 00 






2 


Middlesex, East 




Middlesex, West 




Muskoka, South and West 


1 


Norfolk 




Northumberland and Durham, No 1 . 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 3. 
Ontario N., and Parry Sound, N. E. 
Ontario, South 


"i" 


Oxford, North 




Oxford, South 








Peel :.. 








Perth, South 




Peterborough, East 




Peterborough, West, and Victoria, E. 
Prescott and Russell 





1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



301 



RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1917, TO OCT. 1st, 1918.— Concluded 



Inspectorate 


No. of schools 
purchasing 
books to the 
amount of 
$10.00 dur- 
ing the year 


Total amount 
expended by 
such schools 
during the 
year for books 
recommended 


O Vt 

S a 


No. of rural 
public school 
libraries in 
inspectorate 


No. of libraries 
established 
during year 


Prince Kdward 


19 


$ c. 
208 82 


$ c. 
190 00 


76 
25 
74 
81 
47 
59 
90 
75 
45 
69 
72 
40 
42 
62 
60 
68 
64 
52 
65 
42 

48 
13 
27 
17 
45 

2 
18 

6 


2 






Renfrew, North 


5 
5 


77 43 
60 04 


50 00 
50 00 




Renfrew, South 








Simcoe, North • 


7 
1 


99 50 
10 06 


70 00 
10 00 




Simcoe, South West 






«** 


Sudbury, North Nipissmg, etc 

Timiskaming 


11 
8 
6 
1 
7 

11 
4 

11 

35 

6 

35 
11 

26 
9 


256 00 
141 35 

63 04 

10 00 
110 89 
125 54 

49 90 
161 90 
480 41 

71 36 
372 40 

136 90 

294 83 

137 15 


110 00 

80 00 

60 00 

10 00 

70 00 

110 00 

40 00 

110 00 

350 00 

60 00 

350 00 

110 00 

194 88 


3 

2 


Victoria, West 




Waterloo, North, No . 1 




Waterloo, South, No . 2 




Welland 




Wellington, North • 




Wellington, South 




Wentworth 




York, East 




York, North 




York, West 




Inspector Bennett 




' ' Finn 


2 


1 ' Gratton 






4 
36 


70 91 
437 34 


35 51 

285 40 


1 


Lee 








' ' Sullivan 


7 


72 67 


48 69 














801 
902 


10,578 94 
12,491 84 


7,846 92 
8,360 52 


5,381 
5,292 


22 


Totals, 1916-1917 


46 






Increase 








89 












24 









302 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX M 

CADET CORPS, 1918 

Collegiate Institutes, High, Public and Separate Schools having Cadet Corps with 
at least twenty members between the ages of 14 and 18 years in the case of Public 
and Separate Schools, and between 16 and 18 years in other cases. 

Collegiate Institutes: Barrie, Brantford, Brockville, Chatham, Clinton, 
Cobourg, Collingwood, Fort William, Gait, Goderich, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, 
Kingston, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, Morrisburg, Napanee, Niagara Falls, North 
Bay, Orillia, Ottawa, Owen Sound, Perth, Peterborough, Picton, Port Arthur, 
Renfrew, St. Catharines, St. Mary's, St. Thomas, Sarnia, Seaforth, Smith's Falls, 
Stratford, Strathroy, Toronto (Harbord, Humberside, Jarvis, Malvern, Oakwood, 
Parkdale, Riverdale), Vankleek Hill, Windsor, and Woodstock. Total, 46. 

High Schools: Alexandria, Athens, Aurora, Belleville, Carleton Place, Corn- 
wall, Dutton, Essex, Harriston, Iroquois, Leamington, Listowel, Lucan, Meaford, 
Orangeville, Oshawa, Pembroke, Port Hope, Ridgetown, Sault Ste. Marie, Syden- 
ham, Tillsonburg, Toronto (Commerce, North, and Technical), Trenton, Walkerton, 
Wiarton, Winchester, and Wingham. Total, 30. 

Public Schools: Belleville (2), Blenheim, Brantford, Chatham, Dundas, 
Dunnville, Guelph (2), Hamilton (13), Kingston, London (2), Niagara Falls, 
North Bay, Orangeville, Ottawa (14), Paris, Peterborough (2), Port Arthur, 
Port Hope, St. Thomas, Sault Ste. Marie (2), Stratford (2), and Toronto (38). 
Total, 90. 

R. C. Separate Schools : Kingston and Toronto. Total, 2. 

Total number of Cadet Corps, 168. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



303 



APPENDIX N 

SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS 

(Ryerson Superannuation Scheme) 

Summary for Years 1882-1918 



Year 


Number of 

Teachers 

on List 


Expenditure 
for the Year 


Gross 

Contributions 

to the Fund 


Amount 

Refunded to 

Teachers 

or to the Estates 

of Teachers 


1882 


422 

454 
456 
424 
407 
375 
297 
274 
266 
245 
221 


$ c 

51,000 00 

58,295 33 

63,750 00 

62,800 33 

64,244 92 

63,018 55 

*52,696 90 

*51,927 75 

*50,909 50 

*48,232 00 

*48,421 50 


$ c. 

13,501 08 

1,489 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 

1,073 50 

766 00 

*504 65 

*560 35 

*464 52 

*353 60 

*29 00 


$ c. 
3,660 10 


1887 


3,815 80 


1892 


786 86 


1897 


620 27 


1902 


722 78 


1907 


764 54 


1912.., 


*443 01 


1915 


*219 05 


1916 


*220 12 


1917 


*810 92 


1918 


*816 53 



Two teachers' subscriptions were withdrawn from the fund during the year ending 
31st October, 1918. 

No new names were added to the list of Superannuated Teachers in 1918J 
*For fiscal year ending 31st October. 



304 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 
t 



APPENDIX O 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE FACULTIES OF EDUCATION 

I.— UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FACULTY OF EDUCATION 

Financial Statement for the Year Ended 30th June, 1918 

Receipts 

Provincial Grant: 

Received on account thereof during financial year $6,000 00 

Balance for 1917-18 still due on 30th June 9,000 00 

Fees: 

Teachers in training $6,957 00 

Pupils in University Schools 24,628 00 



$15,000 00 



31,585 00 
$46,585 00 



Expenditure 

1. Salaries. 



Superannuation 
reservations 
under 
Payment to 7 Geo. V, 
Officer. Cap. 58. 
Professors, each 12 mos. to 30th June: 

W. Pakenham, History and Science of Education (also 

Dean of Faculty), at $4,000.00 $3,876 25 $123 75 

H. J. Crawford, Methods in Classics, also Headmaster of 

Schools, at $3,400.00 3,294 38 105 62 

P. Sandiford, Associate Professor, 12 mos. to 30th June, at 

$3,200.00 3,100 63 99 37 

Assistant Professors in Methods, also Chief Instructors, Schools, 
each 12 mos. to 30th June: 

G. A. Cornish, Science, at $2,700.00 2,616 25 83 75 

J. T. Crawford, Mathematics, at $2,700.00 2,616 25 83 75 

Lecturers in Methods, also Chief Instructors, Schools, each 12 
mos. to 30th June: 

G. M. Jones, English and History, at $2,700.00 2,616 25 83 75 

W. C. Ferguson, French and German, at $2,600.00 2,519 38 80 62 

F. E. Coombs, Elementary Subjects, at $2,600.00 2,519 38 80 62 

S. W. Perry, Art and Commercial Work, at $2,400.00 2,325 63 74 37 

Instructors in Faculty and Assistant Instructors, Schools, each 
12 mos. to 30th June: 
A. N. Scarrow, Constructive Work and Manual Training, 

at $2,100.00 2,035 00 65 00 

G. N. Bramfitt, Music, at $2,000 (war service, half pay) .. 969 06 30 94 
Assistant Instructors, University School: 

T. M. Porter, 12 mos to 30th June, at $2,400.00 2,325 63 74 37 

H. A. Grainger, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,400.00 2,325 63 74 37 

J. A. Irwin, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,300.00 2,228 75 71 25 

J. O. Carlisle, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,200.00 2,131 88 68 12 

J. G. Workman, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,200.00 2,131 88 68 12 

W. J. Dunlop, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,100.00 2,035 00 65-00 

H. G. Manning, at $2,000.00 (war service, half pay) 967 88 32 12 

F. Halbus, substitute for Manning, salary for 10 teaching 

months at $160 per month 1,548 75 51 25 

G. A. Cline, at $2,000.00 ( war service, half pay) 967 88 32 12 

Substitute for Cline: 

G< A. Ballantyne, 3 mos. to 30th Nov., at $170.00 per 

mo. (resigned) 497 25 12 75 

F. Phillips, 10 days at $5 per day 50 00 

J. G. Adams, 6 mos. from 1st January, at $180.00 per mo. 1,053 00 27 00 

W. L. C. Richardson, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $2,000.00 . . 1,938 13 61 87 



1918 DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 305 



1. Salaries. — Continued. 



H. B. Kilgour, substitute for Bramfitt, salary for 10 teach- 
ing months at $150.00 per month 

N. L Murch, 12 mos. salary (ten payments),, at $1,900.00 

d! E. Hamilton, 12 mos. to 30th June, at $1,800.00 

E. L. Daniher, 12 mos. salary (10 payments), at $1,700.00 

W. J. Lougheed, 12 mos. salary (10 payments), at $2,400.00 

W. H. Williams, 12 mos. salary (10 payments), at $2,300.00 
Special Instructor in Music (Sessional): 

A. T. Cringan, at $400.00 

Special Instructors (Sessional): 

Miss L. L. Ockley, Household Science 

Miss I. (Sutherland, Household Science 

Miss E. Robertson, Sewing 

Supervisors of Practice-teaching (Sessional) : 

J. Jeffries, High Schools 100 00 

N. Macdonald, Public Schools 100 00 

Miss L. Swinarton, Stenographer in Dean's Office, 12 mos. to 

30th June 800 00 

Miss G. Cotter, Assistant Clerk, 12 mos. to 30th June 650 00 



'Superannuation 


reservations 




under 


Payment to 


7 Geo 


• V, 


Officer. 


Cap. 


58 


1,462 50 




37 50 


1,839 00 




61 00 


1,744 38 




55 62 


1,645 50 




54 50 


2,340 00 




60 00 


2,242 50 




57 50 


390 00 




10 00 


100 00 






100 00 






100 00 







$62,304 00 $1,886 00 
62,304 00 



$64,190 00 



2. Education and Building Department. 



(a) Maintenance of Building: 

Fuel $2,395 02 

Light 619 29 

Water 203 04 

Caretaker's supplies 360 50 

Cleaning 1,629 83 

Repairs and renewals 1,072 00 

Engineer and cartaker, iS. Hunter, 12 mos. to 30th June . . 1,200 00 
Firemen at $65.00 per month: 

Chas Fly, 4 fa months 292 50 

G. Maitland, 2 months, 4 days 138 66 

S, Green, 1 month, 6% days 76 91 

Messengers at $4.00 to $6.00 per week 205 88 



$8,193 63 



(h) Maintenance of Department: 

Payment to City Board of Education for use of schools, 24 

rooms at $150.00 a room $3,600 00 

Clerical and laboratory assistance 487 32 

Office expenses, printing, postage, class-room supplies and 

apparatus, and sundries * . . 3,493 26 

$7,580 58 

(c) Education Building Annex: 

Alterations $6,698 63 

Furnishings and equipment 1,775 91 

Maintenance 1,428 19 

$9,902 73 



$89,866 94 



Note. — in the above statement no charge has been made upon the Faculty of Educa- 
tion for any portion of the general expenses of University administration, such as 
Library, Examination, etc. 

Certified correct, 

F. A. Moure, Bursar. 
Toronto, 7th January, 1919. 



306 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. UNIVERSITY OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FACULTY OF EDUCATION 
Financial Statement for the Year ending 31st December 1918 

Receipts 

Surplus from 1917 

Fees 

Ontario Government 

Overdraft, 1918 



$42 78 

1,813 00 

6,000 00 

8,319 03 



$16,174 81 

Expenditure 

Salaries: 

Dean Coleman $3,600 00 

Prof. W. E. Macpherson 2,941 66 

Willa Atkins 520 00 

Arts Professors 940 00 

Jean McCallum 15 00 

J. Macdonald 20 00 

Alice King 100 00 

Victoria Wiltshire 50 00 

$8,186 66 

Board of Education, as per agreement $6,725 00 

Travelling Expenses: 

Dean Coleman $140 00 

Geo. Y. Chown 20 00 

D. Whyte 12 00 

172 00 

Presiding Examiners 158 15 

Printing and Stationery: 

Hanson & Crozier $1 60 

Wormwith Co 43 50 

M. Kirkpatrick 2 15 

Jackson Press 216 10 

R. Uglow & Co 19 94 

J. A. Stokes 3 20 

Stamps 75 00 

361 49 

Advertising, Queen's University, share 250 00 

Library, Miss L. Saunders 150 00 

Office Furniture and Equipment: 

United Typewriter Co $100 00 

R. J. Lindsay 30 25 

130 25 

Sundries: 

Bell Telephone Co $39 00 

Express and telegrams 2 26 



41 26 



$16,174 81 



Audited and found correct, 



December 31st, 1918. 



R. Easton Burns, 

Chartered Accountant. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



307 



APPENDIX P 

LIST OF INSPECTORATES AND INSPECTORS 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Algoma District in part; Cockburn 
Island; City of SaultSte. Marie; Towns 
of Bruce Mines, Steelton, Thessalon 

Brant County and Norfolk in part; Town 
of Paris; Village of Waterford; (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Bruce, Bast; Towns of Chesley, Walker- 
ton, Wiarton; Villages of Hepworth, 
Lion's Head, Mildmay, Tara 

Bruce, West; Towns of Kincardine, 
'Southampton; Villages of Lucfcnow, 
Paisley, Port Elgin, Teeswater, Tiver- 
ton 

Carleton, East ; Town of Eastview 

Carleton, West, and Lanark, East; Towns 
of Almonte, Carleton Place; Village 
of Richmond (Joint Inspectorate) .... 

Dufferin; Town of Orangeville; Villages 
of Grand Valley, Shelburne 

Dundas; Villages of Chesterville. Iroquois, 
Morrisburg, Winchester 

Elgin, East; Town of Aylmer; Villages 
of Springfield, Vienna . '. 

Elgin, West; City of St. Thomas; Vil- 
lages of Dutton, Rodney, Port Stanley, 
West Lome (Joint Inspectorate) 

Essex; Towns of Amherstburg, Essex, 
Ford, Kingsville, Leamington 

Frontenac, South; Villages of Garden 
Island, Portsmouth 

Frontenac, North; and Addington (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Glengarry; Town of Alexandria; Villages 
of Lancaster, Maxville 

Grey, East; Towns of Meaford. Thorn- 
bury ; Village of Flesherton 

Grey, West; Town of Owen Sound; Vil- 
lages of Chatsworth, Shallow Lake 

Grey, South; Towns of Durham, Hanover, 
Villages of Dundalk, Markdale, Neu- 
stadt 

Haldimand; Town of Dunnville; Villages 
of Caledonia, Cayuga, Hagersville, 
Jarvis 

Halliburton and Muskoka East; Town of 
Huntsville (Joint Inspectorate) 

Halton and Wentworth in part; Towns of 
Burlington. Milton, Oakville; Villages 
of Acton, Georgetown (Joint Inspector- 
ate) 

Hastings, Centre; Villages of Madoc, Mar- 
mora, Stirling, Tweed 

Hastings, South, and City of Belleville- 
Towns of Deseronto. Trenton (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Hastings, North; South Nipissing, and 
South-East Parry Sound Districts; 
Towns of Powassan, Trout Creek; Vil- 
lages of Bancroft, South River, Sun- 
dridge (Joint Inspectorate) 



T. W. Standing, B.A. 



L. A. Green, B.A. 



John McCool, M.A. . 



W. F. Bald, B.A., LL.B. 
Thos. Jamieson, B.A... 



Willis C. Froats, M.A., B.Paed 

W. R. Liddy, B.A 

H. B. Fetterly, M.A 

J. C. Smith, B.A 



John A. Taylor, B.A 

D. A. Maxwell,B.A.,LL.B.,Ph.D 

S. A. Truscott, M.A 

M. R. Reid, M.A 

J. W. Crewson, B.A 

Samuel Huff, B.A 

H. H. Burgess, B.A 

Robert Wright, B.A 



Post Office 



J. L. Mitchener, B.A. 
R. 0. White 



James M. Denyes, B.A. 
J. E. Minns, B.A. . . . 



H. J. Clarke, B.A. 



Jas. Colling, B.A. . 



Sault Ste. Marie. 

Brantford. 

Walkerton. 

Port Elgin. 
Ottawa, 115 
Strathcona Ave. 

Carleton Place. 

Orangeville. 

Winchester. 

St. Thomas. 

St. Thomas. 

Windsor. 

Kingston. 

Sharbot Lake. 

Alexandria. 

Meaford. 

Owen Sound. 

Hanover. 

Caledonia. 
North Bay. 

Milton. 
Tweed. 

Belleville. 
Bancroft. 



308 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; Villages of Blyth, Brussels, 
Wroxeter 

Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Vil- 
lages of Bayfield, Exeter, Hensall 

Kenora District, and Thunder Bay 
(East); City of Fort William; Towns 
of Dryden, Keewatin, Kenora (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Kent, East; Towns of Blenheim, Both- 
well, Dresden, Ridgetown; Villages of 
Highgate, Thamesville 

Kent, West, and City of Chatham; Town? 
of Tilbury, Wallaceburg, Village of 
Wheatley (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lambton, East (No. 2); Town of Pe- 
trolia; Villages of Alvinston, Arkona, 
Oil Springs, Watford 

Lambton, West (No. 1); City of Sarnia; 
Town of Forest; Villages of Court- 
right, Point Edward, Thedford, Wyom- 
ing (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lanark, West; Towns of Perth, Smith's 
Falls; Village of Lanark (Joint In- 
spectorate) 

Lanark, East (see Carleton, West). 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque; Villages of Newboro, West- 
port 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2); Town of 
Brockville; Village of Athens (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) ; Town of 
Prescott; Villages of Cardinal, Kempt- 
ville, Merrickville (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lennox; Town of Napanee; Villages of 
Bath, Newburgh (see also Frontenac, 
N.) 

Lincoln, and Pelham Tp.; Towns of Nia- 
gara, Thorold; Villages of Beamsville, 
Grimsby, Merritton, Port Dalhousie 
(Joint Inspectorate) 

Manitoulin Dist; Algoma Dist. in part; 
Sudbury Dist., in part; Towns of 
Blind River, Gore Bay, Little Current, 
Massey, Webbwood 

Middlesex, East; Village of Lucan 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, 
iStrathroy; Villages of Ailsa Craig, 
Glencoe, Newbury, Wardsville 

Muskoka, South and West; District; 
Towns of Bala, Bracebridge, Graven- 
hurst; Village of Port Carling 

Muskoka, East (see Haliburton). 

Nipissing, North (see Sudbury Dist.). 

Nipissing, South (see Hastings, North). 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe; Villages of 
Delhi, Port Dover, Port Rowan (see 
Brant Co. ) 

Northumberland and Durham, West, No. 
1; Towns of Bowmanville, Port Hope; 
Village of Newcastle 



John M. Field, B.A., Ph.D. 
J. Elgin Tom 



W. J. Hamilton, B.A., 

Rev. W. H. G. Colles, 

i 



J. H. Smith, M.A. 



N. McDougall, B.A. 



Henry Conn, B.A. 



F. L. Michell, M.A. 



James F. McGuire, M.A. 



W. C. Dowsley, M.A. 



T. A. Craig 



E. J. Corkill, B.A. 



Geo. A. Carefoot, B.A., B.Paed 



James W. Hagan, M.A. 
P. J. Thompson, B.A. 



H. D. Johnson 



H. R. Scovell, B.A. 



H. Frank Cook, B.A 



W. E. Tilley, M.A., Ph.D. 



Goderich. 
Goderich. 

Fort William. 
Chatham. 
Chatham. 
Petrol ia. 

Sarnia. 
Perth. 

Westport. 
Brockville. 
Kemptville. 
Napanee. 

St. Catharines. 



Gore Bay. 
London. 



Strath roy. 
Bracebridge. 

Simcoe. 
Bowmanville.. 



1918 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



309 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



John W. Odell, B.A. 



Robert Boyes 



T. R. Ferguson, M.A. . 
R. A. Hutchison, B.A. 



J. M. Cole 



R. A. Paterson, B.A. 



J. L. Moore, B.A. 



W. J. Galbraith, M.A. 



William Irwin, B.A. 



James H. Smith, B.A. 



Richard Lees, M.A. 



Northumberland and Durham, Centre, 
No. 2; Town of Cobourg; Village of 

Millbrook 

Northumberland and Durham, East, No. 3 : 
Town of Campbellford; Villages of 

Brighton, Colborne, Hastings 

Ontario, North; North-East Parry Sound; 

Town of Uxibridge; Villages of Beaver- 
ton, Cannington (Joint Inspectorate) . . 
Ontario, South; Towns of Oshawa, 

Whitby ; Village of Port Perry 

Oxford, North, and City of Woodstock; 

Villages of Embro, Tavistock (Joint In- 
spectorate) 

Oxford, South; Towns of Ingersoll, Till- 

sonburg; Village of Norwich (Joint 

Inspectorate) 

Parry Sound, South, District; Towns of 

Kearney, Parry Sound; Village of 

Burk's Falls 

Parry Sound, South-East (see Hastings, 

North). 
Parry Sound, North-West (see Sudbury). 
Parry Sound, North-Bast (see Ontario, 

North). 
Peel; Town of Brampton; Villages of 

Bolton, Port Credit, Streetsville 

Perth, North; Towns of Listowel. Mit- 
chell, St. Mary's; Village of Milverton. 
Perth, South, and City of Stratford 

(Joint Inspectorate) 

Peterborough, East; Villages of Ha veloek, 

Lakefield, Norwood 

Peterborough, West, and Victoria, East 

Town of Lindsay; Villages of Bobcay- 

geon, Omemee (Joint Inspectorate) 

Prescott and Russell; Towns of Hawkes- 

bury, Rockland, Vankleek Hill; Villages 

of Casselman, L'Orignal 

Prince Edward; Town of Picton; Villages 

of Bloomfield, Wellington 

Rainy River District, Thunder Bay (in 

part) ; Towns of Fort Frances, Rainy 

River, Sioux Lookout (Joint Inspector- 
ate) 

Renfrew, North; Town of Pembroke; 

Village of Cobden 

Renfrew, South; Towns of Arnprior, Ren- 
frew; Villages of Eganville, Killaloe 

Station 

Simcoe, North; Towns of Barrie, Colling- 

wood, Penetanguishene 

Simcoe, South; Towns of Alliston, Stay- 

ner; Villages of Beeton, Bradford, 

Creemore, Tottenham 

Simcoe, East; Towns of Midland, Orillia; 

Villages of Coldwater, Port McNicoll, 

Victoria Harbour 

Stormont; Town of Cornwall; Village of 

Finch 

Sudbury District (in part), North Nipis- 

sing and North-West Parry Sound; 

Towns of Bonfield, Cache Bay, Chelms- 
ford, Copper Cliff, Frood Mine, Mat- 

tawa, North Bay, Sturgeon Falls, Said- 

bur y |D. M. Christie, B.A. 



G. E. Broderick 



John Nelson, B.A. 



John E. Benson, M.A. 



C. McDowell, B.A. 



I. D. Breuls, B.A. 



G. G. McNab, M.A. 



Joseph L. Garvin, B.A. 



Edwin Longman 



Isaac Day, B.A. 



James Froats, M.A. 



Cobourg. 

Campbellford. 

Uxbridge. 
Whitby. 

Woodstock. 

Ingersoll. 

Parry Sound. 



Brampton. 
Stratford. 
Stratford. 
Peterborough. 

Lindsay. 

Vankleek Hill. 
Picton. 

Fort William. 
Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 
Barrie. 

Barrie. 

Orillia. 
Cornwall. 



Sudbury. 



310 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 




Post Office 



John Ritchie 



John A. Bannister, B.A. 



Thunder Bay, West; City of Port Arthur 

(Joint Inspectorate) 

Timiskaming District; Towns of Charl- 
ton, Cobalt, Cochrane, Emglehart, 

Haileybury, Iroquois Falls, Latchford, 

Matheson, New Liskeard, Timmins; 

Village of Thornloe 

Victoria, West; Villages of Fenelon Falls, 

Sturgeon Point, Woodville W. H. Stevens, B.A 

Victoria, East (see Peterborough, West). 
Waterloo, N. (No. 1); City of Kitchener; 

Town of Waterloo; Village of Elmira 

(Joint Inspectorate) !f. W. Sheppard 

Waterloo. S. (No. 2); City of Gait; 

Towns of Hespeler, Preston ; Villages 

of Ayr, New Hamburg (Joint Inspec- 
torate) Lambert Norman, B.A 

Welland; City of Welland; Towns of i 

Bridgeburg, Port Colborne; Villages of | 

Chippawa, Fort Erie, Humberstone^j 

(Thorold Town and Pelham Tp. are! 

under Lincoln Inspector.) (Joint In- 
spectorate) John W. Marshall, B.A 

Wellington, North; Towns of Harriet on. 

Mount Forest, Palmerston; Village of 

Clifford Robert Galbraith, B.A 

Wellington, South; Villages of Arthur,! 

Drayton* Elora, Erin, Fergus J. J. Craig, B.A 

Wentworth; Town of Dundas; Village of 

Waterdown . . i J. B. Robinson, B.A., B.Paed. . 

York, North; Towns of Aurora, New-i 

market; Villages of Holland Landing.! 

Sutton West . . .". |c. W. Mulloy, B.A 

York, West; Towns of Mimico, Weston; j 

Villages of New Toronto, Woodbridge. . A. L. Campbell, M.A .Weston 

York, East; Town of Leaside; Villages of 

Markham, Richmond Hill, Stouffville. . A. A. Jordan, B.A 



Port Arthur. 

New Liskeard. 
Lindsay. 

Kitchener. 

Gait. 

Welland. 

Mount Forest. 

Fergus. 

Hamilton. 

Aurora. 



Brantford, 

Guelph, 

Hamilton, 

do 
Kingston, # 

London, 
Niagara Falls, 
Ottawa, 

do 
Peterborough, 
Toronto, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Windsor, 

Sandwich and 



City of 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do and St. Catharines 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do and 
Walkerville 



Towns of 



E. E. C. Kilmer, B.A 

Wm. Tytler, B.A 

W. H. Ballard, M.A 

Jas. Gill, B.A., B.Paed 

J. Russell Stuart 

C. B. Edwards, B.A 

D. C. Hetherington 

J. H. Putman, B.A., D.Paed 

EL T. Slemon, B.A., D.Paed. . 

A. Mowat, B.A 

R. H. Cowley, M.A., Cf. Insp. 

W. H. Elliott, B.A 

Jos. W. Rogers, M.A 

G. H. Armstrong, M. A., B.Pscd 

Henry Ward, B.A 

D. D. Moshier, B.A., B.Paed.. 
N.S. MacDonald, B.A., D.Paed. 
Walter Bryce, B.A 



Robt. Meade, M.A. 



Toronto, 63 Or- 
chard View Bd. 
Brantford. 
Guelph. 
Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Kingston. 
London. 
St. Catharines. 
Ottawa. 
Ottawa. 
Peterborough. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 

Windsor. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 311 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Concluded 

R.C. Separate School Inspectors 

J. P. Power, M.A Toronto, 33 Dalton R. 

J. F. Sullivan, B. A London, 873 Helmuth Ave. 

Jas. E. Jones, B.A Ottawa, 104 Henderson St. 

J. P. Finn, B.A North Bay. 

W. J. Lee, B.A Toronto, 434 Brunswick Ave. 

J. M. Bennett, B.A Toronto, 694 Euclid Ave. 

English=French Public and Separate School Inspectors 

L. O. E. Payment, M.A Ottawa, 12* Tormey St. 

Thomas Swift Ottawa, 320 Cooper St. 

J. S. Gratton Toronto, 77 McGill St. 

Jno. C. Walsh, B.A Rockland. 

Chief Inspectors of Public and Separate Schools 

John Waugh, M.A., D.Psed., Chief Insp.. . Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 
W. I. Chisholm, M.A., Asst. Chief Insp.. Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Director of Industrial and Technical Education and Inspector of Normal Schools 

F. W. Merchant, M.A., D.Psed Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

High School Inspectors 

J. A. Houston, M.A Toronto, 105 Roxborough St. West. 

I. M. Levan, B.A Toronto, 144 Balmoral Ave. 

G. F. Rogers, B.A Toronto, 44 Roxborough St. West. 

Continuation School Inspectors 

G. K. Mills, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

J. P. Hoag, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Manual Training and Household Science Inspector 

Albert H. Leake Toronto, 116 Spencer Ave. 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Education 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Ph.D Toronto, 13 Hazelton Ave. 



February 15th, 1919. 



312 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX Q 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1918 



Collegiate Institutes 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


N amber taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


High Schools — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


Number taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


Barrie 




85 

228 

143 

67 

52 

85 

75 

142 

186 

64 

143 

99 

80 

238 

199 

87 

254 

46 

55 

105 

119 

112 

468 

162 

95 

96 

46 

135 

115 

156 

75 

151 

156 

57 

96 

189 

54 

101 

65 

60 

66 

61 

67 

105 


71 

178 

110 

38 

43 

74 

59 

130 

180 

54 

125 

57 

61 

200 

191 

66 

196 

33 

43 

90 

90 

103 

314 

141 

79 

70 

43 

120 

90 

121 

60 

127 

141 

51 

72 

161 

47 

60 

19 

40 

45 

36 

44 

56 


Arnprior 




77 
34 
37 
47 
15 
76 
20 
31 
58 
13 
43 
31 
42 
41 
54 
31 
17 
55 
57 
28 
109 
26 
22 
57 
49 
46 
45 
34 
57 
51 
10 
44 
52 
37 
43 
35 
31 
31 
53 
29 
44 
31 
41 
58 
51 
83 
41 
50 
44 
19 
36 
61 
68 
46 
20 
43 


65 


Brantf ord 


7 


Arthur 




28 


Brockville 


Athens 




23 


Chatham 


70 


Aurora- 




41 


Clinton 


Avonmore 




12 


Cobourg 




Aylmer 




50 


Collingwood 




Beamsville 




16 


Fort William 




Belleville 


73 


23 


Gait 




Bowmanville 


47 


Goderich 




Bradford 




12 


Guelph 




Brampton 




36 


Hamilton 


362 


Brighton 




22 


Ingersoll 


Caledonia 




30 


Kingston 




Campbellford 




32 


Kitchener-Waterloo . . . 




Carleton Place 

Cayuga 


27 


20 


Lindsay 




15 


London 


315 


Chatsworth 




14 


Morrisburg 


Chesley 




46 


Napanee 




Chesterville 




35 


Niagara Falls 




Colborne 




18 


North Bay 




Cornwall 




101 


Orillia 




Deseronto 




22 


Ottawa 


324 


Dundalk 




19 




Dundas 




49 


Perth 




Dunnville 




33 


Peterborough 


113 


Durham 




28 


Picton 


Dutton 




36 


Port Arthur 




Elora 




29 


Renfrew 




Essex 




51 


St. Catharines 




Fergus 




40 


St. Mary's 




Flesherton 




8 


St. Thomas 




Forest 




18 


Sarnia 




Gananoque 




36 


Seaf orth 




Georgetown 




33 


Smith's Falls 




Glencoe 




24 


Stratford 




Gravenhurst 




28 


Strathroy 




Grimsby 




25 


Toronto, Harbord St. 




Hagersville 




23 


Toronto, Parkdale . . . 




Haileybury 




33 






Harriston 




24 


Toronto, Humberside 




Hawkesbury 




34 


Toronto, Malvern Ave. 




Iroquois 




24 


Toronto, Oakwood . 


Kemptville 




33 


Toronto, Riverdale . . 




Kenora 




54 


Toronto 1 


2,195 


Kincardine 




30 


Vankleek Hill . , 


63 
242 
136 


45 
235 
110 


Leamington 




60 






Listowel . 




36 






Lucan 




30 










34 


Totals . . . 




5,681 


4,519 


Markdale 




15 








30 


High Schools 
Alexandria . . 




75 
27 
50 

47 1 


54 
19 
38 
41 


Meaf ord 




48 


Midland . 




54 


Alliston 




Mitchell . 




37 






Morewood 




12 


Amherstburg 




Mount Forest 




29 



1918 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



313 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1918.— Continued 



High Schools.— Con . 



2i.§! 



jsl'i 









d _j§ d 
3 d-2 

^ a § 
^ +=.d 
«» ^ d 



<D c3 d 

» !h d 

^ SB § 

aga 



Other Places. 



d° 



03- 






^ d.2 

^a d 

<x> n d 
* 5 I 

d © M 



S * d 
03 d .2 

c3 © -♦■= 

s-l+a.d 



Newburgh 

Newcastle 

Newmarket 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls South, 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Omemee 

Orangeville , 

Oshawa 

Paris 

ParkhiU 

Parry Sound , 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene 

Petrolia 

Plantagenet 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Prescott 

Richmond Hill 

Ridgetown 

Rockland , 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smithville 

Stirling 

Streetsville 

Sudbury 

Sydenham 

Thorold 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto, North , 

Trenton 

Tweed . . . . , 

Uxbridge 

Vienna 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Wardsville 

Waterdown 

Waterford , 

Watford 

Welland 

Weston 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Williams town 

Winchester 

Wingham 



Totals, 



47 



147 



37 
12 

52 
15 
58 
36 
42 
28 
21 

115 
46 
41 
53 
95 
57 
59 
22 
36 
32 
63 
29 
20 
46 
41 
40 
23 

148 
21 
68 
22 
38 
21 
73 
29 
25 
69 
7 

18 
68 
51 
22 
42 
86 
10 
35 
38 
36 
74 

126 
48 
33 
27 
68 
54 



5,079 



25 
7 

44 
11 
46 
27 
32 
22 
19 
96 
39 
25 
43 
76 
32 
52 
14 
22 
23 
60 
25 
16 
27 
36 
30 
23 
120 
12 
64 
16 
37 
21 
62 
21 
21 
52 
3 
10 
54 
37 
12 
39 
69 
9 

29 
31 
26 
60 
77 
30 
26 
25 
51 
49 



3,892 



Aberf oyle 

Acton 

Agincourt 

Alvinston 

Ameliasburg 

Ancaster 

Angus 

Apsley 

Arkona 

Ashton 

Aultsville 

Ayr 

Ayton 

Bailieboro' 

Bancroft 

Barriefield 

Bath 

Battersea 

Bayfield 

Beachburg 

Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belleville, Co. Centre 

Belle River 

Belmont 

Bethany 

Billings' Bridge 

Binbrook 

Bisco 

Blackstock 

Blenheim 

Blind River 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Bowesville 

Bracebridge 

Bridgeburg 

Brigden 

Bruce Mines 

Brussels 

Burf ord 

Burgessville 

Burk's Falls 

Burlington 

Burridge 

Burritt's Rapids 

Caistor Centre 

Cannington 

Cardinal , 

Cargill 

Carp , 

Castleton , 

Cataraqui 

Chapleau 



28 



17 
39 
36 
36 
18 
11 
17 
3 
4 

10 
29 
17 
21 
6 
21 
21 
22 
14 
12 
32 
38 
7 

51 
19 
10 
17 
24 
9 
4 
16 
48 
19 
12 
20 
27 
20 
22 
12 
95 
28 
17 
24 
34 
21 
12 
40 
20 
2 
1 
6 
30 
26 
16 
14 
8 
24 
21 



314 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1918— Continued 



Other Places— Con. 


JN umber granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


JN umber taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 

Examination 




Other Places— Con. 


JN umber granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


JN umber taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


Charleston 




16 

45 

16 

9 

38 

44 

8 

9 

13 

20 

19 

30 

14 

21 

15 

11 

19 

8 

10 
13 
13 
31 
50 
7 
5 

10 
14 
29 
50 
13 
30 
34 
6 
8 
20 
24 
21 
12 
2 
39 
7 
61 
46 
32 
16 
8 
22 
18 
17 
29 
39 
36 
! 5 
21 
35 
19 
10 
17 
36 


8 

42 

12 

7 

26 

20 

7 

7 

11 
12 
14 
23 
4 

12 

12 

10 

16 

7 

6 

8 

7 

25 

29 

2 

2 

3 

11 

19 

38 

12 

17 

25 

3 

6 

17 

14 

17 

7 

1 

33 

5 

44 

35 

18 

14 

7 

11 

9 

11 

24 

26 

20 

5 

12 
12 
10 
10 
13 
25 


Fournier 




14 


12 


Chester , . 




Frankford 


6 




Claremont 




Galetta 


8 

9 
33 
10 

4 

3 

43 
34 

9 
21 
10 
10 
26 
24 
23 
10 
22 
12 
11 
54 
12 

3 
11 

3 

22 
22 
13 

8 
24 

9 
10 

6 

12 
10 

7 

10 
40 
11 
14 
39 

4 

52 
57 
22 
27 

4 

23 
12 
12 
34 
20 
131 

6 
18 

20 
8 


8 


Clifford 




Glen Ailan 




8 


Cobalt 




Gore Bay 




17 


Cobden 




Grand Valley 




10 


Coboconk 




Haliburton 




4 


Cochrane 




Hall's Bridge 


2 


Coldwater 




Hamilton, Co. Centre 




35 


Comber 




Hanover 




33 


Cookstown 




Harrington , 




7 


Copper Cliff 




Harrow 




15 


Courtright 




Harrowsmith . 




5 


Crediton 




Hastings 




7 


Creemore 




Havelock 




10 


Creighton Mine 




Hawkestone • • • • 




12 


Crosshill , 




Hensall 




16 


Cultus 




Hepworth 




8 


Cumberland 




Highgate . . . 




12 


Dalkeith 




Hillsdale . . 




5 


Dashwood 




Homing's Mills . . 




8 


Delhi 




Huntsville . 




37 


Delta 




Innerkip . . , 




9 


Demorestvilie 




Iroquois Falls 




3 


Denbigh 




Ivy 




9 


Desbarats 


Janetville 




3 


Dickinson's Landing. . . 




Jarvis 




13 


Dixon's Corners 




Jasper 




16 


Dorchester Station . . . 




Jockvale 




11 


Douglas 




Kars 




7 


Drayton 




Keene 




10 


Dresden 




Keewatin 




8 


Dromore 




Kenmore 




8 


Drumbo 




Killarney , . . . . 




5 


Dry den 




Kilmaurs 




9 


Dungannon 




Kimberley 




7 


Eastview 




Kinburn 




2 


Easton's Corners 




King 




10 


Echo Bay. .; 




Kingsville 




34 


Echo Place 




Kinmount 




7 


Edgar 




Kintail 




10 


Eganville 




Kirkfield 




20 


Elmira 




Kleinburg 




2 


Elmvale 




Lakefield 




41 


Embro 




Lanark 




40 


Embrun 




Lancaster 




21 


Emo 




Lansdowne 




14 


Englehart 








4 


Ennismore 




Lef roy 




14 


Erin 




Lemonville 




10 


Exeter 




Lion's Head , 




9 


Fenelon Falls 




Little Britain 




26 


Fenwick 




Little Current. . 




15 


Feversham 




London East 




88 


Fingal 




Loring 




4 


Florence 




Lucknow . . 




17 


Fonthill 




Macdonald Consoli- 
dated Guelph 






Fordwich 




16 


Fort Frances 




Madawaska 




6 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



315 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1918— Continued 



Other Places— Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


Number taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


Other Places— Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


Number taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examiuation 


Magneta wan 




11 

2 
21 
19 
14 
10 
44 
18 

5 
26 

8 

22 
21 
13 
20 
13 
23 
20 
26 
10 
22 
20 
24 
48 
54 
33 
18 

6 

9 

4 
11 
13 
15 

6 

22 
16 
11 
14 
11 

9 

13 
15 
12 
54 
11 
11 

7 

16 
35 
15 
13 
34 
20 
11 
18 
29 

1 
26 
11 


10 

2 

11 

15 

13 

6 

27 

12 

5 

20 

3 

11 

13 

4 

15 

12 

19 

19 

20 

6 

21 

15 

20 

41 

37 

28 

14 

6 

6 

4 

8 

10 

12 

4- 

13 

9 

4 

10 

9 

9 

6 

12 

12 

31 

9 

5 

4 

16 

24 

12 

7 

25 

15 

4 

15 

24 

"22* 

9 


Pelee Island 




15 

18 

17 

8 

18 

65 

32 

27 

9 

34 

6 

7 

17 

15 

3 

12 
16 
20 
30 
14 
35 
31 
8 
11 
18 
20 
22 
37 
21 
18 
11 
26 
9 
5 
7 

13 
21 
35 
12 
32 
18 
19 
18 
17 
18 
26 
13 
25 
19 
20 
21 
15 
62 
20 
26 
25 
44 
15 
34 


6 


Magpie Mine 




Pickering 




9 


Mani to waning 




Plattsville 




12 


Manoitick ; 




Port Burwell 




7 


Maple 




Port Carling 




13 


Marlborough 




Port Colborne 




48 


Marmora 




Port Credit 




28 


Marshville 




Port Dalhousie 




18 


Marsville 




Port Stanley 




3 


Massey 




Powassan 




22 


Matheson 




Priceville 




4 


Mattawa 




Princeton 




3 


Maxville 




Queensville 




9 


Medina 




Rainy River 




11 


Melbourne 




Randwick 




2 


Merivale 




Richard's Landing . . 




6 


Merlin 




Richmond 




14 


Merrickville 




Ridgeway 




13 


Merritton 




Ripley 




18 


Metcalfe 




Rockton 




4 


Mildmay 




Rockwood 




28 


Milford 




Rodney . . 




18 


Millbrook 




Rosemont 




3 


Milton 




Roseneath 




8 


Milverton 




Russell 




12 


Mimico 




St. David's ...... 




10 


Minden 




St. George 




21 


Minesing 




Sandwich 




29 






Schomberg 





11 


Moorefield 




Schreiber 




14 


Moose Creek 




Scotland 




9 


Mount Albert 




Selkirk 




17 


Mount Brydges 




Sharbot Lake 





4 


Mount Hope 




Singhampton .... 




4 


Mount Pleasant 




Sioux Lookout 




• 1 


Mount St. Patrick 




Solina 




12 


Mountain Grove 




Southampton 




15 


Mountain Station 




South Finch 




27 






South Indian . 




6 


Neustadt 








18 


Newboro 




South Porcupine . . 




10 


New Hamburg 




South River 




12 


Newington 




Sparta 




8 


New Liskeard 




Spencerville 




10 


New Toronto . . , 




Springfield .... . 




11 


North Augusta 




Stayner 




20 






Stevensville 




11 


North Lancaster 




Steelton 




23 


Norwich 




Stittsville .. 




12 


Oakwood 




Stony Creek 




15 


Odessa 




Stouffville . . . 




18 


Oil Springs 




Strabane 




12 






Sturgeon Falls . . 




37 


Ohsweken 




Sunderland 




17 


Otterville 




Sutton 




23 


Paisley 




Tarn worth . . . 




18 


Pakenham 




Tara 




35 


Palmerston 




Tavistock 

Teeswater 




10 






23 



316 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1918— Concluded 



Other Places— Con, 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


Number taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


Other Places — Con.' 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's re- 
commendation 


Number taking 
Departmental 
Examination 


Number passed 
Departmental 
Examination 


Thamesford 




25 
38 
18 
42 
31 
23 
32 
19 
13 

103 
20 
23 
14 
17 
20 
26 
23 
7 

19 
13 
31 
44 
21 
34 


18 
19 
17 
29 
24 
11 
22 
10 
7 

59 
15 
13 
11 
12 
8 

10 

21 

7 

9 

5 

28 

37 

12 

18 


Wheatley 




18 

3 
12 

8 

13 
16 
24 

8 

20 
21 
26 
19 
15 
26 
35 
22 

4 
15 


15 


Thamesville , . . 




White River 




2 


Thedf ord 




Whitevale 




10 


Thessalon 




Wilberf orce 




4 


Thombury , 




Wilkesport 




5 


Thorndale 




Williamsburg 




6 


Tilbury 




Willowdale 




22 


Timmins , 




Winona 




8 


Tiverton 




Wolfe Island 




9 


Toronto. De La Salle 




Woodbridge 




16 


Institute 


Woodville 




20 


Tottenham 




Wooler 




11 


Uptergrove 




Worthington 




10 


Varna 




Wroxeter 




19 


Verona 




Wyoming 




22 


Victoria Harbour ...... 




Yarmouth Heights 




15 


Vineland 




Zephyr , 




3 


Warkworth 




Zurich 




11 






Totals 






Webbwood 




34 


6,851 


4,756 






Collegiate Institutes . . . 
High Schools 




Wellington 




3,386 

147 

34 


5,681 
5,079 
6,851 


4,519 


Westboro' 




3,892 


West Lome 




Other Places 


4,756 






Grand Totals, 1918 . . 








3,567 


17,611 


13,167 



Number Obtaining Junior High School Entrance Standing under Farm 
Employment Regulations, 1918 



Inspectorate 



o » 

2;o 



Algoma 37 

Brant 67 

Brantf ord 7 

Bruce, East 46 

Bruce, West 63 

Carleton, County 115 

Dufferin | 65 

Dundas 30 

Elgin, East ; 51 

Elgin, West | 25 

Essex ! 88 

13 
35 



Frontenac 

Frontenac, South 

Glengarry 

Grey, East j 47 

Grey, South I 67 

Grey, West j 67 

Haldimand 86 

Halton and Wentworth . . . . I 80 

Hamilton City 20 

Hastings, Centre 2 

Hastings, N., S. Nipissing 



and S. E. Parry Sound, 

Hastings, South 

Huron, East 

Huron, West 



20 
50 
81 
67 



Inspectorate 






Kent, East 

Kent, West 

Kingston 

Lambton, East , 

Lamb ton, West 

Lanark, West , 

Leeds and Gren., I 

Leeds and Gren., II. ... 

Lennox 

Lincoln and Pelham . . . 

London City 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex, East 

Middlesex, West 

Muskoka 

Niagara Falls and St. 

Catharines 

Norfolk 

Northumber'd&D.,C II. 
Northumber'd &D..E..III. 
Northuml'd & D., W., I. 

Ontario, North 

Ontario, South 

Oxford, North 

Oxford, South 

Parry Sound, South 



76 
63 
20 
56 
42 
11 
14 
33 
36 

100 
12 
28 
56 

108 
2 

16 

85 
45 
58 
39 
1!) 
26 
57 
39 
7 



Inspectorate 



Peel 

Perth, North 

Perth, South 

Peterborough City 

Peterborough, East 
Prescott and Russell . . 

Rainy River Dist 

Renfrew, North 

Renfrew, South 

Simcoe, North 

Simcoe, South 

Stormont -. 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming 

Toronto City 

Victoria West 

Waterloo, North 

Waterloo, South 

Welland 

Wellington, North 

Wellington, South 

Wentworth 

Windsor City 

York, North 

York, West 



o - 



Total 3,366 



80 

109 

92 

12 

25 

100 

16 

66 

31 

46 

79 

55 

4 

18 
34 
24 
18 
31 
12 
66 
46 
125 
3 

15 
29 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



317 



APPENDIX R 

JUNIOR PUBLIC SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA EXAMINATION, 1918 



Centre 


Ex- 
amined 


Passed 


High 
School 
Entrance 
allowed 


Centre 


Ex- 
amined 


Passed 


High 
School 
Entrance 
allowed 




3 
1 
6 
5 
2 
7 
4 

10 
3 
7 
6 
2 
5 
5 
4 
4 
5 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
6 
6 
3 
5 
3 
2 
2 
5 
2 


3 




Milverton 

Mimico 


6 . 








18 
5 
2 
5 

98 
4 
1 
• 10 
4 
5 
1 
2 
9 
4 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
5 
4 
7 
4 
4 
2 
3 
1 
7 
2 

10 


18 
2 
1 
2 

55 
4 
1 
8 
3 
3 






6 
2 
2 
6 
2 
8 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
4 
5 
3 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 

"2 

3 

2 

4 
2 
2 
2 
5 




Navan 


1 


Bavfield 




North Bay 

Oil Springs 

Ottawa 




Beachburg 

Bolton 








21 


Bracebridge 




Parry Sound 

Picton 












Port Credit 

Powassan 

Renfrew 




Burk's Falls 


1 




Byng Inlet 

Collingwood 


1 




Richard's Landing 
Rodney 




Courtright 










Schreiber 

Selkirk 


9 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
5 
2 
5 










Dutton . 




Sparta 




Echo Bay 




Stony Creek, 

Strabane 

Sunderland 

Thamesville 

Tiverton 




Emo 






Exeter 






Fingal 






Florence 


1 


1 


Fordwich 


Varna 




Fort Frances 




Victoria Harbour. 

Vineland 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock 

Wooler 


3 


Fournier 


2 




Goderich 




Hensall 






Hillsdale 


2 




Kingsville 


Worthington 

Wroxeter 

Zephyr 




Kinmount 






Kintail 






Kirkfield 




Zurich 








Totals 






Marmora 




372 


242 35 


Massey 


2 








1 



Junior Public School Graduation Diplomas Obtained by Farm 
Employment, 1918 



Inspectorate T^li^is 

Algoma 3 

Brant 3 

Bruce, West 1 

Elgin, East 2 

Hastings, North 5 

Hastings, So uth 1 

Huron, East 6 

Huron, West 6 

Kent, East 3 



Inspectorate DipftmL 

Kent, West 2 

Lambton, East 1 

Lincoln 3 

Muskoka 4 

Ontario North 4 

Ottawa 2 

Oxford, North 1 

Oxford, South 2 

Parry Sound, South 3 



Inspectorate Diplomas 

Peel 4 

Perth, North 3 

Prescott and Russell ... 4 

Wentworth 5 

York, North 1 

York, West 3 

Total 72 



318 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX S 



LIST OF CERTIFICATES ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
EDUCATION, 1918 



I. High School Principals' Certificates 



(Math.) 

(Classics.) 



(Classics.) 



Adamson, William H., M.A 

Affleck, Archibald A., B.A. 

Anderson, John A., B.A. 

Brackenbury, George L., B.i 

Butcher, Cecil W., B.A. 

Caldwell, Alexander, B.A. 

Cameron, James M., B.A. 

Cowan, Margaret T., B.A. 

Cumming, Eva M., B.A. 

Curtis, Jeremiah T., B.A. 

Davidson, Edith M., B.A. 

Davies, Norman, B.A. (Science). 

Fletcher, Beatrice L. R., B.A. (Classics.) 

Gilfillan, Viola, M.A. 

Green, Walter H. H., B.A. 

Hitsman, Samuel A., B.A. 

Hood, Finlay, B.A. 



(Science.) 



Ionson, Margaret A., B.A. 

Irving, Jessie C, B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 

Jewitt, Olver V.y B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 

Keenan, Edward J., B.A. 

Kinnear, Jennie A., B.A. (Math.) 

Knight, Carrie M., M.A. (Classics, Eng. 

& Hist.) 
Lawrence, Charles P., B.A. 
Lewis, Nora, B.A. (Classics). 
McCormack, Mary I., B.A. 
McNeely, Priscilla V. M., M.A. (Science.) 
McNeil, William G., B.A. (Eng & Hist.) 
Medcof, James L., B.A. (Science.) 
Nugent, Eleanor, B.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 
Philp, James H., B.A. 
Young, Ralph H., B.A. 



II. High School Assistants and Specialists 



Adams, Ada. 

Aitchison, Belle. (Art.) 

Allen, Eula P. 

Allin, Arthur E., M.A. (Art.) 

Anderson, John A., B.A. 

Appelbe, Louise A., B.A. 

Arnold, Leita E., B.A. 

Austin. Prudence M. (Art.) 

Baird, Jean F., M.A. 

Barlow, Frederick J.. B.A. (Art.) 

Beaman, Elsie K. (Phys. Cult.) 

Beckwith, Mrs. Lizzie A. 

Bell, John M. 

Bottoms, Emma M. (Art.) 

Broad, Luella L., B.A. 

Brown, Annie E. 

Burns, Grace, B.A. (Art.) 

Burriss, Mae N., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Butcher, Frank H., B.A. (Classics.) 

Byram, Kathleen A., B.A. (Mods. & 

Hist.) (Art.) 
Caldwell, Alexander, B.A. (Commercial.) 
Cameron, James. (Phys. Cult.) 
Cameron, Murray, B.A. 
Campbell, Minnie M. (Art.) 
Campbell, (Mrs.) Ruby C, B.A. 
Campbell. William A., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Challen, Newton E., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Clayton, Vivian E., B.A. (Art.) 
Clement, Jessie M., B.A. 
Coleman, (Mrs.) Jessie D. 
Cordingley, Margaret L„ B.A. 
Corkery, Florence, M.A. (Art.) 
Coughlan, Anna T., B.A. 
Cowan, Ida K., B.A. (Art.) 



Cruickshank, Libbie. 
Cruikshank, Gertrude, 
Cryderman, May, B.A. 



(Com.) 
B.A. 
(Eng. &Hist.) 



Cult.) 



Cunningham, Evangeline, B.A. (Phys 

Cult.) 
Danard, Charles H„ B.A. 
Davidson, Georgia, B.A. 
DeFoe, Eugenie M., B.A. (Phys. 
Delmage, Ehielyn E., B.A. (Art.) 
Dewar, Nora, B.A. (Classics.) 
Dickson, Marion C. 
Dobson, Viola J., B.A. 
Doherty, Mabel 0. (Phys. Cult.) 
Douglas, Gordon A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Downey, William H.. 
Duncan, Muriel, B.A. 
Dunnett, Alfred H., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Durie, Helen F., M.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Eadie, William M., B.A. 
Elcoat, Hazel I. (Art.) (Commercial.) 
Elliott, Frederick V., B.A. 
Erb, Maurice, B.A. (Eng. & Hist.) 
Erwin, Willis M., B.A. 
Farmer, Bessie S., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Fenn, Lloy E., B.A. 
Fletcher. Douglas R. 
Fothergill, Eithel L. 
Fraser, Bertha F., B.A. 
Fraser, Christine M., B.A. 
Gabriel, Mary. 
Gardiner, M. Mae, B.A. 
Gilchrist, John, B.A. 
Going, Ambia L., B.A. (Art.) 
Goring, Ralph B., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 






1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



319 



II. High School Assistants and Specialists.— Con. 



Graham, Hugh H., B.A. (Science.) 

Graham, Samuel J, B.A. 

Graham, Thomas S. H., M.A. (Math. & 

Phys.) 
Greig, Earl H., B.A. 
Grills, Margaret. (Art.) 
Hall, Grace, B.A. 
Halpenny, Milton D. 
Hamilton, Agnes I. (Art.) 
Hardy, John H., B.A. (Classics.) 
Harrington, Marjorie L., B.A. 
Harris, Una M. 

Harvey, Martha A., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Hay, Hazel F., B.A. 
Helson, Margaret J., M.A. (Mods. & 

Hist.) 
Henderson, Orville J. 
Hicks, Eleanor M. 
Hodgins, Ethelberta. (Art.) 
Horan, J. Cecilia. 
Horton, Charles W., B.A. (Art.) 
Howson, Alexandra A., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Hubbs, Maude, B.A. 
Hume, Annie I., B.A. 
Husband, Edith P., B.A. 
Irving, Maude G. N., B.A. 
Jardine, Amy M. 
Johnson, Alfred, B.A. 
Jones, Gwendolyn B. 
Judge, Albert E., B.A. 
Kennedy, Jessie, B.A. 
Kenny, Vera B., B.A. (Art.) 
Kenyon, Isabel. 

Kerr, (Mrs.) Winnabel E., B.A. (Art.) 
King, Eva W., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Kinnee, Herbert C, B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 
Kirk, Gladys R. (Art.) 
Lailey, Marion B., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Lamont, Alexander D., B.A. 
Lee, Gertrude M. 
Lee, Sadie, B.A. 

Lockett, Horace G., M.A. (Classics.) 
Maitland, Jessie H., B.A. 
Maitland, Marion. 

Martin, Jean E., B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 
Martyn, Tena. (Art.) 
Might, Lincoln, M.A. (Art.) 
Mills, Jennie. 
Money, Mabel L. K. 
Montgomery, May me I., B.A. (Fr & Ger.) 

(Art.) 
Morgan, Susan P. (Commercial.) 
Mowat, John H., B.A. 
Mullette, Fernia H. 
Munro, Margaret K., B.A. (Math.) 
MacGregor, Mrs. Jeanette E. (Art.) 
MacLeod, Emma B., B.A. 
McCallum, Mary, B.A. (E'ng. & Hist.) 
McKnight, Mary G., B.A. 
McLellan, Mary A., B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 
McNab, Alberta, B.A. 
McTurk, Isabel, B.A. 
MeVean, Kathleen P., B.A. 
Nelson, Eva E., B.A. 
Newton, Amy A., B.A. 



Nichol, Winifred S., M.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Norton, M. Maud. (Art.) 

O'Connell, Marguerite E., B.A. (Phys. 
Cult.) 

Page, Jennie, B.A. 

Parker, Mrs. Frances G., B.A. (Eng. & 
Hist.) 

Parlee, Edith. (Art.) 

Parr, iSarah E. (Art.) 

Pirie, Lizzie B. 

Raitt, Helena G., M.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 

Ramage, George E., B.A. 

Redick, Clara L., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Reid, Edith L. (Art.) 

Rendall, Stanley D. 

Roberts, Mabel E. 

Rodden, Mary K., B.A. 

Ross, Margery E., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Russell, Flossie L. 

Rutledge, Evelyn M. 

Ryan, Gertrude, B.A. 

Ryan, Mae H., B.A. 

Saunders, Lucy, M.A. 

Scanlon, Mary G. (Art.) 

Schooley, Fred. T. 

Shields, Jean S., B.A. 

Shook, Muriel A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Sillers, Roberta M., B.A. 

Simpson, John M., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Singleton, Blanche, B.A* 

Smith, Sadie L., B.A. (Science.) 

Smith, Wallace W., B.A. 

Somerville, Eva M. 

Southcombe, William J. A., B.A. (Clas- 
sics). 

Spence, Ruth E„ B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Stanley, Fredrica. 

Stark, Ethyle M., B.A. (Art.) 

Stewart, James H. (Art.) 

Stewart, Margaret E. 

'Still well, Laura M., B.A. 

Stinson, Allie M. (Phys. Cult.) 

Stinson, Mildred E., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Stollery, Edith, B.A. (Art.) 

Syme, John J. (Phys. Cult.) (Only 
specialist's standing granted.) 

Symons, Helen F., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Thompson, Howard E. 

Tighe, Elsie S., B.A. 

Towle, Lucie A. 

Trace, Cephas M., M.A. 

Traver, Lillie A., B.A. 

Trenaman, Mabel N., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Turvey, Ina M., (Art.) 

Van Duzer, L. Mabel, B.A. (Art.) 

Walker, Ruth M., B.A. 

Wallace, Mary H., B.A. 

Wallace, Muriel J., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Wallace, Verna M. 

Wallen, Wilfrid B. 

Warren, Violet, B.A. 

Weir, Julia M., B.A. (Art.) 

Wheelton, Leonard. (Art.) 

Williams, Winnifred L., B.A. 



320 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. Permanent Elementary Certificates 



Abraham, Mary B. (Art.) 

Adamson, William H., M.A. ( Phys. Cult. ) 

Allen, Eula P. (Phys. Cult.) 

Anderson, Nellie L. (Art.) 

Appelbe, Louise B., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Austin, Prudence M., (Phys. Cult.) 

Awde, Elgin 0., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Baird, Jean F., M.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Baker, Sarah J. (Phys. Cult.) 

Brackenbury, George L., B.A. (Phys. 

Cult.) 
Brewster, Gladys I. (Art & Phys. Cult.) 
Broughton, Clara E. (Art.) 
Clement, Jessie M., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Conway, Irene E. (Art.) 
Coon, Amy. (Agri. & Hort.) 
Daley, Mary M. (Phys. Cult.) 
Davidson, Georgia, B.A. (Art.) 
Dobson, Viola J., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Douglas, Adam C. (Phys. Cult.) 
Downey, Emily (Sir. M. Kotska). (Vocal 

Music.) 
Duncan, Muriel, B.A, 
Dunlop, Charles G. 
Ellerby, Florence E. 
Farrington, Mabel C. 
Fletcher, Douglas R. 
Forsyth, Eunice A. 
Fothergill, Ethel L. 
Eraser, Bertha F., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Galloway, William H. (Agri. & Hort.) 
Garrett, Evelyn C. (Art.) 
Gillespie, Grace A., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Glasgow, Marion I. (Phys. Cult.) 
Haig, M. Helen. (Phys. Cult.) 
Hall, Grace F., B.A. (Art.) 
Hall, Margaret M. S., B.A. (Phys 
Helson, Margaret J., M.A. (Phys. 
Hiscock, Reta, B.A. (Art.) 
Howie, Mabel F. (Phys. Cult.) 
Jar dine, Amy M. (Art.) 
Johnston, Hally, B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Johnston, Helena E. (Art.) 
Kirk, Hugh. (Agri. & Hort.) 
Kirkwood, Elizabeth M. (Art.) 
Lamont, Alex. D., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Lutman, Margaret E. (Phys. Cult.) 
Maitland, Marion. (Phys. Cult.) 
Martin, Jean E., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Mazinke, Henrietta E. (Art.) 



(Phys. Cult.) 
(Phys. Cult.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
, B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
(Agri. & Hort.) 
(Phys. Cult.) 



Cult.) 
Cult.) 



Medcof, James L., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Might, Lincoln, M.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Millard, Lena. (Phys. Cult.) 

Mills, Jennie. (Art.) 

Mitchell, L. Grace. (Phys. Cult.) 

Mitchell, May. Art. 

Molr, Mary I., B.A. (Art.) 

Morgan, Flora E. (Phys. Cult.) 

Munro. Margaret K., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Murray, Edith M. (Phys. Cult.) 

MacLeod, Eimma B., B.A. (Art.) 

McDonald, Vivian C. (Phys. Cult.) 

Mclntyre, (Mrs.) Edith M., B.A. (Phys. 

Cult.) 
McLean, Mary B. (Agri. & Hort.) 
McNabb, Finlay, B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
McNamara, Elizabeth. (Phys. Cult.) 
McVean, Kathleen P., B.A. (Art. & Phys. 

Cult.) 
Neagle, Agnes. (M. M. Stella) (Art.) 
Norton, M. Maud. (Phys. Cult.) 
Nugent, Eleanor, B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Pacey, Mabel I. (Art.) 
Page, Jennie, B.A. (Art.) 
Pirie, Lizzie B. (Phys. Cult.) 
Porter, William A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Preston, Thomas, B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
O'Donohue, John. (Art.) 
Ranson, Eva M. (Art.) 
Rendall, Stanley D. (Phys. Cult.) 
Sadler, Annie J. (Agri. & Hort.) 
(Scott, Jessie M. (Phys. Cult.) 
Sillers, Roberta M., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Stark, Ethyle M., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Stark, Laverna B. (Art & Phys. Cult.) 
Stewart, Annie J., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Sweeney, Agnes C. (Art and Phys. Cult.) 
Thompson, Howard E. (Phys. Cult.) 
Trench, Wm. W. A., B.A. (Commercial.) 
Tucker, Mary C, M.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Turvey, Ina M. (Art & Phys. Cult.) 
Walker, Alexina A. C. (Phys. Cult.) 
Wallen, Wilfrid B. (Phys. Cult.) 
Wells, Vera M. (Phys. Cult.) 
White, Henry G. (Manual Training.) 
White, Margaret E. (Art.) 
Whyte, Marion I., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Wightman, Stanley, B.A. (Phys. Cult) • 
Wilker, Milton J. (Phys. Cult.) 
Wilson, Phyllis (iSr. M. Christina). (Vo- 
cal Music). 



Binnie, Laura R. 
Cringan, Alex. T. 
Carswell, Jean A. 
Robbie, Isabella E. 



IV. Permanent Supervisors 



(Phys. Cult.) 
(Vocal Music.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
(Agri. & Hort.) 



Foley, Teresa. (iSr. Lucretia), (Art.) 



Kennedy, Maria (Sr. M. Borgia) (Art.) 
Livingstone, May E. (Phys. Cult.) 
Rannie, Marion R. (Vocal Music.) 
Thompson, John T. (Phys. Cult.) 



Arnot, Colin M. 
Anderson, Erne E. 
Aylsworth, Bessie C. 
Anderson, Eunice M. 



V. Permanent First Class Certificates 



Armstrong, Mabel R. 
Bowes, Emer W. J. 
Boothby, Erma I. 
Butler, Edna M. 



Brownlee, Vera A. 
Barnett, Gladys G. 
Brown, William J. 
Ballance, Florence R. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



121 



V. Permanent First Class Certificates.— Con. 



Baker, Agnes H. C. 
Bates, Alta E. 
Cass, Annie H. 
Clark, Lola M. 
Campbell, Muriel F. 
Carlyle, Margaret M., B.A. 
Card, Marion J. 
Coulter, Mary I. 
Cline, Gertrude R. 
Campbell, Laura. 
Clark, Alice B. 
Campbell, Mrs. Vera. 
DeLaporte, Lucy H., B.A. 
Davison, Margaret A. 
Dawson, Sara E. 
Deem, Edna M. 
Dowd, Winnie M. 
Dolbear, Callie C. 
Dow, Laura J. 
Elliott, Violet M. 
Forsyth, Ernest, B.A. 
Foster, Helen E. 
Forsythe, Pansy A. 
Fennell, Rena L. 
Foreman Kathleen B., B.A 
Field, Helen, B.A. 
Fyckes, Jessie D., B.A. 
Gleeson, Nora. 
Gill, Grace G. 
Glen, Isabella P. 
Gray, Laura B. 
Gibson, Mary H. 
Galbraith, Fannie H. . 
Geddes, Mary M. 
Gould, Ford M. 
Graham, George H., M.A. 
Gilliland, Mary R. 
Greaves, Helen. 
Heather, Grace M. 
Hale, Dorothy L. 
Hopkins, Marguerite V. 
Hammond, William G. 
Hogarth, Hazel M. 
Hall, Robinson A. 
Hardy, Jessie R. 
Hunt, Abigail. 
Henry, Refa I. 



Hartley, Emily M. 
Hodgson, Mattie E. 
Hoag, Percy W. 
Irwin, Mary 0. 
Johnston, Florence M. 
Johns, Thomas E. 
Judd, William J. 
Johns, Nancy L. 
Kenyon, Grace. 
Kirkwood, Eva V. 
King, Annie A. 
Kelly, Mabel L. 
Kennedy, Mildred H. 
Krug, Elizabeth A. 
Logan, Meryol E. 
Lee, Elizabeth D. 
Love, Dorothy. 
Lister, Clara I. 
Lauber, Stella B. 
Lalande, Mary B. 
Love, Kathleen. 
LeBoeuf, Emilie A. 
McCaw, Kathleen P. 
McCartney, Mary E. 
McNabb, Allan P. 
McAlpine, Agnes. 
McLeod, Annie. f 
McLaughlin, Vivian. 
MacGregor, John S. 
MacKinnon, Helen C. 
MacPherson, Rose. 
Macdonald, Jean M., B.A. 
Mungovan, Marguerite K. 
Middough, Bessie I. 
Murphy, Ruth M. 
Murphy, Marguerite. 
Muirhead, Jessie L., B.A. 
Matchell, Ethel M. 
Maus, Janet W., B.A. 
Matthews, Ruby A. 
Mather, Ana I. 
Murchison, Mary B. 
Milliken, Coral. 
Petrie, Margaret. 
Pow, Arthur W. 
Pass. Clara A. 



Payne, Kathleen M. 
Peddie, Mary H. 
Ross, Susan J. 
Rutherford, Myrtle. 
Robinson, Bertha E. 
Steen, Elda G. 
Shortt, Mrs. Rae M. 
iShortt, Mrs. Evalena. 
Simpkins, Helen M. 
Spooner, Nellie E., B.A. 
Sanderson, Elizabeth M. 
Sangster, Grace. 
Stover, Jane E. 
Scott, Helen W., B.A. 
Stouffer, Archibald. 
iSwitzer, Kathleen R. 
Sarjeant, Helen M. 
Stong, Annie A. 
Short, John H. 
Simon, Cleda F. 
Sweezey, Edna M. 
Smyth, Alice C. 
Turner, Hattie C. 
Tranter. Hazel M. 
Terry, Ruby E. 
Thompson, Hope. 
Vickery, Beatrice I. 
Vardon, Muriel D. 
Walls, Lillian. 
Wilson, Elizabeth A. 
Watson, Louisa S. 
Warrell, Edith A. 
Wilson, Jean R. 
Walker, Annie. 
Watson, Muriel H. 
Wright, Edna. 
Wilson, Nora E. 
Walker, Gladys I. 
Warren, Cecile V. 
Wynn, Alma V. 
Whale, Violet P. 
Whiteman, Margaret. 
Wordsworth, Margaret D. 
Wilson, Laura I 
Young, Laura G. 
Yates, Blanche V. 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates 



Abra, Mabel M. 
Abbott, Gladys M. 
Armstrong, Dorothy M. 
Allen, Edna L. M. 
Aldcorn, Agnes J. 
Alexander, Mary. 
Atkinson, Sara E. 
Andrews, Winnie I. 
Adams, Jessie E. 
Abel, Olive M. 
Allen, Marion E. 
Armour, Elm a. 
Arnold, Edith M. 
Armstrong, Aggie J. 
Almas, Mabel J. 
Armour, Marguerite. 



Anderson, Lena R. 
Ainslie, Helen I. 
Aitken, Margaret I. 
Burgess, Margaret A. 
Beneteau, Constance. 
Beattie, Clara F. 
Borst, Mrs. Beatrice H. 
Bacon, Vera L. 
Bonham, Ella M. 
Bigelow, Bessie R. 
Bishop, Lillian M. 
Best, Norma E. 
Bongard, Mrs. Cora L. 
Baxter, Isabelle A. 
Baxter, Anne S. 
Bonnycastle, Helen M. 



Benn, Luella L. 
Baird, Myra H. 
Burns, Sadie E. 
Brooke, Lyla. 
Burt, Grace. 
Best, Hilda P. C. 
Barber, Pearle. 
Barr, Daisy A. 
Brown, Inez E. 
Brown, Margaret E. 
Broadwood, Florence E. 
Buchanan, Lulu M. 
Brydges, Annabell. 
Ballantyne, Anna L. 
Blakely, Mabel B. 
Brown, Ethel G. 



21 E. 



322 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates.— Con. 



Brealey, Rheta A. 

Bryan, Christena I. 

Bedford, Hilda M. 

Bell, Ruth. 

Baird, Frances V. . 

Burchill, Electa. 

Bowland, Beatrice B. 

Bowman, Lila. 

Bowes, Isabel. 

Broadfoot, Annie. 

Bain, Helen. 

Blanchard, Evelyn H. 

Broadwood, Marjorie G. 

Burchell, Verna. 

Bryden, Winona I. 

Bateman, Ruth I. 

Butler, Veronica L. 

Blanchfield, Agnes A. 

Brown, Nellie M. 

Brown, Bella. 

Bradd, Margaret H. J. 
Birkett, Elsie M. 
Burke, Margaret A. (Sr. 
Clotilde.) 

Boyle, Rachael E. 
Brunder, Ella M. (Sr. M. 

Teresa.) 
Black, Ketha. 
Bruckner, Jean F. 
Blair, Mary B. 
Brimson, Elva E. 
Bricker, Hilda M. 
Breedon, Ethyle M. 
Barnes, M. Ruperta. 
Bradley, Emma F. 
Bradley, Idella M. 
Barnes, Vera. 
Bierworth, Hilda E. 
Barr, Dora I. M. 
Barber, Winnifred E. 
Burgess, Verna W. 
Bornhold, Ruth E. 
Barth, Frederick J. 
Boyd, Maud L. 
Bright, Amy E, 
Booth, K. Winnie. 
Brenchley, Mayme R. 
Buchanan, Myrtle M. 
Beaumont, Nellie. 
Brackett, Lola M. 
Barney, Elizabeth M. (Sr. 

Gonzaga. ) 
Byrne, Frances S, 
Brown, Mary V. 
Brohmann, Alfred. 
Bateson, Ilda A. 
Boehler, Kathleen. 
Black, Hazel E. 
Bates Mary E. 
Burritt, Nellie M. 
Baker, Lillian H. 
Breen, Hazel M. ' 
Benner, Mary J. W. 
Bruce, Ruby D. 
Batters, Susan. 
Barron, Belle B. 



Black, Lillian P. 

Bickell, Julia C. 

Baxter, Gladys C. 

Cheney, Mary J. 

Campbell, Florence A. 

Carlton, Mrs. Elsie M. 

Campbell, Annie. 

Currie, Ida G. 

Cassidy, Kathleen C. 

Cantelon, Harold R. 

Carey, Agnes B. 

Curtin, Gladys H. 

Conway, Annie M. 

Courtney, Elsie G. 

Craig, Mary L. 

Cuthbertson, Edith B. 

Crump, Myrtle I. 

Caldwell, Lawrie* M. 

Cavanagh, Laura M. 

Cuthbertson, Kathleen G. 

Crawford, Isabel. 

Cruse, Cora M. 
M.Cox, Amelia M. 

Calderwood, M. Helen. 

Camm, Mary I. 

Clemens, Mabel I. 

Collins, Ida M. 

Cannon, Hattie. 

Collins, Mary H. (Sr. M. 
Paschal.) 

Clark, Vera L. 

Cook, Elsie M. 

Clark, Mary (Sr. M. St. 
Vincent.) 

Campbell, Verna. 

Coleman, Verna. 

Christie, Dora. 

Core, Catherine M. 

Carbert, Alice. 

Corbett, Mary L. 

Cale, Ruth S. 

Campbell, Fred. A. 

Connelly, Rita. 
Carruthers, Princess E. M. 
Carriveau, Annie F. 
Cowain, Mary A. 
Conley, Tena B. 
Clark, Edith. 
Cutler, Dorothy. 
Culbert, Ina M. 
M.Curry, Gladys A. 
Campbell, Carrie M. 
Campbell, Ida M. 
Cameron, Ilah P. 
Cross, Eva B. 
Crawford, Maud. 
Cole, Mildred F. 
Cowan, Luella E. 
Clark, Mary B. 
Chaseley, Mabel. 
Clare, Florence M. 
Clark, May. 
Cameron, Hettie T. 
Cameron, Edna C. 
Crowe, Mary F. 
Carr, Sara. 



Cleland, Ina. 

Cunning, Edith EL 

Draper, Annie G. 

Dunlop, Annie M. 

Downs, Julia R. 

Dalby, Enid E. 

Dillon, Marie A. 

Danard, Edna M. 

Dolmage, Elizabeth K. 

Drennan, Pearl I. 

Dunn, Margaret I. 

Down, Myrtle A. 

Dunn, Leonora. 

Daley, Jessie K. 

Demman, iSadie E. 

Dobberman, Elsie A. 

Dicks, Emily H. 

Drapeau, Aurore (Sr. St. 
Audre Corsini.) 

Dickson, Dorothy F. 

Dertinger, Alice (Sr. M. 
Anastasia.) 

Duffin, Georgina R. 

Dorrance, Mabel. 

Davidson, Lillian H. 

Dodge, Dena M. 

Dietrich, Rufina (Sr. M 
Josepha. ) 

Dickson, Mary E. 

Doherty, Nellie. 

Duck, Annie G. 

Dunlop, Florence S. 

Dodsworth, Georgiana. 

Deacoff, Gertrude. 

Drost, Stella C. (Sr. Cyp- 
rian.) 

Dennis, Eva. 

Dillon, Loretto. M. 

Duffy, Mabel. 

Duffleld, Alma A. 

Doyle, Genevieve. 

Deck, Beatrice. 

Dewan, Mary E. 

Donnelly, Verna A. 
Delahunt, Edna M. 

Dever, Ida G. 
Dool, Reta P. 
Dutot, Ruth L. 
Doan, Hugo. F. 
Drohan, Mary F. 
Douglas, Gladys M. 
Dunning, Margaret E. 
Darling, M. Claire. 
Davidge, Minnie. 
Davis, Alma H. 
Eastcott, Constance E. H. 
Emery, Dorothy L. 
Ellis, Ruth. 
Elliott, May L. 
Elliott, Margaret E. 
Evans, Olive I. 
Elliott, Viola M. 
Elliott, Anna M. 
Eydt, Adeline A. 
English, Mary. 
Edgecombe, Ethelwyn. 



1918- 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



323 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates.— Con. 



Elsley, Helen H. 
Edwards, George F. 
Easson, Catherine K. 
Eckardt, Winnifred. 
Egan, Katherine A. 
Earle, Evelyn M. P. 
Elliott, Sophie C. 
Ferguson, Isabel G. 
Flurey, Katherine A. 
Frost, Marjorie G. 
Firth, Maggie I. 
Ferguson, Janet W. 
Farlinger, Ada. 
Falkins, Mae. 
Ferguson, Hazel M. 
Farrill, Mildred A. 
Ferguson, Norma G. 
Feely, Clara B. 
Fitzgerald, Jennie V. 
Fisher, Marie T. 
Feeney, Marion S. 
Fennell, Mildred H. 
Fleming, Mellicent A. 
Frazer, Mary. 
Freeman, Gertrude C. 
Farrant, May M. 
Fallis, Frances. M. M. 
Fairchild, Olivia. 
Falls. Iva. A. 
Fisher, Myrtle A. 
Farrell, Nellie. 
Fenn, Ruth I. 
Francis, Lilian F. 
Field, Rheta F. 
Fawcett, Marjorie I. 
Galbraith, Mary C. 
Greenwood, Edith. 
Gollins, Erne M. 
Green, Lila V. 
Green, Lois M. 
Geddes, Annie E. 
Gubbins, Roberta I. 
Gardiner, Annie. 
Grieve, Helen M. 
Gregory, Sara E. 
Green, Kathleen L. 
Green, Janet L. 
Gray, Gladys M. 
Gibson, Hazel M. 
Goodwill, Muriel E. 
Garragh, M. Evelyn. 
Galbraith, Annie. 
Gilmour, Charlotte E.. 
Groves, Estella C. 
Glavin, Mary A. (Sr. 

Omer.) 
Gardiner, Sarah M. 
Gourlay, Jane. 
% Gerow, Sarah E. 
Guenther, Letta R. 
Ghent, Jessie M. 
Gillogly, Mary J. 
Gibbons, Kathleen A. 
Gill. Alice D. 
Goulding, Hazel E. 



Grier, Margaret J. (St. M. 

Winnifred. 
Greer, Jessie A. 
Gullett, Marjory L. 
Gordon, Tula I. 
Giles, Elizabeth A. 
Glassford, Vivian I. 
Giffen, Bertha fi. 
Griffith, Sara A. 
Gleeson, Julia B. 
Gaynor, Ethel L. 
Granton, Alda M. 
Hudson, Mary W. 
Holmes, Esther L. 
Hart. Lillian M. 
Hildebrandt, Alexander A. 
Houlahan, Clara, M. A. 
Hance, Ruth A. 
Hollingsworth, Marion M. 
Howse, Arthur T. 
Hayes, Fannie M. 
Hannon, Mary M. 
Home, Jessie. 
Holtorf, Agnes. 
Hamilton, Martha. 
Howard, Ruth A. 
Hall, Robert W. E. 
Hawley, Kathleen L. 
Hart, Winona J. 
Honey, Mary B. 
Herron, Rosa E. 
Hubble, Agnes M. 
Hayter, Ruth A. 
Hoeflin, Ada M. 
Hinman, Harriett A. 
Han Ion, Mary. 
Hofstetter, Irene. 
Hetherington, Nellie. 
Humphrey, Mildred. 
Harris, Lottie M. 
Hobbs, Vera H. 
Hodgins, Myra E. 
Hutchison, Mary. 
Harper, Leila R. 
Hartleib, M. Carrie (St. M. 

Johanna). 
Hawkins, Mae ( Sr. M. Theo- 

phane). 
Hobbs, Anna E. 
Hubbs, Helen M. 
Hagedorn, Elsie C. 
Hamilton, Blanche I. 
Hardy, Lilian V. 
Hornick, Lauretta. 
Horricks, Laura A. 
St. Harkin, Gertrude M. 
Hamilton, Alice L. 
Hayden, Eva B. 
Hailstone, Ella M. 
Hildred, Effie J. 
Hull, Bessie M. 
Heslop, Florence B. 
Hardie, Bessie M. 
Hennessy, Nina A. (Sr. St. 

Alban). 
Hall, Melba E. 



Higgins, Frances M. 
Hurley, Edna. 
Hutson, Mary E. 
Howarth, M. Winifred. 
Holmes, Harold S. 
Hammar, Elizabeth M. 
Holtzman, Beulah. 
Hudelmaier, Florence B. 
Henry, Elizabeth. 
Harron, Florence M. 
Hunter, Etta L. 
Haist, Martha A. 
Halladay, Beatrice M. 
Heaslip, Cora. 
Heywood, Evelyn. 
Hogarth, Evelyn M. 
Harswell, Hazel A. E. 
Innes, Nora M. 
Ingall, Vera A. 
Irwin, Coral A. 
Irwin, Edwina H. 
Isaac, Oni. 
Jackson, Sara E. M. 
Johnson, Kathleen A. 
Johnston, Edythe E. 
Johnston, Amy. 
Johnston, Elizabeth M. 
Jackson, Nelda B. 
Jackson, Ada M. 
James, Mary J. 
Jermyn, Laura O. 
Jenkins, Adelaide E. 
Johnston, Jean R. 
Jackson, Teresa K. 
Jameson, Gladys C. 
Johnston, Charlotte L. 
Jones, Gladys W. 
Justin, Margaret P. 
Jay, Eva F. 
Jacques, Dorothy E. 
Jordan, Teresa. 
Jackson, Alzena J. 
Johnson, Eliza. 
Johnston, Mary E. 
Johnston, Esther M. 
Johnson, Gertrude iS. 
Jones, Blanche. 
Jordan, Molly E. 
Kennedy, Lila E. 
Kratz, Edith. 
Kerr, Mabel R. 
Kirke, Kathleen M. 
Kellaway, Bessie. 
Kennedy, Maude A. 
Kerr, Ruby O. 
Kehoe, Kate. 
Kelly, Edna B. 
Kleinfeldt, Susan E. 
Kerr, Margaret B. 
Kirkwood, Gladys G. 
Kerr, Alma M. 
Karr, Ivy I. 
Kempton, Tabitha M. 
Kendrick, Helen M. 
Keelan, Irene C. (Sr. M. 
Giles). 



32i 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates. — Con. 



Knechtel, Walter M. 

Kennedy, Inez M. 

Kennedy, Nellie. 

Kaiser, Ora C. 

Kennedy, Lilian L. (Sr. M. 

Celestine). 
Kearney, Creta M. 
Kerruish, Edna M. 
Kalbfleisch, Freda M. 
Keaney, Annie B. 
Kennedy, Muriel E. 
Kirby, Caroline M. 
Lehrbass, Frieda M. 
Lyons, Beatrice C. 
Laidlaw, Anna. H. 
Lounsbury, Muriel B. 
Lennox, Addie J. 
Long, Jennie M. 
Lennox, Grace M. 
Locke, Muriel K. 
Long, Helen. 
Loney, Marjorie M. 
Lawrence, Edith M. 
Levitt, Pearl. 
Lawrence, Lena B. 
Linn, Mabel M. 
Lake, Ivy. 
Leckie, Edith H. 
Leach, Beatrice M. 
Latimer, Emma E. 
Lochart, Vera. 
Locklin, Mae. 
Louch, Annie E. 
Love, Pearl. 
Leonard, Marguerite M. 
JLaundy, Gladys E. 
ILeitch, Jessie F. 
Xynchke, Frances M. 
Lawson, Mary C. 
Lince, Esther M. 
Lang, John H. 
Long, Hattie G. 
Longstreet, Bonnie. 
Loveland, Mary E. (Sr. M. 

iLaurentia). 
Lynett, Joseph. 
Lynch, Verna. 
Laverty, Charlotte M. 
Moore, Carrie A. 
Matthews, Norma. 
Masales, Mary C. 
Moir, Agnes W. 
Morley, Ruth. 
Mitchell, Edith E. 
Merritt, Ellen D. 
Moyer, Hazel I. 
Mitchener, Flossie T. 
Miller, Revali E. 
Martin, Una G. 
Morrison, Christina E. 
Macklin, Ethel G. 
Martin, Grace E. 
Morris Maude M. (Sr. M. 

Edwardine). 
Marsh, Beulah M. 
Midgely, Jennie R. 
Mullen. Nellie G. 



Manning, Leatha M. 
Mounce, Lizzie M. 
Murray, Helen M. 
Milne, Margaret J. 
Meagher, Alma C. 
Miller, Annie S. 
Murray, Madeleine. 
Martin, Helena (Sr. M. 

Caia). 
Morrison, Lila I. 
Merrick, Mary P. 
Moffatt, Clara E. 
Marcellus, Kathryn M. 
Morris, Lillian A. M. 
Marsh, Tena. 
Middleditch, Margaret I. 
Millikin, Louise. 
Muir, Mary A. 
Master, Grace. 
Mountain, K. Shirley. 
Martin, Edith P. 
Munro, Amy. 
Marshall, Annie N. 
Moffat, Alexia E. 
Martin, Ida J. 
Maxwell, Jean E. 
Miehlhausen, Sylvia C. 
Miller, Edna L. P. 
Mosley, Annie. 
Mosley, Elsie. 
Meredith, Laura M. 
Munro, Malcolmina. 
Mayhew, Vivian P. 
Martin, Georgina M. 
Miller, Delia. 
Munro, Edna E. 
Munt, Winnifred S. 
Matheson, Margaret A. 
Moorehead, Clara M. 
Moore, Dorothy B. 
MacDevitt, Mrs. Wilhelm 

M. 
MacDonald, Margaret J. 
MacKinnon, Florence. 
MacDonald, Margaret D. 
MacLaurin, Margaret. 
Macdonald, Annie. 
MacGregor, Rubena R. 
Mackenzie, Anna. 
MacTavish, Elizabeth. 
MacArthur, Annie H. 
Macdonald, Roberta. 
MacKenzie, Grace R. 
MacDonald, Sadie F. 
MacDermid, Pearle. 
MacNeil, Marion L. 
Maclntyre, Margaret H. 
McMullen, Gladys L. 
McLean, Grace. 
McMillan, Madge. 
xMcCord, Evelyn M. 
McLean, William P. 
McGuirl, Allan C. 
McKinnon, Elizabeth A. 
McAuley. Margaret F. 
McCordic, Via B. 
McAfee, Irene. 



McCarten, Kathleen M. 
McDonald, Eva M. 
McLeish, Marjorie. 
McFarlane, Erne M. 
McPherson, Margaret M. 
McClure, Jean K. 
McArton, Elsie. 
McKnight, Lulu B. 
McLeod, Elizabeth. 
McCulloch, Edna K. 
McMahon, Hazel I. 
McKnight, Lena M. 
McLaughlin, Mirian A. 
Mclntyre, Hannah F. 
McKenzie, Ruth M. 
McEvoy, May A. (Sr. St. 

Cleta). 
McMullen, Samuel. 
McLachlan, Archie T. 
McLean, Tena E. 
McKee, Alice L. 
McNeill, Vivian M. F. 
McCordic, Hannah G. 
McMahon, Edna N. 
McNamara, Wilfrid 0. 
McGuire, Florence E. 
McAdam, Martha E. 
McArthur, Lillian H. 
McKenzie, Jean I. 
McLachlin, Margaret E. 
McCrimmon, Sara M. 
McGill, Margaret H. 
McLeod, Carrie. 
McKibbon, Edna R. 
McLean, Maria A. 
McMaster, Agnes A. V. 
McCulloch, Elsie M. 
McConnell, Cenoe. 
Mclnnis, Grace W. 
McKinlay, Nettie. 
inaMcQuaker, Agnes. 
McQueen, Violet. 
McMechan, Clara E. 
McCurdy, Vera C. 
McEwen, Selena P. 
McFadden, Emily M. 
McGeary, Wynnifred. 
McLean, Mary. 
McLean, Beatrice E. 
McKernan, Mary E. 
McCannel, Ora M. 
McNally, Alice M. 
Newhouse, Marietta E. 
Newman, Olga H. 
Nicholls, Nellie M. 
Nurse, Olive I. 
Newton, Elizabeth U. 
Newman, Lillian B. 
Nicholls. Florrie M. 
Noonan, Patricia. 
Newell, Florence M. 
Nichol, Annie M. 
Needham, Anna. 
O'Malley, Mary A. 
O' Grady, Martha. 
O'Neill, Margaret. 
Orr, Margaret O. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



325 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates. — Con. 



Oliver, Eliza A. 
Orr, Bessie M. 
O'Brien, Janie A. 
Oliver, Jessie E. 
Oestreicher, Lydia E. 
Ottewell, Frances G. 
Olds, Bertha T. 
O'Brien, Olive M. 
O'Connell, Mary E. 
O'Reilly, Maude M. 
O'BrJen, Alice J. 
Owens, Catharine. 
Paterson, Madeline R. 
Prosser, Joy. 

Proudfoot, Mrs. Catherine. 
Pye, Alice C. 
Pye, Eva K. 
Powell, Joan L. 
Perkin, Ivy L. 
Philp, Vivien W. 
Poast, Alma G. W. 
Pils worth, Adeline E. 
Pritchard, Mina. 
Phelan, Margaret M. 
Philip, Grace C. 
Payne, Prances E. 
Pullen, Lela. 
Payette, Blanche R. 
Plunkett, Grace A. 
Park, Sara E. M. 
Parker, Thelma. 
Pope, Audrey L. 
Price, Mrs. Pearl. 
Powers, Raymond L. 
Peden, Flora M. 
Phillips, Helen G. 
Purvis, Janet G. 
Palmer, Hazel B. 
Pettit, Zita M. 
Percival, Jessie E. 
Queenan, Katie. 
Rutherford, Jean C. 
Riddell, Margaret E. 
Robinson, Elsie I. 
Ren wick, Florence M. 
Ruby, Kathleen M. 
Ramsay, Queenie. 
Robertson, Hilda K. 
Russell, Bella L. 
Reynolds, Hannah L. 
Ruttan, Mary. 
Ralph, Lilian A. 
Robinson, Lelia M. 
Richardson, Cecelia D. 
Rowsom, M. Arilla. 
Riley, Kathleen. 
Roe, Florence A. 
Rutherford, Gertrude L. 
Ritchie, Delia J. 
Reynolds, Lillie. 
Roberts, Nellie J. 
Reynolds, Edith M. 
Reynolds, Albert. 
Reid, Katherine B. 
Ross, Clarence M. 
Ritchie, Mary E. 



Robinson, Eva. 
Reid, Grace M. 
Robertson, Edna R. 
Richardson, Pauline M. 
Ralph, Florence K. 
Rutherford, Kate M. 
Robinson, Christine A. 
Ramage, Elizabeth R. 
Rutherford, Marion E. 
Redmond, Mae L. 
Rembe, Helena H. 
Rowntree, Tressea A. 
Ross, Eula I. 
Ross, Isa E. 
Riddle, Gertrude I. 
Rey craft, Elena. 
Reed, Jean. 

Riordan, Edward M. - 
Richards, Helen L. 
Ross, Mona A. 
Ross, Christina. 
Railton, Myrtle. 
Robb, Gladys E. 
Rothmann, Flora M. 
Robertson, Jean P. 
Reycraft, Ada G. 
Robbins, Harry M. 
Russell, Ruth H. 
Rutherford, Charles H. 
Ross, Mrs. Annette. 
Steer, Oliver M. 
Stewart, Marion. 
Sloan, Edna V. 
Smith, Edith F. 
Shearer, Helen. 
Sage, Dorothy H. 
Stevens, Lillian E. 
Smibert, Kathleen. 
Smith, Lucy A. 
Shaver, Jessie A. 
Smith, Muriel J. 
Smail, Bertha M. 
Singleton, Edna E. 
Stinson, Verna L. 
Scott, Edna. 
Smith, Amy. 
Scott, Eleanor W. 
Stout, Edith M. 
Smith, Nora C. 
Stobo, Mary G. 
Smyth, Susie I. 
Sheppard, Vera. 
Smith, Mabel A. 
Sherk, Mrs. Olive. 
Smith, Myrtle A. 
Swain, Audrey. 
Seaman, John R. 
Scott, M. G. Jeanne. 
Sutherland, Agnes G. 
Shaw, Essie A. 
Selmann, Sadie L. 
Sullivan, Vera. 
Schwartz, Matilda E. 
Steer, Louella V. 
Smith, Alice M. 
Scott, Margaret F. 



Short, Annie E. 

Smith, Alice M. 

Stetler, Clara M. 

Somerville, Hannah E. I. 

Scott, Lorene J. 

Slater, Blanche I. 

Snyder, Mary E. 

Synnott, Norman. 

Schaefer, Anna D. 

Sheppard, Mary N. 

Sinclair, Agnes H. 

Swerdfager, Ina M. 

Shaver, Gladys. 

Sanderson, Ruby J. 

Staley, Helena (Sr. Mary 
Louise). 

Stock, Leonore (Sr. M. Hen- 
rietta). 

Staply, Sarah A. 

Seymour, Marguerite. 

Schenck, Mary F. A. (Sr. M. 
St. Lewis). 

Scharf, Minnie B. 

Scott, Edith M. 

Stanfield, Laura L. 

Somerville, Myrtle J. 

Scott, Helen M. 

Sweet, Helen E. 

Sanders, Edith M. 

Schnekenburger, Mattie. 

Steele, Ada. 

Scott, Muriel G. 

Sturgeon, E. Lemoine. 

Sterling, Mary. 

Sparling, Lyla M. 

Stockwell, Mrs. Annie E. 

Smith, Lillie E. 

Sutherland, Catharine B. 

Thomson, Margaret W. 

Titus, Hazel A. 

Turner, Edna M. 

Triebner, Florence L. 

Teasdale, Joseph R. 

Truax, Constance C. 

Thomas, Grace. 

Tolhurst, Leonora. 

Tripp, Hazel F. I. 

Trotter, Evelyn M. 

Taylor, Edna E. 

Thompson, Winnifred E. 

Tuttle, Mrs. Lila G. 

Tichborne, Olive M. W. 

Tobin, Mary L. 

Tucker, Margaret C. 

Thurston, Dell. 

Thorn, Isabel M. 

Traves, Beatrice. 

Tinney, Rosa E. 

Taylor, Sara M. 

Tweedy, Bertha. 

Towriss, Lottie E. 

Taylor, Ethel A. 

Thompson, Blanche G. 

Tighe, Mary F. 0. (Sr. M. 
St. Basil). 

Theobald, Florence B. 



326 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



VI. Permanent Second Class Certificates.— Con. 



Thomson, M. E. Fern. 
Taylor, Eva M. 
Tate, Ellen. 
Thompson, Dorothy. 
Thomas, E. May. 
Topping, Eva J. 
Tobin, Violet. 
Thompson, Leah M. 
Ventress, Helen E. 
Vantsone, Gertrude. 
Venning, Nellie M. 
Vickers, William. 
Vance, Jean V. 
Vining, Harriete J. 
Walker, James G. 
Watt, Mrs. Wilhelmina. 
Wilkinson, Florence E. 
Watson, Cedric E. 
Wismer, Lulu M. 
Willard, Hattie J. 
Williams, Edith G. 
Westlake, Alice E. 



Weegar, Ena D. 
Willcox, Gertrude. 
Wilson, Richard E. 
Waddell, Edith. 
Wing, Muriel L. 
Wilson, Eleanor E. 
Wanklin, Geneva. 
Wade, Mary. 
Willard, Ethel M. 
Walker, Janet I. 
Wood, Ruby H. 
Walden, Nora. 
Weinert, Charlotte M. 
Woodworth, Leila M. 
Wilson, Gertrude L. 
Williamson, Jessie L. 
Woods, Nina R. 
Ward, Frieda C. 
Wallace, Felicia D. 
Waring, Clara I. 
Whiting, Florence M. 
Willan, Eva M. 



Wilton, iSusie E. 
Wynn, Florence A. 
Welsh, Helen. 
Ward, Florence H. 
Wright, Edith G. 
Walsh, Katie M. 
Willis, Ada V. 
Wakeford, Vera V. 
Watson, James R. 
Wolfe, Mary E. 
W T armington, Edna J. 
Werry, Alice G. 
Waugh, Ella E. 
Wood, Libbie. 
Woods, Anna. 
Webb, Rachel E. 
Yelland, Vivian G. 
Young, Rhoda M. 
Young, Mary M. 
Zurbrigg, Mildred T. 
Zimmer, Charlotte (St. 
Oswald). 



M. 



Leggott, Ethel M. 



VII. Kindergarten Directors' Certificates 

Steele, May K. 



VIII. Permanent Kindergarten= Primary Certificates 



Claris, Edna P. 
Coyne, Elrma L. 
Cunningham, Beatrice. 
Davidson, Susan G. 
Ferguson, Mrs. Estelle. 
Gearing, Marguerite. 
Hall, Ethel M. 
Heaman, Annie V. 
Jackson, Flora L. 



Johnson, Lulu A. 
Mair, Winni'fred M. 
Macpherson, Edith. 
McCrae, Edith. 
Ormiston, Jessie M. 
Peacock, Mary A. 
Robertson, Florence M. 
Rankin, Mary C. 
Robb, Alma F. 



Rough, Susie P. 
Simpson, Lena R. 
Sparling, Chryssa A. 
.Sproule, Thomasene. 
Thomson, Margaret. 
Tyler, Hilda. 
Watson, Winifred. 
Woods, Marjorie H. 



Smyth, William E. 



IX. Manual Training Certificate 

Permanent Ordinary 



Campbell, Clara L. 



X. Household Science Certificates 

Permanent Ordinary 
Munt, Grace F. McNally, Frances. 



1918 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



327 





XI. 


Professional 


Certificates, 1918 










— 


CO 

d 

i 

o 

d 


la 

f-< 

3 co 


High School 
Permanent 
Certificates 


CO 

o 


Permanent Pro- 
vincial First Class 
Certificates 


CO 
CD 

co« 

.9 CO 

?-t CO 

^3 


-3 0>\ 

g CO 

<23 


CO 
<U 

S 2 

o«P 
o • rt 

.JH CO 

M CO 


LimitedThlrd Class 
Certificates, valid 
for five years 


District Certifi- 
cates, valid for 
one or two years 


Extended District 

Certificates 
(Academic Course) 


u 

03 

-Q (fl 

BS 

O 1) 


Faculties of Education. . . . 


280 
1473 

86 

102 
276 


34 

135 

4 





84 




186 




14 
1351 








?84 


207 
86 

49 
63 

21 






1558 


Autumn Model Schools . . . 












2 





88 


English-French Model 














49 


Summer Model Schools . . 
















116 


73 


255! 


Certificates issued on pro 
tanto standing 














8 


29 


Interim High School Certi- 
ficates, issued on reaching 


*93 


















93 


Interim Certificates made 
permanent 




203 


84 


151 


186 


881 










1235 


Total number of newly 
certificated teachers . . . . 




j 


1373 


426 


118 




2187 













*These previously held Interim I Class Certificates. 

Household Science 

Number of Interim Ordinary Certificates 22 

Number of Interim Specialist Certificates 9 

Number of Permanent Ordinary Certificates 3 

Manual Training 

Number of Interim Ordinary Certificates 4 

Number of Interim Specialist Certificates 2 

Number of Permanent Ordinary Certificates 1 

Kindergarten Certificates 

Number of Interim Kindergarten-Primary Certificates * * * • 17 

Number of Permanent Kindergarten-Primary Certificates 27 



Physical Culture Certificates 

Number of Interim Elementary Physical Culture Certificates (Faculty of Education) 

Summer School Certificates 



77 



Elementary Agriculture and Horticulture 

(Interim) 123 

Intermediate Agriculture and Horticulture 

(Interim) 9 

Elementary Art (Interim) 54 

Supervisors in Art (Interim) 57 

Specialists in Art (Interim) 39 

Specialists in CommercialSubjects (Interim) 4 

NOTE — In addition to the above, twenty 
Culture were granted on pro tanto standing. 

Number of Interim Elementary and Super 



Farm Mechanics (Interim) 9 

Kindergarten-Primary (Interim) 11 

Elementary Manual Training (Interim) . . 6 

Elementary Vocal Music (Interim) 18 

Supervisors in Vocal Music (Interim) 9 

Elementary Physical Culture (Interim) . . 75 

Supervisors in Physical Culture (Interim). 48 

Specialists in Physical Culture (Interim) . . 85 
Interim Certificates in Elementary Physical 



visors' Certificates made permanent 



10 



328 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



XII. Temporary Certificates issued in 1918 



Inspectorate 



Number 

during 

1st half 

year 



Number 

during 

2nd half 

year 



E.. 



Bruce, E 

Bruce, W 

Carleton, E 

Carleton, W & Lanark 

Dufferin 

Elgin, E 

Essex, N. (in part only). . . . 

Essex, S 

Frontenac, N., & Adding ton. 

Frontenac, S 

Glengarry 

Grey.E 

Grey, S 

Grey. W 

Hastings, Centre 

Hastings, N 

Hastings, S 

Kent, W 

Lambton, W. (No 1) 

Lambton, E. (No. 2) 

Lanark, W 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 1. . 
Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 . 
Leeds and Grenville, No. 3 . . 

Lennox 

Lincoln and Pelham Tp. . . . 

Norfolk 

Northumberland & Durham 

West, No. 1 

Centre, No. 2 

East, No. 3 

Ontario, N 

Ontario, S 

Oxford, N 

Oxford, S 

Peel 

Peterborough, E 

Peterborotigh, W. & 

Victoria, E 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 



7 
3 
4 
4 
4 
1 
2 
3 
20 
5 
5 



5 
3 
1 
5 
5 
3 
2 
1 

13 
3 
2 

7 

12 
1 
4 

3 
2 
6 
2 
4 
1 
2 
4 
7 



1 
38 
12 



2 
1 

1 

I) 

11 

3 



13 

1 



Inspectorate 



Number 

during 

1st half 

year 



Renfrew. N 

Renfrew, S 

Simcoe, N 

Simcoe, S 

Stormont 

Victoria, W 

Waterloo, N (No. 1), 
Waterloo, S (No. 2), 

Wellington, N , 

Wellington, S 

Wentworth 

York, N 



District Divisions : 
No. I 

No. II .... 

No. Ill .... 

No. I V .... 

No. V .... 

No. VI .... 

No. VII .... 
No. VIII.... 

No. IX 

No. X .... 

No. XI 

No. XII .... 



English-French Divisions: 

No. IA 

No. IIA 

No. IB 

No. IIB 



R.C. Separate Sch. Divisions 
No. I 



No. II 
No. Ill 
No. IV 

No. V 

No. VI 



Totals 



15 

19 

(J 

9 

9 

<> 

15 

10 

2(> 

5 



21 
4 



Number 

during 

2nd half 

year 



(i 
12 



11 
2 

7 
3 

10 

is 

20 
30 
8 
11 
10 



1 
2 

9 

34 

9 



375 



38(i 



1918 DEPARTMENT .OF EDUCATION 329 



APPENDIX T 

ORDERS-IN-COUNCIL 

Miss Louise Fearson appointed teacher in the School for the Deaf, such ap- 
pointment to date from 15th Jan., 1911). Approved, 9th January, 1918. 

Hon. Haughton I. S. Lennox, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ontario, 
appointed a Commissioner to inquire into and report upon the Building Depart- 
ment of the Board of Education of the City of Toronto, as requested by said body. 
Approved 9th Jan. 

List of Schools and Teachers as contained in pamphlet dated November, 
1917, approved 14th Jan. 

Reports of Departmental and Matriculation Associate Examiners as con- 
tained in Circular 66, approved 17th Jan. 

Agreement made with the Macmillan Company of Canada, Lijmited, respect- 
ing the right to print, publish and supply the " Ontario High Schcol Physical 
Geography." Approved 18th Jan. 

Agreement made with William Briggs, as Book Steward, Toronto, respecting 
the right to print, publish, and supply the " Ontario Teachers' Manual on Element- 
ary Agriculture and Horticulture." Approved 23rd Jan. 

Eegulations, Professional Courses, and Examinations for Public School In- 
spectors' certificates, as contained in Circular No. 80, approved 29th Jan. 

Agreement made with the Canada Publishing Company, Limited, of Toronto, 
respecting the right to print, publish, and supply the "Ontario High School 
Peader." Approved 29th Jan. 

Agreement made with the Canada Publishing Company, Limited, respecting 
the right to print, publish, and supply the " Ontario High School English 
Grammar." Approved 29th Jan. 

Miss Agnes C. Hanahoe appointed Head Mistress of the Girls' Model School 
at Ottawa. Approved 4th Feb. 

George Chandler appointed Fireman and Watchman of the Normal and Model 
Schools, Toronto. Approved 18th Feb. 

Agreement made with the Educational Book Company of Toronto, Limited, 
respecting the right to print, publish, and supply the "Ontario School Book- 
keeping, Second Course." Approved 25th Feb. 

The following appointments to the staff of the OttaAva Normal Model School, 
approved 25th February : — 

C. P. Halliday, teacher. 

Miss Lilias Henderson, Kindergarten-Primary teacher. 

Miss A. II. Baker, Kindergarten teacher. 

Miss Norma McRitchie, Assistant Kindergarten teacher. 

Also Mr. Milton Sorsoleil appointed Principal of the Toronto Nornial Model 
School. 

C. S. Nicholson appointed Farmer and Agricultural teacher at the School for 
the Deaf, Belleville. Approved 7th March. 

Miss M. K. Caulfeild appointed Headmistress of the Girl's department of the 
Toronto Normal Model School. Approved 15th March. 

Instructions re Junior High School Entrance and Junior Public School 
Graduation Examinations for 1918, as contained in Circular 57, approved 15th 
March. 

22 e. 



330 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



A. M. Burnham appointed Clerk under Departmental Examinations. Approved 
26th March. 

Special Regulations for the Medical and Dental inspection of Separate 
Schools, approved 27th March. 

Instructions regarding Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation Act, as 
contained in Circular 31', approved 19th April. 

Instructions to School Inspectors regarding the apportionment of the Legis- 
lative Grants, as contained in instructions Nos. 12 and 13, approved 19th April. 

Miss Dora Allen appointed Secretary and Stenographer to the Deputy 
Minister of Education, Miss Jessie Craig appointed as Stenographer under the 
Public Libraries Branch, and Miss Winifred Courtney appointed Clerk and Steno- 
grapher under Departmental Examinations, said appointments to take effect from 
1st May, 1918. Approved 23rd April. 

Agreement made with the Copp, Clark Company, Limited, of Toronto, re- 
specting the right to print, publish, and supply " The Ontario Standard Note 
Book." Approved 1st May. 

Provisions of Circular 27 respecting the employment of school pupils on 
farms in Ontario, so amended that similar employment elsewhere may be accepted. 
Approved 2nd May. 

Empire Day Programme as contained in the pamphlet, and the Summer 
Courses and Examinations in 1918 for teachers, approved 9th May. 

Text-book regulations as contained in Circular 14, and the Literature selec- 
tions of 1919 as contained in Circular 58, approved 29th May. 

Notwithstanding any existing regulations and the terms of the Order-in- 
Council of 19th June, 1917, classes beyond Form V in operation in certain public 
and separate schools to be admitted to write at the Departmental Examinations in 
June, 1918, on the same conditions as candidates from Continuation Schools, and 
such schools shall be deemed as coming under the Regulations relative to enlist- 
ment and farm employment. Approved 23rd May. 

Harry Bertram Anderson, M.D., appointed Official Medical Referee to per- 
from the duties prescribed in subsection 4 of section 11 of the Teachers' and 
Inspectors' Superannuation Act. Approved 6th June. 

Geo. F. Rogers, B.A., appointed High School Inspector, the appointment to 
take effect 1st Sept., 1918; J. M. McCutcheon, B.A., B.Psed., appointed De- 
partmental Master at the London Normal School, said appointment to take effect 
1st July, 1918; and W. I. Chisholm, M.A., appointed Assistant Chief Inspector 
of Public and Separate Schools. Approved 12th June. 

Mrs. Balis, Miss Ada James, Miss Mary Bull, Miss N. Brown, and Mr. D. R. 
Coleman, teachers in the Manual Training department of the School for the Deaf, 
granted special certificates enabling them while employed on the teaching staff of 
said school to become eligible as contributors to the Teachers' and Inspectors' 
Superannuation Fund. Approved, 13th June. 

Principal Radcliffe, of the London Normal, School, appointed acting Prin- 
cipal of the Toronto Normal School, and John Dearness appointed Acting Prin- 
cipal of the London Normal School, said appointments to take effect 1st Sept., 
1918. Approved, 9th July. 

Alonzo J. Madill, B.A., appointed Science Master at tile Normal School, 
Peterborough, for one year from 1st Sept., 1918. Approved 12th Aug. 

Regulations and Courses for the English-French Model Schools for 1918-19 
as contained in Circular 4y 2 , and the Regulations, Courses of Study and Examin- 



1918 DEPARTMENT OE EDUCATION 331 

ations of the Autumn Mode] Schools for the Session of 1918, as contained in 
Circular 4, approved 15th August. 

The following persons appointed Literary Teachers at the School for the Deaf, 
Belleville, for one year commencing 1st Sept., 1918: Misses G. Springer, V. 
Handley, E. Panter, B. Riordan, F. Currie, L. Fearson, N. Brown, I. Palen, M. 
Hitchcox, I. Aherne, K. B. Scott, Ethel Nurse, Lena Carroll, Grace Graham. 
Approved 22nd August. 

Miss Rose Lynch appointed as teacher in the Ottawa Normal School, said 
appointment to take effect 1st Sept., 1918. Approved 28th Aug. 

Thomas E. Clarke, B.A., B.Paed., appointed Departmental Master at the 
London Normal School, Adrian Macdonald, M.A., appointed Departmental Master 
at the Peterborough Normal School, and Charles McDowell, appointed Inspector 
of Public Schools, said appointments to take effect 1st September, 1918. Approved 
28th August. 

Course in History for the Junior High School Entrance Examination, revised 
1918, as contained in Circular 35, approved 28th Aug. 

" The War and the Schools," special regulations for 1918-19, as contained 
in Circular 27, approved 3rd Sept. 

Miss Gladys M. McClenaghan appointed Assistant Kindergarten teacher at 
the Ottawa Normal School from 1st Sept., 1918. Approved 3rd Sept. 

Harry Bond appointed Chief Engineer at the School for the Blind, said 
appointment to begin 15th Sept., 1918. Approved 5th Sept. 

r Paul Greenwood appointed Boys' Supervisor at the School for the Blind for 
nine months, such appointment to date from 25th Sept., 1918. Approved 10th 
Sept. 

Amendments to the Regulations of the Collegiate Institutes, High and Con- 
tinuation Schools, and the Public and Separate Schools, as contained in Circular 
34 of 1918, approved 17th Sept. 

J. C. Logan appointed Writing and Bookkeeping Master at the Ottawa Normal 
School. Approved 12th Oct. 

Particulars regarding the courses in Spanish, as contained in Circular No. 36, 
approved l'9th Oct. 

George Walton appointed to the position of Delivery Clerk in the Department 
of Education, such appointment to date from 1st Nov., 1918. Approved 29th 
Oct. 

Joseph Thompson appointed Storekeeper in the Department of Education, 
such appointment to date from 1st Nov., 1918. Approved 29th Oct. 

Catalogue of books recommended for Libraries of Collegiate Institutes, High 
Schools, and Continuation Schools, approved 29th Oct. 

Agreement made with the Macmillan Company of Canada, Limited, respect- 
ing the right to print, publish, and supply " The Ontario High School Physical 
Geography." Approved 30th Oct. 

Agreement made with the Macmillan Company of Canada, Limited, respect- 
ing the right to print, publish, and supply " The Ontario Public School History 
of Canada and The Ontario Public School History of England," bound in a single 
volume. Approved 30th Oct. 

Agreement made with William Briggs, as Book Steward, Toronto, respecting 
the right to print, publish, and supply " The Ontario Teachers' Manual on House- 
hold Science in Rural Schools." Approved 30th Oct. 

Reports of the Departmental Examiners on the Midsummer Examinations, as 
contained in Circular 66, approved 5th Nov. 



332 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Mrs. Bertha McGee appointed stenographer in the Department of Education. 
Approved 20th Nov. 

Harry Bond appointed Mechanical Superintendent at the School for the 
Blind. Order-in-Council passed 5th September, 191'8, appointing him as Chief 
Engineer, rescinded. Approved 23rd November. 

John R. Humphreys reappointed a member of the Commission created under 
the Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation Act. Approved 29th Nov. 

Joseph Lapensee appointed Assistant Teacher in the Sturgeon Falls English- 
French Model School, such appointment to commence on 11th Dec, 1918. Ap- 
proved 11th Dec. 

John Gillespie appointed stoker at the School for the Blind, such appoint- 
ment to date from the l'6th December, 1918. Approved 11th Dec. 

Charles Payne, appointed engineer at the Peterborough Normal School, such 
appointment to take effect on 1st Jan., 1919. Approved 11th Dec. 

Option between the use of German and Spanish languages in the 'Courses of 
the University of Toronto for 1918-19 approved as satisfactory so far as the 
courses specified are used in the examinations of the Department of Education. 
Approved 16th Dec. 

Provisions and information contained in Circulars 66A and 32, regarding 
Midsummer Examinations, 1918 and 1919, respectively, approved l'6th Dec. 

Miss Muriel Brothers, B.x\., appointed teacher at the Ottawa Normal Model 
School. Approved 30th Dec. 



APPENDIX U 

AUTUMN MODEL SCHOOLS, 1918 



School 


Principal 


Attendance 


Extra 
Mural 


Limited 
Third Class 
Certificates 


District 
Certificates 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Clinton 

Cornwall 

Kingston .... 

Madoc 

North Bay. .. 

Orillia 

Port Arthur . 
Renfrew 


C. D. Bouck 

G.R.Theobald.... 

W. F. Inman 

R. A. A. McConnell 
A. C. Casselman. . . 
C. L. T. McKenzie. 
J. H. W. McRoberts 
W. T. Baker 




6 

16 

*15 

13 

5 

9 

6 

tl6 


6 
16 
15 
13 
5 
9 
! 6 
16 


1 



1 
2 




5 

16 
14 
13 

6 
11 

6 
15 


2 



1) 






Totals 


86 


86 


4 


86 2 



* One deceased. 
f One withdrew. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 333 



APPENDIX V 

PROVINCIAL NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS 
I. Normal School, Hamilton 

Staff, January, 1919. 

S. A. Morgan, B.A., D.Psed Principal : Science of Education and Grammar. 

F. F. Macpherson, B.A Master : English. 

E. T. Seaton, B.A. Psed Master : Mathematics and School Management. 

Frank E. Perney B.A., B.Psed Master : History and Geography. 

G. 0. McMillan, M.A., B.Paed Master : Science, Nature Study and Agriculture. 

A. J. Painter Instructor : Manual Training. 

Julien R. Seavey Instructor : Art. 

Miss Clara E. Elliott Instructor : Household Economics. 

H. A. Stares, Mus. Bac Instructor : Music. 

*Sergt.-Maj. Jesse Skinner Instructor : Physical Culture. 

Oscar Main Instructor ; Writing. 

* Granted leave of absence for Active Service, March 17, 1915. 

Students admitted, Session 1918-1919 

Male 4 

Female 141 

Total 145 



II. Normal School, London 

Staff, January, 1919. 

John Dearness, M. A Acting Principal : School Management and Science, 

A. Stevenson, B.A., B. Paed Master : Science of Education and Literature 

E. T. White, B.A., B.Paed Master : Mathematics and History. 

G. W. Hofferd, B.A Master : Science and Geography. 

T. E. Clarke, B.A, Master : English. 

Sugden Pickles Instructor : Manual Training. 

S. K. Davidson Instructor : Art. 

Miss A. B. Neville Instructor : Household Economics. 

C. E. Percy Instructor : Music. 

Albert Slatter Instructor : Physical Culture. 

J. W. Westervelt Instructor : Writing. 

Students admitted, Session, 1918-1919 

Male 8 

Female 175 

Total 183 



III. Normal School, North Bay 

Staff, January, 1919 

A. C. Casselman Principal: History, History of Education, Reading, 

J. C. Norris, M.A., B.Pasd Master : Mathematics and School Management. 

J. B. McDougall, B.A Master : Science of Education and English. 

H. E. Ricker, M.A. . . Master : Science, Nature Study, Agriculture. 

J. E. Chambers Instructor : Manual Training. 

C. Ramsay Instructor : Art. 

Miss Mayme C. Kay Instructor: Household Economics. 

Herbert Wildgust, L.L.C.M Instructor : Music. 

Students admitted, Session, 1918-1919 

Male 2 

Female 89 

Total 91 



331 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 



IV. Normal School, Ottawa 

1. Staff, January, 1919 

J. F. White, LL.D , Principal : School Management and English. 

W. J. Karr, B.A., D.Pasd Master : Science of Education and English. 

J. W. Forbes, B.A Master : Mathematics, History, and Hygiene. 

G. A. Miller, M.A Master : Science and Nature Study. 

F. A. Jones, M.A., D.Psed Master: Grammar, Geography, and History of /Education 

J. S. Harterre Instructor : Manual Training. 

Roy F. Fleming Instructor : Art. 

Miss C. E. Green Instructor : Household Economics. 

T. A. Brown Instructor : Music. 

C. Emery Instructor : Physical Culture. 

Students admitted. Session, 1918-1919 

Male 10 

Female 140 

Total 150 

2. Staff of Normal Model School, Ottawa, January, 1919 

C. E. Mark, B.A Headmaster, IV Form, Boys. 

H. M. Leppard Ill Form, Boys. 

C. P. Halliday (on active service) II Form, Boys (Mrs. F. Carter, B.A., actio?) 

Miss Muriel Brothers, B.A Pt. II, Boys. 

Miss Rose Lynch I Form, Boys. 

Miss A. G. Hanahoe TV Form Girls. 

Miss J. Foster Ill Form, Girls. 

Miss A. M. Delaney II Form, Girls. 

Miss E. Cluff, B.A Pt. II, Girls. 

Miss M. R. Elliott. . . . • I Form, Girls. 

Miss Lilias M. Henderson Kindergarten-Primary. 

Miss A. H. Baker Kindergarten Directress. 

Miss Gladys McGlenaghan Kindergarten Assistant. 

J. S. Harterre Instructor : Manual Training. 

Roy F. Fleming Instructor : Art. 

Miss C. E. Green Instructor : Household Economics 

T. A. Brown Instructor : Music. 

C. Emery Instructor : Physical Culture. 

J. M. Fleury Instructor: French. 

Number of pupils, 1918 392 

Number of Kindergarten pupils, 1918 40 

Total 432 



V. Normal School, Peterborough 

Staff, January, 1919 

Duncan Walker, B.A Principal : Mathematics. 

Henry G. Park, B.A., D. Paed Master : Science of Education and English, 

Adrian Macdonald, M.A Master : English. 

Alonzo J. Ma lill, B.A Master : Science. 

Elmer E. Ingall, B.A Master : English. 

A. F. Hagerman Instructor : Manual Training. 

Miss Jessie C. McRae Instructor : Art. 

Miss Elizabeth MacVannell Instructor : Household Economics. 

Miss Marion R. Rannie Instructor : Music and Physical Culture. 

John A. McKone Instructor : Writing. 

Students admitted, Session 1918-1919 

Male (> 

Female 141 

Total 147 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 335 



VI. Normal School, Stratford 

Staff, January, 1919 

S. Silcox, B.A., D.Psed Principal: Science of Education, Hygiene and 

Spelling. 

J. W. Emery, B.A., D. Psed Master : Science, Nature Study and Agriculture. 

J. D. Campbell, B.A Master: Mathematics, History of Education, History. 

H. G. Martyn, B.A Master : Grammar, Literature and Reading. 

V. K. Greer, M. A Master : Composition, Geography, School Manage- 
ment. 

Sugden Pickles Instructor : Manual Training. 

Mrs. Helen Mayberry Instructor : Art. 

Miss A. Neville Instructor : Household Economics. 

J. Bottomley, A.R.C.O Instructor : Music. 

Miss E. M. Cottle Instructor : Physical Culture, Writing, and Book- 
keeping. 



Students admitted, Session 1918-1919 

Male 8 

Female 159 

Total 167 



VII. Normal School, Toronto 

1. Staff, January, 1919 

*Wm. Scott, B.A., Principal. 

S. J. Radcliffe, B.A Acting Principal : School Management and Litera 

ture. 

Wm. Prendergast, B. A., B.Paed Master : Mathematics and History of Education. 

David Why te, B.A Master : Science. 

R. H. Walks, B.A Master: English. 

S. J. Keyes, B.A., B.Paed Master : Science of Education and ReadiDg. 

S. J. Stubbs, B.A Master : Grammar and Geography. 

Miss Mary E. Macintyre Instructor : Kindergarten Principles. 

Miss Ellen Cody Instructor : Kindergarten Assistant. 

Jas. H. Wilkinson Instructor : Manual Training. 

Miss A. Auta Powell Instructor : Art. 

Miss Nina A. Ewing Instructor : Household Economics. 

Mrs. Emma Macbeth Instructor : Needlework. 

A. T. Cringan, Mus. Bac Instructor : Music. 

Miss Miriam Thompson Pianist. 

Mrs. Jean Somers Instructor : Calisthenics. 

Capt. E. H. Price, S. of M Instructor: Drill. 

A. F. Hare Instructor : Writing . 

Mrs. M. W. Brown Instructor : Reading. 

*On leave. 



Students admitted, Session 1918-1919 

Male 6 

Female 193 

199 

Kindergarten-Primary Students 17 

Total 216 



336 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



2. Staff of Normal Model School, Toronto, January, 1919 

Milton A. Sorsoleil, B.A Head Master. 

Miss M. K. Caulf eild First Female Assistant. 

Thornton Mustard First Male Assistant. 

Miss A. F. Laven Assistant. 

Francis M. McCordic Assistant. 

Miss C. E. Kniseley Assistant. 

John E. Montgomery, B.A Assistant. 

Miss Jessie I. Cross * . Assistant. 

Miss Isabella Richardson Assistant. 

Miss Alice A. Harding Assistant. 

Miss Lilian B. Harding Kindergarten-Primary. 

Miss Mary E. Macintyre Kindergarten Directress. 

Miss Ellen Cody Kindergarten Assistant. 

Jas. H. Wilkinson Instructor : Manual Training. 

Miss A. Auta Powell Instructor : Art. 

Miss Nina A. Ewing Instructor : Household Economios. 

Mrs. Emma Macbeth Instructor : Needlework. 

s-A. T. Cringan, Mus. Bac Instructor : Music. 

Miss Miriam Thompson Pianist. 

Mrs. Jean Somers Instructor : Calisthenics. 

Capt. E. H. Price, S. of M Instructor : Drill. 

Mrs. G. de Lestard Instructor : French. 

Number of pupils in 1918 407 

Number of Kindergarten pupils in 1918 30 

Total 497 



VIII. Summary of Attendance at the Normal Schools 



Normal Schools 



Hamilton . . . 

London 

North Bay . . . 

Ottawa 

Peterborough 
Stratford. . .. 
Toronto 

Totals . 



Total 
attendance 



145 
183 
91 
150 
147 
167 
199 



1,082 



Male students 



4 
8 
2 

10 
6 
8 
6 



Female students 



141 
175 
89 
140 
141 
159 
193 



1,038 



Kindergarten-Primary [ ; students, Toronto 18 

NOTE. — A Model School is also conducted in the North Bay Normal School building. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 33 



APPENDIX W 



LIST OF ASSOCIATE EXAMINERS AND CONTINUATION AND HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPALS AND ASSISTANTS 

I. Associate Examiners, 1918 

Model Entrance, Lower School, Senior High School Entrance 
and Senior Public School Graduation Diploma 

English Grammar: Margaret H. Abel, Belle Aitchison, Prudence M. Austin, C. G. 
Beck, Bessie Clothier, L. H. Corbett, Florence Ellerby, Roberta G. Gilray, Clara Hulse, 
Helena E. Johnston, Marion B. Lailey, Evelyn McDonald, Pearl McGregor, 0. M. Mac- 
Killop, Mayme Montgomery, Helena G. Raitt, Margaret E. Ross, Mary G. Scanlon, Annie 
A. Smith, Rose I. Strang, Elizabeth J. Wallen, Elizabeth A. R. V. Wilson, E. May Wyman. 

Literature: Alta-Lind Cook, Euphemia Maclntyre. 

Spelling: J. H. Adams, Norma Gee, Annie H. Giles, Margaret Grills, Evelyn D. 
Kellock, R. G. McConachie, Mrs. Norma Rochat, J. W. Russell, Orethia Salisbury, J. M. 
Simpson, Edith A, Traver. 

Geography : Etta L. Barber, Olive M. Burns, J. L. Challinor, Georgia Davidson, A. C. 
Douglas, Ethel C. Eaton, I. Mae Finch, Mary A. Fraser, Leah A. Gillard, S. A. Hitsman, 
J. Cecilia Horan, Margaret A. Ionson, Margaret E. Lutman, R. J. McMillan, Susie H. 
Manson, Lena Millard, M. J. O'Neil, H. C. Pugh, Julia Richardson, H. F. Schmietendorf, 
Jessie M. Scott, Edna E. Staples, L. Stevenson, Mary Strathdee, R. D. Webb, M. J. 
AVilker. 

Art: H. E. Bicknell, Emma M. Bottoms, Charles S. Buck, Irene P. Davis, Rebecca S. 
Edwards, Roxie Ellis, Elva Gould, C. W. Horton, Agnes M. Johnston, Elva Locklin, Bessie 
McCamus, Lillian Maclntyre, Nellie L. Mahon, Marcella T. Marshall, Maude Miller, 
S. W. Perry, Josephine E. Redmond, Mabel Van Duzer, Julia Weir. 

History: Mabel B. Allen, Elsie K. Beaman, R. J. Blake, James Cameron, J. Collins, 
'Eva M. Coulter, Magdalene De La Mater, S. G. Devitt, Grace Edwards, J. W. Fraser. 
Helen M. Grieve, Annie Guilfoyle, J. I. Hutchinson, Florence B. Ketcheson, Eva W. 
King, Elizabeth McNamara, Henrietta E. Mazinke, Christina H. Morton, Edith A. Murphy. 
Olive H. Murray, Louise E. Ney, Ida M. Oldham, Lucy Saunders, A Hie Stinson, Cassie 
Wright. 

Composition: Ada Menhennick. 

Elementary Science: A. E. Allin, M. H. Ayers, J. A. Bell, J. M. Bell, G L. Bracken- 
bury, G. W, Bunton, Muriel Daley, Letitia E. Durnin, H. W. Gerhardt, R. S. Hamilton, 
V. R. Henry, A. D. Hone, N. A. Irwin, W. A. Jennings, L. R. McCrimmon, T. W. Martin, 
J. L. Medcof, Flora E. Morgan, C. I. Nelson, Mabel I. Pacey, Eva M. Ranson, Rena C. 
Scott, D. G. Smith, J. H. Stewart, Ruple Taite, Mabel R. White, Margaret E. White. 
Clara Young. 

Writing: Lillie C. Anderson, J. J. Bailey, Sarah J. Baker, D. M. Clark, Hazel I. 
El coat, Myrtle E. Fritz, A. F. Hare, Hilda M. Hindson, Mabel Howie, Edith Parlee, 
Eva A. Power, C. Irene Pridham, D. M. Walker. 



338 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Book-keeping and Writing: J. A. Dickinson, Olive Fritz, G. A. Lucas, Kate Richard- 
son, Margaret Smith, Alice B. iStone. 

Household Science: Clara E. Elliott, Mary C. Macpherson, A. Enid Robertson, Lila 
K. G. White. 

Arithmetic: J. G. Adams, R. H. Archibald, Alice I. N. Ball, R. F. Bennett, C. S, 
Browne, B. W. Clarke, J. T. Curtis, Rita Fleming, Viva M. Hicks, Walter Keast, C. H. 
McGee, Ada A. Miller, Margaret K. Munro, W. H. Rogers, F. T. Schooley, Elizabeth A. 
Tomkins, E. T. Young. 

Algebra and Geometry: F. B. Clarke, J. M. MacKay. 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 

English Composition: H. E. Collins, Winnifred Dengate, Jessie Foster, Ethel Gibson, 
Christina C. Grant, A. E. MacLean, Mrs. Ada Pattee, Harriet A. Patterson. 

English Literature: Mary Bain, H. W. Brown, Eleanor L. Clarke, Wilhelmina L. 
Colbeck, W. J. Feasby, Margaret Forester, Aletha L. Hotson, John Jeffries, E. W. Jen- 
nings, T. C. Somerville, Annie M. A. Taylor, Mabel N. Trenaman, Viola Whitney. 

Ancient History: Elsie Affleck, Lillian M. Allen, J. G. Althouse, Marjorie M. Colbeck, 
J. H. Dolan, Mabel Farrington, Viola Gilfillan iStella A. Jordan, S. Winnifred Nichol, 
Aileen Noonan, G. H. Reed, Margaret C. Ross, Annie E. Rowntree, W. J. Salter, Minerva 
Stothers. 

British and Canadian History: Mrs. Irene M. Brogden, W. A. Campbell, Mrs. C. T. 
Casselman, Jessie S. Cattanach, May Cryderman, Helen I. Dafoe, A. Gilmour, Lottie E. 
Hamer, E. A. Hardy, Claire Hitchon, J. Keillor, M. Irene McCormack, A. D. Norris, 
Frances A. Robinson. 

Algebra: J. L. Cornwell, C. L. Crassweller, J. H. Davidson, R. Gourlay, T. Hobbs, 
G. M. James, W. E. Rand, E. E. Snider. 

Geometry: Florence J. Adams, E. W. Durnin, B. F. Howson, Frances V. Johnston, 
A. N. Myer, J. H. Packham, J. F. Ross, W. A. Skirrow, E. E. Wood. 

Physics: R. A. Brunt, W. A. Dent, F. A. Flock, H. H. Graham, W. H. H. Green, 
A. C. Hazen, A. D. Hone, Catherine I. Hyde, J. W. Kelly, Mrs. E. W. Kerr, Jessie F. 
Lawrence, H. Loucks, P. MacKichan, M. Augusta MacLeod, W. J. Saunders, F. Sine, 
W. B. Wyndham. 

Chemistry: E. T. Bell, G. H. Bielby, A. B. Cooper, J. W. Firth, H. J. Heath, C. F. 
Marshall, W. H. Martin, L. P. Menzies, L. Might, W. J. Moffat, E. Morrison, A. M. Patter- 
son, Mary C. Tucker, S. Wightman, Edna J. Williams. 

Latin: C. L. Barnes, W. Clarke, Rosalie Dugit, A. A. Dundas, D. A. Glassey, A. G. 
Hooper, H. W. Kerfoot, F. H. Lingwood, Annie K. McGregor, C. A. Mayberry, J. H. Mills, 
W. E. Murdock, Winifred Ovens, Peter Perry. 

Art: H. W. Brown, T. W. Kidd, S. W. Perry. 



1918 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 339 

UPPER SCHOOL 

English Composition: A. W. Burt, T. Carscadden, Eleanor D. Odium. 

English Literature: Elizabeth C. Henry, Kate C. Skinner, Gladys S. Story, Ada L. 
Ward. 

History: J. W. Charlesworth, Cora E. Hewitt, Laura L. Jones, G. W. Malcolm. 

Classics: A. E. Coombs, I. Kathleen Cowan, Margaret Cowan, D. M. Grant, C. S. Kerr, 
E. A. Miller, P. F. Munro, W. J. Twohey. 

French: Mabel M. Graeb, E. S. Hogarth, Mary V. McWhorter, L. R. Whitely. 

German: Margaret E. Carman, F. H. Clarke. 

Science: P. W. Brown, A. Cogens, S. J. Courtice, T. J. Ivey, W. J. McMillan, L. A. 
Marlin, J. R. Moore, E. Pugsley, J. H. Sexton, W. Smeaton, L. E. Staples, P. M. Thompson. 

Mathematics: W. J. Lougheed, A. M. Overholt, R. C. Rose, G. W. Rudlen, W. W. 
Rutherford, R. Wightman, J. S. Wren. 

JUNIOR MATRICULATION 

Literature: W. G. Anderson, Marie V. Bibby, A. St. J. Furnival, Margaret M. S. Hall. 

Composition: William Kemp, Enid McGregor, Ethel L. Ostrom. 

British and Canadian History: A. G. Dorland, G. L. Gray, Hazel I. Reid, Agnes 
Vrooman, Helen C. Walker. 

Ancient History: A. A. Affleck, Hilda C. Smith, Madeline C. Young. 

Chemistry: J. P. Hume, F. A. Stuart. 

Physics: J. L. MacLaurin, J. L. Mitchener. 

Geometry: A. R. Girdwood, F. 0. McMahon. A. C. McPhail, I. T. Norris, J. G. 
Workman. 

Algebra: F. R. Lishman, G. R. Smith, Rebecca Stenhouse. 

'Classics: J. S. Bennett, H. W. Bryan, G. E. Evans, J. A. Freeman, D. E. Hamilton, 
Hally Johnston, H. M. McCuaig, S. F. Passmore, Gertrude Pringle, L. C. Smith. 

French: Harriett E. Black, Effie M. Bunnell, Annie B. Francis, N. R. Gray, Maud 
Hawkins, Elizabeth Henstridge, Maybelle M. Laing, J. S. Lane, A. N. McEvoy, Mrs. Edith 
Mclntyre, H. S. McKellar, Eleanor Nugent, Marguerite O'Connell, G. S. Otto, W. H. 
Williams, Alice Willson. 

German: N. L. Murch, C. E. Reaman, R. Reid, H. B. Tapscott. 



340 



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